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Malaysian Government Wants Internet Filtering

Soulskill posted more than 5 years ago | from the it's-fashionable-these-days dept.

Censorship 113

adewolf tips news that the government of Malaysia is looking into the development of an internet filtering program. According to a Reuters report, "A vibrant Internet culture has contributed to political challenges facing the government, which tightly controls mainstream media and has used sedition laws and imprisonment without trial to prosecute a blogger." The Malaysian government insists that such a filter would only be used to block pornography, though critics of the plan expect it would be wielded as a political tool, censoring websites that are critical of the current administration. "An industry source says the government could impose the filters late this year or in 2010, coinciding with the rollout of a high-speed broadband network run by Telekom Malaysia. Malaysia aims to increase broadband penetration to half of all homes by 2010 as part of its drive to boost economic efficiency."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

ipv6 (1)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 5 years ago | (#28993699)

Is it too late to note that none of these problems would occur if we adopted ipv6? "Mandatory encryption", being the most obvious benefit.

Re:ipv6 (4, Insightful)

ScytheBlade1 (772156) | more than 5 years ago | (#28993741)

Erm, there is no mandatory encryption with IPv6.

The change from v4 that you're thinking of is IPSEC being a first class citizen to the protocol, as opposed to a backported second class citizen in the networking world.

Not that it doesn't work fine with v4, mind you.

Re:ipv6 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28993747)

Ironically, a high-level Malaysian minister had talked about IPv6 research and adoption as an important milestone for the country's progress. (Can't remember who, that was many years ago.) He was chided for merely parroting technical stuff without knowing what they mean.

Burn, karma, burn. (-1, Offtopic)

ductonius (705942) | more than 5 years ago | (#28993709)

In Soviet Russia, Malaysia fires you!

Re:Burn, karma, burn. (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28993785)

What? Malaysia is merely thinking about mandary filtering?
In Singapore, we already have mandatory filtering since (roughly) 1996!

(Goodbye, Karma...)

There's a simple solution to this (1)

oracle128 (899787) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994047)

Kill The Malaysian Prime Minister!

Re:There's a simple solution to this (1)

raju1kabir (251972) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994149)

Kill The Malaysian Prime Minister!

He'll kill you first; that's the one thing he does well. He already had Altantuya Shaariibuu and Teoh Beng Hock taken care of; you don't want to be next.

Re:There's a simple solution to this (1)

oracle128 (899787) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994261)

But I bet he has no defence against Blue Steel.

Re:There's a simple solution to this (2, Insightful)

raju1kabir (251972) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994439)

We wouldn't know; that movie was banned in Malaysia.

Of course the government has no problem with the endless movies that depict assassinations of other heads of state, but even a joke about Malaysia and the petulant UMNO children pulling the strings behind the censor's office go haywire. Ironically, in the process, they make Malaysia into more of a joke than ever.

Re:There's a simple solution to this (1)

oracle128 (899787) | more than 5 years ago | (#28995179)

Wow, talk about WHOOSH.

Re:There's a simple solution to this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28995021)

The good news is, he did not learn everything from his father, who waged genocide back in 1969 in order to put pressure on the first Prime Minister (today, PM=Professional Murderer is more accurately discriptive, but i digress) to resign and pass the rulership to him.

Religion and Internet Filtering (5, Interesting)

reporter (666905) | more than 5 years ago | (#28993751)

Together with Iran and Turkey, Malaysia will soon be filtering its Internet content. The common thread among all 3 countries is that the majority of their citizens are Muslims.

Approaching this matter from another angle, we see that Vietnam, China, and North Korea censor the Internet. The common thread among all 3 countries is that the majority of their citizens subscribes to Confucianism. Confucianism is a quasi-religion. In it, you are told how and what to think.

Is there a causal relation? Do the governments of countries inhabitated by strongly, religious people tend to filter Internet content?

Note that Russia, despite its brutal form of government, does not filter the Internet. You can write whatever you want in an Internet forum. The Kremlin censors mainly television.

Re:Religion and Internet Filtering (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28993799)

Together with Iran and Turkey, Malaysia will soon be filtering its Internet content. The common thread among all 3 countries is that the majority of their citizens are Muslims.

but what about china and australia.

thats 5 countries and the internet is still kinda young. this is a trend that is just getting worse.

Re:Religion and Internet Filtering (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28993813)

Seems to me the "common thread" between all 6 of the countries you mention is their governments fear dissent. There are plenty of Muslim and Confucian majority countries that do not censor the Internet.

Re:Religion and Internet Filtering (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28993859)

You must admit, though, that religion provides a convenient and inexplicably politically-correct excuse for fostering repressive government and xenophobic belligerence.

For example, we should thank The Family [wikipedia.org] and those like them for the downfall of America.

Yours in trolling,

--Ethanol-fueled

captcha: descends

Re:Religion and Internet Filtering (3, Interesting)

clarkkent09 (1104833) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994043)

Which Muslim countries do not censor the Internet?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Internet_blackholes.svg [wikipedia.org]

islam, socialism (not confucianism) = totalitarian (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28994649)

imposition of sharia on eachother ("the enforcement of good and forbidding of evil", in arabic the verbs are explicitly the militant versions. The verbs clearly express violent coercion is to be used). This is THE most important part of islam, repeated over 600 times in their holy book.

That socialism, the spending of other people's money, which is supposedly somehow "just", is a totalitairian ideology is beyond obvious to anyone with a brain. It's consequences, the total destruction of wealth production, and subsequent collapse, cannot seriously be called either an accident, or an effect that is in any way unknown. Not that there aren't thousands of people denying it

These are by no means the only totalitarian ideologies, nor are these states the only totalitarian states. But it must be said, there is no muslim majority country that does not filter the internet. There is not a single socialist state that does not filter the internet (and everything else). This can hardly be called an accident, now can it. Given the common thread, it also clearly established both correlation and causation : totalitarian ideology causes internet blocks, not the other way around.

Re:Religion and Internet Filtering (1)

mo0s3 (1563877) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994665)

For what it's worth, Brunei, Niger, Mali, Mauritania, Western Sahara, Guinea Bissau, Guinea, Gambia, Djibouti, Lebanon, Kosovo. I know some of those probably don't have the resources to implement heavy censortship but just thought I'd respond to the question. Also there are others that are classified by that as "Under Surveillance" (like Australia) and others classified as "Some censorship" like the USA and the UK. From a cursory glance at that map it seems there are about eight Muslim countries classified as "under surveillance", , and around the same number classified as "black holes". Most of them seem to be classified as "Some censorship," like most of Europe. Two countries in Europe that have "no censorship" are Kosovo and Bosnia. There are 57 Member states in the Organisation of Islamic Conference, although as far as I am aware not all of them have Muslim majorities.

Re:Religion and Internet Filtering (1)

clarkkent09 (1104833) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994741)

For what it's worth

Not much really since those countries are unrepresentative of the Muslim world, and most, as you said, are mostly small and poor and don't have much internet access or facilities to censor it. Kosovo is arguably not a country as only a minority of the world's countries recognize it and it is under international (UN but in reality NATO) rule so it's not up to them, while Bosnia can't be called a Muslim country as only one third of the population are Muslims. On the other hand most of the *major* Muslim countries (not counting the occupied Iraq and Afghanistan) are classified as either black holes or under surveillance. Funnily enough, Australia is the ONLY non-Muslim and non-totalitarian, country that falls under either of those two classifications. Something to think about for you Aussies out there.

Re:Religion and Internet Filtering (1)

donaldm (919619) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994943)

Australia is the ONLY non-Muslim and non-totalitarian, country that falls under either of those two classifications. Something to think about for you Aussies out there.

I have heard some of the people who want this speak, they are very eloquent and I think they genuinely believe they are doing the right thing. The problem is they keep harping on about the evils of child porn to get their point across to the point where you start to look for that monocle or small moustache.

Re:Religion and Internet Filtering (1)

mo0s3 (1563877) | more than 5 years ago | (#28995427)

For what it's worth Not much really since those countries are unrepresentative of the Muslim world ... On the other hand most of the *major* Muslim countries (not counting the occupied Iraq and Afghanistan) are classified as either black holes or under surveillance.

Black holes: Tunisia, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Heavy Surveillance: Syria, Libya, Yemen,Bahrain, UAE, Malaysia, Tajikistan. Fair points about Kosovo and Bosnia, but I don't know what you mean by 'unrepresentative' with respect to the previously listed countries. If by 'major' Muslim countries you mean the ones that make it to the news in the West, then fair enough, they are very restrictive, but if you look at the religious values espoused by the inhabitants of these countries and try come up with which ones are 'representative', you would have to exclude Saudi Arabia and Iran and Bahrain since they follow minority sects and there are wide discrepencies between their beliefs and those of the rest of the Muslim world. Most of the other countries attempt to restrict religious practice in addition to the internet; In Libya and Egypt the type of religion practiced by the people may well be representative of the rest of the Muslim world, but in Libya the government is known to suppress traditional religious scholarship, similar stories in Egypt and Syria, where religious organisations are under heavy surveillance eg all congregations have to register and sermons have to be approved. The Turkic countries are very secularised; beards were forbidden in Turkmenistan, though I think they may have recently lifted that, and most Muslims there do not regularly attend mosques. Uzbekistan is similar in the level of religious practice of its population. In Tajikistan girls in government schools are forbidden from wearing headscarves, and many Mosques have been taken down or converted to other types of buildings. In Tunisia the government restricts the wearing of headscarves by women in public office, and discourages it among the general population. I think a lot of those countries restrict the internet for similar reasons to China; mainly to control the news that gets to their people and cover up injustices by the government.

Re:Religion and Internet Filtering (1)

cpghost (719344) | more than 5 years ago | (#28999499)

For what it's worth, Brunei, Niger, Mali, Mauritania, Western Sahara, Guinea Bissau, Guinea, Gambia, Djibouti, Lebanon, Kosovo.

Western Sahara is not an independent country and as such doesn't have an own internet connection. It is being administered (or owned, depending on the perspective) by Morocco, which does provide the only internet connection through their national telecom IAM. And yes, Morocco does implement internet censorship sporadically, ironically mostly to block a couple of pro POLISARIO sites... though not every effectively. Should you visit Laayoune, feel free to test the (rather slow) connection there.

Re:Religion and Internet Filtering (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28994799)

You gotta love how - say - the USA and pretty much all of Europe are partially censored, while, say, Mexico and most of Africa aren't.

Says a lot really...

Re:Religion and Internet Filtering (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28994989)

As you can see, not all of them (Check Algeria and Morocco)

Re:Religion and Internet Filtering (3, Insightful)

basementman (1475159) | more than 5 years ago | (#28993839)

I think the reason they don't censor the internet in Russia is because the government knows it would get it's ass handed to them by the good citizens of the internet if they did.

Openness and the underdog (1)

mcrbids (148650) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994353)

In any competetive environment, it's often to the advantage of a sitrong underdog to support open standards at the expense of a strong, closed competitor. Microsoft is all about compatibility in a field when they aren't top dog.

Russia is in a similar position - they are not a leader in Internet technology, unless you include their legendary mafia, where they excell. Why would they want to regulate when they stand to profit by bilking the wealthy Americans?

Perhaps even more than in America, the Russians have institutionalized corruption

Xbox was the underdog (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 5 years ago | (#28995521)

Microsoft is all about compatibility in a field when they aren't top dog.

Then why did Microsoft include a lockout chip in its original Xbox in an era when Sony was top dog and Nintendo was #2? A lockout chip reduces the compatibility of a platform with applications developed by students, hobbyists, and small businesses.

Re:Religion and Internet Filtering (3, Insightful)

moon3 (1530265) | more than 5 years ago | (#28993871)

It has nothing to do with religion. The bigger the country the stakes for government (of any kind) and the involved individuals are higher, the exposure for them is higher, so the urge for control and filtering comes along with it.

Re:Religion and Internet Filtering (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28993905)

Or just that porno is not acceptable to some cultures.

Re:Religion and Internet Filtering (1)

cpghost (719344) | more than 5 years ago | (#28999457)

Porn is supposed to be more fun when it is forbidden... Why do you think some cultures oppose it so vehemently?

Re:Religion and Internet Filtering (0, Offtopic)

cmseagle (1195671) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994025)

Is there a causal relation?

CORRELATION != CAUSATION

Re:Religion and Internet Filtering (1)

martas (1439879) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994033)

russia doesn't filter the internet, they just assassinate anyone who writes anything that's too troublesome. oh, i'm sorry, i should've said "anyone who writes anything that's too troublesome dies in an accident or under other circumstances completely unrelated to their political stance".

in soviet russia, only someone with no ability to detect patterns and "coincidences" whatsoever doesn't see the atrocities committed by the government.

Re:Religion and Internet Filtering (2, Insightful)

gullevek (174152) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994205)

Erm, Germany is doing this too. Every country will do that. With the reason of Porn, Child Porn or whatever. But at the end it is just to protect the aristocracy, the ruling class, the dictators we always vote for.

Re:Religion and Internet Filtering (1)

janwedekind (778872) | more than 5 years ago | (#28995255)

In Germany this is called "Salamitaktik" (salami attack). Use terrorism (or now child porn) as a litmus test to scare of any opposition. Undo some civil rights. Once the public indignation has dissipated the next hardliner comes forward to implement the next step.

Re:Religion and Internet Filtering (1)

techno-vampire (666512) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994295)

Do the governments of countries inhabitated by strongly, religious people tend to filter Internet content?

AFAIK, Italy has no interest in censoring the Internet and it's certainly inhabited by strongly religious people. The same goes for Israel, I might add.

Re:Religion and Internet Filtering (1)

JockTroll (996521) | more than 5 years ago | (#28995007)

O RLY? Italy has filtered plenty of gambling sites and doesn't like you watching sports on the internet. Their new laws will make bloggers responsible for each and every comment made by users, too, which will expose each and every loserboy blogger to heavy fines and imprisonment.

Government do not *like* dissent, they *have* to tolerate it because it doesn't look good if you call yourself a democratic country and then explode heads on live TV. But they will not allow the internet to remain an anarchic medium with (almost) total anonymity and worldwide reachability. They'll turn it into digital TV and there's absolutely nothing you can do to avoid this, because you never bothered to fight your battles in the real world, which is the only one that matters.

You, the nerds, the losers, the trekkie pedophile geeks, you who thought the 'Net would be your oyster. You, who dreamed of "leading the revolution" with your hollow pursuits, who believed against all reason that the "digital world" would be an alternative to the real one, all the while masturbating in your own feces while watching kiddie porn, are to blame for this.

That's why we will hunt you down one by one, beat you up and shit on your faces.

Re:Religion and Internet Filtering (1)

SupremoMan (912191) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994381)

What about Germany and Australia... The only common thread between all these countries is the government wants to control its citizens.

Re:Religion and Internet Filtering (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28994511)

...The only common thread between all these countries is the government wants to control its citizens.

ding! ding! ding! ding! ding!

Re:Religion and Internet Filtering (1)

donaldm (919619) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994913)

Together with Iran and Turkey, Malaysia will soon be filtering its Internet content. The common thread among all 3 countries is that the majority of their citizens are Muslims.

It is not just Muslim countries but so called Christian countries as well. The usual excuses are "We want to protect you from child porn", " We need to protect children and young adults (WTF) from inappropriate material" and the best one "Think of the children". Surprisingly if you investigate the people who propose some sort of censorship they will normally be people who genuinely believe they are doing the right thing.

Two quotes come to mind when I hear about any type of censorship are "The road to hell is paved with good intentions" and "Power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely". The only way to combat this infringement of what to me is a fundamental human right is have these people who want censorship investigating a wall covered with graffiti or other such obscene art that people are using for target practice at the time :).

Re:Religion and Internet Filtering (1)

kevingolding2001 (590321) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994997)

we see that Vietnam, China, and North Korea censor the Internet. The common thread among all 3 countries is that the majority of their citizens subscribes to Confucianism.

I think a more relevant 'thread' among these 3 countries is that they are all communist (just as Russia isn't, referring to your last paragraph.)

So we have religious nut-job countries censoring, and communists censoring! But Australia is also trying to bring in censorship (neither particularly religious or communist).

Maybe the "causal relation" is just any government without appropriate checks and balances?

Re:Religion and Internet Filtering (1)

Lakitu (136170) | more than 5 years ago | (#28995473)

Russia doesn't censor what you write, it just censors the people who write. After the fact. With a gun.

what are you talking about?

Re:Religion and Internet Filtering (1)

cpghost (719344) | more than 5 years ago | (#28999433)

Russia doesn't censor what you write, it just censors the people who write. After the fact. With a gun.

The real joke went like this (back to Soviet Russia times). A Russian and an American meet at an international conference in Switzerland. The Russian boasts: "In the Soviet Union, we have freedom of expression." The American replies: "In the West, we have freedom after we've expressed ourselves."

Well... how long we'll enjoy that kind of freedom in the West with increasingly draconian copyright, libel/slander etc... laws, I prefer not to elaborate.

Re:Religion and Internet Filtering (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28995597)

Muslim countries like Australia and New Zealand.

It was the Christian-fundamentalist "Family First" party in Australia that pushed for internet filtering.

This isn't just muslim or confucious countries (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28998617)

Australia, the UK, Canada, and other countries have censorship systems in place, "just for pornography." But an effective system, once in place, will find uses nobody counted on.

Malaysian Government achieves filtering. (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28993773)

Answer: Google(R).

So long as I am the filter, they can filter all they want.

How does that work, again? (2, Insightful)

NewbieProgrammerMan (558327) | more than 5 years ago | (#28993793)

Malaysia aims to increase broadband penetration to half of all homes by 2010 as part of its drive to boost economic efficiency.

Yeah, I'm sure you'll see a lot of economic efficiency coming from the introduction of an "internet" that's so crippled that you can't find any criticism of the government on it.

Re:How does that work, again? (3, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 5 years ago | (#28993835)

As much as I'd like to agree with you, it seems to be working out OK (for the moment at least) for China.

The world would be a much nicer place if it were true; but there seems to be room, with the right techniques, to capture a fair slice of the benefits(quite possibly not all; but a decent portion) with comparatively little of the freedom.

Re:How does that work, again? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28993929)

You're kidding right?

I've got this strange feeling you've never been to china, or know people living there and definitely haven't used their internet. Considering how big it is, how central it is and it's growth, the internet there is terrible. Especially if you go to access a site hosted there from outside the country.

Although this is a generalization, I've been to China several times (and I'm a nerd so I'm always online), and I've several friends and family that live there. I know "OK" is a relative relationship, but I would not call their internet, "OK".

Re:How does that work, again? (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 5 years ago | (#28993969)

"OK" refers to economic efficiency, not quality of internet access(about which I have no direct experience; but no trouble believing that it sucks). My point was that in spite of considerable censorship of the internet, China seems to be realizing a decent slice of economic advantage.

Re:How does that work, again? (1)

raju1kabir (251972) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994089)

China's economic growth is built directly on unprecedented rape of the environment, and on well-precedented rape of its labour force. Both situations are unsustainable; the latter is just part of the same cycle that led to the cultural revolution last century and similar upheavals as you go backward throughout Chinese history. They never lurch that far forward before consuming all their progress in violence and chaos, and there's no reason to believe the present lurch will be any different.

The internet is at best a triviality in this grand epic context.

Re:How does that work, again? (1)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994289)

Rape of the labor force led to the Cultural Revolution? WTF dude? The CR was caused by Mao Zedong losing control of the CCP and trying (successfully) to regain control.

If you actually read any Chinese history, you discover that they regulary destroy themselves. This makes sense when you realize that China is not and has never been an expansionist power. Heck, even Zheng He (that admiral dude before Columbus) only went to see other nations not for colonization, but so that the heathens could be collected so as to properly pay respect to the best nation in the world.

The only way they have to get free from the past is to destroy their own history. During the CR, priceless Buddhist relics were destroyed, temples razed, university education was denounced as right-wing (and therefore punishable by death penalty, or reeducation camp [which was pretty much the same thing]), and class enemies such as writers and intellectuals were 'airplaned' for the entertainment of the public.

China's historical reserves, artifacts and sites of interest suffered devastating damage as they were thought to be at the root of "old ways of thinking". Many artifacts were seized from private homes and often destroyed on the spot. There are no records of exactly how much was destroyed. Western observers suggest that much of China's thousands of years of history was in effect destroyed during the short ten years of the Cultural Revolution, and that such destruction of historical artifacts is unmatched at any time or place in human history.

from Wikipedia English edition, which is not blocked while I'm in America. I'm going right now to save a copy of the Chinese edition of this page, for seditious use when I go back to China. ;)

Re:How does that work, again? (1)

raju1kabir (251972) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994429)

Rape of the labor force led to the Cultural Revolution? WTF dude? The CR was caused by Mao Zedong losing control of the CCP and trying (successfully) to regain control.

Take a step back. The cultural revolution was the culmination of a movement which was able to gather critical mass because the labor force had been so miserably treated under the incumbent feudal regime. I used the word "rape" figuratively of course (though it does apply literally as well).

Re:How does that work, again? (1)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994581)

Huh? The 'incumbent feudal regime' was deposed in 1949, decades before the CR. Right-wingers (and suspected right-wingers) were regularly imprisoned and executed. The movement was nothing other than Mao getting back into power using the only lever available to him, the Red Guards (i.e. stupid youth who knew nothing other than what's fed to them...for modern examples see apeish idolation of Eminem, N.W.A., G.W. Bush's religous police who condemned American citizens to Gitmo, Last Poets, Run DMC, etc. The only ones 'raped' during the CR were the workers themselves, who suffered horribly. Funny thing, that: the workers have to die to extirpate the sins of the educated - ever seen that trope before?

Re:How does that work, again? (1)

raju1kabir (251972) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994905)

The cultural revolution was the crowning abuse in a tragic sequence that began with the rise of the communist party. The rise of the communist party is the consequence of the previous social order, an order which is rapidly being recreated today.

I don't see the point of continuing this hair-splitting game in which every statement I make is attacked for not including ten paragraphs of context which should be obvious to anyone who has paid the remotest attention to China. Yes, you read some book or whatever, congratulations, I kowtow to you.

Re:How does that work, again? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28995049)

Speaking as an impartial observer...

1. You lost the debate.
2. And it's not because of your lack of skills.
3. You lost it on the facts.

If I were you, I would just say, "I was wrong. My apologies."
That will actually win me some respect. Going your, "yeah yeah you're partially right, big deal if you look at it this way I was more right" only makes you look bad.

Re:How does that work, again? (1)

raju1kabir (251972) | more than 5 years ago | (#28995081)

1. You lost the debate.
2. And it's not because of your lack of skills.
3. You lost it on the facts.

I honestly don't see how. What's the fact that's in question here?

Did, as I claimed, the feudal system set the scene for the communist revolution?

Did, as I claimed, the communist revolution lead to an escalating series of atrocities, culminating with the most famous and easily identified, the cultural revolution?

Is the Chinese economy today, as I claimed, heading back toward the same pattern of sharp divisions between owner and worker classes that kicked off the cycle most recently in the 1940s?

If I were you, I would just say, "I was wrong. My apologies."

If you look back over my long and dull Slashdot career, you'll see that I do say that when I'm wrong. I like to learn, and one of the best ways to learn is to confront your own mistakes. Here I simply don't see it. As far as I can tell, I am being vexed by a nitpicker who is so blinded by his desire to show off some irrelevant bit of knowledge he has (about the proximal rather than ultimate cause of the cultural revolution) that he is unable to see the context of my argument.

If there's a reason I "lost", it's because I haven't let this go long ago, and keep responding in this thread like a nincompoop.

Re:How does that work, again? (1)

Lurkingrue (521019) | more than 5 years ago | (#28997525)

FWIW, I think you won, Raju. Your argument was pretty clear, and I think D-a-B was confused or something. S/He seems to think that Mao was somehow the cause of the CR without thinking how Mao was able to get that power in the first place. Sorta like saying a bullet was the cause of a murder, without looking at the person pulling the trigger.

The AC spontaneously declaring victory was just... weird. Kinda like Bush stating "Mission Accomplished", when it obviously wasn't.

Ok... well... er...

Now what?

I guess, let's all let it go?

Re:How does that work, again? (1)

raju1kabir (251972) | more than 5 years ago | (#28997711)

I guess, let's all let it go?

Thanks, sounds good to me!

Re:How does that work, again? (1)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994079)

Sites *inside* China are blindingly fast. I went to a lot of trouble to learn specialized Chinese characters (which are rather useless in daily conversation) just to be able to read Chinese bittorrent sites. The government slows down traffic going overseas to make foreign sites less attractive. And don't tell me it's because of infrastructure or distance from the Pacific...BS, Hong Kong and Japan have very well-homed facilities where the only impediment is the speed of light.

As far as the GP poster's "OK" goes, well censorship is working "OK" to keep the citizenry ignorant of issues that they don't need to know about. For historical comparisons, try wartime censorship in the USA during WWII (i.e., why are we devoting 90% of our effort to fighting Germany when Japan is the one who attacked us?)

Re:How does that work, again? (1)

techno-vampire (666512) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994307)

(i.e., why are we devoting 90% of our effort to fighting Germany when Japan is the one who attacked us?)

This was because Germany was viewed (and rightly, IMO) as the bigger threat, and the policy was well publicized as "Get Hitler First."

Re:How does that work, again? (1)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994359)

Threat to what, exactly? To the continential United States? That the Wehrmacht would somehow come out of nowhere on landing craft and invade New York City? This when they couldn't even get across 22 miles of water to invade England! So the USA was in mortal danger? As if!!!

Re:How does that work, again? (1)

techno-vampire (666512) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994811)

No, Germany was the biggest threat to our allies Britain and Russia. And if you don't think Germany could ever have defeated Britain, consider the Battle of The Atlantic. Don't be more of a fool than you have to.

Re:How does that work, again? (1)

donaldm (919619) | more than 5 years ago | (#28995025)

I suggest you read some modern history on this. One of the main reasons that Nazi Germany never invaded England was he fact that Germany needed air superiority however they did not know how close they came to achieving it and the burning desire of Hitler to invade Soviet Russia above all else. The possible invasion of America was not even a priority although the German submarines had a field day with coastal US shipping in the early weeks just after the US entered WW2.

Even the Japanese had no real intention of invading the US during WW2 since the main thrust of the Japanese attacks was to secure most of SE Asia including the Philippines and Indonesia as well as forcing the US to negotiate an end to hostilities which would be more favourable to the Japanese. Of course this did backfire but it cost many American and Japanese lives.

Re:How does that work, again? (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | more than 5 years ago | (#28993847)

Yeah, I'm sure you'll see a lot of economic efficiency coming from the introduction of an "internet" that's so crippled that you can't find any criticism of the government on it.

I'm not sure I see that censoring political criticism will effect Internet commerce... Educate me.

Re:How does that work, again? (4, Interesting)

raju1kabir (251972) | more than 5 years ago | (#28993995)

Well, in the most obvious way in Malaysia, it prevents people from calling attention to all the problems caused by the corrupt relationship between the government and monopolist Telekom Malaysia. TM provides remarkably bad connectivity at remarkably high prices and manages to maintain iron fist control over the wired last mile for 98% of the population due to a weak regulatory agency (SKMM/MCMC) that spends its time sucking TM's dick instead of doing its job. If people can't shine light on this state of affairs due to political censhorship - and mark my words, that is the single and only purpose of the filtering proposal, porn is a red herring - then there's no hope for change.

This has already driven away the much-hoped-for internet economy that Cyberjaya was built, at billions of ringgit in taxpayer expense, to host.

Then there's the simple fact that a filtered internet is a slow and erratic internet. It's true in China and Saudi Arabia and Iran and it will be true here.

Re:How does that work, again? (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994039)

This has already driven away the much-hoped-for internet economy that Cyberjaya was built, at billions of ringgit in taxpayer expense, to host.

Gee I remember driving past that place when I was in KL the first time in 2000. Recently I had to research radiotherapy services for my father in law, who is from Ipoh. I noticed that a lot of equipment is made in Malaysia for export, but it rarely gets used there. I am sure the Government wants their people to be nice productive manufacturers, but to not ask too many questions.

Over the years I have noticed places which should have taken off big time (Palau Langkawi is one which comes to mind) are not growing much at all. There should be more thinking outside the box.

My wife's dad, when he was a teacher could never get a passport to travel. His family assumed that this was because he earned money from the Government and they didn't want him to take it out of the country. Maybe it had more to do with not wanting their teachers to be too worldly....

Re:How does that work, again? (2, Insightful)

BitZtream (692029) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994633)

I love how apparently no one can communicate without the Internet.

You realize people dealt with this soft of problem before the Internet existed right? People actually ... talked to each other ... rather than twiting it up or facebooking.

Contrary to popular belief, the Internet is not a requirement to life, you can live without it and do pretty much everything you need to do.

I don't want filtering either, but you're just pushing your own political agenda rather than actually caring about the problem.

Re:How does that work, again? (5, Insightful)

raju1kabir (251972) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994891)

You realize people dealt with this soft of problem before the Internet existed right? People actually ... talked to each other ... rather than twiting it up or facebooking.

People can talk to the people they know, and the people in their community, sure. But that is very limiting:

  • No possibility for anonymity
  • Limited number of viewpoints
  • Limited access to externally verifiable information

The internet has transformed politics in Malaysia, by bringing people all over the country together based on their shared views rather than based solely on whom they happened to live nearby. It's allowed people to have open, frank discussions that previously they would only be able to have with their closest confidants. It's allowed facts and evidence to be brought to general public attention which would previously have been squelched by the BN-owned mass media.

Of course humans can survive without the internet. But in my mind there is no question that it has enabled a transformative level of communication which we are only beginning to see the full impact of.

Re:How does that work, again? (1)

Lurkingrue (521019) | more than 5 years ago | (#28997553)

I'm sure that the folks who didn't want to adopt the automobile over horses, and those who spurned the telephone in favour of older forms of communication espoused similar views.

Re:How does that work, again? (1)

xaboo (1599655) | more than 5 years ago | (#28995451)

Think in terms of public accounting and freedom of the press. Accounting - If investors have a more transparent view of the companies they want to invest in, they can minimise risk and increase investor confidence. Now, if the news is filtered, how does that effect consumer confidence and commerce? I for one will avoid the untrustworthy. freedom of the press - systems are improved through feedback (critical analysis). The free press can provide this feedback if unhindered by political agendas. Additionally, the press can expose corruption. Corruption undermines any type of free trade, Internet commerce included.

Re:How does that work, again? (1)

Wowsers (1151731) | more than 5 years ago | (#28995339)

It's a cunning productivity drive. Without places to moan about the government, you have lots more time for your work, rather than posting to web forums.

they should try to filter the sky... (1)

npgmr (451808) | more than 5 years ago | (#28993821)

as a first step towards world domination... and leave a mark on history to tell the rest of the world how someone spend another multi-million tax payer money on a project destined to fail on delivery.

To all countries invovled in censorship... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28993867)

Kiss my ass.

Re:To all countries invovled in censorship... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28994125)

Alternate Olympic Logo [wikipedia.org] (NSFH - Not Safe For Health)

Isn't this an oxymoron? (4, Funny)

Artifakt (700173) | more than 5 years ago | (#28993901)

Seems kind of self contradictory - increased penetration and less pornography.

Re:Isn't this an oxymoron? (1)

martas (1439879) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994045)

there comes a point when increased penetration turns pornography into smut. i've seen it. it ain't pretty.

Re:Isn't this an oxymoron? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28996067)

There is not much penetration when you're not interacting with other people.

Malaysian government has already backed off (4, Informative)

erice (13380) | more than 5 years ago | (#28993945)

Re:Malaysian government has already backed off (1)

raju1kabir (251972) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994117)

Every year the government holds a meeting to plan its latest net censorship scheme, then every year the internet industry people leak it out to their big clients who create an uproar and then it gets quietly put away for a while.

Sooner or later they'll adjust their strategy and sneak it through. Recently we had our first major political censhorship incident when SKMM tried to block heroic gadfly website Malaysia Today [malaysia-today.net] , but backed down after a couple weeks when it became clear they could not keep up with the flurry of mirrors that appeared, and when Malaysia Today's readership soared in the face of all the attention the ham-handed move caused. BN politicans tend to be quite stupid (the party's power dynamics select for it) but over time even the stupidest can succeed when backed up by enough force and enough deliberately under-educated voters.

Re:Malaysian government has already backed off (1)

Viceice (462967) | more than 5 years ago | (#28997979)

I hate to tell you this, but they already have.

For instance, if you compare Streamyx's DNS and another DNS, say OpenDNS, certain sites are stricken from Streamyx's DNS, which everyone is conveniently told to use.

Re:Malaysian government has already backed off (1)

Copernicus1234 (1613137) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994385)

Good. I hope the Internet will always remain free and uncensored, but there are powerful interests out there that wants to censor it to remain in control of the information flow. They are going to say that its for the best interest of the people that the Internet needs to be regulated. That there is no way for regular people to know what information is trustworthy and which is not. Instead, they want to be the ones telling people what information to trust. I hope we never, ever, get there but there is a big risk we will. Corporations dont want anonymity on the web for example, its no good for them.

This is bad for everybody (1)

CranberryKing (776846) | more than 5 years ago | (#28993979)

Filter content how? Just to their own end nodes or everything that passes through? There is no way to know how a government initiative to do this will be implemented. One would have to assume that if they thought certain content was inappropriate for their own citizens, they wouldn't want anyone else to access it either. When I am in Thailand, and connecting to someone in Indonesia, if my traffic routes through Malaysia, will they filter it?

Re:This is bad for everybody (1)

raju1kabir (251972) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994055)

Filter content how? Just to their own end nodes or everything that passes through? There is no way to know how a government initiative to do this will be implemented. One would have to assume that if they thought certain content was inappropriate for their own citizens, they wouldn't want anyone else to access it either. When I am in Thailand, and connecting to someone in Indonesia, if my traffic routes through Malaysia, will they filter it?

In no case would it affect through traffic (e.g. from Indonesia to Thailand, though I doubt much of that traffic comes through Malaysia anyway; Malaysia's link to Thailand is puny and Thailand has direct connections to exchange points in Singapore and Hong Kong). Nobody who's not bound by Malaysian law would pay anything for transit filtered by Malaysia.

From what I've heard behind the scenes, it would be implemented by ISPs and not affect corporate clients. There are multiple international links controlled by different companies (Telekom controls the cable landing stations but for technical reasons that's not an effective place to impose traffic filtering) so a decentralised approach would be necessary in any case.

Hi kettle, this is pot... (1)

DustoneGT (969310) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994041)

flag@whitehouse.gov - why apply blanket censorship when you can selectively harass the important opponents?

Aww, c'mon... (1)

Anachragnome (1008495) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994059)

Could we just stick to submitting stories about countries that DON'T want to censor the internet?

It would be a lot simpler.

I'm willing to venture that most of the readers here pretty much assume they all want to anyways...

Good old Telekom Malaysia (4, Informative)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994223)

I was on a project with Telekom Malaysia back in '01, went to Kuala Lumpur for a month. Random observations, in no particular order: Telekom is pretty good, other than falling for my company's crappy spiel about our product that barely worked and which could bring an E10000 to its knees with a load of 100 messages per minute. KL was a pretty modern place, with big buildings, good restaurants, shops, etc. The ringgit was set at 4.25 to the dollar (the explanation was that it had protected the Malay economy against George Soros' currency manipulation that helped to cause the Asian Financial Crisis.) This had the odd effect that all the prices were generally what I would expect in America, only 4.25 times less. A plate of [whatever] plus fries and drink at the mall food court would be 5.75, only in local currency, not in dollars (this was back when the USD was actually worth something overseas.) KL was also my first experience with Asian fake markets...hell yeah I came back with a suitcase full of CDs and Kung Fu VCDs (I didn't have a DVD player or DVD drive at the time IIRC.) The bars there sucked, but I suppose that comes with the territory, being an Islamic country and all. I mean, I wouldn't expect the bar scene in Cow's Asshole, Alabama to be thriving, either. There were ads in the newspaper for apartments and jobs, specifically listing the religions, ages, and sexes of the people eligible to apply. Seriously, the ads would say something like "30 sq meters, private bath, window with good view of sunset, unmarried Muslim girls 18-30 only, call 03-77445678." This was quite shocking to me coming from America, with its history of rigidly enforcing civil rights, at gunpoint if necessary [usg.edu] . But Malaysia has rigid enforcement if its religious laws - every citizen's national ID card has a field where it says "religion". A friend of mine related this anecdote: he was in Malaysia to visit the factory, at some restaurant somewhere with the factory people. The factory manager got a tap on her shoulder from the waiter, and she had to go up to the front of the restaurant. She was gone for some time, which caused my buddy to become concerned. She returned in due course, explaining that the JAWI (religious police) came into the restaurant, and she had left her ID card in her car. She had to go all the way out and get it, to prove that she was a Hindu, and therefore not subject to jail for eating during daytime (it was Ramadan at the time of his visit). The JAWI apologized and said that she looked Muslim.

I'm not surprised a country like this has decided to join China by firewalling the outside world. They have a lot to lose (by their standards) and little to gain (again, by their standards) by allowing unfettered access. And since post-modern thought says that there is no truth, only differing points of view, who can disagree with this decision? No matter how you come down on the censorship debate, there is always another equally valid point of view on the opposite side.

Re:Good old Telekom Malaysia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28994423)

Gee...thanks a lot. Now I know who to blame for our shitty internet connections here. You peddle rubbish while our ISP (who has a monopoly on the market) is too stupid to know any better.

Re:Good old Telekom Malaysia (4, Interesting)

raju1kabir (251972) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994923)

The bars there sucked, but I suppose that comes with the territory, being an Islamic country and all. I mean, I wouldn't expect the bar scene in Cow's Asshole, Alabama to be thriving, either.

FWIW, the bar scene in KL is much better these days.

JAWI (religious police) came into the restaurant, and she had left her ID card in her car. She had to go all the way out and get it, to prove that she was a Hindu, and therefore not subject to jail for eating during daytime (it was Ramadan

There was a funny article in the newspaper a few years back where they interviewed (and showed photos of) a bunch of Chinese people who looked sort of Malay-ish, getting them to share their stories of being harassed during Ramadan. Some said they just gave up and ate indoors, others wore giant crucifixes, others turned around and got pre-emptively aggressive with the lunch police.

Re:Good old Telekom Malaysia (1)

gnapster (1401889) | more than 5 years ago | (#28996125)

And since post-modern thought says that there is no truth, only differing points of view, who can disagree with this decision?

Anyone who does not accept post-modern thought as sound and infallible.

Following AU's disappointing lead, here...? (1)

ivi (126837) | more than 5 years ago | (#28994229)

Australia went through an embarrassing run up the filtering road "to protect children"

Lots of silly examples of inadvertantly (or intentionally, you decide) blocked safe sites
have already been published, arising from that boondoggle..

Now, nearby Malyasia wants to follow in AU's dusty trail...?!?

HELLO HI (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28994553)

HI AM CHEIF TECHNOLOGY MINISTER
for small nation state who is looking for expertise in helping establish a internets watchering protocol for wathcing our people in their peacful democratic lives. we hope that this internets filtering technology
can integrate with our bedroom CCTV technology we have installed such that we can have uploads of CCTV bedroom footage as they go about their peacful tranquil democratic.
we also want to migrate our nantional government it infrastructure to 'distributed storage' on your distributed service you call conflicker.
i would like to to know how to download footage from our nations fornication justice system onto my ipod
i ask slashdot community it to help in using ask.slashdot to get the community to help. because out technology experts not so good we couldn't figure out ask.slashdot so we asking posting
anonymousely.
you will help our democracy advice and such.

This would be true if..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28994667)

...had the prime minister not made a statement the next day assuring the country that such steps would NOT be taken.

http://thestar.com.my/news/story.asp?file=/2009/8/7/nation/20090807143305&sec=nation

KUALA LUMPUR: The Government will not censor the Internet as such a move will be ineffective in a borderless world where information flows freely, said the Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak.

He said that it would also lead to dissatisfaction among people.

He was responding to reports that the Information, Communication and Culture Ministry had called for a tender for an Internet filtering system.

Racial discrimination in Malaysia ... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28994947)

There are other reasons why the Malaysian governement want to filter Internet traffic. To stop what they might consider to be embarrassing news getting out.

Here is an excerpt of an e-mail recently sent to me by a Malaysian friend. The word "bumis" mentioned several times in the e-mail refers to Bumiputras - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bumiputra - basically Malays, as opposed to other (non-Malay and usually non-Muslim) Malaysians.

--- excerpt begins ---

Discrimination of Non-Malays in Malaysia

Plain racists as PAS said. .

This list is a common knowledge to a lot of Malaysians, especially those non-Malays (Chinese, Ibans, Kadazans, Orang Asli, Tamils, etc..) who have been racially discriminated against.

Figures in this list are merely estimates, so please take it as a guide only. The government of Malaysia has the most correct figures. Is the government of Malaysia too ashamed to publish their racist acts by publishing racial statistics?

This list covers a period of about 48 years since independence (1957).

List of racial discriminations ( Malaysia ):

(1) Of the five major banks, only one is multi-racial, the rest are controlled by Malays.

(2) 99% of Petronas directors are Malays.

(3) 3% of Petronas employees are Chinese.

(4) 99% of 2000 Petronas gasoline stations are owned by Malays.

(5) 100% all contractors working under Petronas projects must be of Bumis status.

(6) 0% of non-Malay staff is legally required in Malay companies. But there must be 30% Malay staffs in Chinese companies.

(7) 5% of all new intake for government police, nurses, army, are non-Malays.

(8) 2% is the present Chinese staff in Royal Malaysian Air Force (RMAF), a drop from 40% in 1960.

(9) 2% is the percentage of non-Malay government servants in Putrajaya, but Malays make up 98%.

(10) 7% is the percentage of Chinese government servants in the entire government (in 2004); a drop from 30% in 1960.

(11) 95% of government contracts are given to Malays.

(12) 100% all business licensees are controlled by Malay government, e.g. Taxi permits, Approved permits, etc.

(13) 80% of the Chinese rice millers in Kedah had to be sold to Malay controlled Bernas in 1980s. Otherwise, life is made difficult for Chinese rice millers.

(14) 100 big companies set up, owned and managed by Chinese Malaysians were taken over by government, and later managed by Malays since 1970s, e.g. UTC, UMBC, MISC, etc.

(15) At least 10 Chinese owned bus companies (throughout Malaysia in the past 40 years) had to be sold to MARA or other Malay transport companies due to rejection by Malay authorities to Chinese applications for bus routes and rejection for their applications for new buses.

(16) Two Chinese taxi drivers were barred from driving in Johor Larkin bus station. There are about 30 taxi drivers and three were Chinese in Oct. 2004. Spoiling taxi club properties was the reason given.

(17) 0 non-Malays are allowed to get shop lots in the new Muar bus station (Nov. 2004).

(18) 8000 Billion Ringgit is the total amount the government channeled to Malay pockets through ASB, ASN, MARA, privatization of government agencies, Tabung Haji etc, through NEP over a 34 years period.

(19) 48 Chinese primary schools closed down from 1968 - 2000.

(20) 144 Indian primary schools closed down from 1968 - 2000.

(21) 2637 Malay primary schools built from 1968 - 2000.

(22) 2.5% is government budget for Chinese primary schools. Indian schools got only 1%, Malay schools got 96.5%.

(23) While a Chinese parent with RM1000 salary (monthly) cannot get school textbook loan, a Malay parent with RM2000 salary is eligible.

(24) All 10 public university vice chancellors are Malays.

(25) 5% of the government universities' lecturers are of non-Malay origins. This percentage has been reduced from about 70% in 1965 to only 5% in 2004.

(26) Only 5% has been given to non-Malays for government scholarships in over 40 years.

(27) 0 Chinese or Indians were sent to Japan and Korea under the 'Look East Policy.'

(28) 128 STPM Chinese top students could not get into the course to which they aspired, i.e. Medicine (in 2004).

(29) 10% quotas are in place for non-Bumi students for MARA science schools beginning in 2003, but only 7% are filled. Before that it was 100% Malays.

(30) 50 cases in which Chinese and Indian Malaysians are beaten up in the National Service program in 2003.

(31) 25% of the Malaysian population was Chinese in 2004, a drop from 45% in 1957.

(32) 7% of the Malaysian population is Indian (2004), a drop from 12% in 1957.

(33) 2 million Chinese Malaysians have emigrated in the past 40 years.

(34) 0.5 million Indian Malaysians have emigrated overseas.

(35) 3 millions Indonesians have migrated to Malaysia and become Malaysian citizens with Bumis status.

(36) 600,000 Chinese and Indian Malaysians with red IC were rejected repeatedly when applying for citizenship in the past 40 years. Perhaps 60% of them had already passed away due to old age. This shows racism, based on how easily Indonesians got their citizenship's compared with the Chinese and Indians.

(37) 5% - 15% discount for a Malay to buy a house, regardless whether the Malay is rich or poor.

(38) 2% is what new Chinese villages get, compared with 98% - what Malay villages got for rural development budget.

(39) 50 road names (at least) had been changed from Chinese names to other names.

(40) 1 Dewan Gan Boon Leong (in Malacca) was altered to another name (e.g. Dewan Serbaguna or something like that) when it was only officially used for a few days. The government tries to shun Chinese names. This example of racism occurred around 2000.

(41) 0 temples/churches were built for each housing estate. But every housing estate got at least one mosque/surau built.

(42) 3000 mosques/surau were built in all housing estates throughout Malaysia since 1970. No temples or churches are required to be built in housing
estates.

(43) 1 Catholic church in Shah Alam took 20 years to apply to have a building constructed. But they were told by Malay authority that it must look like a factory and not like a church. As of 2004 the application still have not been approved.

(44) 1 publishing of Bible in Iban language banned (in 2002).

(45) 0 of the government TV stations (RTM1, RTM2, TV3) are directors of non-Malay origin.

(46) 30 government produced TV dramas and films always showed that the bad guys had Chinese faces, and the good guys had Malay faces. You can check it out since 1970s. Recent years, this has become less of a tendency.

(47) 10 times, at least, Malays (especially Umno) had threatened to massacre the Chinese Malaysians using May 13, since 1969.

(48) 20 constituencies won by DAP would not get funds from the government to develop. These Chinese majority constituencies would be the last to be developed.

(49) 100 constituencies (parliaments and states) had been racially re-delineated so Chinese votes were diluted for Chinese candidates. This is one of the main reasons why DAP candidates have consistently lost in elections since the 1970s. (update to 2008 needed)

(50) Only 3 out of 12 human rights items are ratified by the Malaysian government since 1960.

(51) 0 - elimination of all forms of racial discrimination (UN Human Rights) has not been ratified by Malaysian government since 1960s.

(52) 20 reported cases whereby Malay ambulance attendances treated Chinese patients inhumanely, and Malay government hospital staffs purposely delayed attending to Chinese patients in 2003. Unreported cases may be 200.

(53) 50 cases each year whereby Chinese, especially Chinese youths, are being beaten up by Malay youths in public places. Police reports may be checked to verify this, provided the police took the report, otherwise there will be no record.

(54) 20 cases every year whereby Chinese drivers who accidentally knocked down Malays were seriously assaulted or killed by Malays.

(55) 12% is what ASB/ASN got per annum while banks fixed deposits are only about 3.5% per annum.

There are hundreds more examples of racial discrimination in Malaysia to add to this list of 'colossal' racism. It is hoped that the victims of racism will write in to help expose this situation.

The Malaysian government should publish statistics showing how much Malays had benefited from the 'special rights' of Malays and at the same time release the statistics which show how minority races are being discriminated against.

Hence, the responsibility lies in the Malaysia government itself to publish unadulterated statistics of racial discrimination.

If the Malaysia government hides the statistics above, then there must be some evil doings, immoral doings, shameful doings and sinful doings, like the Nazis, going on with the non-Malays of Malaysia .

Civilized nations, unlike the evil Nazis, must publish statistics to show its treatment of its minority races. This is what Malaysia must publish.

We are asking for the publication of the statistics showing how 'implementation of special rights of Malays' had inflicted colossal racial discrimination onto non-Malays.

Human Book
Penang , Malaysia

--- excerpt ends ---

Bill of Guarantee (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#28995601)

Im Malaysian. This new rule violates Malaysia's Bill of Guarantee no 7. http://www.mscmalaysia.my/topic/MSC+Malaysia+Bill+of+Guarantees

They should amend this bill first before making new rule.

Re:Bill of Guarantee (1)

gnapster (1401889) | more than 5 years ago | (#28996161)

Thank you for sharing that, but I hope that you do not stop at telling us: raise awareness in your own country, too!

All governments want internet filtering. (1)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 5 years ago | (#28995917)

Fortunately, there are a few that can't have it.

not news (2, Interesting)

shentino (1139071) | more than 5 years ago | (#28996197)

Call me out of hibernation once we find a government OPPOSED to internet filtering...

First, they came for ... (1)

Zarluk (976365) | more than 5 years ago | (#28997303)

"First, they came for the pornogrphers...
as I was no a pornographer, I didn't speak out..."

I guess you know the rest...

political challenges... (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 5 years ago | (#28997375)

Is porno?

Umm okie.

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