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The Mindset of the Incoming College Freshmen

kdawson posted more than 4 years ago | from the we-have-always-lived-in-the-castle dept.

Education 383

Beloit College has come out with its annual Mindset List of what the incoming class (of 2013) has always known and has never known. "For these students, ... the Green Giant has always been Shrek, not the big guy picking vegetables. They have never used a card catalog to find a book. ... Tattoos have always been very chic and highly visible. ... Rap music has always been mainstream. ... Except for the present incumbent, the President has never inhaled. ... Amateur radio operators have never needed to know Morse code."

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383 comments

Sorry (5, Informative)

dakohli (1442929) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114155)

In my world, Britney Spears has never been featured on a Classic Rock Radio Station.
Dave

Re:Sorry (2, Interesting)

SgtKeeling (717065) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114263)

While most of the items on the list are true, some are off the mark as far as I'm concerned. "#64. CDs have never been sold in cardboard packaging" Personally, I see more and more CDs sold in cardboard rather than plastic these days. "#51. Britney Spears has always been heard on classic rock stations" Classic Rock Stations? I usually listen to the CBC (Talk Radio) or classic rock, and I've never heard Britney Spears on a rock station.

Re:Sorry (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29114523)

I think this is more about back when CDs first came out and were considered very valuable so they had larger boxes to both prevent casual theft.

WHAT THE FUCK (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29114719)

What the fuck? What is this bullshit? This is not "news". Put this shit back in Idle, or better yet, give it back to Oprah where it belongs.

Re:Sorry (5, Funny)

Fluffeh (1273756) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114697)

I just always assumed every other boy had my mindset when I hit that age.

Girls! GIRLS! GIRLS!!!

Re:Sorry (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29114721)

The Britney Spears thing is totally out of place. Besides the obvious that Britney Spears and rock stations usually don't mix, I haven't heard a classic rock station that plays anything that recent.

At least in the NYC area, the newest songs on the classic rock stations seem to be pulled from Nirvana's Nevermind, Pearl Jam's Ten, and Stone Temple Pilots' Core albums. All albums from 1991-1992. Britney Spears started out in what, 98 or 99 ?

Re:Sorry (1)

Kral_Blbec (1201285) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114731)

That surprised me to see. Britney spears as classic rock? What was he smoking?

Re:Sorry (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29115233)

I think the point is that to these kids Britney Spears is old music, something that happened before they were teenagers.

I would hope that their mindset involves... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29114169)

thinking about more important things than the Jolly Green Giant.

!news (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29114171)

get off my slashdot.

stuff that matters.

yeah right

Re:!news (3, Funny)

PBoyUK (1591865) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114221)

You must be new here...or wait, they must be new here. They're not new here yet, but will be new here soon, hence, news about being new here not yet but soon.

Not news new here? Not new.

hammered as the cubs won it all in 2012 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29114187)

hammered as the cubs won it all in 2012.

1984 much? (5, Interesting)

nadando (1234720) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114193)

'The European Union has always existed'.

Re:1984 much? (2, Interesting)

SleazyRidr (1563649) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114373)

The KGB has never officially existed.

Sounds like something that might have been true all along...

Re:1984 much? (5, Interesting)

gbarules2999 (1440265) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114633)

I know I'm not quite indicative of my fellow class of 2013 (I'm on Slashdot, dear lord), but this is nonsense. I know exactly who the Green Giant is and have eaten several of its products. I have indeed used a card catalog to find books, back in elementary and early middle school. Tattoos being chic is an opinion that is not shared by an entire generation.

The actual link has truth in the list occasionally, but I'm annoyed at the assumptions made.

Re:1984 much? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29114811)

As a part of the college class of 2010, I don't believe many of the things listed

Re:1984 much? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29115079)

I represent 100% of my generation when I say:
"Get off our lawn!"

Re:1984 much? (3, Insightful)

JimXugle (921609) | more than 4 years ago | (#29115183)

Indeed. The only things I could really relate to were the bits about chocolate chip cookie dough ice cream, GDP, and Blue Jello.

Honestly, this is basically a list of things to assume about the class of 2013 that you can bring out in conversation to insult their knowledge of history.

Broken rocking chair (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29114215)

Hey you kids, get off my lawn!

I remember record players, portable tape players, laptops that weighed a ton, actually having to manage hard drive space. And walking to class backwards in six feet of snow for at least ten miles.

And, no, you don't get your netbook back. You hit it through my window, now its mine.

"Tattoos have always been very chic" (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29114237)

Ah, the young white trash generation.

Re:"Tattoos have always been very chic" (5, Insightful)

Stargoat (658863) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114423)

There's something to that. This is a generation that grew up thinking Jerry Springer was normal and acceptable behavior.

Re:"Tattoos have always been very chic" (5, Insightful)

Nutria (679911) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114955)

This is a generation that grew up thinking Jerry Springer was normal and acceptable behavior.

Because their parents suck, politically-correct panty-waisted fools who "feel" their children won't love them if a parent say, means, and enforces:

No, you can not watch South Park! It's rated MA for a reason! Now go outside and practice with that Savage Model 40 we bought you last year, and don't be greedy when it's your sister's turn...

Re:"Tattoos have always been very chic" (5, Insightful)

samexner (1316083) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114449)

What gives you the right to say that? You're generalising my generation. You are implying that we all listen to rap, and we all conform. You are implying that we are all stupid, and we all are materialistic. I do not listen to rap. I listen to Slayer. I am not stupid. I kick my whole classes ass at the academic bowl every year. I know about these things. I know who the green giant is. We are not all ignorant. It's like me saying your generation is the pot smoking generation. Or maybe you're older. Maybe you're the racist generation. You can't generalise a whole generation of people. You're saying that all the people who will spend the vast majority of their life in the 21st century are ignorant conformists who listen to rap. That's not very fair of you.

Re:"Tattoos have always been very chic" (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29114483)

I do not listen to rap. I listen to Slayer.

Lol at this retort to a "white trash generation" claim.

Sorry buddy, but Slayer is no better than rap (1, Informative)

Rix (54095) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114487)

It's just a different genre of mindless grunting.

Re:Sorry buddy, but Slayer is no better than rap (2, Informative)

samexner (1316083) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114509)

But my point is we do not all listen to rap. Some of us might. And some of us might listen to Led Zeppelin and Rush.

Re:Sorry buddy, but Slayer is no better than rap (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29114681)

And then there's white trash like you who listen to Slayer.

Re:"Tattoos have always been very chic" (5, Insightful)

PBoyUK (1591865) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114669)

At what I feel may be a very real risk of WHOOSH, I'll respond. This hate on "generalising" is totally irrational. Humans are habit forming, pattern matching biological machines who owe a large part of our success as a species to the ability to generalise. Forming connections based on observed behaviours between multiple sources and using those connections to draw conclusions. Sometimes right, sometimes wrong, but largely useful. Surely you recognise that in even attempting to speak on the character on something as widely varied as the culture of a generation of people, you're dealing with such huge numbers of people that in order to say anything of non-obvious value means identifying the largest occupied unions of the set. What's crazy here is your apparent level of butthurt over someone putting a label on something which by your tone you already knew to be true.

Or maybe you're hating on generalisations for the sake of them being generalisations. Which is twisted in its own ironic way because it's not based on any proof that abstraction is a bad thing, but rather on the feared result of being subject to some inappropriate application of generalisation to an individual. So really you're damning generalisation as a whole because some idiots misuse it. Generalising generalising not out of its most frequent use, but most feared misuse, a highly faulty premise.

Funny this should come out today... (3, Interesting)

Deadstick (535032) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114253)

...I just told my Electronics 1001 students about the tube testers they used to have at Seven-Eleven. I'll have a 12AU6 and a Slurpee, please. rj

Re:Funny this should come out today... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29114757)

dude i would have LOVED to be alive in that day

Re: (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29114269)

"They have never used a card catalog to find a book"

What's a book?

Re: (2, Funny)

Tubal-Cain (1289912) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114887)

A PDF reader than can only display a single PDF file. It is immune to rm but is difficult to back up and doesn't have a search feature.

Seinfeld is "classic TV"... (2, Insightful)

cfa22 (1594513) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114285)

... and U2 sucks.

Re:Seinfeld is "classic TV"... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29114451)

... and U2 sucks.

That has always been true.

My conclusion.. (1)

bogaboga (793279) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114291)

America is in trouble. These are the same students who think that all countries along the equator are hotter than any desert in the USA.

Heck, I saw and almost touched snow on one mountain in Africa. Quite a revelation to me...I almost froze!

Re:My conclusion.. (1)

UltimApe (991552) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114469)

Not me, I read my biology and earth science books in a week for sixth grade.... I practically skipped 2 grades levels with my "knowledge". It is amazing how far a little interest in something can take you, especially when that interest coincides with curriculum.

Some things are rather benign in the grand scheme of things... the fact act the earth moves round the sun and not vice-versa, is of no real consequence unless you plan to go to outer-space and for most is little more than a passing curiosity.

However the fact that seasons change due to the tilt of the earth, and not the distance of the sun, has been invaluable.

I also blame sim-earth and related addictions.

Re:My conclusion.. (2, Interesting)

tonycheese (921278) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114489)

Why would that put us in any kind of trouble? Is it particularly important to know that some countries on the equator are cold? How is that relevant to anything? This list looks to me like an entertainment piece, reminding people of rapid culture changes in the US or the world. It doesn't exist to show us that we have a failing education system.

Re:My conclusion.. (1)

bogaboga (793279) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114749)

Why would that put us in any kind of trouble?

You will not categorize "Not knowing anything about other parts of the world" as particularly advantageous, will you? If all [ignorant] college going folks referenced in the article became future politicians, we surely would have "work" on our hands.

Re:My conclusion.. (1, Interesting)

Artifakt (700173) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114965)

I can think of several reasons why knowing some tropical regions are cold matters. For one, look at geopolitics:

South America - the left edge is where most of the mountains are, often leaving no more than narrow strips before you get to the seacoast. Peru and Argentina are both colder on average than is generally assumed by North Americans. So, is coca a tropical plant? Or is that just another assumption that follows from the first one? 'No one could grow coca in the Rocky mountains - it has to be imported from tropical countries like Columbia. We can win the war on drugs by fighting it there.'

Afghanistan - same situation, lots of areas above 10,000 feet mean it's colder than most people here assume. When they hear the stories about the Taliban or Al Quaida hiding in caves in the mountains, they believe them uncriticially, but the real situation involves many regions with incredibly dangerous winters, sometimes altitiudes and temperature combinations where most people cannot adapt, but simply weaken and die from long term exposure, and vast distances that must be crossed to to bring in water. There are serious reasons to doubt that many people can lay up in most of that terrain long term. There are places no one is desperate enough to try and farm, and anybody up that way is on the lam from someone. Either the government as a whole knows this and could narrow its searches for people such as Osama considerably, or they aren't listening to their geography experts at the CIA.

Re:My conclusion.. (1)

gbarules2999 (1440265) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114653)

Because labelling and then making assumptions about an entire generation is a great pastime once you grow older, I assume. they all seem to be doing it these days.

No, please, stay on my lawn... (4, Insightful)

Angst Badger (8636) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114295)

...with my eyesight failing from old age like this, it's too hard to aim if you're across the street.

Somewhere between reactionary neophilia and reactionary neophobia, there is a sparsely populated middle ground where things are evaluated on their own merits, and new things are not automatically good nor old things automatically bad, or vice versa. The modern predilection for the new is just as robotic and mindless as the pre-modern predilection for tradition, the only difference being that we're now indoctrinated into neophilia by advertising instead of being indoctrinated into neophobia by religion.

Maybe, if we learned from the past instead of ignoring it, we wouldn't feel compelled to reinvent COBOL every thirty years. Then we would have been spared the horror of Visual Basic, and then later, Python. Can't wait to see what the next lumbering reanimated monster from the forgotten past will be.

Oh wait, I can already guess: another implementation of Scheme.

Re:No, please, stay on my lawn... (3, Funny)

PBoyUK (1591865) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114357)

I find the concept of the reinvention of COBOL to be severely troubling. On the one hand, although Zombies are cool, they're still sufficiently dragged down by COBOL that the result would be terrible. On the other, a reinvention of COBOL could lead to the eventual development of time travel, fueled by the desire to go back and kill the nefarious project and/or creator in its infancy.

Re:No, please, stay on my lawn... (1)

Falconhell (1289630) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114399)

The only thing you learn fro history is thaty no one ever learns from history.

Great post oh ancient (4 digit ID) wise badger.

Re:No, please, stay on my lawn... (1)

Nyall (646782) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114707)

What the hell is with this obsession of low digit user ID's ?

Re:No, please, stay on my lawn... (1, Offtopic)

NewbieProgrammerMan (558327) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114445)

Ah yes, the horrors of Python. What are those, again? I mean apart from the standard "wtf significant whitespace" one.

Re:No, please, stay on my lawn... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29114907)

need there be a more significant indictment.

Re:No, please, stay on my lawn... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29115035)

yes.

Re:No, please, stay on my lawn... (1)

chthonicdaemon (670385) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114925)

I'm sorry, "the horror of ... python..."? Where did that come from? Wait, let me guess, the language would be great if it had "ends"" or, even better, used braces to delimit blocks.

Re:No, please, stay on my lawn... (1)

Alpha830RulZ (939527) | more than 4 years ago | (#29115131)

Well, you have to admit that a language with simple syntax, rich object libraries and reasonable performance that runs everywhere and is free has to be a bit suspect. Hell, we can't have our managers thinking we should be productive, can we?

Re:No, please, stay on my lawn... (1)

Alpha830RulZ (939527) | more than 4 years ago | (#29115119)

Then we would have been spared the horror of Visual Basic, and then later, Python.

Burn, you witch, BURN!

I have heard many critiques of/complaints about Python, but you are the first to compare it to COBOL. I would be curious as to how you would make that case.

We're Fucked (-1, Flamebait)

mindbrane (1548037) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114307)

We're fucked and we've fucked their future. I don't think that one's on the list, but, I'm guessing, it's something any bright grad will know.

Re:We're Fucked (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29114411)

Come on, a few trillion dollars in debt handed to the next generation is not a big deal. ;)

Fucked? Hell no! Not yet at least... (3, Insightful)

geekmux (1040042) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114493)

We're fucked and we've fucked their future. I don't think that one's on the list, but, I'm guessing, it's something any bright grad will know.

Are you fucking kidding me? They've got another 4 years and $95,000 worth of debt to rack up before they sue the college for not being handed a six-figure salary WITH their diploma. Yeah, talk about a fucked system.

IMHO, we haven't begun to see fucked yet, with the ignorance that MTV likes to portray as the Real World. Let's hope there are still some out there who still see the morality of the world today AND are bright enough to see that we have more than ONE political party out there.

Re:We're Fucked (5, Insightful)

Ralph Spoilsport (673134) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114573)

As an academic, part of what I do is try and get them to think. It's never been easy, but after 30 years of postmodernist bullshit, the layer of cynicism, empty irony, and clueless is so thick and self-reinforcing, it's much more difficult than it used to be to get through to these people. Last year was the hardest.

I quote, "What's wrong withe status quo? It works for me!"

Argh.

Re:We're Fucked (1)

LordKazan (558383) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114631)

blaming postmodernism for the results of a 30 year assault on the education system in this country is simply intellectually dishonest.

Re:We're Fucked (1)

LordKazan (558383) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114663)

adding to my last post.. of course someone who was complicit in that 30 year assault on our education system would also be exactly the type of person to use the term "postmodernist" in that fashion..

assuming that i am correct in that then...

you're blaming postmodernist for the results of the campaign against public education that you waged - you're complaining about the exact affects you WANTED to have biting you in the ass and displacing that blame on the group you constantly attack.

Assuming that i'm correct in making an educated guess at your beliefs based on your pulling a term out of thin air to demonize.

Tatoos and $$ (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29114313)

If I was a doctor Id get into tattoo removal asap. These gen Y peeps and their fugly tats will be running to the doctors office when they hit middle age.

Inhaled? (1)

rolfwind (528248) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114327)

"Except for the present incumbent, the President has never inhaled."

The president in the 90s has never inhaled either;)

Re:Inhaled? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29114347)

Snorted. The word is "Snorted".

Re:Inhaled? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29114385)

Exactly. When before would this even been a question? I thinks this means: Every president has smoked weed, but only one has actually 'inhaled.' YMMV

Re:Inhaled? (1)

Lord Ender (156273) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114557)

Yeah, I am confused by that, as well. Clinton did pot. Bush II was an alcoholic who also did coke. Obama is a smoker who did pot in his youth. What exactly is meant by that "the President never inhaled" statement?

Whipperspnappers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29114337)

We had to get our messages by listening to the audio tone over a 300 baud modem and were gratefull . . .

I must be young at heart (4, Interesting)

chebucto (992517) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114395)

I was born in the early 80s, and some of these things hold true for me, which is somehow reassuring
  • They have never used a card catalog to find a book.

I find it hard to believe that there aren't still a lot of school libraries out there that still use card catalogues. But what do I know.

  • Margaret Thatcher has always been a former prime minister.

I think there's at least a 10-year delay between birth and awareness of international politics; the first UK PM I remember John Major

  • Salsa has always outsold ketchup.

I do remember the excitement we all felt when Salsa was officially the fastest-growing condiment in North America. Heady days, those.

  • Text has always been hyper.

This is interesting. Wiki tells me the first web pages went up in December 1990. Those early days of the web have really moved into the realm of history, albeit recent history.

  • Bungee jumping has always been socially acceptable.

I don't recall it ever being socially unaccebtable, though I do know it was considered - and is, if you ask me - a stupid thing to do, up there with jumping out of perfectly good airplanes.

  • They have never understood the meaning of R.S.V.P.

Since when is RSVP out of our lexicon? I never got that memo.

  • The European Union has always existed.

Well, the European Community has existed since the 50s; this one's more of a technicality.

  • McDonald's has always been serving Happy Meals in China.

And Tianammen Square happened before they were born! Yikes.

  • Christopher Columbus has always been getting a bad rap.

I imagine this has been true since the 60s, at least.

  • The nation's key economic indicator has always been the Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

As opposed to what? The GNP?

  • Amateur radio operators have never needed to know Morse code.

And I bet there's someone on Slashdot who cares! :)

  • There have always been flat screen televisions.

I don't think there were any flat-screen TVs in 1991 - unless you count those flat-glass CRTs, which don't really count.

  • Britney Spears has always been heard on classic rock stations.

Hah! I doubt that happens very often.

  • Vice presidents of the United States have always had real power.

Quayle had power? Biden has power?

  • Migration of once independent media like radio, TV, videos and compact discs to the computer has never amazed them.

That only became blase in the late 90s, as far as I'm concerned

Re:I must be young at heart (1)

Burdell (228580) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114769)

I find it hard to believe that there aren't still a lot of school libraries out there that still use card catalogues. But what do I know.

My sister teaches sixth grade, and last year she mentioned something about the card catalog. She got blank looks from her class, and finally one of the smartest, most studious kids raised her hand and asked what my sister was talking about. There was also an intern teacher in the room, and she vaguely remembered it. She did remember what happened to the cards though; some students took out library books and looked at the back of the check-out card (where they stamp the due date), and they were the old cards from the card catalog.

Some things you expect younger people not to remember; some things are a surprise.

Re:I must be young at heart (1)

jmknsd (1184359) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114857)

I don't recall it ever being socially unaccebtable, though I do know it was considered - and is, if you ask me - a stupid thing to do, up there with jumping out of perfectly good airplanes.

I think your pilot might find it unacceptable if you try and bungee jump out of his plane

Re:I must be young at heart (1)

Ascagnel (826800) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114953)

The European Union has always existed.

Well, the European Community has existed since the 50s; this one's more of a technicality.

The formal body of the European Union (not the general European community) was formed in 1993.

Christopher Columbus has always been getting a bad rap.

I imagine this has been true since the 60s, at least.

As someone only a few years younger (mid-'80s birth), CC got a good rap in grammar school, but got progressively worse as I got older.

There have always been flat screen televisions.

I don't think there were any flat-screen TVs in 1991 - unless you count those flat-glass CRTs, which don't really count.

The first HDTVs and plasmas started coming out in the late 1990s (1997 IIRC). They were "flat", but I still remember my family's first TV set.

Britney Spears has always been heard on classic rock stations.

Hah! I doubt that happens very often.

*shudder* I'm with you on that.

Vice presidents of the United States have always had real power.

Quayle had power? Biden has power?

The VP has the tiebreaking vote in the Senate; although, I'm not sure if thats in an amendment or in the Constitution.

Migration of once independent media like radio, TV, videos and compact discs to the computer has never amazed them.

That only became blase in the late 90s, as far as I'm concerned

Media didn't really start to go online until 1997, or at around age 6 for this group. They might have recognized a computer, but not that their news was online (if they were even old enough to comprehend the news).

Here's a big one to add: For this age group, Bill Clinton always had an unfortunate dry-cleaning incident with a Gap dress.

Re:I must be young at heart (1)

Christopher Fritz (1550669) | more than 4 years ago | (#29115013)

It's interesting to think about, isn't it? I'm upwards of a few years older than you, so I can completely relate. I'm reminded of the Japanese animated movie from Studio Ghibli, "Whisper of the Heart". The main character is a girl in maybe junior high, and she discovers the books she's been checking out were all checked out by the same person before her--because of the cards. The movie also refers to the school's library moving away from the card system, which interested me to consider, as I was with the card system up through graduation in 1999! Coincidentally, I was waiting in the car earlier today, and to keep it from getting too hot, I "rolled down the window"--by pressing a button. I wonder which "incoming college freshmans" will have been the first to ask, "Why is it called 'rolling' the window up or down?"

Re:I must be young at heart (1)

rastilin (752802) | more than 4 years ago | (#29115253)

There's one quote that's going to stick with me, forgive me for not remembering it correctly however; I read this a while back.

Archeologists uncovered a tablet from thousands of years ago. Roughly about the same time as "The Epic of Gilgamesh", the oldest written story; in it, the writer sates. "I despair of the children of today, they are too interested in the modern stories, full of fire and fury, and do not pay attention to their crop records and studies."

So that's one thing that's been around forever. Self important idiots who think the world is ending with the next generation. Forgetting they were exactly the same.

Showing my age (1)

SleazyRidr (1563649) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114421)

20. American students have always lived anxiously with high-stakes educational testing.
...
32. The nation's key economic indicator has always been the Gross Domestic Product (GDP).
...
48. Elite American colleges have never been able to fix the price of tuition.
...
62. Members of Congress have always had to keep their checkbooks balanced since the closing of the House Bank.

I genuinely can't imagine a world before this stuff happened...

Yes I'll get off your lawn, but let me absorb some of your wisdom before I go.

Any other Beloit Alums on /.? (1)

ctmurray (1475885) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114439)

I attended Beloit, I think before they came up with the mindset list. The computer was fed with punch cards to program in Fortran I think. It was located in the basement of 1890's former science building (now the student union). Any other alum's read slashdot?

Re:Any other Beloit Alums on /.? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29114645)

Yes. Class of '96. I don't know where the student union is these days. It was 810 College Street when I was there. That building doubled as a dorm.

In my day student records were kept on a system in the basement of Chamberlain Hall which has since been torn down and replaced with a new science building. It's really a bit sad. The Math & CS department was in Chamberlain Hall. I spent a great deal of time there, along with quite a few Physics, Chemistry, and Biology students.

Re:Any other Beloit Alums on /.? (1)

Alpha830RulZ (939527) | more than 4 years ago | (#29115149)

Not from Beloit (Reed, actually), but I kicked a few decks of FORTRAN punch cards while I was there. In the 70's, punk. ;-)

off the top (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29114463)

  • Champions, medal winners, and all-stars at the Olympics and major professional sports leagues have always been suspected of using steroids or other performance enhancing drugs.
  • TV cop shows have always featured multiple intertwined plot threads, some of which lap into the next episode, fast camera cuts and off-camera dialog, and always have had an undercurrent of "who are the good guys, anyway?".
  • Toys have always featured software-controlled electronics.
  • PC and console games have always featured interactive 3D graphics with texture mapping.
  • The primary application on a personal computer has always been the Internet browser.

This list is probably drivel (1)

Nimey (114278) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114481)

I'm extrapolating from the 2002 list, which is the oldest one and for the class that was born the year after I was. Many of the things they claimed people of that age never experienced or were too young for, I knew about back then.

Granted, I'm a little sharper than the average, but it was just /full/ of inaccuracies. I don't expect this list to be all that much better.

A different setting for the same plot (1)

Logibeara (1620627) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114507)

Even though every single one of those statements are true, there are still many variations of personality and character. It's just a different setting for the same plot. Much less than a mindset, more like meaningless ramble of facts.

And soon Fermat's Last Theorem... (3, Interesting)

JoshuaZ (1134087) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114545)

Soon they will also be people who only remember when Fermat's Last Theorem was a solved problem, not one of the great mysteries told to young kids interested in mathematics. I've worked for a few years teaching number theory to highschool students and it came as a shock when I realized that I was teaching some students who had actually been born after Andrew Wiles had proved Fermat's Last Theorem. The proof of FLT was one of the defining moments in my mathematical childhold. And in a year or two, those kids will in college. There really isn't any simple problem that has the same wonderful history to rope kids into doing math by looking really easy and yet having such a convoluted and romantic history. Even the oldest two unsolved problems in mathematics (whether there are any odd perfect numbers and whether there are infinitely many even perfect numbers) don't have the same sort of romance to them: No one ever claimed they had a beautiful proof of these. Ok, someone now go ahead and mark this an off-topic ramble by an old-codger...

Re:And soon Fermat's Last Theorem... (3, Interesting)

biobogonics (513416) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114793)

Soon they will also be people who only remember when Fermat's Last Theorem was a solved problem, not one of the great mysteries told to young kids interested in mathematics.

The problem might be solved, but there still is a lingering mystery. Did Fermat have a proof by elementary methods? Does such a proof exist? But I suppose that since there is A proof, the impetus to find another one is mostly gone.

Shrek as Green Giant? (1)

SheeEttin (899897) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114551)

"the Green Giant has always been Shrek, not the big guy picking vegetables"? What are these people on? Shrek came out in 2001. Are they saying that we (yes, I am this precise age) never saw or heard a Green Giant commercial? I sure have.

I also take umbrage with some of their other points, like "Cable television systems have always offered telephone service and vice versa."
We used to have NYNEX (the New England Baby Bell) for telephone. (Hell, I think I still have a NYNEX umbrella somewhere...) TV was from an antenna on the roof. (It only came down when we had our hose re-roofed, about three years ago.) Internet access, when we got it, was dial-up (see NYNEX).

They have been preparing for the arrival of HDTV all their lives.

Nnnnnnnno. We only just got an HDTV a year or two ago. I'd hardly heard of it before that.

Nobody has been able to make a deposit in the Bank of Credit and Commerce International (BCCI).

I'll give them this one. I hadn't even heard of it.

Re:Shrek as Green Giant? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29114665)

Remember this is about mindset not complete fact. Some of the events listed happened so early in these kids lives to not mean anything to them. For example I was born in early 1980 before John Lennon was killed but for all practical purposes he has been dead to me my entire life. Even if he hadn't died till 1984 or so he would still be dead to me because I would have no memories of him being alive.

Re:Shrek as Green Giant? (1)

thatkid_2002 (1529917) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114799)

I was born in 1991... I have never heard of a Green Giant - but I am Australian so I have never heard of 75% of American crap.

Re:Shrek as Green Giant? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29114821)

Looking at the Green Giant Homepage [greengiant.com] (which seems to be a Betty Crocker brand?) They still have pictures of the Green Giant on the packaging. I still see it on packages in the freezer section of the grocery store. So maybe they are just refereeing to the ads?

And yeah, cable carrying more than TV itself was something that I knew existed, but wasn't in my home town till after I graduated high school (2002 HS grad, So Fall 1998-Spring 2002 was high school). But yeah, cable carrying something other than TV in the mid-90s wasn't there.

HDTV? Again I don't think I even heard the term till after I was out of high school. I knew of digital TV and that was supposed to happen in 2006. Perhaps the article should have used DTV.

Thanks everyone... (1)

timothyb89 (1259272) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114563)

For feeding the troll.

Seriously, what sort of article is this? The "generation" this story so fondly speaks of accounts for a pretty significant portion of the /. crowd.

Here I was thinking this would be more than trivia (1)

Quackers_McDuck (1367183) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114679)

Based on the headline and the fact that I was not in the idle section I expected this to be some sort of examination of incoming freshmen' opinions on things like education, drugs, and sex. Of course the article is instead just a collection of celebrity trivia and popular culture from the past twenty years.

What exactly is the author trying to convey? (1, Interesting)

Atriqus (826899) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114759)

"There have always been flat screen televisions"
"Margaret Thatcher has always been a former prime minister"

These statements are not a function of one's age, nor are they true as is. Is the author trying to say that we've got a group passing through that is so self-centered that they refuse to acknowledge any event prior to their birth? I was born in the 80s, but I know it's false to say "Winston Churchill has always been a former prime minister" or "CRT screens have always existed".

But why point out just the local generation gap? Why didn't the author include "The US has always been a country" or "There has always been written language"? How about "Earth has always had approximately 24 hour rotations" or "The atmosphere has always been about 20% oxygen"?

Then at the top are lines like "Members of the class of 2013 won't be surprised when they can charge a latte on their cell phone and curl up in the corner to read a textbook on an electronic screen.".... nor should anyone who has recently left the cave. Hell, the first guy I knew that got an eReader was in his 60s. You're not excused from observing your surroundings just because you've made it to (or past) middle-aged.

I'm writing this article off as a failed attempt at promoting ageism.

From my generation to yours... (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29114783)

I'm not sure why this isn't in the Idle section, or if this is "News" or a giant troll, if it isn't then you old timers are the real disappointment.
If it is a troll, then I fell for this bait but I had to let his out...

Let's go through a few of these...

"They have never used a card catalog to find a book." Yes, let's NOT use the advancements in databases and instant relational lookups....

"They have never had to âoeshake downâ an oral thermometer." Yes, please go back to using toxic mercury for nostalgia's sake.

"Rap music has always been main stream." So? We never stopped you from listening to whatever music you grew up with, quit being condescending on our childhood.

"Amateur radio operators have never needed to know Morse code." Should we know smoke signals as well?

"Someone has always been asking: âoeWas Iraq worth a war?â" Yea, I'm sure Vietnam wasn't an issue when you guys were going through college through the Hippy years.

"Migration of once independent media like radio, TV, videos and compact discs to the computer has never amazed them." You can't blame us for this, it's not our fault advances happened so rapidly in our times, whereas going from Mono to Stereo was the big thing in yours...

Your nostalgia's great and all, it just gets damned annoying when it starts being condescending....

I shall part with the following from your generation...

"UP YOURS!"

Few things. (2, Interesting)

Omniscient Lurker (1504701) | more than 4 years ago | (#29114873)

As a upcoming freshmen let me make a few points.
3. The Green Giant has always been Shrek, not the big guy picking vegetables.
Shrek came out in 2001. I remember part of the first 11 years of my life. Including the Jolly Green Giant (not much but enough to never call Shrek the green giant).
4. They have never used a card catalog to find a book.
My first Elementary School had one, so did the public library back then.
8. Tattoos have always been very chic and highly visible.
That's pretty regional, it is only in the last few years they have caught on where I live
19. They have never understood the meaning of R.S.V.P.
Send a Reply/Confirmation?
21. Except for the present incumbent, the President has never inhaled.
???
27. Christopher Columbus has always been getting a bad rap.
Not in my school(s).
44. There have always been flat screen televisions.
Maybe, but how many people had them earlier in the 90's (my childhood).
51. Britney Spears has always been heard on classic rock stations.
She didn't really become popular till the late 90s. How'd she get on classics for my entire life when she didn't start until halfway through it?
53. Someone has always been asking: "Was Iraq worth a war?"
They're gonna be asking that a long time.
54. Most communities have always had a mega-church.
I let this slide because they used "most".

#76 (1)

SilverJets (131916) | more than 4 years ago | (#29115087)

They don't truly know what Cc. stands for on an e-mail. Even if they do know it stands for the words "carbon copy" they don't know what a carbon copy is.

Of course this has been true for quite a few years.

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