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CRIA, MPAA Demand Expanded DMCA For Canada

timothy posted about 5 years ago | from the professional-envy dept.

The Internet 224

An anonymous reader writes "The Canadian Recording Industry Association and the MPAA's Canadian subsidiary are demanding that Canada adopt copyright laws that go beyond even the DMCA. The groups demand anti-circumvention law, three strikes and you're out legislation, and increased secondary liability for websites. The demands come as part of the national copyright consultation in which hundreds of Canadians have spoken out against such reforms."

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Seriously.. (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29024855)

Who the fuck are they to demand that a country do their bidding? Go to hell already.

Re:Seriously.. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29025109)

an employer of hundreds of thousands of people?

Re:Seriously.. (4, Insightful)

billcopc (196330) | about 5 years ago | (#29025323)

Not an employer, more like a subcontractor. They are enlisted by artists to "handle" the royalties on their behalf. If the CRIA disappeared today, artists would still be pretty much in the same place. The big guys would be pissed, but they're free to hire their own 1st-tier droogs. The small guys probably wouldn't notice a thing.

Re:Seriously.. (2, Funny)

mcgrew (92797) | about 5 years ago | (#29025119)

hundreds of Canadians have spoken out against such reforms

Did you notice the typo? They misspelled "deforms".

Ladies and gentlemen (1)

Hojima (1228978) | about 5 years ago | (#29025335)

Me and my Canadian buddy have now decided that anything that ends with a capital 'A' is now evil and must be destroyed.

Re:Ladies and gentlemen (4, Funny)

e4g4 (533831) | about 5 years ago | (#29025429)

Sounds like you might have a problem with a large portion of Canadians, then, A?

Sorry, couldn't resist...

Re:Ladies and gentlemen (2, Funny)

Synchis (191050) | about 5 years ago | (#29026297)

If you're going to poke fun at Canadian culture, at least spell it right, Eh?

Re:Ladies and gentlemen (1)

BrotherBeal (1100283) | about 5 years ago | (#29026571)

Whooooosh, eh?

Re:Ladies and gentlemen (1)

Holi (250190) | about 5 years ago | (#29026677)

Give him a break, I mean he is canadian.

Re:Ladies and gentlemen (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29025659)

What about "T n' A"?

Re:Ladies and gentlemen (2, Funny)

jackharrer (972403) | about 5 years ago | (#29025749)

CANAD-A?

Re:Ladies and gentlemen (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29026339)

AMERIC-A?

Re:Ladies and gentlemen (2, Funny)

Lumpy (12016) | about 5 years ago | (#29025825)

Canada wants more money....

Re:Seriously.. (1)

ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) | about 5 years ago | (#29025507)

They are the people that pay for the Canadian Parliament's fancy cars and houses and suits. Why shouldn't they have a say in which Laws the Parliament passes?

Re:Seriously.. (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29025661)

political donation rules [elections.ca]

Re:Seriously.. (1)

erroneus (253617) | about 5 years ago | (#29025903)

Yeah I know. I want frikken Lollipop trees on ever road side and fountains of chocolate syrup on every corner.

What other businesses have such amazing legislation supporting their business models? Almost all legislation is written to prevent "business models" from abusing the public. This is quite the opposite.

Will Canadian Pols Roll Over (4, Insightful)

gpronger (1142181) | about 5 years ago | (#29024865)

So what we have is the average Canadian, thinking their government should do one thing, and a few vested parties (with A LOT of $$$) disagreeing. I know how this plays out on this side of the border, but will Canadian govt actually listen to it's people? Eh? Greg

Re:Will Canadian Pols Roll Over (5, Informative)

Demonantis (1340557) | about 5 years ago | (#29024979)

Not with Harper in power. He likes to roll over and play dead for anything corporate. Fortunately its a minority and the senate is still there to protect the interests of the people of Canada. On a side note, I haven't seen anything from CBC so I don't know how many Canadians actually know this is happening. If I am wrong it would be nice to see a link to the article.

A Direct Quote From Comedian Robin Williams: (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29025045)

Stephen Harper is like Bush, but without the charisma.

Re:A Direct Quote From Comedian Robin Williams: (1)

the_fat_kid (1094399) | about 5 years ago | (#29025419)

oh, BURN!!!

Re:A Direct Quote From Comedian Robin Williams: (1)

MatthewCCNA (1405885) | about 5 years ago | (#29025889)

or the approval rating

Mod parent up PLEASE!! (1)

ansak (80421) | about 5 years ago | (#29026391)

Please... mod-up parent. This is so true.

Re:Will Canadian Pols Roll Over (5, Interesting)

Garbad Ropedink (1542973) | about 5 years ago | (#29025279)

Oh please!

The Liberals are at the same corporate trough as the Conservatives.
Remember Paul Martain? Do you remember him, our former prime-minster? The one who didn't want to pay Canadian taxes on his ships so he registered them outside the country and staffed them all with foreign workers, yet still called his shipping company 'Canadian Shipping'. Do you remember him? Do you remember the private copying levy that the Liberals introduced back in 1997? Where we have to pay extra money on all blank media we buy here to compensate the poor media companies and the losses they incur? The Liberals have ZERO problem with enacting the same laws.

If you want a leader who's against new copyright laws you have to look to the ones who're anti-american like the Bloc, and the NDP, or Green.

Re:Will Canadian Pols Roll Over (1)

Quickfry (799118) | about 5 years ago | (#29025329)

Those copyright antics the two major parties have been up to have pretty much convinced me not to vote for them. Really hoping this is true for many other Canadians.

Re:Will Canadian Pols Roll Over (-1, Flamebait)

R2.0 (532027) | about 5 years ago | (#29025375)

"If you want a leader who's against new copyright laws you have to look to the ones who're anti-american like the Bloc, and the NDP, or Green."

Puh-lease. Are Canadians so insecure that they think the US is at the root of all their ills? That you are children who can't do for themselves but for US support? When you stub your toe, is it Mommy's fault?

Or is it just you?

Re:Will Canadian Pols Roll Over (1)

jedidiah (1196) | about 5 years ago | (#29025555)

No but obviously they have only 2 equally unappealing extremes to choose from when it comes to politics.

Re:Will Canadian Pols Roll Over (1)

jornak (1377831) | about 5 years ago | (#29026111)

If you want a leader who's against new copyright laws you have to look to the ones who're anti-american like the Bloc, and the NDP, or Green.

...or the Pirate Party of Canada.

Re:Will Canadian Pols Roll Over (2, Informative)

davester666 (731373) | about 5 years ago | (#29026767)

Uh, the Senate? Stop legislation in Canada? I don't think so. I can recall only a single time in the past 30 years when they DELAYED some legislation briefly (a month or two).

And I hope they can stop this legislation, because right after it, the media companies will immediately go to Congress and demand changes in copyright law to match or exceed that in Canada, "just to give US companies equal protection".

Re:Will Canadian Pols Roll Over (1)

konadelux (968206) | about 5 years ago | (#29026823)

...Fortunately its a minority and the senate is still there to protect the interests of the people of Canada...

Only for a little while longer though, come January [hilltimes.com] the Conservatives will no longer have a minority in the Senate.

Re:Will Canadian Pols Roll Over (2, Interesting)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | about 5 years ago | (#29025321)

Here, we will find out if Canadians have more balls than us Americans who live south of the 49th parallel. Hopefully, the Canucks will tell them all to eat shit, and that will give the voters in the states a little motivation to get off THEIR dead asses to protest.

Will corrupters of the US get control of Canada? (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29025525)

Will the corrupters of the U.S. get control of Canada, too?

By some measures, the U.S. government is the most corrupt in the world. For example, this Rolling Stone article: The Great American Bubble Machine [rollingstone.com] . (The full article is in the paper edition, available at any library.)

The U.S. government spends more money on surveillance and war than any country in the history of the world. That taxpayer money partly helps those who want corruption to profit, and hurts U.S. taxpayers, and the entire world. For just one example, see the book: House of Bush, House of Saud [amazon.com]

The U.S. government has invaded or bombed 25 countries since the 2nd world war [evergreen.edu] . Most or all of the interference was for profit. Quote: '... although nearly all the post-World War II interventions were carried out in the name of "freedom" and "democracy," nearly all of them in fact defended dictatorships controlled by pro-U.S. elites' The dictators pay the corrupters. In Iraq, the U.S. government wanted control over the oil, and didn't care how many people it killed. In Afghanistan, the corrupters want to build an oil pipeline from Turkmenistan through Afghanistan to a port where the oil can be delivered.

The U.S. government has a higher percentage of its people in prison than any country ever in the history of the world, over 6 times higher than in Europe, for example. Wikipedia quote: Approximately one in every 18 men in the United States is behind bars or being monitored. [wikipedia.org]

U.S. citizens don't want to believe that their government is as corrupt as it is, even though the recent financial corruption has made many of them poor.

If the corrupters have success in Canada, they will only want more. The problem is MUCH bigger than most people think.

As a Canadian let me say... (5, Interesting)

Joelfabulous (1045392) | about 5 years ago | (#29024879)

Fuck you.

We've been opposed to this shit since the beginning of your so-called "reforms," and now you go one further and try to make it even more draconian?

And you wonder why I have no qualms subverting your business model and giving money in a more direct manner to the artist instead.

Re:As a Canadian let me say... (4, Insightful)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | about 5 years ago | (#29024977)

And you wonder why I have no qualms subverting your business model

pass whatever laws you've been PAID to pass.

that's quite a different matter from getting buy-in from the citizenry. they won't follow really bad laws.

in the US, we already ignore copyright (many of us do) as a way of protesting the current status quo.

civil disobedience works and is justified here. ignore any bad laws passed. they don't apply to you. they were corrupt and so are null and void. use your own good common sense! the understanding of what's right and wrong is inside you; you don't need to look at BOUGHT AND PAID FOR laws for your morality.

once the media industry decided to play fair, we'll take off the mitts and also play fair. until then, its lawlessness. on both sides.

Re:As a Canadian let me say... (1)

DrLang21 (900992) | about 5 years ago | (#29025331)

ignore any bad laws passed. they don't apply to you.

Try saying that when they finally decide to make copyright violation a criminal offense and want to put you in jail or on probation for file sharing.

Re:As a Canadian let me say... (3, Interesting)

Shikaku (1129753) | about 5 years ago | (#29025369)

You think you can jail 3/4 of a country?

Re:As a Canadian let me say... (1)

DrLang21 (900992) | about 5 years ago | (#29025703)

The RIAA/MPAA is not interested in attacking every single copyright violator. They are only interested in making extreme examples of a handful of unlucky people to warn everyone else. Is it working? You betcha! I think twice before I download anything now. I don't have $3000 to settle with, I sure as hell don't have $1.5 million to lose in court, and I have no desire to ruin my wife and I's spotless and good credit history by going through bankruptcy.

Re:As a Canadian let me say... (2, Informative)

Shagg (99693) | about 5 years ago | (#29026769)

Apparently their misinformation campaign is working just as well as their fear campaign. You do realize that nobody has settled or gone to court because of downloading, right?

Re:As a Canadian let me say... (1)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | about 5 years ago | (#29026813)

Canada has a loser-pay system. If they sue you and you win, they will pay your court costs.

In the US, they can threaten you with a lawsuit because it can cost you tens of thousands (or more) to defend with no chance of recovery.

Re:As a Canadian let me say... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29025791)

The USA sure seems to be trying.

Re:As a Canadian let me say... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29026433)

We are number 1! [insert patriotic flag image here]

Re:As a Canadian let me say... (1)

The Archon V2.0 (782634) | about 5 years ago | (#29026587)

You think you can jail 3/4 of a country?

Nope. But send a few juicy targets off to the state pen and the rest will learn to keep their heads down. If a country makes a fairly minor crime a hanging offense, that first guy swinging from the gallows is a great message to any possible second. Laws aren't just punishments, they're also deterrents.

Re:As a Canadian let me say... (1)

PrimaryConsult (1546585) | about 5 years ago | (#29025567)

If that were to happen, copyright 'criminals' combined with petty drug 'criminals' would outnumber actual criminals in jails. When non-violent criminals overwhelm the prison system, and it becomes more likely that your roommate is Clyde from accounting rather than someone who murdered six people with their bare hands, jail is a lot less threatening and thus less of a deterrent from crime.

So, never gonna happen, since the entire justice system would collapse if people were to stop fearing jail.

Re:As a Canadian let me say... (1)

horatio (127595) | about 5 years ago | (#29025681)

civil disobedience works and is justified here. ignore any bad laws passed. they don't apply to you. they were corrupt and so are null and void. use your own good common sense! the understanding of what's right and wrong is inside you; you don't need to look at BOUGHT AND PAID FOR laws for your morality.

once the media industry decided to play fair, we'll take off the mitts and also play fair. until then, its lawlessness. on both sides.

(emphasis mine) I think you nailed it. Unfortunately, "[any bad laws] don't apply to you" is a quick trip to anarchy. The RIAA and the other groups have no power without the government intervening on their behalf. Which is another in a long list of arguments for small government with limited power, positioned just barely to the left of anarchy.

Re:As a Canadian let me say... (1)

Lumpy (12016) | about 5 years ago | (#29025863)

Here in the USA though, you have to live like a spy or hunted criminal when you do that.

I have 2 identical NAS drives in my home, one is offline with harmless home videos on it. the other has my 1TB of DVD rips and BluRay rips.

They come in to raid my home they will file XBMC live media centers all looking at a NAS that has home movies and podcast videos on it. no evidence at all.

My ripper is a laptop that can disappear easily as well.

Re:As a Canadian let me say... (1)

dna_(c)(tm)(r) (618003) | about 5 years ago | (#29025407)

I think you should go for an even morest draconianst reform: those who bring copyrighted material to the market place should be liable for any illegal copying. Ha, that would show them...

hundreds?? (5, Funny)

gandhi_2 (1108023) | about 5 years ago | (#29024883)

hundreds of Canadians have spoken out

Who does that leave?

Re:hundreds?? (1)

stagg (1606187) | about 5 years ago | (#29024939)

Most Canadians don't even know about the issue, let alone understand it. And that's hardly their fault.

Re:hundreds?? (0)

causality (777677) | about 5 years ago | (#29025001)

Most Canadians don't even know about the issue, let alone understand it. And that's hardly their fault.

So whose fault would that be, if not their own? Does it not occur to them that this kind of ignorance is exacty what enables draconian new laws like this? When you're up against a well-informed and well-financed opponent who wants more control over you, the last thing you can afford is to be uninformed yourself. Maybe this is a situation where word-of-mouth is not to be underestimated.

Re:hundreds?? (3, Insightful)

stagg (1606187) | about 5 years ago | (#29025097)

People very rarely say "Oh look, I'm ignorant about an important issue! Oh no!" They need to realize it's important first... right? :) In this case, it's a very new technology, and debates like this aren't of much interest outside geek circles. Clearly those of us who are concerned do what we can to raise awareness, but in a lot of ways it's still a very new issue, and it takes a while for things like this to reach the public awareness.

Re:hundreds?? (1)

causality (777677) | about 5 years ago | (#29025327)

In this case, it's a very new technology, and debates like this aren't of much interest outside geek circles.

When most modern means of control are at least related to technology, perhaps the average person needs to question whether it is in their interests to leave such matters to "geek circles." The amount of effort needed to have at least a familiarity with these issues is nearly trivial; there is no need to become an expert in anything in order to understand that this is a bid for power that should rightly be resisted. It doesn't take much technical sophistication to comprehend a message like "the freedoms you currently enjoy for music and movies and such, well, they are trying to criminalize more of those for the sake of control."

It's their fault in the sense that it wouldn't take very much to understand these issues. It's also their fault for holding a certain naivete: do they believe that the bought-and-paid-for media is going to help them? No, not when some of its ownership and much of its advertising revenue comes from these very media companies who are pushing for more copyright laws.

I often feel this way, that the biggest part of the problem for ALL systems of control is that the average person is ignorant and passive and refuses to inform himself at all costs. Meanwhile he is up against people who will assert control at all costs, for whom no move is too underhanded or too immoral or too deceitful. They will lie to you and misrepresent the facts in a heartbeat if it gets their new law passed. They will fund front groups to back up their predetermined claims. They will give financial backing to politicians who support them. They will talk about the horrors of piracy in the media. Yeah, in the face of this the average person has not just the ability but also the duty to inform himself so that he's not so easy to push around, because the average person will be hardest hit by these bad laws when they arrive, both in terms of copyright and in terms of losing any say in their country and how it is run.

If people refuse to do that, or are too unsophisticated, or too lazy, or too stupid, or too apathetic, or whatever the problem is, then they will reap what they sow. Fair or not, they will have been found to be unfit to have a meaningful say in their government or to be ruled by laws that are just and respectable. That will be evidenced by the way a small well-financed minority can walk all over the voting majority. This really isn't about copyright. This is about control. Copyright just happens to be an object of control.

Re:hundreds?? (1)

DrLang21 (900992) | about 5 years ago | (#29025373)

Not to mention that people need to rely on the media to inform them of what is going on (this is just a reasonable expectation that most people don't have the time to research everything that is going on in the government). This is one thing that the media is definitely going to either keep quiet about or be openly on the side of the recording and movie industry

Re:hundreds?? (1)

causality (777677) | about 5 years ago | (#29025615)

Not to mention that people need to rely on the media to inform them of what is going on (this is just a reasonable expectation that most people don't have the time to research everything that is going on in the government). This is one thing that the media is definitely going to either keep quiet about or be openly on the side of the recording and movie industry

The media's job is so important that if they fail to carry it out, it's up to us. Maybe that means a couple fewer TV shows that you watch or a ball game you don't attend so you can do a little research. The Internet makes this possible, but it won't do the job for you; you have to actually engage yourself. That's such a tiny price to pay to have such an important job taken care of. If the will were there, it would get taken care of one way or another. When it comes down to it, most of us don't think it's as important as our beer or our entertainment. That makes us easy prey for such attempts to control. If this continues down the path that it has been on for a long time now, then at some point the average person is going to wish like hell that they had a different set of priorities a few years ago. I would like to see more people wake up before we get to the point where we wonder how the hell this happened.

Re:hundreds?? (1)

jedidiah (1196) | about 5 years ago | (#29025605)

The "new technology" aspect of it really has squat to do with it. Also,
these changes in favor of the labels have been going on for quite a long
time. Infact, the more relevant aspects of the recent legislative changes
don't even have anything do to do with "new gadgets".

Things like "Catcher in the Rye" and "Happy Birthday" are far more pressing.

Re:hundreds?? (1)

vintagepc (1388833) | about 5 years ago | (#29025299)

Perhaps not, but those that do are raising hell as loudly as they can...
Remember when they wanted to add the blank media tax for "piracy"? Some stores like Staples refused to do it (or at least, media prices did not change).

Re:hundreds?? (1)

stagg (1606187) | about 5 years ago | (#29025977)

We have had this debate before in Canada. And we are paying a substantial tax on all blank media, supposedly that made it legal for us to backup our music. It's a levy on legal copies, but it still applies somewhat. It's about 30 cents a unit, and a few bucks on sales of mp3 players. So I'll agree that this isn't a new issue in Canada, and has reached the public awareness before.

Re:hundreds?? (2, Funny)

Minwee (522556) | about 5 years ago | (#29025549)

Who does that leave?

That leaves Jimmy, Sally and Suzy from Canada. I don't know them but I'm certain they're really, really nice.

Next weeks headline (2, Funny)

Jaysyn (203771) | about 5 years ago | (#29024885)

Canadians demand RIAA, MPAA, CRIA go die in a fire!

Re:Next weeks headline (1)

m3rc05m1qu3 (1611071) | about 5 years ago | (#29024907)

Why wait until next week, can't they die in a fire now ?

Net Neutrality and Copyright (4, Interesting)

stagg (1606187) | about 5 years ago | (#29024901)

In a lot of ways Canada, like the US under President Obama, has done alright on Net Neutrality issues. Copyright is another matter. Canada has been staggering backwards for quite some time on that issue. Net Neutrality is threatening to everyone but the ISPs that stand to profit from it, Copyright is a much uglier matter. It's been a long time since I heard anyone say "but we pay tax on blank cds, it's okay to copy here! We already had this fight over tapes decades ago!" The way things are going I guess we just pay that tax for the hell of it.

Re:Net Neutrality and Copyright (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29025453)

It's been a long time since I heard anyone say "but we pay tax on blank cds, it's okay to copy here! We already had this fight over tapes decades ago!"

Dear...Gawd...Why? Back in those days, it took 4 years to fabricate a new chip. Amiga Inc. had formed (with Jay Miner, Dale Luck, RJ Michael and others) to do just that. After years of baking, the Amiga appeared. 40 year old Commodore Business Machines moved in to buy it, but before it could happen, a fight broke out between the CEO and the Chairman who had just gained control of the company. The CEO of 40 years quit and tried to buy Amiga Inc. on his own, in a new company. The Chairman of Commodore objected and completed the purchase of Amiga Inc.

The new company that the former CEO of Commodore had founded knew it was DOOMED because it didn't have 4 long years of 22 hour days to recreate the chipset and ti couldn't even run DOOM! So what did it do? It put together a turkey which did what the Amiga did in software (instead of hardware), so it ran like 1000x slower and was a dog -and he priced it like a Commodore 64 (sweat spot) - way way below the price of an Amiga (because he didn't have the extra cost of the hardware chips on his Bill of Materials and because he was using cheap Indian laborers in America). So what did he decide to call this new piece of crap? Being a million years old, he did not realize the name was tainted to forever be associated with VIDEO GAMES and he, in fact, reportedly paid $45K to buy the name "Atari", which had obviously gone defunct after Jay Miner took off years earlier. Then he marketed his low-cost piece of crap as an Atari ST for years up against the Amiga. The public began to think of the Amiga and Atari as being similar products and somehow associated with video GAMES, thus destroying the credibility of the Amiga in business -leaving the door wide open for the vastly inferior Macintosh and eventually Windows products. In the end, Amiga and Commodore will killed with Bill Gates lamenting at how he had been wise enough to steer clear of that disaster (by not supporting it with Office and BASIC as he did the early Macs). Jay Miner, seeing his life's work go up in smoke over a slow motion decade, died a little while later of kidney problems (he ate his own feces until death set it), he was 62 -Windows 3.11 (the first "real" Windows) was 2...and Jaysus it was a retarded, Mongoloid, bastard of a child.

The CEO of the "new" Atari, a holocaust survivor and admitted faggot, retired and the last I heard, he let two small boys run what was left of the company. Meanwhile at Apple, they had fired Steve Jobs and the French idiots who took over R&D basically had an Amiga 1000 in the basement they were surgically dissecting and running upstairs every few days to proclaim their new "inventions" -such as QuickDrawGX (aka Amiga GfxBase), AppleScript!! (aka ARexx), PlainTalk!! (aka Amiga Speech Synthesizer), nuBus!! (ZorroBus!) and the list goes on and on. Those maggots got theirs when CALPERS fired the Pepsi Drinker, the Board who put him there and the French Guys, brought in real dudes from Rockwell and the Navy/DOD who quickly realized they needed to buy Steve Jobs backâ¦and the rest his history.

Only one part I'm leaving out. WE ALL LOST 15 YEARS OF OUR LIVES! Even if you were not into Tech, how much of your life was spent editing CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT or dealing with crappy DOS programs while your kids grew up without an Internet and all the great things that came from multimedia-computers with a graphical user interface. I'm sure it all makes perfect sense to the man who saw his family murdered by the Nazis as a small boy, but it was just wrong. Ok, well going back to my happy place now. Remember, you asked, stagg!

Re:Net Neutrality and Copyright (1)

jedidiah (1196) | about 5 years ago | (#29025789)

The Atari ST was NOT 1000 times slower than the Amiga.

While the Amiga certainly was impressive and had capabilities that
exceeded those of it's bretheren, it was by no means the computing
equivalent of some ubermench.

The ST was more comparable to a Mac Plus.

The fact that the Amiga was optimized for gaming use was probably
what got it associated with Games more so than the fact that it
was labeled with a well established home computing brand.

Pretty much nothing could stop the juggernaut that associated itself with IBM.

Re:Net Neutrality and Copyright (0, Troll)

R2.0 (532027) | about 5 years ago | (#29025457)

"In a lot of ways Canada, like the US under President Obama, has done alright on Net Neutrality issues."

Yeah, like when the FCC told Comcast to knock it off with messing with people's Bittorrent.

Oh, wait - that happened under the Bush administration. Well, I'm sure Obama has done plenty since his inauguration...[searches Google]...Hmmm, I see a whole page of hits on his campaign promises.

Well, that's fine - everyone knows that he will fulfill all of his campaign promises.

Re:Net Neutrality and Copyright (1)

causality (777677) | about 5 years ago | (#29025787)

"In a lot of ways Canada, like the US under President Obama, has done alright on Net Neutrality issues."

Yeah, like when the FCC told Comcast to knock it off with messing with people's Bittorrent.

Oh, wait - that happened under the Bush administration. Well, I'm sure Obama has done plenty since his inauguration...[searches Google]...Hmmm, I see a whole page of hits on his campaign promises.

Well, that's fine - everyone knows that he will fulfill all of his campaign promises.

For some reason people think that the identity of the President is more important than who finances him so he can get into office. If you take a moment to make even a cursory study of it, you'll find one "odd" thing: many of the interests, particularly bankers, who financially supported Obama also supported his Republican opponent. Why, it's almost as though they don't care who wins as long as it's a major-party candidate...

The modern two-party duopoly serves the same purpose as the trade guilds of old. It raises barriers to entry in order to lock out potential competition. Any member of either party promising "change" really means "things will become more so" or "things will go farther down the path they are already on." If Obama wanted to enact truly meaningful change, such as reducing the size and power of the federal government, much of his opposition would come from within his own party. The same would be true for any Republican President.

Reforms? (1)

shawnmchorse (442605) | about 5 years ago | (#29024903)

Why the hell would adding draconian laws favorable only to certain industries be called "reforms"?

What if Canada doesn't comply? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29024905)

More trade sanctions? You already steal our lumber at less than market value, we sell you power at less than market value, you fish our waters, you drink our water, you consume our oil. Not really sure what else America can make Canada do that they haven't already done to us. Fuck off MPAA, this is a battle you won't win. Canada is united in protecting our freedoms, we don't roll over like the other sheep you've steam rolled.

Re:What if Canada doesn't comply? (3, Insightful)

billcopc (196330) | about 5 years ago | (#29025535)

America hasn't "made us do" any of these things. Our trade ministers and premiers are the ones to blame. We've had a really bad run of crooked bastards over the past decade, and the problem stems from the fact that we have a rapidly expanding Albertan market that's got more in common with southern States than a Canadian provinces, and it just so happens that their own mini Bush is the guy calling the shots here in Ottawa.

If we had leaders with even average-sized balls, they could put a foot down and shift the trade relationships back in our favor - or simply cut the off and see what (doesn't) happen. War ? I can't even type that word without chuckling... The only reason our industries are being exploited is because our leaders set it up that way, under presumed ulterior motives. There's no need to blame the Americans.

Re:What if Canada doesn't comply? (1)

Abcd1234 (188840) | about 5 years ago | (#29025793)

There's no need to blame the Americans.

So you'd rather just blame Alberta? Please. While the conservatives have their strongest support here, they were voted for throughout Canada, and that includes Ontario. Turning this into an "east versus west" debate is the most petty kind of political bickering and brings absolutely nothing to the table.

So please, take your blind, idiotic regionalism and kindly shove it up your ass. And that goes for everyone, "easterners" and "westerners" alike.

Re:What if Canada doesn't comply? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29026115)

America hasn't "made us do" any of these things.

They threaten to lock down their borders when Canada does not bend over. So yes, they made them do it, through threats.

While We're Being Ridiculous (4, Funny)

CopaceticOpus (965603) | about 5 years ago | (#29024985)

NCFPM (National Coalition of Five-hundred Pound Men) demands that Taco Bell increases sour cream levels in the Nachos Belle Grande!

Cell Phone companies demand the right to increase text messaging rates using a logarithmic scale, and to charge a monthly rent for those you don't immediately delete!

ICBE (International Coalition for Bathwater Equality) demands that whenever bathwater is thrown out, a baby is included!

"Democracy" (5, Insightful)

javacowboy (222023) | about 5 years ago | (#29024993)

A friend of mine said once that the global corporations, by nature of the vast resources they control, actually formulate government policy and the elected politicians are the ones tasked with selling those policies to the public. There are minor exceptions such as privatizing Social Security in Bush II's second term in which public opposition is too strong to put through the policy, but these are few and far between.

In the case of the DMCA, this couldn't be closer to the truth. The problem is that the politicians have had difficulty selling the idea to Canadians at large, and prioritizing it in a minority government.

With the comment submission process, the elites can make the already formulated policies more palatable to Canadians. Perhaps there will be a few minor compromises. But in the end, they'll get what they want once they find the right "marketing" formula.

Personally, I find the idea that my internet access could be cut off after three false accusations of piracy to be frightening. I don't pirate anything, but the methodology for associating individuals with IP addresses is rife with errors and false positives.

Re:"Democracy" (3, Insightful)

Fulcrum of Evil (560260) | about 5 years ago | (#29025235)

So automate complaint generation and gather a list of influential people. That or go city by city and get everybody.

Re:"Democracy" (1)

Medgur (172679) | about 5 years ago | (#29025409)

I wish I had mod points for you.

+1 Insightful

They can demand all they want. (0, Troll)

Hurricane78 (562437) | about 5 years ago | (#29025013)

Doesn't mean anyone in going to listen to those criminals.

Oh, and if you defend their position, you are ultimately working for their cause. Even if you're just stating their position (and thereby promote it).

So um... (-1, Flamebait)

jmerlin (1010641) | about 5 years ago | (#29025019)

this is bullshit, eh?

i know the perfect solution (4, Insightful)

FudRucker (866063) | about 5 years ago | (#29025141)

the next time you produce a movie why don't you just keep it locked in your vaults and don't let anyone touch it or see it, then nobody will be able to copy/download/upload or pirate it. if someone can see it you can bet they will find a way to make a copy to either share freely or to sell on the black market. and even those that technically don't know how to do it will just get one of those copies so in the long run you are wasting your time and money...

those that just want to go to the theater will go anyway even if it is available free because they can go with friends & family or on a romantic date and enjoy the show (popcorn and sodapop too) and you still get your billions in return for your investment, so please quit acting like a paranoid selfish kid afraid that somebody is going to take a piece of your candy...

So, um... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29025143)

As long as I can retrieve data over a network, piracy will always be possible.

Re:So, um... (1)

jedidiah (1196) | about 5 years ago | (#29025837)

As long as I have some means of recording my own content, piracy will be possible.

The network is irrelevant and was really never necessary.

Sneakernet does just fine. It's still the leading video distribution medium.

How can these entities demand laws? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29025153)

"The Canadian Recording Industry Association and the MPAA's Canadian subsidiary are demanding that Canada adopt copyright laws"... How exactly can these un-elected entities demand changes in legislation? Do voters (the actual tax-payer people of the land) have right to refuse such demand, or even to initiate to revoke the rights of these organizations to "demand" any legislation? What gives these corporate interest groups the right at the first place to be entitled to demand any kind of legislation?

Of course (4, Informative)

SilverHatHacker (1381259) | about 5 years ago | (#29025229)

Because, don't forget, according to surveys, Canada has more piracy than the US.
These surveys which I refer to are the ones which they admitted they extrapolated from the American data, without actually considering Canada at all... [michaelgeist.ca]
So it makes total sense to demand stricter laws.

Re:Of course (1)

JediTrainer (314273) | about 5 years ago | (#29026183)

These surveys which I refer to are the ones which they admitted they extrapolated from the American data, without actually considering Canada at all... [michaelgeist.ca]

Mods are not doing their job, seeing how that link in the parent post is about software piracy and has nothing to do with music or movies.

Sheesh.

Well this will make things interesting (1, Interesting)

Jailbrekr (73837) | about 5 years ago | (#29025237)

In Canada, broadband is classified as an essential service, so any 3 strikes law will fail. You cannot deny a person what is deemed a right.

Re:Well this will make things interesting (2, Interesting)

compro01 (777531) | about 5 years ago | (#29025417)

Could I get a link to where you're hearing this from? I've only read last year that the CRTC was considering classing it as an essential service, but I never heard anything further about it.

Re:Well this will make things interesting (1)

Synchis (191050) | about 5 years ago | (#29026615)

There is no link, because the OP is totally incorrect.

The CRTC just finished net neutrality hearings with pretty much every major ISP involved. Their decision I believe is still pending, but no law, statement, or otherwise has ever been made that deems Broadband an essential service.

If it were an essential service, there would be much more strict regulation in place, ISP's would not be allowed to throttle service, and We would be *MUCH* happier with broadband in Canada.

Unfortunately, Canada is slipping when it comes to broadband penetration, cell phone service, and pretty much every other aspect of the modern world.

jerks (1)

el_tedward (1612093) | about 5 years ago | (#29025239)

If this goes through, it'll totally make it harder to use the, "If x happens, I'll just move to Canada," argument. What a bunch of butt nuts.

Re:jerks (1)

R2.0 (532027) | about 5 years ago | (#29025503)

""If x happens, I'll just move to Canada," argument."

BTW, did any of those folks who said that during Kerry/Bush actually do that?

Didn't think so.

Isn't it time someone sued their pants off? (4, Interesting)

MartinSchou (1360093) | about 5 years ago | (#29025313)

I seem to recall quite a few incidents where the RIAA, MPAA and their members and brethren have been caught using unlicensed code on their websites.

Now, if this code is part of the navigation, chances are it'll be included on every single page served. Now, even if say http://www.riaa.com [riaa.com] only got 100 visitors per day, and each visitor only visited two pages, that'd be 200 counts of breach of copyright.

At an average $22,500 per copyright violation, that comes up at $4,500,000 ... per day.

Step 1) Write code
Step 2) Find RIAA using that code unlicensed
Step 3) Profit

Even if they somehow get the damages reduced in court, they'll be arguing that their own claims for damages are completely out of proportion.

Plus, as a group who is supposedly on the side of the creators, it'd look really bad if they tried to claim ignorance, unfair damages, that code isn't worth as much as songs etc.

Basically it's a win-win situation.

So, to all you bright people out there, I urge you to get hacking!

But don't go putting code onto their webservers without them knowing it - that defence doesn't fly well in RIAA cases, and it'd be unfair to use it against them ;)

And I Demand... (4, Insightful)

whisper_jeff (680366) | about 5 years ago | (#29025351)

I demand that my members of parliament, regardless of party affiliation, stand up to these greed-interested lobby groups and champion the best interests of the people they serve - the people who elected them to their positions.

As a voting Canadian, I assure the people in power that I do have influence over their job security should my demands not be met. Given that I am confident that my demands are not dissimilar to the demands of other Canadians, I would strongly suggest that the decision-makers of Canada pay close attention to my demands lest they find themselves out of work and replaced with someone who _is_ willing to represent the best interests of the people of my great nation.

Further, I, as a proud Canadian, demand that lobby groups that do not serve the best interests of the people of my great nation fuck the hell off.

Re:And I Demand... (1)

canadian_right (410687) | about 5 years ago | (#29026783)

Did you write your MP? He likely doesn't read slashdot.

Don't just say no in a negotiation (1)

Sloppy (14984) | about 5 years ago | (#29025377)

I'm willing to entertain the MPAA's proposal. But as a concession, I'd like DMCA repealed in US. Gimme that, and you can do whatever you want to Canada. Do we have a deal?

How about a compromise? (5, Interesting)

Jason Levine (196982) | about 5 years ago | (#29025415)

The MPAA/RIAA/etc gets their draconian copyright laws but with two modifications:

1) When the copyright on a work expires, they are required to publish a high quality public domain version of the work in a well-documented format. (e.g. a high bitrate MP3 or lossless FLAC for audio. MPEG-2 for video.)

2) Copyright terms will be shortened to 5 years.

As a Canadian... (1)

CRiMSON (3495) | about 5 years ago | (#29025469)

Let me say, go fuck yourself!

Thank you...

Draconian Protest (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29025517)

If these sorts of draconian reforms go through I seriously am tempted to protest this by immolating myself on the Parliament lawn in Ottawa.

So what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29025531)

Demand? Or what? They'll stop paying taxes? Stop producing movies/music? Protest? Leave the country?

Companies that still make money hand over fist in this economy don't have a lot of leverage with your average citizen. I suppose making demands like that makes incoming legislation seem more like a legitimate response to a real problem than calling your pocket gov't lackey and getting it done on the sly does.

Canadian Universities (1)

stagg (1606187) | about 5 years ago | (#29025541)

There's been a lot of concern expressed in Canadian universities about how this will affect them, particularly long distance institutions like the Athabasca University. The copyright restrictions put them in a very precarious position that could increase licensing costs, make educational materials inaccessible or result in fines. There's no provision to protect such institution and their use of material, and nothing to even warn them if they risk violation. The threat to educators may be even more significant than the threat to individuals in this case, and it runs a serious risk of being overlooked in this ongoing crusade against copyright violation.

democrat party apologists (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29025879)

Why is there a 'republican' keyword when almost every single recording industry person is a Democrat?? You guys are intellectually dishonest, and uncle fuckers to boot, eh?

Oh really? (1)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | about 5 years ago | (#29025929)

Well, I demand that Mitch Bainwol eats my dick.

Express Yourself and Forget the Pop Culture (1)

MarkvW (1037596) | about 5 years ago | (#29026065)

We now have fantastic communication access to our fellow humans. We also have access to awesome creative tools that allow us to express ourselves graphically and aurally. Thanks to the BSD and GNU people we have free creative tools and the tools to create those tools.

It seems to me that the vital battles over the Internet center on reasonable access to bandwidth--not bandwidth for receiving data from the Cloud, but bandwidth for uploading and receiving content to and from the World.

What's the big deal about downloading Michael Jackson music or Terminator videos? Why waste so much time over such stupid drivel!! Express your own damn self!!!!

Disturbance (1)

malchus6 (870609) | about 5 years ago | (#29026207)

I felt a great disturbance in Canada, as if millions of voices suddenly cried out in terror and were suddenly served with Lawsuits.

Re:Disturbance (1)

stagg (1606187) | about 5 years ago | (#29026317)

This comment deserves special notice.

Possible interesting strategy (2, Insightful)

DaveV1.0 (203135) | about 5 years ago | (#29026219)

If you want 50, ask for 100 and let yourself be argued down a bit.

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