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Exploding ipod? Don't worry! (4, Funny)

Vinegar Joe (998110) | more than 4 years ago | (#28925767)

It's not a bug, it's a feature!

Re:Exploding ipod? Don't worry! (5, Funny)

KDR_11k (778916) | more than 4 years ago | (#28925793)

Apple is going for the middle eastern fundamentalist market then?

Re:Exploding ipod? Don't worry! (2, Funny)

slarrg (931336) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926111)

I forget, how many virgins does one get for an exploding iPod?

Re:Exploding ipod? Don't worry! (5, Funny)

dna_(c)(tm)(r) (618003) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926293)

72 free downloads at Virgin records

Re:Exploding ipod? Don't worry! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28925811)

It's not a bug, it's a feature!

There's an app for that

Re:Exploding ipod? Don't worry! (5, Funny)

kimvette (919543) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926115)

You need to jailbreak the phone to install it though. Apple rejected it from the iTunes store because it duplicated their native functionality.

Re:Exploding ipod? Don't worry! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28925841)

Maybe it's a leftover feature for military use that got into the consumer version! Get your ipod damaged in the middle of a firefight? Just chuck it at the enermy.

http://tech.slashdot.org/story/09/04/20/2312233/US-Military-Issuing-iPod-Touches-To-Soldiers

Re:Exploding ipod? Don't worry! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28926033)

Its Apple's new product... the iHandgrenade...

Re:Exploding ipod? Don't worry! (5, Funny)

aplusjimages (939458) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926217)

iPlode is what you were looking for.

Re:Exploding ipod? Don't worry! (1)

laihduttaminen (1610967) | more than 4 years ago | (#28925903)

hah, you can use them for self protection with correct timing of throwing an exploding one at a mugger trying to rob you.

Re:Exploding ipod? Don't worry! (2, Funny)

muyla (1429487) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926221)

Do they hold the patent for exploding electronic apparatus or are they paying royalties to the army?

Re:Exploding ipod? Don't worry! (1)

spintriae (958955) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926355)

That's why it's the hottest device on the market.

Re:Exploding ipod? Don't worry! (5, Funny)

mdwh2 (535323) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926377)

It Just Explodes.

Apple may not have been the first to do this, but they were the ones who popularised it. They also make it easy: no need for complex buttons to press, Apple have pioneered the "open-hand" gesture, which causes the device to drop, and initiate destruction after a short time period.

Other products may win out on paper in terms of pure feature lists, but it's the attention to little details, such as the seamless integration of a music player and a product that blows up in your face.

It turned me into a newt! (2, Insightful)

BadAnalogyGuy (945258) | more than 4 years ago | (#28925773)

Customer service is a cost. But it also buys goodwill when done right.

It's sad that Apple has done this and marred their customer-centric aura. However, such settlement terms are really par for the course.

Re:It turned me into a newt! (4, Insightful)

Arimus (198136) | more than 4 years ago | (#28925797)

What customer centric aura? Apple have been pulling stunts like this for a long time now...

The only reason I have an iPod touch is, at the time I got it, nothing else really fitted the bill for what I wanted.

Re:It turned me into a newt! (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28925885)

What customer centric aura? Apple have been pulling stunts like this for a long time now...

The only reason I have an iPod touch is, at the time I got it, nothing else really fitted the bill for what I wanted.

So you only purchased it...because you liked the product.?

Sounds like apple made a product that you wanted. Sounds like they design with the consumer in mind.

Re:It turned me into a newt! (5, Insightful)

Attila Dimedici (1036002) | more than 4 years ago | (#28925977)

He didn't say they were customer centric, but that they had a "customer centric Aura". The first requires a corporate culture that cares about the customer, the second requires a marketing department that works very hard to make the customer think you care about them. Amazingly a lot of companies work very hard at the second even though the first is much easier to accomplish (and harder to lose).

Re:It turned me into a newt! (1)

dna_(c)(tm)(r) (618003) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926367)

I think that reputation is not only due to marketing. They consistently make user friendly UI's, so as a user you feel the "computer cares for you".

Re:It turned me into a newt! (5, Interesting)

MadCow42 (243108) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926101)

I've had the opposite experience, personally...

I bought a 24" white iMac (2006). It worked perfect up until it was 2.5 years old, when I started having video issues with it. It was under Applecare, so I brought it into the local Apple store, and they fixed it on-site (took a couple days, unfortunately).

Similar issues re-occured a few days after getting it back, then after a second repair it happened a third time. The computer DID work each time when I got it back, and the symptoms were different each time... so I can't really blame them. They replace all the major componants in the process too.

However, after 2 repairs and 3 similar faults, they replaced the machine with a brand-new 2009 aluminum iMac - with bigger/better/faster everything. Even the lowest-end machine would have beaten my old one, but they gave me the mid-line one anyways. They even offered this without me pushing. On top, they even gave me a free mini-DVI converter for my second monitor because my old cable was a different plug on the old iMac.

So - although I agree this incdent looks horrid, I would argue that they're certainly not as bad as the majority of corporations these days. I'm certainly a lot more brand-loyal than I was 6 months ago.

MadCow.

Re:It turned me into a newt! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28925817)

It's an awful big leap to assume this guy is telling the truth.

Re:It turned me into a newt! (2, Insightful)

mdwh2 (535323) | more than 4 years ago | (#28925861)

However, such settlement terms are really par for the course.

Do you have examples of other companies doing this? Note, he wasn't asking for compensation, just a refund.

Re:It turned me into a newt! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28925953)

Re:It turned me into a newt! (2, Interesting)

VoyagerRadio (669156) | more than 4 years ago | (#28925883)

Apple better watch this type of behavior; there's only so much fanboys will overlook. (Former/still kinda Apple fanboy here.) Google's been getting more and more of the "cool cred" that Apple established, and if Google's Chrome OS hits its stride, it may be worth taking a real good look at. Plus there'll be a much wider variety of hardware to choose from. Hmm...wonder if Google will partner with a device maker for a portable audio device?

Re:It turned me into a newt! (0, Offtopic)

Norsefire (1494323) | more than 4 years ago | (#28925921)

Because what could possibly [xkcd.org] go wrong [xkcd.org] with Android?

Re:It turned me into a newt! (5, Informative)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926041)

Apple customer support is notoriously spotty. Sometimes you call them, get to talk to a human, and they ship out a replacement that arrives within a day or two. Sometimes you don't. The first time my PowerBook needed servicing, it took about 45 minutes on the phone (most of it on hold, on a 10p/minute customer support line) to get them to send a box out to collect it. They said it should be back in a few days. A week later I called them and was told it had been shipped back and would be with me soon. Another week later, I called them again and was told that it had been returned to the repair centre because I wasn't in when the courier tried to deliver it. Next call, I was told that it had never made it to the repair centre (i.e. the first two things I had been told were outright lies) - that UPS had a signature for someone at the repair centre but it had never made it into their repair tracking system.

After eight hour on the phone (at 10p/minute) and six weeks, they finally sent me a replacement (good thing I backed up the disk before sending it in...). The replacement was DoA - it didn't even boot, it just got hotter and hotter until you pulled the battery out.

Two weeks later, they sent me another replacement. This one actually worked, but had the wrong amount of RAM. A few days later they sent me some replacement DIMMs to install. I did, and a couple of months later, one of the RAM slots failed (this having been one of the faults that I had originally posted the machine in to get fixed).

The next repair, they replaced the motherboard with one with a slower CPU. Then they over-tightened the hinges so first time I opened it after getting it back one of them snapped. They then failed to honour this as a warranty replacement (luckily for me, the local computer shop that was handling the repairs decided to absorb this cost to generate some goodwill).

But over the same period I had several Mac-using friends who had repairs happen without any trouble. The most irritating thing was that all of my complaints were met by being told that Apple is consistently ranked top for customer support in independent surveys. This may be true, but it doesn't alter the fact that they consistently and repeatedly screwed up in my particular case.

What was that diturbance in the Force? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28925783)

Well, at least they're not Microsoft. Or something.

It's as if a billion Fanboys all cried out at once.

Picture (5, Funny)

abigsmurf (919188) | more than 4 years ago | (#28925787)

The 11 year old wearing such heavy makeup (lipstick, mascara and other stuff I'm too manly to admit to knowing the names of) is far more worrying than the burnt out ipod she's holding

Re:Picture (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28925859)

I take it you never been to England then?

make-up seems to be compulsory part of the school uniform from the age of 8 upwards

Re:Picture (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28925873)

I take it you never been to England then?

make-up seems to be compulsory part of the school uniform from the age of 8 upwards

I welcome anything that takes your eyes off their teeth.

Re:Picture (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28926065)

This thread carries the Pedobear Seal of Approval.

Re:Picture (3, Informative)

cptdondo (59460) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926073)

You must not have seen heavy makeup.... Try any of Avril Lavigne's followers.

Anyway, that's obviously a staged shot, so the makeup was applied by the photographer's studio. Not surprising. Heck, I've had more than that pancaked on my face - when they were doing marketing shots for a control panel I built. (And, yes, I'm a middle aged guy.)

What does that have to do with the ipod?

Re:Picture (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28926137)

Heck, I've had more than that pancaked on my face - when they were doing marketing shots for a control panel I built. (And, yes, I'm a middle aged guy.)

Are you the inventor of the world famous gay panel ?

Re:Picture (1)

funkatron (912521) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926079)

It's an attempt to look older and it's hardly surprising when looking like a teenager means that you're threatening and therefore deserve an ASBO.

Is this uncommon? (3, Insightful)

Shag (3737) | more than 4 years ago | (#28925829)

The Times has learnt that the company would offer the family a full refund only if they were willing to sign a settlement form. The proposed agreement left them open to legal action if they ever disclosed the terms of the settlement.

I don't see where it says they can't say the iPod exploded.

I do see where it says they can't disclose the terms of the settlement, which is absolutely normal and common as far as settlement language goes.

Was there something newsworthy here that I missed?

Re:Is this uncommon? (4, Insightful)

mdwh2 (535323) | more than 4 years ago | (#28925929)

I've never heard of anyone having to sign anything when given a refund (for whatever reason), let alone not being able to tell anyone about the simple existence of it (see later - it's not just the terms, but "agree that you will keep the terms and existence of this settlement agreement completely confidential").

Did anyone claim "they can't say the iPod exploded"?

Was there something newsworthy here that I missed?

I find it ironic that when there'd bad publicity for Apple, we hear pleading that it's not newsworthy. Well, every Iphone story we get day after day isn't really newsworthy - the Apple publicity works both ways.

Re:Is this uncommon? (1)

rishistar (662278) | more than 4 years ago | (#28925989)

I don't see where it says they can't say the iPod exploded.

From TFA:
âoeIt made a hissing noise,â he said. âoeI could feel it getting hotter in my hand, and I thought I could see vapourâ. Mr Stanborough said he threw the device out of his back door, where âoewithin 30 seconds there was a pop, a big puff of smoke and it went 10ft in the airâ.

Re:Is this uncommon? (1)

mdwh2 (535323) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926051)

I see that it exploded :) Where does anyone claim that the terms stated he wouldn't be able to say it exploded?

Re:Is this uncommon? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28926053)

I've never heard of anyone having to sign anything when given a refund (for whatever reason)

That's because they've upheld their end of the bargain.

Re:Is this uncommon? (4, Insightful)

funkatron (912521) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926019)

The Times has learnt that the company would offer the family a full refund only if they were willing to sign a settlement form. The proposed agreement left them open to legal action if they ever disclosed the terms of the settlement.

I don't see where it says they can't say the iPod exploded.

I do see where it says they can't disclose the terms of the settlement, which is absolutely normal and common as far as settlement language goes.

Was there something newsworthy here that I missed?

Even if a gag order is a normal part of a settlement, it is an unwanted part and an indication of a business which does not value its consumers. A business to asking someone to keep quiet in order to have a problem resolved is pretty arrogant.

Re:Is this uncommon? (2, Insightful)

Shag (3737) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926241)

A business to asking someone to keep quiet in order to have a problem resolved is pretty arrogant.

To honest consumers like you and me and them? Sure. But the article notes that this is more common on older iPods (imagine that - fancy newfangled batteries are more prone to trouble as they get older?) and from a corporate lawyer's viewpoint, having settlements and their terms made public only increases the risk of people running 250V through their years-old iPods in hopes of getting a shiny new one.

iDiots... (5, Insightful)

thisnamestoolong (1584383) | more than 4 years ago | (#28925831)

Why not publicly give the girl a refund and then reiterate the fact that this can happen with ANY Lithium Ion battery, and that the odds of it happening to you are about 1 in 11 million, and even less if you use a modicum of care. Instead they get to meet the Streisand effect, drawing huge amounts of attention to a COMPLETE non-issue, making themselves look like (Godwin alert) Nazis and making the minor tech failure seem like a huge catastrophic problem, surely hurting sales. It really blows my mind that a tech savvy company like Apple can still honestly think that it is possible to hide knowledge in this information age. iDiots...

Re:iDiots... (4, Funny)

lawaetf1 (613291) | more than 4 years ago | (#28925967)

And what do you propose to do with all those corporate lawyers if companies simply acted sensibly and didn't default to litigation for everything? The unemployment rate is already sky-high, we don't need a wave of unemployable, irritable suits hitting the streets.

Re:iDiots... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28926259)

There must still be a landmine problem in Bosnia or Kosovo or someplace.

Re:iDiots... (1)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926271)

"And what do you propose to do with all those corporate lawyers..."

Here is an interesting proposal [acs.org]

.

Re:iDiots... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28925975)

It seems lately that Apple is making a lot of stupid PR mistakes. Maybe Steve Jobs went completely crazy over the death of Michael Jackson?

1 in 11 million (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28926287)

so,, if you sold, say, 1.1 billion lithium batteries you could expect a hundred people's houses to burn down.

nice.

Re:iDiots... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28926347)

I would like to comment on calling Apple (Godwin alert :) ) Nazis. Apple are actually commies. They want to abolish private property and freedom of speech. Calling you criminal for jailbreaking, by which you exercise your ownership of an iPhone, Apple does not respect the fact that the iPhone that you have bought is your private property and you have the right to do whatever you wish with it. Therefore, Apple are rather Soviets than Nazis.

Re:iDiots... (1, Interesting)

Sockatume (732728) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926399)

The article states that they dropped it first, at that. It wasn't a spontaneous battery eruption of the kind we got used to when that batch of bad cells went out 5 years ago. That Apple could appear in the wrong in that sort of scenario tells you how much of a PR fail that NDA was.

Question of human nature (-1, Troll)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | more than 4 years ago | (#28925837)

So, large corporations like Apple, Microsoft, those in the RIAA and MPAA, etc. seem to have really hurt lots and lots of people. (And that's ignoring Union Carbide [wikipedia.org] etc.)

Considering the huge number of people harmed by these corporations, I would have expected at least a few people to go postal [wikipedia.org] on them and bomb / shoot-up their headquarters. But that seems to just not happen.

I'm not advocating violence - I'm just trying to understand why we're seeing none, when I would have expected at least one ruined person to want to exact revenge.

Any ideas why?

Re:Question of human nature (0, Redundant)

Elbart (1233584) | more than 4 years ago | (#28925949)

No videogames or highschools/colleges are involved.

Re:Question of human nature (1)

Tony (765) | more than 4 years ago | (#28925969)

Because they're not the government?

Re:Question of human nature (1)

Yvanhoe (564877) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926013)

Proportions and statistics. As many people note, these kind of occurrence are quite rare. If you consider that every pissed off person has a one on a billion chance to go postal (that's still high!) he is more likely to go after his own school, hospital, city hall, company, church or the generally crowded street he takes every day. These are far more annoying in average that your regular high tech company. We hear a lot of complaint about RIAA trials on /., but in real life I hear more stories about people annoyed about a local administration.

Re:Question of human nature (1)

mdwh2 (535323) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926091)

Perhaps now we'll see an angry mob turning up and throwing their Ipods at Apple HQ...

Re:Question of human nature (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28926203)

Considering the huge number of people harmed by these corporations, I would have expected at least a few people to go postal [wikipedia.org] on them and bomb / shoot-up their headquarters. But that seems to just not happen.

I'm not advocating violence - I'm just trying to understand why we're seeing none, when I would have expected at least one ruined person to want to exact revenge.

Any ideas why?

Maybe everybody doesn't have the nerd-typical way of dealing with small issues like their gadgets not working as expected and does not respond to it with a Jihad-like holy rage towards the maker of the gadget?

Re:Question of human nature (1)

Hijacked Public (999535) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926235)

Because it isn't effective?

People yell at the CS rep who answers the phone, but deep down they know that person isn't the architect of their circumstances. Even if you followed the Slashdot logic and held Steve Jobs personally responsible for this specific exploding iPod, it isn't like you can just walk into his office off the street.

Re:Question of human nature (1)

cowscows (103644) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926291)

I don't think you're making a particularly valid argument when you equate a handful of battery issues or suing over music downloads to releasing giant clouds of poisonous gas that kill thousands of people.

It sucks if your iPod battery goes up, and it sucks even more if it burns you, but considering that nobody has been killed by one, or even horribly disfigured, or anything that interesting. Apple's handling of the issue hasn't been very good, but to suggest that people should be so outraged about it that they blow up a building is silly.

Here's an interesting article about how many people the ipods have hurt, comparing it to other everyday items: http://www.fastcompany.com/blog/kit-eaton/technomix/chill-out-people-ipods-are-less-dangerous-socks [fastcompany.com]

Consumer protection? (-1, Offtopic)

Norsefire (1494323) | more than 4 years ago | (#28925845)

Doesn't America have anything like the Consumer Guarantees Act [consumeraffairs.govt.nz] ? If something like this happened in New Zealand, Apple would be legally liable and have to fix the device or refund the money [consumeraffairs.govt.nz] with no strings attached. If there had been consequent damage to other property they would have to pay for that too.

Re:Consumer protection? (4, Informative)

Arimus (198136) | more than 4 years ago | (#28925935)

What has America got to do with this story? Several pointers as to why this is a UK story (and no, despite appearances to the contrary we're not part of the US yet):

1. Its a story from the Times - a major UK broadsheet newspaper.
2. He obtained the iPod at Argos which I believe is not present in the US.
3. He's from Liverpool - which, last time I looked, is in England in the context of this article.
4. Trading Standards Institute is the UK consumer protection board.

Re:Consumer protection? (1)

Norsefire (1494323) | more than 4 years ago | (#28925995)

Oops assumed because Apple is an American company, America can be substituted with whatever country it originates from and the question still stands. However, considering New Zealand copied most of British law I would be surprised if they didn't have a similar consumer legislation. In which case Apple could be in for very large fines.

Re:Consumer protection? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28926095)

Since the UK is part of the EU ... well kinda ... there should be some customer protection laws. Isn't a 2 year warranty mandatory EU-wide?

The article isn't really clear what that contract/agreement covered. Maybe Apple - being a US company - instinctively thought they wanted to sue for damages and sent a run of the mill "we pay for all damages and then some, just shut up" letter instead of just sending a new Ipod?

Re:Consumer protection? (1)

Sockatume (732728) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926277)

The manufacturer warranty is in addition to their existing statutory rights in the UK, which say that the company selling you the goods has to deal with any lemons (the key limits being wear-and-tear, misuse, and how long a product can be "reasonably" expected to last) so Argos would've been held responsible for refunding them or replacing the item. Presumably the alarming nature of the fault caused them to bring in Apple, and Apple took the unusual step of offering a refund themselves as a way of getting the NDA into play.

Re:Consumer protection? (1)

slarrg (931336) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926253)

Well, America also copied all the existing case law from England when the United States was formed, too.

Re:Consumer protection? (0, Flamebait)

wytten (163159) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926077)

The evil corporation is American (go figure)

Re:Consumer protection? (1)

Civil_Disobedient (261825) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926159)

What has America got to do with this story?

I think the knee-jerk assumption when you read about a large, American company building products that can maim or kill their users, then attempting to stifle free speech to protect their bottom line, is that it's a U.S.-centric story.

Mostly because other first-world countries don't have our (U.S.) level of legalistic crazy-stupid.

Re:Consumer protection? (1)

gnapster (1401889) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926327)

None of those are certain to be obvious to someone in New Zealand. Plus, you are underestimating the penchant for British immigrants to the New World to name their settlements after Old World locations [google.com] .

Re:Consumer protection? (1)

Attila Dimedici (1036002) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926123)

Doesn't America have anything like the Consumer Guarantees Act [consumeraffairs.govt.nz] ? If something like this happened in New Zealand, Apple would be legally liable and have to fix the device or refund the money [consumeraffairs.govt.nz] with no strings attached. If there had been consequent damage to other property they would have to pay for that too.

Since this happened in the UK, it doesn't really matter if the U.S. has such a law. A U.S. Consumer Protection Law would not apply in the UK.
Additionally, such a law would not stop a company from trying to get people to sign such a settlement. It would just mean that they have to make good even if the consumer refuses.

Re:Consumer protection? (1)

xaxa (988988) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926125)

Doesn't America have anything like the Consumer Guarantees Act [consumeraffairs.govt.nz] ? If something like this happened in New Zealand, Apple would be legally liable and have to fix the device or refund the money [consumeraffairs.govt.nz] with no strings attached. If there had been consequent damage to other property they would have to pay for that too.

You misunderstand the law like most people. The retailer is liable, not the manufacturer. From your link: "The Act requires the retailer who supplied the goods to sort out any problems. This means a retailer can not tell you to take the problem to the manufacturer."

The law is almost identicle in the UK. The article says the man took the iPod back to Argos (the shop), but they referred him to Apple (incorrectly, but they know consumers don't know the law).

ign.com review of the iPod (1)

El_Muerte_TDS (592157) | more than 4 years ago | (#28925851)

"it will blow you away" - ign.com [igndotcom.info]

ps, not really IGN

youtube (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28925871)

I cant wait for the youtube video of someone reproducing this

What kind of gag? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28925889)

I wonder what type of gag Apple is using. Checking out Wikipedia:Gag [wikipedia.org] made me realize just how many there are!

I'm quite partial to the muzzle gag myself.

Perhaps they will be using their new product, iChoke!

Oh, you're talking about another type of gag. My bad.

The moral of the story (1)

hcs_$reboot (1536101) | more than 4 years ago | (#28925907)

It made a hissing noise, I threw the device out of the back door, and within 30 seconds there was a pop, a big puff of smoke and it went 10ft in the air

Moral: while it is cheaper, don't buy your iPod in Irak...

Re:The moral of the story (1)

Ihlosi (895663) | more than 4 years ago | (#28925941)

Moral: while it is cheaper, don't buy your iPod in Irak...

I'd say it's "Throwing your iPod may break it."

Seriously. Apples lawyers are going to be all over this.

Re:The moral of the story (2, Funny)

ichthyoboy (1167379) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926117)

Moral: while it is cheaper, don't buy your iPod in Irak ...

Probably shouldn't buy an atlas or a globe there either.....

Apple vs. Microsof (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28925909)

I've always thought Apple was just as greedy and immoral as Microsoft.

Re:Apple vs. Microsof (2, Insightful)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926141)

I've always thought Apple was just as greedy and immoral as Microsoft.

SOMEBODY has to pay for Steve Jobs' liver...

Re:Apple vs. Microsof (1, Interesting)

JonStewartMill (1463117) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926341)

Publicly-traded companies HAVE to be "greedy and immoral", otherwise they're not acting in the best interests of their stockholders. Mind you, I'm not saying this is a good thing; I think it's the cause of much that is wrong with the world today. I don't see an easy way to fix it though.

Deliberately inflammatory news entry... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28925927)

Why is it alright with you when Dell, HP, Sony et al â" the manufacturers that you buy the laptops you run on â" deal in these shady ways? I'm sure it's not news to you that all of these producers have marketing organs that are rotten to the core, partaking in this practice routinely, but why is it alright with you when they do it, and not when Apple's marketing organ does it? "Or something."

It speaks as loud about you as it does about the marketing practices.

Surprises me this doesn't happen more often (5, Interesting)

larwe (858929) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926011)

Really. Li-poly batteries in these applications have no housing except the housing of the device; they're a metallized plastic bag full of gelled chemistry goodness, basically. Crunch it the wrong way and you get an internal short and a runaway reaction, which produces a lot of gas - and the whole battery acts like one of those "popping bags" you can get at 7-11 and toystores.

Re:Surprises me this doesn't happen more often (2, Funny)

Ihlosi (895663) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926027)

Crunch it the wrong way ...

Woud throwing the device containing it out the back door suffice?

Re:Surprises me this doesn't happen more often (1)

larwe (858929) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926109)

Suffice for what? Gets it out of your house, sure :)

Re:Surprises me this doesn't happen more often (1)

Ihlosi (895663) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926297)

Suffice for what?

Doing sufficient damage to the device so it explodes?

Re:Surprises me this doesn't happen more often (1)

rsmith-mac (639075) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926349)

With enough force and against a particularly against a non-flat object, absolutely.

Re:Surprises me this doesn't happen more often (3, Funny)

DetpackJump (1219130) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926231)

Crunch it the wrong way and you get an internal short and a runaway reaction, which produces a lot of gas

Reminds me of that chalupa I had at Taco Bell last week.

Re:Surprises me this doesn't happen more often (5, Insightful)

delt0r (999393) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926243)

Yea, and yet you are allowed to take them onto a airplane... But not a bottle of water.

Re:Surprises me this doesn't happen more often (1)

larwe (858929) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926325)

Well, I have enough complication in my life without a DHS investigation, but I'm sure somewhere out there, some hacker is publishing a "HOWTO - make portable electronics into incendiary that will breeze through airport security". I don't fly any more. It's no longer worth the trouble.

Sensationalism ftw! (2, Insightful)

bidule (173941) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926017)

The letter also stated that, in accepting the money, Mr Stanborough was to "agree that you will keep the terms and existence of this settlement agreement completely confidential", and that any breach of confidentiality "may result in Apple seeking injunctive relief, damages and legal costs against the defaulting persons or parties".

Gag?! Sensationalism ftw!

Where I come from we call that buying silence. Everyone tries for that stuff, if there wasn't Apple nobody would care.

The real story here is that we have an exploding iPod and pictures of the result.

Re:Sensationalism ftw! (1)

LVSlushdat (854194) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926149)

Well a good response to Apple would be:

"Thanks for your offer, but no thanks. What I will do in regard to this offer, is to first publicize your offer to the whole of the Internet, and then go and buy my daughter another player, which will be ANY other brand BESIDES Apple.. Since we're only talking about a small amount of money, I'm thinking of the damage this attempt to bribe silence of myself and my daughter will do to Apple's reputation, FAR more than the cost of a no-strings-attached REFUND of the purchase price of the unit..

Sincerely,
An_Ex_Apple_Customer

no the real story is why has it become acceptable (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28926397)

to hide the truth simply because it might hurt a corporation?

Can happen with any li-ion battery... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28926031)

...but you hate-sick trolls and hypocrits just have to make sensationalism over it when apple's marketing division tries to cover up theirs. you sat silent when sony tried to cover up their disaster involving batteries. you say silent when dell did it. when lenovo did it. but now you point finger and gawk.

Standard Operating Procedure (-1, Troll)

whisper_jeff (680366) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926055)

They're putting a life sentence on myself, my daughter and Ellie's mum, not to say anything to anyone. If we inadvertently did say anything, no matter what, they would take litigation against us. I thought that was absolutely appalling.

Ok, let's start with the "life sentence" bit. Uh, really? Hyperbole much? Are you joking?

Second, and more importantly, it's pretty standard for a company to require non-disclosure when a settlement agreement is made. In fact, I'd wager that 99% of all settlement agreements made have a non-disclosure clause and the 1% that don't are made by people without a clue. To paint it as if Apple is doing something outrageous or vile in requiring this is akin to painting them as vile and evil for doing business - that's what happens. Deal.

I know people want to hate on Apple lately but let's be serious for a moment - this is such a complete non-issue. Yes, Apple screws up from time to time and I'm fine with people calling them on their mistakes but requiring non-disclosure of a settlement agreement is so far from being an issue worthy of scorn...

What if this happend on an airoplane? (3, Interesting)

kaptink (699820) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926153)

I don't think Apple can brush this one under the carpet. What if this were to have happend inside an airoplane at 30,000ft. No so much the explosion but the toxic, carcinogenic fumes would inevitably be curculated around the aircraft explosing 100+ passengers and those in direct contact with the ipod could suffer serious burns, eye damage, etc. To place a gag order on those effected as a messure to cover up the defect is pure negligence and would leave them open to possibly pay huge settlements for future incidents. Seems smarter to issue a warning / disclaimer than to leave yourself open. I doubt it would seriously effect sales, people would still buy them anyway.

Re:What if this happend on an airoplane? (2, Insightful)

natehoy (1608657) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926353)

While not trying to minimize the impact of this on an airplane, and certainly not trying to downplay the stupidity of Apple's apparent PR gaffe on this one...

Li-Ion batteries contain a lot of energy, and they will (not may, WILL) occasionally do this. The frequency depends on the quality of the plant that manufactured the battery, but even the very best plant will put out batteries that will do this from time to time. Put any weight on the battery, or don't allow it to dissipate its heat while in use, and the battery suddenly becomes a prime candidate for a meltdown, and possibly a catastrophic one.

Frankly, I'd be FAR more concerned about, say, your average "long battery life" laptop. If one of those suckers goes up, there's a lot more battery to go "boom", a lot more fumes released, etc. An iPod/iPhone has a small enough battery that any physical harm would probably be limited to the owner and maybe their seatmates, and the fumes would be dissipate pretty quickly. A large laptop battery could cause harm over several rows, and possibly even cause some minor damage to the aircraft (nothing it couldn't land with, but enough to cause a divert).

Given the minuscule chances that any one battery will decide that it wants to go "blammo", the risk is about as statistically significant as hitting the lottery. If you short, compress or overheat the battery, you increase your chances somewhat, but still we're talking lottery statistics. But the risk is real, and it exists in every device containing a battery (and especially Li-Ion).

Hidden feature (1)

nevvamind (988833) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926183)

Fanbois rejoice ! This ain't accident, its a hidden feature. Ipods do that if they find pirated songs on 'emselves OR (next iPods with more "firepower") if your found anywhere near a windows computer (in which case, appl says "you shall not live")

Screw the exploding battery - the girl is scarier (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28926187)

I'm really not the "get off my lawn" kind of guy, but if that girl is just 11, the thought of what she will look and be like at 16 scares the h*ll out of me.

iTunes quota (1)

Is0m0rph (819726) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926189)

This is what happens when you don't spend enough money at the iTunes store. BOOM

Tell me again (3, Insightful)

DiSKiLLeR (17651) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926237)

Tell me again why Apple's not Evil ?

David Gerard is a problem. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28926257)

We at least need a partial disclosure of David Gerard with the hopes that in the future we get a rejection of submissions that include childish remarks like: "Well, at least they're not Microsoft."

For one thing, David is good friends with Roy Schestowitz [twitter.com] , the mastermind behind Boycott Novell [boycottnovell.com] among other things. This site also happens to be the feeding ground for everyone's favorite Slashdot troll: Twitter [slashdot.org] . You'll find David making comments in both places and even going to far as to drop in the IRC chat room on rare occasions.

When he isn't trolling Slashdot to drop links to his website or editing Wikipedia to keep it free of people he can label as "shills", David is also responsible for shock sites such as lemonparty(dot)org (homosexual images) and other disgusting things he apparently thinks are funny. You might find that hard to believe without the proper context. Take a look at this unofficial collection of pictures [encycloped...matica.com] . Yes, that is a man wearing leather pants standing next to a huge red-haired beast. Assholes like David are the kind of people that turn Slashdot into something the rest of us don't like.

Reality check regarding Apple (1)

i_want_you_to_throw_ (559379) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926279)

It's important in times like these to take a little break from the hipster-doofus lovefest with Apple to remember one thing....

Apple is a publicly traded company and as such their only obligation is to make a profit for shareholders.

That means things like closing off Darwin, heading more and more down their proprietary path and to quell dissent or other actions that may hurt the Apple juggernaut.

Burned out iPAQ (1)

lars_boegild_thomsen (632303) | more than 4 years ago | (#28926317)

While not quite as bad as this - I had the battery on a 12 month old iPAQ expand to double size - enough to break the cover. That in itself is not interesting at all. What IS interesting however is that I actually thought HP would be interested in this (in order to prevent this from happening) but they were not - not at all. I contacted the local HP support, I wrote letters, faxes and emails - with absolutely zero reaction except I could buy a new battery if I wanted. They didn't attempt to stop me from talking - they simply weren't interested at all.

Pics are here: ipaq pics [ovi.com]

While this one didn't explode it's definitely a faulty battery (the fault happened over a day or two) and I reckon it could easily have caused some damage to the surroundings if only it had been a tad more violent.

Scary child in photo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28926365)

That is one scary 11 year old. She could walk into a pub in downtown Glasgow, yell "STFU and sit the F down you worthess bunch of cross-eyed neanderthalls", then pat them down for drugs and smoke/snort those drugs right in front of them then walk out of the building slamming the door behind her so hard the glass breaks.

And totally get away with it.

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