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Emacs Hits Version 23

timothy posted about 5 years ago | from the actually-includes-duke-nukem-forever dept.

Software 367

djcb writes "After only 2 years since the previous version, now emacs 23 (.1) is available. It brings many new features, of which the support for anti-aliased fonts on X may be the most visible. Also, there is support for starting emacs in the background, so you can pop up new emacs windows in the blink of an eye. There are many other bigger and smaller improvements, including support for D-Bus, Xembed, and viewing PDFs inside emacs. And not to forget, M-x butterfly. You can get emacs 23 from ftp.gnu.org/gnu/emacs/ or one of its mirrors; alternatively, there are binary packages available, for example from Ubuntu PPA."

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Eight megs and constantly swapping (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28886539)

Shit, these days VIM requires no less than 30 megs....

But... (4, Funny)

Brian Gordon (987471) | about 5 years ago | (#28886549)

Does it run Linux?

Re:But... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28886751)

Yes. Yes it does.

Re:But... (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28886979)

Emacs would be the perfect operating system, if only it included a decent text editor.

Re:But... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28887033)

lol o wow thansk i haven thead tha tone befor>e

Re:But... (3, Funny)

C0vardeAn0nim0 (232451) | about 5 years ago | (#28887339)

it does. you can run Vim inside EMACS, you know ?

Re:But... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28887125)

more importantly, of course it runs NetBSD. But NetCraft says it's dying

Re:But... (2, Funny)

DrData99 (916924) | about 5 years ago | (#28887397)

More importantly, will it blend?

Congrats! (5, Insightful)

just_another_sean (919159) | about 5 years ago | (#28886553)

Thanks RMS for Emacs, the GPL and the spirit of GNU that I found in 1995 and has not left me since!

Happy Hacking!

Re:Congrats! (3, Informative)

Hammer (14284) | about 5 years ago | (#28886917)

This is good news indeed

Thanx RMS for more than 20 years w the only editor

Re:Congrats! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28887605)

You can get ointment for that.

Missed the best feature! (5, Informative)

Just Some Guy (3352) | about 5 years ago | (#28886579)

The summary misses the absolute best new feature: the separation of the client and server. I have a GUI Emacs running on my workstation, always. I sshed in a few days ago, wishing I could access one of its buffers. Voila! emacsclient -nw connected to the underlying server and gave me full access, in console mode, to the running Emacs. Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!

Re:Missed the best feature! (3, Funny)

Brian Gordon (987471) | about 5 years ago | (#28886677)

The system goes on-line August 4th, 1997. Human decisions are removed from strategic defense. Skynet begins to learn at a geometric rate. It becomes self-aware at 2:14 a.m. Eastern time, August 29th. In a panic, they try to pull the plug.

I never thought I'd see the day that a text editor needed a network-aware client-server architecture.

Re:Missed the best feature! (2, Insightful)

clang_jangle (975789) | about 5 years ago | (#28886869)

It's not just a text editor -- emacs is a full-fledged IDE with modules for virtually every kind of work (and recreational facilities too)!

Re:Missed the best feature! (4, Funny)

Brett Buck (811747) | about 5 years ago | (#28886997)

I don't know why someone modded this "Funny"! Well, actually, I do - because there's no tag for "Scary"

      Brett

Re:Missed the best feature! (1)

Late Adopter (1492849) | about 5 years ago | (#28887587)

Oooh, scary post you've got there.

Re:Missed the best feature! (4, Insightful)

oGMo (379) | about 5 years ago | (#28887015)

"Haw haw a text editor that duz stuff, we here around these parts just use NOTEPAD.EXE"

Yawn. Tired jokes that aren't funny anymore.

Text editing, text processing, and generally manipulating anything involving language---especially natural language---is the most complicated thing that's ever done on a computer. Yet people---even supposedly knowledgeable people---demand stupidly broken tools that lack sophisticated tools for doing a sophisticated thing. When you understand this, jokes about "ha ha your text-editor-operating-system does X" aren't funny. It makes you wonder why other text editors don't do things.

Re:Missed the best feature! (1)

Just Some Guy (3352) | about 5 years ago | (#28887233)

I never thought I'd see the day that a text editor needed a network-aware client-server architecture.

In my case, it was so that I could SSH in, run a Python script to generate an SQL query, then run that query in a PostgreSQL interaction buffer. I'd written a macro to do all that automatically and didn't want to spend more than 3 seconds recreating something that was already working - if I was at the Emacs session running at my office.

Re:Missed the best feature! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28887239)

I thought this was one of the main features of text editors that are actually decent. E.g., subethaedit on the Mac.

I'd try this new Emacs out, but I see no obvious Mac download. It's things like this that make Gnu software irrelevant to most people. I remember starting out on Emacs 19 back in the day, back then its syntax highlighting and features were a cut ahead, now they're way way behind.

Re:Missed the best feature! (2, Informative)

retchdog (1319261) | about 5 years ago | (#28887597)

The relevance comes in phases.

The compile-from-source people had moved to emacs23 months ago.

Now it's available for the 3rd-party binary-repository people on nix.

Then it'll become a standard package.

Eventually, Aquamacs will move to v23 or do backporting, and the Mac (without darwine, &c.) people can have it. (Aquamacs is a beautiful app, and has at least some of the features implemented independently anyway)

Re:Missed the best feature! (1)

SpinyNorman (33776) | about 5 years ago | (#28887307)

I never thought I'd see the day that a text editor needed a network-aware client-server architecture.

That day isn't here - it's only the editor that is.

Re:Missed the best feature! (1)

Late Adopter (1492849) | about 5 years ago | (#28886747)

I have that in 22, but you had to start the server listening from the original emacs process. Is that still the case, or does it start acting as a server by default now?

Re:Missed the best feature! (1)

the Atomic Rabbit (200041) | about 5 years ago | (#28886929)

The point is that a graphical Emacs session can now connect to a client on a tty. (And in answer to your question: yes, Emacs can now be started in daemon mode.)

Re:Missed the best feature! (1)

Just Some Guy (3352) | about 5 years ago | (#28887021)

Exactly. I've been randomly using clients for about a decade, but it's only been very recently that you could connect a GUI or text client to a server that was launched in the other mode.

now all it needs ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28887045)

is a feature that allows me to surf _pr0n_ from within emacs, and then i'd consider using it

oh wait, those guys think of everything!

Re:Missed the best feature! (2, Informative)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | about 5 years ago | (#28887151)

This is also called 'multitty'. You can open a new frame anywhere, whether on another X display, or on a TTY.

You can even start Emacs in a screen session in your .profile.

And ... did I mention that because each emacs server can have it's own name, you can different emacs servers for different purposes, each with their own .emacs file.

Oh, yeah, and someone even told me that it has a decent text editor, too!

Re:Missed the best feature! (5, Informative)

zeromorph (1009305) | about 5 years ago | (#28887205)

They also missed to mention the full unicode support, which is quite nice.

Anyway they could have linked to NEWS.23.1 [gnu.org] , which has a concise list of new feature.

Re:Missed the best feature! (1)

harmonise (1484057) | about 5 years ago | (#28887275)

If you save your buffer to disk you can access the contents without having to use software that requires a client/server architecture just to edit files.

Re:Missed the best feature! (1)

Just Some Guy (3352) | about 5 years ago | (#28887465)

My buffer was a connection to a PostgreSQL server and about three days worth of history. How well does that work out for you?

Re:Missed the best feature! (1)

gknoy (899301) | about 5 years ago | (#28887487)

That's great when you're only dealing with files, but if you are running a REPL, being able to remotely access the same development environment (sources+REPL) is pretty freaking cool.

M-x butterfly (1, Redundant)

cstdenis (1118589) | about 5 years ago | (#28886599)

Best command ever.

According to Psychologist Zippy, (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28886895)

According to Psychologist Zippy, people that focus on a "best of" feature tend to suffer from prior mental tramma that is slowly dominating the psyche and which may result in a sudden personal or societal failure in one's interactions with other people in the environment.

Perhaps you should be more concerned with the progress of eMacs in what you originally needed to use it for, rather than functions that extend its purpose. What does or did "eMacs" originally mean to Mr. Stallman and has his insecurity consumed him to embrace the product of one of his many multiple personality disorders into another? I recently recalled him on Slashdot posting as Anonymous soliciting hard anal sex in one post while in another in the same moment talking about the virtues of Free Software in GPL versus Open Source and public domain. I find this a striking problem that only heavy doses of Abilify(tm) and Lythium(tm) would remedy, but it all begins with him as a patient and his willingness to admit these facts himself first in-front of those that he has effected the most. Only then will the healing begin.

Let's all hold hands... [freeimagehosting.net]

Decent text editor still not included right? (1, Redundant)

dvh.tosomja (1235032) | about 5 years ago | (#28886647)

Decent text editor still not included in this great operating system right?

Re:Decent text editor still not included right? (4, Insightful)

erroneus (253617) | about 5 years ago | (#28886757)

emacs is what happens when a project goes too far beyond its intended purpose.

It's a frikken text editor for God's sake. If it's not a text editor any longer, and is now the beginning of its own OS, then let it be identified as such. I mean my god, the extensions this thing can have? Calendar/Planners? I like advanced text editing functions as much as the next guy... maybe some useful macros here and there... but this is just ridiculous. How long will it be before Microsoft starts seeing emacs as a threat to Windows + Office?

Re:Decent text editor still not included right? (5, Funny)

itsdapead (734413) | about 5 years ago | (#28886863)

emacs is what happens when a project goes too far beyond its intended purpose.

Why do you feel that emacs is what happens when a project goes too far beyond its intended purpose?

Re:Decent text editor still not included right? (1)

Yetihehe (971185) | about 5 years ago | (#28886871)

How long will it be before Microsoft starts seeing emacs as a threat to Windows + Office?

When it's too late.

Re:Decent text editor still not included right? (5, Insightful)

the Atomic Rabbit (200041) | about 5 years ago | (#28886885)

Correct: Emacs is a text editor. And guess what: a calendar consists of text. Plans consist of text. So are emails and newsgroup contents. Source code, XML data files, patches, changelogs, directory listings, version control messages, compilation messages, are all text.

Re:Decent text editor still not included right? (1)

Glyphn (652286) | about 5 years ago | (#28887103)

And of course one could represent an image in straight text (e.g. rgb code) and edited it in a text editor.

Does that make a text editor the best tool for the job?

Re:Decent text editor still not included right? (3, Insightful)

the Atomic Rabbit (200041) | about 5 years ago | (#28887263)

Actually, it might. For instance, Emacs 23 includes support for SVG, and SVG code consists of human-readable text. So if you need to change some parameters in an SVG image, such as its width or height, you can open it in Emacs, type C-c C-c to switch to text representation, perform your edits, and type C-c C-c again to instantly view the result.

Re:Decent text editor still not included right? (1)

just_another_sean (919159) | about 5 years ago | (#28887309)

The brilliant guy who decided a xbm file should easily be able to double as a c header file thought so. I agree with him. Am I gonna go flipping bits in the textual representation of an image? No, but it's nice to know I can easily read meta data in my text editor, see if there is some obvious corruption in a file or just include it as a resource in my program.

Re:Decent text editor still not included right? (1)

Ardaen (1099611) | about 5 years ago | (#28887243)

I have a fully graphical calendar, it contains no text, not even numbers. Guess you can represent time without text, funny that.

Just because you can represent something as text, doesn't mean text is the best representation nor does it mean a text editor is the best method of manipulating it

Re:Decent text editor still not included right? (1)

Late Adopter (1492849) | about 5 years ago | (#28887279)

I like this train of thought, but it's not really as straightforward as that. Many of the things you've listed are more concepts or relationships than text, and can be represented just as well (or better) graphically.

I find the improvement is, when they ARE represented as text, you can use your own customized powerful set of keybindings and macros written in a Turing-complete language with a WIDE degree of hooks expressly designed for manipulating text.

Emacs is an amazing hammer, so it's more appealing to start treating things as nails where you can get away with it.

Re:Decent text editor still not included right? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28887407)

With uuencode, everything is text.

Re:Decent text editor still not included right? (1)

AvitarX (172628) | about 5 years ago | (#28887063)

I remember a great AIM client for it (tnt I think)

This was quite useful for me one time when I had a computer crash and had to use my old 486.

Re:Decent text editor still not included right? (1)

Tubal-Cain (1289912) | about 5 years ago | (#28887227)

if it's not a text editor any longer, and is now the beginning of its own OS, then let it be identified as such.

Linux started as a terminal emulator....

Re:Decent text editor still not included right? (2, Informative)

RLiegh (247921) | about 5 years ago | (#28887287)

feature creep
Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English

Noun

Singular
feature creep

Plural
uncountable

feature creep (uncountable)

      1. The tendency of a design project or product cycle to accumulate more and more features or details, rather than to be completed and released at a more basic level.

Examples: Emacs

[edit] Synonyms

        * creeping elegance

Re:Decent text editor still not included right? (1, Flamebait)

andre.ramaciotti (1053592) | about 5 years ago | (#28886791)

M-x viper-mode

Terrorist post. (4, Funny)

girlintraining (1395911) | about 5 years ago | (#28886693)

A lone geek runs into the middle of the forum, screaming "vi forever! Praise the hex codes!" *boom* :)

Obligatory XKCD (0, Redundant)

UnknowingFool (672806) | about 5 years ago | (#28886739)

Before anyone starts the emacs/vi wars: A primer [xkcd.com]

Re:Obligatory XKCD (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28886793)

Real programmers use Windows Notepad.

Re:Obligatory XKCD (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28886859)

In Soviet Russia, Windows Uses Real Programmers! ...wait, why does that sound totally wrong?

Re:Obligatory XKCD (1)

jDeepbeep (913892) | about 5 years ago | (#28887017)

Real programmers use ed.

Fixed that for you.

Re:Obligatory XKCD (1)

Bazer (760541) | about 5 years ago | (#28886821)

M-x butterfly

Knowing emacs, to actually issue that command, you would have to press all those buttons at once.

Re:Obligatory XKCD (1)

AvitarX (172628) | about 5 years ago | (#28887091)

And a special keyboard with 2 "t" buttons.

But I don't remember emacs working that way at all (it has been a while though)

Re:Obligatory XKCD (2, Informative)

dkf (304284) | about 5 years ago | (#28887315)

M-x butterfly

Knowing emacs, to actually issue that command, you would have to press all those buttons at once.

Never following M-x; that let's you just type in the command name. (M-: is even better; lets you type raw elisp...)

Re:Obligatory XKCD (1)

digitalderbs (718388) | about 5 years ago | (#28887433)

Splunk! It would be a swoosh, but the original joke wasn't that great to begin with.

Re:Obligatory XKCD (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28887385)

I've used Linux since 1997 and I still don't know what the Meta key is actually. I know at some point it changed from being alt+ESC to being the Windows key. Can we just call it something reasonable, like "Win" or "Option" so we don't go ... wtf is "meta" key? Is that a key that presses other keys? A self-indulgent "alt" key? A poncy, geeky "ctrl" key?

Re:Obligatory XKCD (1)

Pixie_From_Hell (768789) | about 5 years ago | (#28887473)

M-x butterfly

Knowing emacs, to actually issue that command, you would have to press all those buttons at once.

Well, no. This means "Meta-x" (which for me is esc then x) then type the command butterfly. I guess “Knowing emacs” mean “having heard all the same tired old jokes about that editor I don't use.”

Me? When I went back to grad school (early 90s), I was pleased to find I could use the same old editor I used to use in college (in the mid 80s). I still do all my work in it (used it this afternoon, and on my netbook on the bus in this morning). And version 23 is out!

Re:Obligatory XKCD (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28887061)

Um, its a shame you just quoted the summary, rather than bringing anything original to the discussion.

Now finish HURD please (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28886741)

Hey can we expect that Hurd kernel soon? I heard Linux is falling apart after the departure of Cox, maybe this is the perfect time for Hurd.

Re:Now finish HURD please (2, Insightful)

Brian Gordon (987471) | about 5 years ago | (#28887007)

Hurd sounds really promising and exciting until you realize that it's been in development for 19 years and it's still not ready. Until it gets the popular support from kernel developers that Linux has, I'm afraid it will never be a viable alternative (look at me saying alternative; Linux is the alternative, not Hurd!). Better (superscalable) microprocessor implementations that support even better parallelization would make also make Hurd more attractive.

Re:Now finish HURD please (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28887101)

With a charismatic figure like Stallman behind it, I can't imagine what might be holding it back.

Re:Now finish HURD please (3, Funny)

CannonballHead (842625) | about 5 years ago | (#28887259)

Apple should take over dev of it. We could all be using iHurd

Remember this one? (5, Funny)

AdmiralXyz (1378985) | about 5 years ago | (#28886785)

Slightly shortened to accommodate the special event:

I asked my email-pal: "UNIX or Windoze?". He replied "UNIX". I said "Ah...me too!".

I asked my email-pal: "Linux or AIX?". He said "Linux, of course". I said "Me too".

I asked him: "Emacs or vi". He replied "Emacs". I said "Me too. Small world."

I asked him: "GNU Emacs or XEmacs?", and he said "GNU Emacs". I said "oh, me too."

I asked him, "GNU Emacs 22 or GNU Emacs 23?", and he replied "GNU Emacs 22". I said "DIE YOU OBSOLETE NO-GOOD SOCIALLY MALADJUSTED CELIBATE COMMIE FASCIST DORK!", and never emailed him again.

Re:Remember this one? (2, Insightful)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 5 years ago | (#28886883)

Either one is better than using 99% of the other options out there. If your text editor requires the use of a mouse you need a better text editor.

Re:Remember this one? (1)

microbee (682094) | about 5 years ago | (#28886919)

Or you just need a better keyboard.

Re:Remember this one? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 5 years ago | (#28886991)

I have one of the best keyboards ever made. IBM Type M(1391401).

Re:Remember this one? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28887351)

Yeah, because all those key combinations are so much easier than a simple swipe of the mouse. I've been programming for 30 years and I couldn't understand the emacs/vi fanboys back then. I use vi when I have to (it great when all you have is a TTY). But, when I don't have to, I want a nice gui editor (which emacs and vim are NOT). I'm not going to keep using emacs just so I can pat myself on the pat because "me and my buddies are so 'eleet, and everyone else is a noob." I laugh at the emacs guys where I work because when they have to use a machine without it, they are completely lost. They can't even do simple shell commands without emacs.

Re:Remember this one? (2, Insightful)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 5 years ago | (#28887467)

So you can do a find and replace based on a regex via the mouse? I would love to see that. Which mouse button changes the case on a whole line of text?

I use vim not because it makes me "leet", but because it is by far the best tool for the job that I have found. It can be used in all places, it runs on everything and I don't need to worry if X is even installed. It does have a steep learning curve, but so do all professional tools in darn near every field.

Kitchen Sink (1)

tsalmark (1265778) | about 5 years ago | (#28886795)

Call me old and grumpy but I think Emacs had enough features when they got the kitchen sink in it.

Let me know when it gets to 42 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28886801)

What's in a forking number anyway?

SSD (0, Offtopic)

Lord Ender (156273) | about 5 years ago | (#28886815)

Get a fast SSD and all your apps will start in the blink of an eye without memory-hogging quickstarters. Hell, even NetBeans loads in less than a second on my X25-E.

emacs? emulate mac software (0, Offtopic)

Em Emalb (452530) | about 5 years ago | (#28886833)

it's a conspiracy. None of you are aware. emacs = Emulate Mac Software.

Solly, Chally. I said it, therefore it's true.

Seriously, though, happy 23rd rev, Emacs!

Re:emacs? emulate mac software (0, Redundant)

Em Emalb (452530) | about 5 years ago | (#28887041)

/waves hand "The previous post was on topic."

Still useful after all these years... (3, Interesting)

SuperKendall (25149) | about 5 years ago | (#28886867)

I don't use Emacs as my primary editor anymore, but I do turn to it pretty often still.

For short repetitive tasks, there's simply nothing more useful than the macro recording mode that lets you execute a combination of searches, multiple buffer stores, and cursor position storage states to easily repeat very complex tasks over a block of code.

For reading in obscure file formats, Emacs usually has an answer - with good syntax highlighting.

I look forward to this next iteration of emacs and what else it can do...

Re:Still useful after all these years... (1)

jjohnson (62583) | about 5 years ago | (#28887311)

*good* syntax highlighting? It looks like my kid threw up fruit loops all over my screen. It's even worse with 16 bit colours enabled.

Re:Still useful after all these years... (1)

russotto (537200) | about 5 years ago | (#28887361)

For reading in obscure file formats, Emacs usually has an answer - with good syntax highlighting.

I was disappointed, however, to find that it lacks a MDL (Muddle) mode. It almost certainly had one at some point, I might have to check back in negative version numbers or something.

Re:Still useful after all these years... (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28887403)

Oh I totally agree. For example, just today I was writing a program that needs to load in around 1000 sequentially-numbered images. Like any decent coder, I had typed all of the filenames into my main program loop. But then my manager called me up to let me know that the base filename of the images had changed! You can just imagine the sinking feeling I had in my stomach, knowing that I would need to retype every single filename! It would have taken me hours, if not for the macro recording functionality in Emacs. Thanks, Emacs.

It doesn't stop there, of course. I needed a function to count how many images had been loaded in, and save that number as a string. Then my boss phones me to say that they don't want image #0003 any more. Think of all the 'if/then' statements I'd have been forced to rewrite by hand, if it wasn't for Emacs!

emacs is lean and mean (1)

FranTaylor (164577) | about 5 years ago | (#28886947)

It starts almost instantaneously on my machine.

It is one of the only programs that works equally well in text mode and GUI mode.

It was designed to run well on a PDP-11, so it just screams on a modern machine.

Emacs was the IDE of choice before people even knew what an IDE was.

People who freak at the emacs feature set should compare it to Eclipse.

I have used emacs on ITS, TOPS-20 and Multics. I am still getting used to this Unix emacs thing, I still smile at the fact that I don't have to put up with gosling emacs any more.

Re:emacs is lean and mean (1)

itsdapead (734413) | about 5 years ago | (#28887145)

No, its actually horribly bloated. Its just that it is horribly bloated by the standards of thirty years ago. A bit like Windows XP, but more so.

In other news, emacs 24 is to be renamed "egacs" because the previous snarky backonym of "Eight Megabytes and Continually Swapping" is now the average footprint of "Hello World".

Re:emacs is lean and mean (1)

dkf (304284) | about 5 years ago | (#28887253)

In other news, emacs 24 is to be renamed "egacs" because the previous snarky backonym of "Eight Megabytes and Continually Swapping" is now the average footprint of "Hello World".

That's a invidious lie! It stands for "Escape Meta Alt Control Shift", and that's still a valid criticism (and I admit I really like emacs); there's only one shift-like key on this keyboard that it doesn't use and that's only because it's a laptop and so needs to put some functionality off a special "Function" shift...

23? (1)

Timosch (1212482) | about 5 years ago | (#28886965)

Let me be the first one to say this: "Illuminatus!"

Floame on... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28886989)

Warning: EMACS/VI Flame War Approaching... You now have: T - minus 10 seconds, to reach *minimum* safe distance...

I seriously doubt Alan Cox is going to upgrade (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28887001)

I seriously doubt Alan Cox is going to upgrade

I've been running emacs 23 for 2 years ... sorta (3, Interesting)

Lemming Mark (849014) | about 5 years ago | (#28887025)

M-x version gives me "GNU Emacs 23.0.0.2 (i686-pc-linux-gnu, GTK+ Version 2.10.6) of 2007-01-18". This is a version I checked out from emacs CVS on that date, compiled with GTK support and antialiasing (at least one, possibly both of which were experimental at the time) and have been using this version ever since. I've been sticking to it because of the antialiasing, basically. Whenever I start it up it displays a warning about how it might be horribly unstable, eat my data, etc.

But I have found it to be remarkably stable - much more so than many / most final releases of software. I can probably count the crashes I've had from it on my fingers - in unary, not binary, for the benefit of any pedants out there. If the final release is at least as good as the random CVS checkout I have then it ought to be pretty good! To be fair it sounds like lots of features have been added since my checkout ...

On the basis of my experience I will consider testing CVS versions of emacs in future if they have useful features that I need. Obviously still gotta take care with that vital data when doing so, my good experiences notwithstanding!

On a side note, the emacs versioning system is amusing in itself ... IIRC they were numbering the releases 0.x and working up to 1.0 as normal. But it took so many releases that they ended up just dropping the "0." designation and calling it "x" instead. Which is why emacs is at version 23 where vim (on my machine) is only at 7.2 and nano at 2.0.9 ;-)

Word wrapping (2, Interesting)

xiox (66483) | about 5 years ago | (#28887047)

How about adding word wrapping when displaying? My local emacs expert wasn't even able to do that, but MS Notepad can do it. It's really useful for editing latex documents where your want a paragraph on a single line (that makes it much easier to search for phrases).

Re:Word wrapping (2, Informative)

FranTaylor (164577) | about 5 years ago | (#28887083)

M-x auto-fill-mode

Re:Word wrapping (1)

pavon (30274) | about 5 years ago | (#28887447)

That's not the same thing. For
starters it only works on a line
by line basis, and changes to a
line in the beginning of a
paragraph don't affect the
formatting of lines further
down in the paragraph. You still
have to manually invoke M-q to
refill the paragraph in that
situation.

Furthermore it inserts actual
newline characters at the column
limit, which is really annoying
when editing or displaying the
document in other applications.

Re:Word wrapping (4, Informative)

the Atomic Rabbit (200041) | about 5 years ago | (#28887105)

1. M-x visual-line-mode RET (or Options->Line Wrapping->Word Wrap)
2. Live happily ever after.

Re:Word wrapping (1)

xiox (66483) | about 5 years ago | (#28887607)

That sounds great. This must be new in emacs 23 - I can't see it in 22.2.1 I have here.

Re:Word wrapping (1)

godztempus (1081497) | about 5 years ago | (#28887379)

M-q ( M-x fill-paragraph )

Re:Word wrapping (1)

acon1modm (1009947) | about 5 years ago | (#28887429)

http://www.google.com/#q=emacs+word+wrap [google.com]
If you can't do that, stick to Notepad then.

I strongly prefer vim, though I haven't been able to figure out word wrapping in it yet.

Re:Word wrapping (2, Informative)

Looke (260398) | about 5 years ago | (#28887471)

M-x longlines-mode

jmacs anyone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28887073)

WTF? Joe's Own Editor? I keep typing "e" but a previous sysadmin wants me to type "j". ARRRGGHH!!!

One question (3, Funny)

feldicus (1367687) | about 5 years ago | (#28887085)

Does the feature list include "Shortcuts that make sense to humans who never used the 30-year old keyboards that were around when RMS was hacking on TEX"?

Until I stop seeing Emacs primers that start with advice to start remapping my keyboard, I'll pass.

I thought eMacs was a command shell replacement? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#28887219)

a gui command shell for manipulating data into pipes/handlers to scripts, no different than at a text console prompt but as a GUI with more powerful control functions like as Labview.

Anyone willing to name that software IBM created to do just that, and included way back when SuSE was in version 7 Professional?

With fine RPM-based distributions on the market (SuSE, CentOS, etc), Do you realy want to install A Debian? [freeimagehosting.net]

Does not compile "out of the box" in Mac OS X 10.5 (1)

juanergie (909157) | about 5 years ago | (#28887469)

The image libraries for jpeg and tiff are not by default in OS X 10.5.7. You have to pass the configure flags --with-gif=no --with-jpeg=no to get it to compile.

Does it support CUA mode out of the box? (1)

sundarvenkata (1214396) | about 5 years ago | (#28887547)

Can I copy/paste successfully/reliably without trying to use some kludgy third party libraries?
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