×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

TomTom Releases iPhone Navigation App

CmdrTaco posted more than 4 years ago | from the hit-the-road-tom dept.

289

andylim writes "Today TomTom released its long-awaited iPhone app that allows you to use your iPhone 3G and 3GS as a GPS navigation device. Recombu.com tested it out on video this morning and concluded that it works well but if you receive a call while you're driving then the app does cut out — it will restart once you've finished the conversation. The app costs £60 for the UK & Ireland version, £80 for western Europe, £45 for Australia and £60 for the US and Canada."

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

289 comments

Prices (0, Offtopic)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092133)

The app costs £60 for the UK & Ireland version, £80 for western Europe, £45 for Australia and £60 for the US and Canada.

Why are all the prices in British Pounds? Did they just annex all those countries overnight or is the author of the article a lazy bastard?

And why does Slashdot suck so much with unicode? I copy/pasted that line from above yet the pound sign shows up with an extra character before it.

Re:Prices (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29092211)

Why are all the prices in British Pounds?

Completely off-topic, but why do the brits call their money "pounds" anyway? They're a metric country, so logically, shouldn't their monetary unit be the British Kilogram?

Re:Prices (1)

Brandee07 (964634) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092315)

The app isn't available in the US yet, for whatever reason. While you could go and run the exchange rate to get the price in USD, it's likely that they'll set a different price point for US customers. I'm gonna guess $100.

The timing on this is just lovely- I just picked up the Navigon turn-by-turn app yesterday for $70, since I got tired of waiting for TomTom. I haven't even had a chance to use it yet.

Re:Prices (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092361)

If the app isn't available in the USA store then where does the price converted to pound comes from?

Re:Prices (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29092419)


If the app isn't available in the USA store then where does the price converted to pound comes from?

Umm... perhaps the price is in Pounds which will be converted to US dollars once it is available there?

Re:Prices (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29092719)

If the app isn't available in the USA store then where does the price converted to pound comes from?

England. Duh.

Re:Prices (5, Informative)

Brandee07 (964634) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092595)

It's up on the US app store now:

US & Can $99.99
Western Europe $139.33
Australia $79.99
New Zealand $94.99

Re:Prices (3, Insightful)

chrisbtoo (41029) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092875)

Why are all the prices in British Pounds? Did they just annex all those countries overnight or is the author of the article a lazy bastard?

The prices are in British Pounds, because the linked article is on a UK website. The author of the article is someone who is reporting the news to people in his country of origin. Congratulations on discovering that there's an entire world outside your country's borders!

New phone - apps transfer? (1)

realsilly (186931) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092137)

So here is the question I have for many of you who own iphones and such. If you pay for an app and your phone dies, or something, will that app be transferred to a replacement phone or do you need to re-purchase the app for the new phone?

Re:New phone - apps transfer? (4, Informative)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092195)

So here is the question I have for many of you who own iphones and such. If you pay for an app and your phone dies, or something, will that app be transferred to a replacement phone or do you need to re-purchase the app for the new phone?

The truth is, I don't know. But I can tell you this: I have an iPod Touch and an iPhone. I've purchased apps on the iPhone and have been able to use them on the iPod Touch, too. It would appear as though that it's all about the iTunes account you use on the device.

Re:New phone - apps transfer? (4, Informative)

SydShamino (547793) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092381)

Yes. Which means that if you and your wife both have iPhones and share an iTunes account, you should both have the app for the price of one.

Re:New phone - apps transfer? (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29092203)


The apps you buy are tied to your account, not the iPhone/iPod Touch.

Re:New phone - apps transfer? (-1, Offtopic)

cayenne8 (626475) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092413)

"The app costs £60 for the UK & Ireland version, £80 for western Europe, £45 for Australia and £60 for the US and Canada."

Hmm...have we now gone to a single world wide currency? This is a US based website, why is the US price not listed in US dollars?

Re:New phone - apps transfer? (2, Funny)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092749)

This being /. perhaps the units of currency should be quatloos or bars of gold-pressed latinum.

Re:New phone - apps transfer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29093025)

This being /. perhaps the units of currency should be quatloos or bars of gold-pressed latinum.

Or Alterian dollars

Re:New phone - apps transfer? (1)

xaxa (988988) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092951)

Because the article used pounds (it was submitted at 10:59 UK time, when the USA is sleeping).

Anyway, don't most people know the very approximate value of $, € and £ in their own currency? They're the three most-traded currencies worldwide. xe.com [xe.com] if you don't, and they don't change enough for it to matter when reading a news story.

Re:New phone - apps transfer? (1)

Anubis IV (1279820) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092229)

Kinda neither. All you need to do is connect the iPhone to your computer and then choose to Restore from Backup, I believe, to get the new iPhone up and running exactly as your old one was. Even if that doesn't work though, apps are associated with your Apple ID, not your phone, so you can freely download them as often as you want and put them on any iPhone that syncs with your computer.

Re:New phone - apps transfer? (3, Informative)

horatio (127595) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092243)

I've had to get my iPhone replaced twice. Neither time did I have any issues transferring my purchased items. The store (Apple or AT&T) will not transfer any settings, contacts, music, apps etc for you. However, iTunes (OS X, I assume Windows version will behave the same) recognizes this is a phone it hasn't seen and asks you if you want to restore this new phone from the last backup.

Re:New phone - apps transfer? (1)

BitZtream (692029) | more than 4 years ago | (#29093031)

Having just replaced an iPhone that went swimming myself, I was pleasently surprised to know that if you let the MobileMe service run your life it will also restore the most important parts of your phone. To my pleasent surprise, as I was walking out of the apple store in a mall, entered my mobileme info and before I exited the mall my contacts and cals were all back, mail accounts configured and ready to sync.

Didn't have any of my apps, music or media, but the important stuff was already to go.

At that point, you won't get the option to restore from backup however, which means you have to jump through hoops if you had apps with important data to restore. iTunes still seems to be the best way to restore a phone.

Re:New phone - apps transfer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29092247)

If you purchased it, you can download it again. I've deleted apps off the phone and downloaded them again without payment.. seems like your purchases are tied and recorded to your account somehow. It even prompts you with a message saying that you already purchased this app.

Re:New phone - apps transfer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29092253)

Yes, it transfers. The easiest thing to do is to just plug the new phone into your computer, and select restore phone when it prompts you in itunes. If you don't want to completely restore your replacement phone, you can set it up as a new phone, and then just selectively sync up that application manually. You can also just re-download the app for free (in itunes, or the app store on the phone).

Re:New phone - apps transfer? (2, Informative)

AnotherShep (599837) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092281)

Yeah, it just shows up on the new phone. All you need to do is sync it to the computer with the apps on it.

Re:New phone - apps transfer? (1)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092351)

ad hoc distribution (which does NOT involve the appt store and are generally for testing) are based on the device id.

Re:New phone - apps transfer? (3, Informative)

alen (225700) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092395)

you can download any app you bought for free on the same account as many times as you want. all the apps are downloaded as .ipa files into your profile in windows and you can even easily back them up yourself so you don't have to download them again.

i have 2 iphones. one for myself and one for my wife. i just put the ipa file on her computer, add to itunes library and next time it syncs she gets the app

GPS Kills! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29092139)

I'm not so sure that bringing GPS to the masses is such a good idea...

"11-Year-Old Boy Dies After Mom Says GPS Left Them Stranded in Death Valley"
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,538323,00.html

Cotton Kills! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29092323)

There's a common saying in the hiking community that "cotton kills." The reason why has to do with moisture management in cold and cool conditions. In fact, there is absolutely nothing wrong with wearing cotton when you can stay dry and warm. The problem is, it is much harder to stay dry and warm when hiking than most people think.

Problems with cotton occur when the cotton gets wet. Cotton does not wick moisture and can become abrasive when wet. When this happens you must watch out for blisters and packsores. Because cotton holds so much moisture, it can hold that moisture against your body and sap body heat from you. This can quickly lead to hypothermia. Cotton also gets heavy when wet. If you wear cotton while hiking, you generally need to carry more "emergency" clothing in case your cotton does get wet (sweat, rain, or falling in while fording a river will all get you wet).

Silk also loses it's insulative properties when it gets wet and does not wick like modern hydrophobic fabrics.

Wool, on the other hand, insulates relatively well when wet. But while some weaves do shed water for a period of time, it will eventually absorb a great deal more moisture than comparably weighted synthetic garments and become very heavy.

All of these natural fiber fabrics take much longer to dry once wet than comparably weighted synthetic fabrics.

The feel of synthetic fabrics has changed quite a bit from the first dark blue polypropelene long underwear I bought. Different brands have different feels. Try a few and see what feels good to you. I happen to like Capilene from Patagonia (both silkweight and other weights) and try to get it on sale (usually at the end of the season when they are trying to get rid of colors that didn't sell.)

So, if you choose to wear natural fibers, think ahead and be prepared for situations when you get an unintentional soaking. Remember hypothermia can set in at temperatures well above freezing.

Last updated, January 7, 2007.

What's the point? (2, Insightful)

Blakey Rat (99501) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092205)

This differs from the built-in Google Maps... how?

There's no pitch here, just a claim that it adds a feature iPhones already had!

Re:What's the point? (0, Troll)

hansamurai (907719) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092241)

I'm assuming the TomTom says the directions out loud? Maybe Google Maps does that too but I don't own an iPhone or iTouch so I wouldn't know.

Re:What's the point? (1)

grub (11606) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092275)


This differs from the built-in Google Maps... how?

Google Maps is free so it just can't be as good as TomTom's pricey AppStore app!

.

Re:What's the point? (4, Informative)

Anubis IV (1279820) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092279)

Voice navigation is not in Google Maps. Also, I think many (but perhaps not most) would argue that it has better algorithms for determining the route to take. It also doesn't rely on having an Internet connection, since you're downloading the entire map with TomTom, so it would work even out in the boonies.

Re:What's the point? (2, Interesting)

Enuratique (993250) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092373)

Voice navigation is not in Google Maps. Also, I think many (but perhaps not most) would argue that it has better algorithms for determining the route to take. It also doesn't rely on having an Internet connection, since you're downloading the entire map with TomTom, so it would work even out in the boonies.

Yes, all of this. Also, apparently the GPS chip inside the iPhone isn't "good enough" to do turn-by-turn navigation, so the cradle that TomTom sells has a chip inside it that is better suited. Now, this might be a big fat lie, since the app will work without the cradle albeit not as well if the marketing literature is to be believed.

Re:What's the point? (5, Informative)

CrankyFool (680025) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092341)

The GPS component of Google Maps suffers pretty drastically compared to ye olde average GPS device:

1. No voice navigation;

2. No "OK, you're coming up on the turn, take the NEXT right turn";

3. No "Oops, you've missed it, OK, the next street is a one-way street, so go two blocks .. " (i.e. automatic route re-calculation);

4. No ability to specify preferences such as "I want to take that bridge, not this one" (maps.google.com lets you rejigger your route quite nicely, but not the app on the iPhone);

5. Doesn't help you at all if you need to control your iPod component right now (so the app isn't in the foreground);

Re:What's the point? (2, Funny)

ajdowntown (91738) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092387)

Now you can have a robotic voice yell at you when you missed your turn! Like a nagging wife with you all the time in your car! Worth the money right there!

Re:What's the point? (3, Insightful)

aardwolf64 (160070) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092389)

1.) No turn-by-turn
2.) No voice routing
3.) Most important - No offline storage of maps.

If you dare go somewhere without cellphone service, you'll quickly find that the streets disappear in Google Maps... That's because it loads the map as needed over your cellphone data connection.

Re:What's the point? (4, Informative)

Brandee07 (964634) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092475)

The built-in Google Maps does automatically display the next direction when you reach a turn, it does not reroute when you go off course, and it does not do anything aloud- everything is displayed in small text.

I have been using the Google Maps in the iPhone for about a year, and it is definitely useful, but it's not a TomTom equivalent. It requires a navigator to be used effectively. Someone other than the driver needs to press the next button and read the directions aloud- otherwise it's like trying to text while driving.

Re:What's the point? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29092803)

Texting while driving is dangerous
Dangerous, treacherous, perilous.
People who were text messaging
Were 20 times more likely to have an accident
Than those who were talking on phones instead of typing.

People on the road can turn an LOL
into a great big OMG.

Re:What's the point? (1)

ninkendo84 (577928) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092503)

Basically, the simple answer is that in the Google Maps app, you have to tell the app when you've reached a turn. It doesn't detect it. (So you have to hit "Next" a bunch of times through your route) The TomTom app will detect when you're close to a turn, tell you (out loud, even) and advance to the next step in the route.

I think the turn-by-turn technology (basically the ability to detect when you've completed a turn) is patented, so the Google Maps app does all it's really allowed to do without infringing patents (hence the need for you to tell it when you've completed a turn.) This also would explain why no turn-by-turn apps are allowed in the app store.

Re:What's the point? (1)

Anubis IV (1279820) | more than 4 years ago | (#29093067)

There are other turn-by-turn apps in the AppStore. The reasons you don't see many of them are 1) the licensing terms say you can't use Google's maps so you have to provide your own, and 2) the A-GPS used by the iPhone 3G and 3GS is subpar to true GPS, making turn-by-turn very difficult to do well.

Re:What's the point? (0, Flamebait)

f1vlad (1253784) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092565)

Probably this one with [attempted] more usability than built-in one. The problem with either is that it's aGPS and accuracy is still making these not as usable as conventional GPS navs.

Re:What's the point? (1)

Algan (20532) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092623)

- Turn by turn directions with voice guidance
- Built in maps, so you don't need data coverage to use it
- Automatic rerouting in case of wrong turns

Still too expensive, considering that a standalone unit can be bought for less than $100 with car kit included

Re:What's the point? (1)

Sl4shd0t0rg (810273) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092821)

If you own a Jeep Wrangler like me, not having to hide your GPS unit or worse carry the head unit with you is worth the money in my opinion.

Re:What's the point? (1)

PhilHibbs (4537) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092723)

Hopefully it has TomTom's maps built in and doesn't download all the map info on demand over the data connection - I didn't use my iPhone in France for navigation except in emergencies as the roaming data charges are pretty steep. Probably less than £80 though...

Re:What's the point? (1)

patch0 (1339585) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092853)

I'm assuming the tom tom app downloads the maps and stores them locally on the iphone. Issues with the googlemap app that comes as standard are that it needs an internet connection to display the map so sometimes if you're in an area of patchy 3G signal you get a blank grid instead of a map. Otherwise it would be pretty pointless buying this in my opinion.

Re:What's the point? (1)

pen (7191) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092871)

The Maps application on the iPhone is very underwhelming. The Google Maps application I tried on a Nokia E71 and Blackberry Pearl were not very feature-rich to begin with, but the iPhone blows them both away with its featurelessness. I don't think it will be hard to improve on at all.

Will there be an adroid version? (2, Insightful)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092223)

I am not going to get vendor locked in to iPhone. Will there be a Android version available from Tom Tom or one of its competitors?

Re:Will there be an adroid version? (1)

Anubis IV (1279820) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092295)

Apple is selling unlocked iPhones in the US these days, you know, and they've been doing it in Europe for far longer now.

Anyway, TomTom hasn't announced anything for Android, to my knowledge.

Re:Will there be an adroid version? (1)

Voyager529 (1363959) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092363)

Apple is selling unlocked iPhones in the US these days

[citation needed]

Re:Will there be an adroid version? (1)

Anubis IV (1279820) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092517)

Nah, it needs to be struck. I could've sworn I had heard it a few days back, but a quick Google after your comment reveals that regardless of what I heard, I appear to be very incorrect.

Re:Will there be an adroid version? (1)

sadler121 (735320) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092635)

Even if this was true, at&t and tmobile use different frequencies for UMTS in the US. You'll be able to do Edge on TMobile, but NOT 3G.

Re:Will there be an adroid version? (1)

alen (225700) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092455)

they offer a blackberry version as well as Garmin. for Android they are probably waiting for the user base to grow. and it depends on the phone. The iphone app clocks in at a whopping 1.2GB. you get all the maps locally to your phone. every iphone ever made has that much storage.

for every other device they have to figure out how many phones meet the requirements or what kind of workarounds they have to code to have it run on as many devices as possible. For the iphone it's a lot easier since every generation of iphone is the same except for the storage.

Re:Will there be an adroid version? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29092493)

Rumours are that there is going to be an Android Tom Tom, but CoPilot has already released voice navigation for Android

http://www.alk.eu.com/copilot/android/

Re:Will there be an adroid version? (4, Informative)

webreaper (1313213) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092607)

Rumour has it there might be, but in the meantime you can get CoPilot for Android (and iPhone) for about half the price of TomTom.

http://www.alk.eu.com/copilot/android

Re:Will there be an adroid version? (1)

EvilNTUser (573674) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092797)

You can get Nokia/Ovi Maps navigation as a monthly or yearly subscription service. You won't be locked in unless you switch phones more than once a month :)

Expensive, but saves on devices (1)

hattig (47930) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092233)

"if you receive a call while you're driving then the app does cut out"

What? If you answer, or just because you receive a call?

The former - well, if you're not using handsfree, you shouldn't be answering. TomTom are releasing some hardware for the iPhone that incorporates handfree features however...

If the latter - Apple: sort this stuff out! This is basic functionality, keeping an application running whilst taking a call.

Re:Expensive, but saves on devices (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29092467)

This is basic functionality, keeping an application running whilst taking a call.

That is not how the iPhone OS works. There is no such thing as a non-native app running in the background.

Re:Expensive, but saves on devices (1)

sjf (3790) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092767)

Not really. This is how an application must behave in order to get approved for the Apple Store.
Moreover, we can assume that Tom Tom are not beholden to the regular Apple agreement, since that also prohibits developing turn by turn voice navigation applications.
It's foolish to make assumptions about the behaviour of the OS from the terms of Apple's agreement, especially when Tom Tom are clearly a special case.
Plenty of applications available through Cydia can background.

ObComment: yes, way too expensive. I'll stick to xGPS for free from Cydia.

Re:Expensive, but saves on devices (1)

Anubis IV (1279820) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092745)

You can still run applications while using the phone operations, but whenever you receive a call, the phone preempts the active application to display the caller and the answer button on the screen. If you answer, the screen then displays the phone controls, such as speaker, conference call, hold, and other similar functions. To me, that sounds like the correct behavior, since if I'm talking on the phone, I want to have access to phone controls by default, unless I choose otherwise.

And you are capable of choosing otherwise. All you have to do is hit the home button while talking on the phone and you can launch other applications while the phone application operates in the background and displays a small bar across the top of the screen. So, viewing maps while talking would still be possible.

You're kidding me. (4, Insightful)

fahrvergnugen (228539) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092255)

Wow, this is a crap deal. How disappointing. Why is the app is 1.2GB in size, when the iPhone is designed as an always-on device? A $30 1GB app with paid map downloads on demand, instead of storing the entire USA on the phone at once, would make much more sense. I agree that streaming maps (such as the google maps app) are useless if you're in the sticks with no coverage or Edge-only coverage, but giving up over 1/8th or 1/16th of my total storage for maps I won't use 99% of the time is a terrible compromise. if I could install map packs based on my travel plans, that would make much more sense. And $100 for the USA, when I can buy a standalone TomTom 125 for $80? Unless the $100 app has feature parity with the $400 standalone units, the only conclusion I can come to is that they are trying to incentivise people away from using the iPhone app, and toward buying a dedicated GPS unit instead. I can think of no other excuse. Bad form, guys. I hope someone sees the market opportunity and steals your cake.

Re:You're kidding me. (1)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092417)

They're planning on releasing a gps/car kit so it can also be used with the iPod touch.

Re:You're kidding me. (1)

dubbreak (623656) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092721)

They're planning on releasing a gps/car kit so it can also be used with the iPod touch.

Which would explain the large file size (app + map data for North America). The size isn't even a slight surprise to me. It's definitely a lot more convenient than your phone downloading the same stuff over and over (yes they could do some kind of caching, but 1gb isn't much to complain about, seriously).

Because of upcoming release I was holding out on buying a small gps unit since I have an Ipod touch already. I'm glad I broke down and bought a small TomTom unit for ~$100 now that the pricing is out. If the app alone is £60, how much more is the cradle going to cost? I had envisioned getting the software and cradle for less than their current entry level hardware as the hardware is already there. Oh well. It'll eventually come down.

Re:You're kidding me. (1)

Enuratique (993250) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092423)

Wow, this is a crap deal. How disappointing. Bad form, guys. I hope someone sees the market opportunity and steals your cake.

Agreed. I've heard licensing the map data represents a healthy chunk of the cost so I doubt you'd ever see a competitor sell just the app for less than $50. Still, you've hit the head on the nail that this is TomTom trying to compete with the iPhone instead of complement it.

Re:You're kidding me. (1)

fahrvergnugen (228539) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092443)

Ugh. Sorry about that post. Slashdot ate my formatting, and of course I meant "$30 100MB app," not "1GB app." Need more coffee.

Re:You're kidding me. (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29092787)

Hmmm, you are missing the whole point of a 1.2 GB download (less if you don't want the entire Europe for example) which is that you don't have to download it everytime you go somewhere (even with some form of caching), even when you don't have a 3G/EDGE connection... You don't want to pay for it everytime either (not everybody has free & open wifi access points everywhere, especially in Europe).

Re:You're kidding me. (3, Insightful)

PhilHibbs (4537) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092819)

I disagree - having map data in poor signal areas is valuable, and also international data roaming charges are pretty horrendous. I didn't use my iPhone for sat nav while in France the last two weeks for the latter reason.

!GPS (-1)

Danathar (267989) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092283)

Why do people keep calling these things "Sat Nav" or GPS? It most CERTAINLY does not use space based satellites for navigation but uses cell tower and/or motion detectors to find out where you are. I was laughing when they guy said in the video "I don't have GPS indoors" and then proceeded to say that once it was outdoors it would be able to pick up the satellite.

Re:!GPS (2, Informative)

twoshortplanks (124523) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092353)

I think you're confused. A iPhone 3G / iPhone 3GS certainly does have GPS signal receiving hardware in it. It was, along with the new look and 3G, the main differences between the iPhone "Classic" and the new model.

Yes...I'm an idiot (1)

Danathar (267989) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092369)

Ok. I was wrong. I honestly did not understand that there is a GPS chip of somsort in my iphone.

Re:!GPS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29092379)

uh, iPhone has had GPS since the 3G model came out last year. Where have you been?

Re:!GPS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29092397)

Infact your wrong. If you look on Apples website (http://www.apple.com/iphone/iphone-3gs/maps-compass.html)

"iPhone 3GS finds your location quickly and accurately via GPS, Wi-Fi, and cellular towers. Drop a pin to mark your location or share it with others via email or MMS."

It uses a comblination of technologies. Cellular towers to get a location quickly and then GPS to get a more accurate position.

Re:!GPS (1)

fahrvergnugen (228539) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092401)

While you're correct about the original silver-back iPhone, the iPhone 3G & 3Gs have A-GPS. A-GPS is a system that uses cell tower & wireless hotspot triangulation to get the receiver's general location, then uses the GPS antenna to nail down the final position. In this way they can get a fix just as quickly as a device that only has a GPS antenna, while using less battery on the handset acquiring a signal.

Wrong (1)

aardwolf64 (160070) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092403)

Wrong... It uses cell tower-assisted GPS. This is most definitely GPS, and uses the GPS chip in the iPhone. It's not compatible with the original iPhone, because there is no GPS.

Re:!GPS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29092437)

Why do people keep calling these things "Sat Nav" or GPS? It most CERTAINLY does not use space based satellites for navigation but uses cell tower and/or motion detectors to find out where you are. I was laughing when they guy said in the video "I don't have GPS indoors" and then proceeded to say that once it was outdoors it would be able to pick up the satellite.

Because they *are* satellite navigation devices? The iPhone *does* have GPS built in, and CERTAINLY DOES use space based satellites for navigation. It DOES NOT use the cell tower or motion detectors to find out where you are.

You are terribly confused about how all this stuff actually works...

Re:!GPS (1)

Old97 (1341297) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092445)

Wrong. The iPhone 3G and 3Gs and the Pre have real GPS antennae. They are getting satellite navigation augmented by cell tower triangulation and motion for improved accuracy. It's SAT Nav alright.

Re:!GPS (1)

xjerky (128399) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092667)

Huh. I didn't realize that the 3G/3GS still used triangulation for assistance. I've wondered why both Google Maps and xGPS (for jailbroken iPhones) can almost immediately determine my location, but Navigon and Sygic take almost a minute to do so. Perhaps the latter apps rely on GPS only.

Re:!GPS (1)

Old97 (1341297) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092913)

GPS works by picking up multiple GPS satellites and then calculating an approximate location. It continually samples the incoming signals. The more satellites you can pick up at one time the better. Unfortunately if you are moving or under trees , tunnels or other cover then you will pick up fewer satellites and your accuracy will plummet. By the early 90's GPS navigation on vehicles was supplemented by inertial systems (motion) in order to improve accuracy at every given point. So the system would get a really good fix at one point and then use your motion to approximate the subsequent points you'd pass through until you get another good SAT fix. In the meantime you might intermittently get inferior data from a subset of available satellites which would also contribute their two cents. Cell phone triangulation just adds to this data and improves your accuracy and availability.

The original civilian available GPS was only accurate to about 50 meters - unless you sat still in an open area for awhile. Improvements in software and inertial guidance and now cell towers have dramatically improved accuracy even while in motion.

Re:!GPS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29092523)

Nice trolling!

Re:!GPS (0, Redundant)

Blakey Rat (99501) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092697)

Ooo, ooo, I want to pile-on the dumb post!

iPhone 3G and newer have GPS chips in them. Only the first generation iPhone uses cell towers to figure out its position!

Woo! Now I get a redundant mod!

Requirement (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29092299)

I've only developed one app for the iphone, but I remember reading the long list of requirements your app has to do to meet apple standards--one of which I believe is that it does need some action to handle phone calls so I'm under the impression that cutting out to take a call is not a developer fault, but rather a requirement.

receiving a call is the biggest complaint? (2, Insightful)

horatio (127595) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092335)

but if you receive a call while you're driving then the app does cut out -- it will restart once you've finished the conversation

My Garmin, when connected to my phone (any phone, not just iPhone) via bluetooth does exactly the same thing. It supresses the nav prompts until you complete the call. I don't understand why this is a complaint? Especially for this particular situation since you're running this app on a PHONE whose primary purpose is to receive CALLS. Or have I missed something obvious?

No, because TFA actually says "For those of you wondering what happens when you get a call, the app turns off but restarts as soon as you finish the call, so it's not too bad."

Re:receiving a call is the biggest complaint? (1)

Colonel Korn (1258968) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092559)

but if you receive a call while you're driving then the app does cut out -- it will restart once you've finished the conversation

My Garmin, when connected to my phone (any phone, not just iPhone) via bluetooth does exactly the same thing. It supresses the nav prompts until you complete the call. I don't understand why this is a complaint? Especially for this particular situation since you're running this app on a PHONE whose primary purpose is to receive CALLS. Or have I missed something obvious?

No, because TFA actually says "For those of you wondering what happens when you get a call, the app turns off but restarts as soon as you finish the call, so it's not too bad."

I agree that it's not a big deal, but it's true that on several year old WinMo phones you can receive or make a call without leaving your navigation program. That can be occasionally useful.

Re:receiving a call is the biggest complaint? (1)

nedlohs (1335013) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092599)

Because you might actually want to know about the freeway exit you needed to take when someone called to ask when you were arriving.

You might like the volume off, I'm sure other people don't and yet more other people don't want the map to vanish.

Re:receiving a call is the biggest complaint? (1)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092681)

...are you even supposed to be talking on your 'phone when driving?

Re:receiving a call is the biggest complaint? (1)

natehoy (1608657) | more than 4 years ago | (#29093005)

Think about it. This is someone who is using SatNav on a handheld. Receiving a call is simply replacing one distraction with another.

Actually, dropping SatNav when the phone rings is probably a brilliant move. Imagine someone driving in traffic trying to hold a phone conversation AND watch their SatNav. It leaves absolutely no hands free to eat a burger.

Anyway, you're right. You really should park somewhere so you can have your conversation without being distracted by pesky pedestrians bouncing off your hood. Let me tell you, if those buggers survive their screams can really drown out a conversation. Especially the younger ones. I've been in the middle of closing a tough deal, been about to say "Yes", and had some asshat I'm about to hit yell "NO!" and screw up the whole deal, tens of thousands of dollars. It's annoying.

An Outrageous Price! (1)

ajdowntown (91738) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092347)

The price on $99 just seems wildly optimistic to me on the parts of Tom-Tom. CoPilot also just release a new GPS maps software, but for only $35, about 1/3rd the price. So, is Tom-Tom really that much better to justify the steep price tag? I am not trying to troll, I really want to know if it is...? If I were to get the Tom-Tom software, I would most likely get the mount/GPS extender, which hasn't even released a price for yet, so the totally cost just sky-rockets. Find out more about the Tom-Tom iPhone software and mount at iPhone.tomtom.com

I am concerned by this application (2, Funny)

For a Free Internet (1594621) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092425)

In todays world we need to be vigilantly aware of the geopolitical implications of our computing. Wide-spread access to G.P.S. positioning system datas could allow terrorists or Italians to locate large crowds of innocent Americans or our Heroic Men Women and Children in Uniform more quickly, nefariously, and devastatingly. Why is no one talking about this? Everything has changed in the post-9/11 world!

Re:I am concerned by this application (1)

GigaHurtsMyRobot (1143329) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092647)

You're a redundant idiot idiot. Widespread access to GPS doesn't provide anyone anything, other than the ability to triangulate their own location. They are called GPS "RECEIVERS" for a reason... They do not transmit anything.

Re:I am concerned by this application (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29092851)

wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooosh. That was the sound of the joke flying past you, but you can't find it because you're only holding a reciever!

iPhone value prop (1)

Pointy_Hair (133077) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092637)

Is probably having on-board maps. The built in app works great as long as you have a good network connection. Get in an area without 3G and the buiilt-in app gets pretty useless if you're moving.

Telenav on the iPhone in the US (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29092657)

For those that don't know, TeleNav is available for the iPhone in the US. AT&T does charge a $10 a month fee to use it, but the app itself is free and available through the app store. It provides turn by turn and all the usual stuff. It also works with the iphone so that if you are playing music or get a call, it goes back to the nav and always saves recent places in it. This is the same app I used to have for free on my Sprint Instinct, and is the same thing Sprint Navigation on other phones is. It's just called AT&T Nav instead. I've always been happy with it from my Sprint phone and when I got my iphone a couple months ago, I decided it was worth the $10 a month for me to have the same app. I may cancel it here soon for using my in car nav system that I'm getting with my new vehicle.

Upcoming Car Kit (1)

JHromadka (88188) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092661)

Hopefully TomTom can get its upcoming car kit that has improved GPS and charging to work with the iPod Touch.

Typical..... (1, Troll)

LibertineR (591918) | more than 4 years ago | (#29092757)

Apple users will pay double for an app with functionality that we've had on our Blackberries for years.

I use the fantastic TeleNav app on my Blackberry Storm, an app that lets me call in addresses which are automatically downloaded to my phone. I dont have to type anything, EVER.

But, I do understand that no technology is actually REAL until Apple puts out something with it. Never mind that the first 2 iPhones didn't even have a GPS chip. Now that Apple's got this Tom-Tom app, GPS Turn-by-turn will be all the rage.

I keep forgetting that unless I wait years for the privilege of paying double, so that my technical toys come with that Apple logo, I just wont ever be a hipster!

WinMo (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29092825)

They've had a Windows Mobile version of Tom Tom for quite a while now.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...