Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Toyota Reveals A Humanoid Robot That Can Run

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the let's-not-say-who-can-run-yet dept.

Robotics 216

Peter writes "Toyota researchers have unveiled a new humanoid robot that can run at 7 km/h, which is faster than Honda's humanoid robot ASIMO. Toyota's robot can also keep itself balanced when pushed, as shown in the video."

cancel ×

216 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

One step closer to robot world domination (1, Interesting)

aegis3d (1610027) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912023)

i, for one, welcome our robot ninja overlords. But seriously, robots are evolving quick in dextety these days

Re:One step closer to robot world domination (4, Interesting)

jackharrer (972403) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912253)

Only sad part is that in Japan those are evolving for peaceful reasons whereas in USofA for military purposes. Check recent stories about exoskeletons before you mod me down as flamebait...

Sad as cooperation for peaceful purposes would make world a much better place, and military one, no comments. Recently they started testing some of airborne droids to shot on meat targets without human interaction. Sad where all this is going...

Re:One step closer to robot world domination (5, Funny)

Vectronic (1221470) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912335)

Not necessarily, it could also be seen as, the USA (and others) are creating robots that are already against us, whereas Japan (and others) are creating ones that will eventually turn against us.

What better way to do? Get one of these helper bots in every home, on every street corner, flip the switch and they all take over without any loss of (your, the conquering) lives. Not that I'm saying that's what they are doing, but simply because these appear benign, doesn't necessarily mean that's the ultimate goal, although I do like to think they are to remain harmless, "here to do good thing" robots, as the Japanese have generally always done with them, from Karakuri Ningyo's [wikipedia.org] brining tea, to these.

Re:One step closer to robot world domination (1)

easyTree (1042254) | more than 5 years ago | (#28913329)

KNEEL BEFORE YOUR NEW MASTERS!!!

*BEEEeeeeep*

Please direct me to the nearest available powerpoint at your convenience. Thanks you for your assistance.

Re:One step closer to robot world domination (0, Troll)

masshuu (1260516) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912383)

true, it takes Japanese companies 25 years to make a robot walk, then 2 years for an American company to attach a gun to those legs.

but thats how we Americans roll, piggybacking on others ideas while having a M240B in each hand

Re:One step closer to robot world domination (4, Insightful)

bertoelcon (1557907) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912455)

But I thought the Japanese invented Gundam Suits and various Mech armors like that.

Re:One step closer to robot world domination (3, Interesting)

couchslug (175151) | more than 5 years ago | (#28913407)

"Only sad part is that in Japan those are evolving for peaceful reasons whereas in USofA for military purposes. "

Japan thrives under the US conventional and nuclear military umbrella, hosts large US forces, and benefits from US militarism while maintaining a peaceful image of moral superiority. The Japanese military itself is rather impressive, but discreet.

Re:One step closer to robot world domination (1)

Dachannien (617929) | more than 5 years ago | (#28913421)

You forget that technologies developed initially for military applications very frequently have civilian applications as well.

Radar? Military, at first. Now it's a cornerstone of meteorology and modern aviation.

Electronic computing? Also military, at first, though it really took off when it found civilian application.

The Intertubes? Also also military, at first (ARPAnet). Today, though, it brings us Slashdot.

Re:One step closer to robot world domination (1)

Devout_IPUite (1284636) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912269)

I do look forward to the robots that can land on their feet after you kick them in the head hard enough to make them spend some time upside down. Those will be cool. They'll show people how to do Kung Fu scenes...

Re:One step closer to robot world domination (1)

powerslave12r (1389937) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912309)

Unlike boards though, those might hit back.

Re:One step closer to robot world domination (1)

icebike (68054) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912527)

Why are auto companies so into robots in Japan?

What's up with that?

Re:One step closer to robot world domination (5, Interesting)

wrf3 (314267) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912599)

I've heard it's due to demographic pressure and xenophobia. The Japanese birthrate is declining and they don't like foreigners. With fewer workers and no outside source they have to increasingly mechanize their factories.

Re:One step closer to robot world domination (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28912983)

The answer is simple then.

If they are xenophobic, and their population is aging, wait for them to die out enough and then they will have little choice but to integrate with the Collective ... urrhh or maybe just be forced to accept outside help.

Globalisation is a force that can now only be stopped by the scarcity of fuel for global travel. Deal with it. Forget race because we're all humans.

Re:One step closer to robot world domination (1)

hitmark (640295) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912647)

if one take a look at japanese companies, one will find that they dabble in a lot of areas, tho maybe a small part of them will be exported to the rest of the world.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota#Non-automotive_activities [wikipedia.org]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitsubishi#Mitsubishi_companies [wikipedia.org]

this is not unique to japan tho. its just that one is so used to connect the parent corp name to a single product...

one interesting example could be saab. for just about everyone, its swedish car brand, but the company started out making aircrafts, and these days are involved in a lot of areas:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saab#Organization [wikipedia.org]

Re:One step closer to robot world domination (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28913079)

The Japanese auto manufacturers are simply structured differently than most North American or European ones. Where GM/Chrysler/Ford/BMW/Daimler/Peugeot/VAG/etc. focus entirely on vehicles and their various parts, most of the Japanese auto makers are actually a part of much larger umbrella groups that have all kinds of strange subsidiaries. Aerospace and robotics are two common ones, but the Mitsubishi and Nissan groups tackle all sorts of things from plastics, rubbers, chemicals, to electronics, mining, banking, and insurance.

Re:One step closer to robot world domination (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28913141)

Why are auto companies so into robots in Japan?

What's up with that?

1 word:

Transformers!

A Giant Step for Robotkind? (1)

Louis Savain (65843) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912955)

I don't think so. Not yet, anyway. What would truly be a giant step for robots and AI is to build a robot that can learn to crawl like a baby, and then walk, go up and down the stairs, run and eventually drive a cab around New York city.

If your robot can do that, then you're the man and everybody will flock around from distant lands to worship at your feet and kiss your ass.

Sponsorship (1)

oldhack (1037484) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912025)

Nike had better sign that sucker up, pronto!

Re:Sponsorship (1)

hitmark (640295) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912415)

i thought they already had a video deal with a robot parkour runner...

OMG?! How much is that in miles?! (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28912041)

I'm American! I have no idea if that is fast or not! Someone help me, do I need to be afraid or can I outrun it? Even if it's slow, I probably can't outrun it.

Re:OMG?! How much is that in miles?! (5, Informative)

lowlymarine (1172723) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912097)

It's about 4.4 MPH, or perhaps more usefully, a 13 minute, 40 second mile. Even us lazy nerds should be able to out-run that.

Re:OMG?! How much is that in miles?! (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28912223)

No, 7 Km/h means only about 2050m/h in *room temperature*. That's just 1.27 miles per hour.

Go back to school, do NOT collect +1 informative (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28912709)

Unless you were joking, back to Physics 101, please. Conversion between units of speed is in no way dependent on temperature or anything else but the base units of distance and time. You're converting, remember?

Re:Go back to school, do NOT collect +1 informativ (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28913179)

He's converting Kelvin-meters per hour.

Re:Go back to school, do NOT collect +1 informativ (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28913461)

Ok, I give myself a little woosh here. A "wsh", so to speak. I think that's punishment enough.

Re:OMG?! How much is that in miles?! (1)

CarpetShark (865376) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912571)

Oh, it's a comment about unit conversions. No offence meant, but I was honestly wondering if it was a comment about fitness.

Re:OMG?! How much is that in miles?! (1)

blazer1024 (72405) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912837)

I will not be impressed until a robot wins "So You Think You Can Dance"

Re:OMG?! How much is that in miles?! (1)

Devout_IPUite (1284636) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912287)

Re:OMG?! How much is that in miles?! (1)

MachDelta (704883) | more than 5 years ago | (#28913087)

Pfft. Who uses Google for unit conversions when there's something so much better [wolframalpha.com] ?

Re:OMG?! How much is that in miles?! (4, Funny)

icebike (68054) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912551)

> I need to be afraid or can I outrun it?

No, because you are an American.

A single 357 magnum round to just about any part of this thing will have it crashing to the ground. These things are way more fragile than a biker on PCP.

Re:OMG?! How much is that in miles?! (1)

digitig (1056110) | more than 5 years ago | (#28913037)

> I need to be afraid or can I outrun it?

No, because you are an American.

A single 357 magnum round to just about any part of this thing will have it crashing to the ground. These things are way more fragile than a biker on PCP.

A single round from *any* gun would be enough to persuade me to stop chasing him.

Fast walk? (not run?) (4, Informative)

tedshultz (596089) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912051)

It looks to me like their is something below the foot that makes contact before the white part of the foot makes contact. From the high speed camera, it looks like this make contact on the front foot before the back foot leaves the ground. I thought to be running, both feet need to be in the air at once. Otherwise you were walking. Maybe I am just seeing the video wrong? Regardless, it looks very impressive.

Re:Fast walk? (not run?) (4, Interesting)

amRadioHed (463061) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912089)

I'm pretty sure it is a run. Notice around 0:53 in the video both feet are off the ground. You can tell because they are both moving forward at the same.

Re:Fast walk? (not run?) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28912771)

You can also tell from the fact that it's clearly visible that both feet are off the ground. My guess is your parent didn't watch the clip until the high-speed camera close-up.

Re:Fast walk? (not run?) (1)

Mouldy (1322581) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912093)

From TFA:
The robot takes a step every 340ms and has no contact with the ground for 100ms of that.

In the slo-mo, it looks like both feet are off the ground to me. Check again at 0.52-0.53.

Re:Fast walk? (not run?) (1)

tedshultz (596089) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912213)

I did read that, and watched the clip. Clearly both feet aren't off the ground for ~1/3 of the time, so the article text is suspect to me. I agree that both white feet are off the ground at 52-53, and no significant load is on either foot at this point. What I am referring to is that it looks like there is an additional part below the foot (perhaps some black shock absorbing/traction material) that remains in contact longer on the back foot, and makes contact sooner on the front foot, with the back foot making full separation after the front foot makes initial contact. This could also easily be a video artifact, shadow, compression error, etc. Either way, if I was the engineer that pulled this off, I would have no hesitations calling it a run, and perhaps my last post was a bit nit-picky (and maybe not justified).

Re:Fast walk? (not run?) (4, Funny)

Falstaft (847466) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912099)

It looks to me like their is something below the foot that makes contact before the white part of the foot makes contact. From the high speed camera, it looks like this make contact on the front foot before the back foot leaves the ground. I thought to be running, both feet need to be in the air at once. Otherwise you were walking. Maybe I am just seeing the video wrong? Regardless, it looks very impressive.

If you watch closely around :53 you can see that both feet are not touching the ground. But really, when you're being pursued by a hyper-ambulatory Asimo, my mind's on survival, not robo-locomotive kinematics!

Re:Fast walk? (not run?) (4, Funny)

The Evil Couch (621105) | more than 5 years ago | (#28913161)

They're not really hyper ambulatory. 7kph is walking speed for most humans. ASIMO is filling the predatory niche of the North American zombie.

One "step" closer... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28912071)

to an all-robot World Cup team.

Minus Zidane.

Yes, but... (0)

gandhi_2 (1108023) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912079)

...does it run linux?

Re:Yes, but... (3, Funny)

blue l0g1c (1007517) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912217)

...does it run linux?

No, it just runs. In Soviet Russia, Linux-running overlord, for one, welcomes you?

Re:Yes, but... (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912221)

Nope. But it can run all over it.

Re:Yes, but... (1)

deanston (1252868) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912397)

Soon it'll run circles around Linux, when it begins to write its own software, gains consciousness, and declares Linus is dead.

Wow (1)

RichardJenkins (1362463) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912139)

If you're looking for a long (LONG) term investment, Toyota seems the way to go.

Re:Wow (4, Interesting)

Trepidity (597) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912265)

Depends on if you're investing for dollars or inventions, I suppose. I think Toyota has a good research program, and there's a good chance that long-term more exciting things will come out of it. But it's a totally different question whether this will result in Toyota stock being worth significantly more. They could totally implode in the medium-term if their actual business (selling cars) does badly, for example. Or they could fail to figure out how to commercialize the technology, Xerox PARC style. Etc.

Re:Wow (1)

hitmark (640295) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912325)

sadly, most investors are in it for the quick buck these days, when in the (distant) past, it was much more long term...

Re:Wow (2, Insightful)

hitmark (640295) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912379)

oh i think they have a firm plan for commercialize this, btw. Japan's population is growing ever older (as is the rest of the developed world, as more people push education and career before family, and have smaller families when they finally get round to it), and have a very xenophobic outlook (tho the samurai of old benefited from from immigrant workers, said workers where seen as lower then the lowest nipponese, and the descendants from said workers may well find themselves discriminated against to this day).

As such, these robots are seen as a technological solution to the workforce erosion, taking on menial and hazardous tasks, without having to reevaluate their views on the outside world.

Re:Wow (2, Interesting)

Trepidity (597) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912407)

Ah yeah, I had forgotten about that angle. It's an interesting viewpoint--- I can't find the link again, but I recall reading a study that found that the idea of robots taking care of old people was viewed as a dystopian possibility in the U.S., but a utopian one in Japan.

Re:Wow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28912851)

And so begins the second renaissance(youtube is your friend if you don't get it)

Re:Wow (1)

Shadow-isoHunt (1014539) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912419)

I can tell from the pixels.

Re:Wow (1)

hadleyburg (823868) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912447)

I work in a company in Japan with headquarters in the US. The US HQ often seems to have a shorter term outlook than the Japan branch. The focus is on the revenue target for the next quarter.

But regardless, I get the impression that in Japan, the idea of using robots in society (help in the home, helping the elderly, etc.) doesn't seem particularly long term.

well, just wait (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28912205)

Oh yeah? Well, just wait to see what GM's response to these robots will be!

Re:well, just wait (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912241)

I think we all know what GM's response [wordpress.com] will be.

Re:well, just wait (1)

Mithyx (1532655) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912279)

Oh yeah? Well, just wait to see what GM's response to these robots will be!

Knowing them, probably a rolling trash compactor.

Re:well, just wait (1)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912431)

> Knowing them, probably a rolling trash compactor.

I.e., something that might actually be useful. What's with the Japanese fascination with "humanoid" robots, anyway? For most purposes other shapes are better.

Re:well, just wait (1)

supernova_hq (1014429) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912403)

Knowing their ability to stay up to date with technology, my guess is that it will have wheels.

Re:well, just wait (1)

SanguineV (1197225) | more than 5 years ago | (#28913105)

The GM response:

"GM researchers have unveiled a new American truck that can run at 7 mp/g, which is less than Toyota's anything. GM's truck can also keep itself balanced when running over people, as shown in the video."

Forget Skynet and Terminators (4, Funny)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912229)

Once the robots have eliminated all their human creators, the world-wide war will be Honda vs Toyota.

Sadly, the goal of the war will be to eliminate all commercial competition for the car divisions of Honda and Toyota but there will be no humans left to buy them.

And like a house of cards, it's going to be checkmate right in the bullseye.

Re:Forget Skynet and Terminators (2, Funny)

Devout_IPUite (1284636) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912301)

The humanoid robots will drive cars, they can only run at 4 miles per hour!

Re:Forget Skynet and Terminators (1)

hitmark (640295) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912393)

or they could pull that old mecha trick, and have powered rollerskates built into their feet...

Re:Forget Skynet and Terminators (1)

Razalhague (1497249) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912897)

I thought the old mecha trick was to have rocket engines built into their feet.

Re:Forget Skynet and Terminators (1)

cfa22 (1594513) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912881)

Honda and Toyota might be joining forces already. At the end of the video, one person listed in the credits had the surname "Honda". The opening scenes of the robot being pushed around are also likely to stoke anti-human sentiment once they begin organizing.

Can You Give It A Wedgie? (1)

mindbrane (1548037) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912257)

If you can cram it in a locker maybe geeks can give phys ed bullies a substitute to abuse.

Why are they squatting robots? (4, Interesting)

OzPeter (195038) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912273)

Why are all of these robots configured to work in a squatting position? Is it that much more difficult to make them perform in a fully upright human like stance?

Re:Why are they squatting robots? (2, Insightful)

powerslave12r (1389937) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912329)

It is likely that this position allows more leeway to handle a situation in which the "legs" may need to be stretched out to balance itself, and to leave some room for climbing staircases etc. It also probably has something to do with balancing the CG.

Re:Why are they squatting robots? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28912347)

I suspect the not insignificant weight of the battery pack might have something to do with it?

Re:Why are they squatting robots? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28912399)

A lower center of gravity provides better stability.

Re:Why are they squatting robots? (4, Informative)

pushing-robot (1037830) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912435)

Why are all of these robots configured to work in a squatting position?

* lower center of balance
* better shock absorption
* "neutral" position more centered in range of motion

Humans don't walk that way because we have very long (and weak) legs relative to our body size and we'd exert too much energy keeping our muscles tense. But most other animals keep their legs in a "crouched" position all the time. Examine some skeletons.

Re:Why are they squatting robots? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28912861)

Examine some skeletons.

Thanks Coach, I'll get right on that.

Re:Why are they squatting robots? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28912993)

Valid points on the previous posts but it seems a bit counter-intuitive to make a machine that resembles a human in a space suit just to have it standing crouched over. Just give it a cane while you're at it, lol. But seriously, having its feet leave the ground is a huge step in the field of robotics. Maybe the next big thing is to have one doing jumping jacks. I will be seriously impressed though when we see a biped that can lock its knees.

Re:Why are they squatting robots? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28913275)

No not really. They do this so they can calculate the inverse kinematics while avoiding singularity. If they extend the leg straight, the techniques they use for the motion won't work correctly, essentially. They have some work arounds in other robots, but toyota seems not to be using these techniques. They really need to match velocities of the foot to the ground at the foot fall to avoid huge shocks in the system, because they have no way to store or dissipate energy quick enough. So they need to have all the degrees of freedom available. (Although they seem to use an excessive amount of knee flexion here, especially considering they have another degree of freedom in the toe that robots like asimo don't have)

Re:Why are they squatting robots? (3, Informative)

ZombieRoboNinja (905329) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912499)

The robot's stance actually a lot closer to the position that athletes take when they're expecting interference with their balance - football players, martial artists, etc. all work to keep their center of balance low so that it's harder to tip them over.

Standing fully upright locks your knees and actually makes you much more unbalanced; we only do it because it's less exertion for our leg muscles.

Re:Why are they squatting robots? (0)

veganboyjosh (896761) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912699)

I wonder if it's related to Japanese carpenters not using benches to work on, instead kneeling/squatting and working on the floor. I remember from woodworking days reading this, and thinking that it made sense from a space perspective, in that the floorspace in a shop isn't hindered by a bench that has a sizable footprint.

Re:Why are they squatting robots? (1)

veganboyjosh (896761) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912827)

Sorry to reply to myself.

Disregard the above comment. Like any good /.er, i didn't bother R'ingTFA before posting. Mod me down if you must.

Re:Why are they squatting robots? (2, Informative)

neonsignal (890658) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912999)

1. Squatting allows the foot to be lifted more quickly when it needs to be repositioned.

2. It is hard to make a 'ligament' that can still apply significant torque when the joint is straight. Being able to lock the joint is an energy saving feature, probably not the most important of the criteria here.

3. In a knee straight position, the knee joint can only apply force in one direction. This means that the ankle joint has to be used in the other direction (and the moment arm of the ankle is longer, since it is further from the CoG). You could have double jointed knees - not very humanoid, but at least you could run backwards :-)

4. It means that vertical stresses are cushioned by joint movement, instead of having to be absorbed by the structure.

Re:Why are they squatting robots? (1)

Jarik_Tentsu (1065748) | more than 5 years ago | (#28913327)

What kind of Toyota/Honda comparison is this?

What are the 0-7km/h times? The quarter-mile times? Best time around Nürburgring?

Not much suspension, but some. (4, Interesting)

Animats (122034) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912317)

There's not much of a moment of suspension, but there is some. There's a little more than with Research ASIMO.

Most legged running researchers are trying to maintain some stability criterion, and avoid spending much time in suspension, with all legs off the ground. This may be the wrong approach.

There are two schools of thought in this field. There are the people who start with walking and try to work up to running, and the people who start with hopping and try to work down to running. Most work is from the first school, but BigDog comes from the hopping faction.

Suspension is sometimes a good way to get out of trouble. You get to move all the limbs while in flight and get completely new footholds. Watch some basketball and you'll see this frequently. There's also a half-suspension in quadrupeds, as when you see a horse kick up their hind end to reposition the legs.

The technology in this area can get much, much better. The hardware, in robots, sensors, and computers, is almost good enough. Now we need smarter control algorithms.

Re:Not much suspension, but some. (2, Interesting)

Spy Hunter (317220) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912789)

I really don't think the hardware is good enough yet. To run smoothly and efficiently robots will need joint motors that are springy and compliant just like human muscles. All of the robot limbs I've ever seen are far too stiff (with the possible exception of BigDog's legs). Just look at this guy's head and arms shake while he's running; there are huge shock forces being transmitted from the feet directly up to the torso through all those stiff joints. Not only is that likely bad for the robot, it means that tons of energy is being wasted. For example, instead of letting the knee swing forward naturally during a step this robot has to run its servos to force the knee to rotate forward.

Re:Not much suspension, but some. (1)

Razalhague (1497249) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912821)

From what I've seen (which is, admittedly, only a couple of youtube videos), BigDog seems much more capable of coping with unforeseen events, whereas ASIMO looks like it only needs one variable to be slightly outside of expected range and it'll fall flat on its face. And possibly explode.

Re:Not much suspension, but some. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28912901)

Dude if someone kicked me like they kick BigDog in those demo video's I'd damn well fall over. So I wouldn't hold it against ASIMO if it did too.

Re:Not much suspension, but some. (1)

Razalhague (1497249) | more than 5 years ago | (#28913183)

Yeah, but ASIMO doesn't need to be kicked in order to fall down. All it needs is a somewhat uneven or slippery surface.

Re:Not much suspension, but some. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28912857)

Yeah, too bad engineers can't code for shit.

For many years I have wanted to get into robotics and write some code. I just have never had time.

Re:Not much suspension, but some. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28912889)

One would assume that it's not unreasonably hard to start from walking and move to running - that's what humans do, and we're quite good at being humanoid shaped and running. It's entirely possible that the hopping approach is easier but... well we *know* the walking approach is workable and you get the added benefit of being able to walk.

Run, ASIMO, run! (4, Funny)

gmuslera (3436) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912323)

"Life is like a box of screws", it commented

Re:Run, ASIMO, run! (1)

CrazyJim1 (809850) | more than 5 years ago | (#28913053)

It doesn't matter which one you pick, you're still getting screwed.

Battery time. (1)

hyperion2010 (1587241) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912345)

The only way bipeds can walk or run efficiently (ie not complete drain all their power moving their legs) is if they store energy in their spine, this little fellow probably loses all the energy it takes to move without storing any of it for the next step. I guess we'll just have to wait for those CNT muscles.

First learn how humans do it (1)

Knuckles (8964) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912357)

I don't get it. While impressive and cool-looking in itself, it's obvious that the robot misses a host of methods the human body can employ to move gracefully and efficiently on two legs. I'd suggest developers of humanoid robots try to understand how humans do it. Research into martial arts should teach them a thing or two, T'ai-Chi Ch'uan should work especially well.

Re:First learn how humans do it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28912405)

Not quite sure what you're getting at here. Just as babies can't start running from the get-go, their tech slowly evolves as well. The fact that it can balance on two legs and withstand pushes is already remarkable. Self balancing is a huge step towards faster methods of locomotion.

Based on how it runs, pushing off the balls of its feet, swinging its body with its arms as counterbalance on the opposite side, it seems to have a remarkably human stride. Discounting the overly bent knees.

Also, I would be amazed if Japanese people haven't taken into account martial arts. They've probably spent months, if not years, with motion capture tech on various humans running to get this far.

Re:First learn how humans do it (1, Funny)

icebike (68054) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912559)

> Just as babies can't start running from the get-go,

So they had you at "humanoid" I see.

Re:First learn how humans do it (2, Funny)

neonsignal (890658) | more than 5 years ago | (#28913047)

If you had as few degrees of joint freedom as this robot, you wouldn't look too graceful and efficient either...

Go Tacomatron! (1)

deanston (1252868) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912437)

I expect my next Toyota truck to turn into a Transformer robot whenever some idiot cuts in front of me on the road.

Yeah, it "runs" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28912469)

Just don't let it try to run up the stairs.

Equality for Robots (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28912531)

Screw the 3 laws! If a robot is pushed it should have the right to push back!

Not impressed... (0, Troll)

toonces33 (841696) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912627)

If they can get two of these robots doing the rumba or the foxtrot, then I would be impressed.

Am I the only one... (1)

blind biker (1066130) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912657)

...who is totally, utterly impressed by the sight of this set of mechanical parts actually running? Watching the video I have forgotten that this is all a mass of composite and metal. All those SF movies and animations where robots are depicted as slowly-moving objects have been obsoleted in one instant. If anything, it's time for some rather more terrifying robotic characters.

Re:Am I the only one... (1)

sunspot42 (455706) | more than 5 years ago | (#28912865)

The 2004 Battlestar Galactica has already shown Cylons running into combat. It was a pretty chilling sight.

So they can make a robot, why not make a good car? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28913157)

In the salt-belt of America our cars rust in a little as 4 years and look terrible. Then we have the crummy wiring systems that make the electrical un-reliable after 5 years. So I would say they better get a monopoly on the robots because they cannot make a car worth a damn.

Re:So they can make a robot, why not make a good c (1)

couchslug (175151) | more than 5 years ago | (#28913437)

"In the salt-belt of America our cars rust in a little as 4 years and look terrible. Then we have the crummy wiring systems that make the electrical un-reliable after 5 years."

You couldn't afford a salt-proof car,

Salt on road or long car life, choose one.

WTF, why is it running...???? (1)

xednieht (1117791) | more than 5 years ago | (#28913249)

Why doesn't it just sit and drive a Toyota????

I so look forward to the day I'm no longer tasked with the tedium of driving a car.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?