Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

China Jails Four For Microsoft XP Piracy

CmdrTaco posted more than 5 years ago | from the imagine-what-they-do-if-you-make-a-silly-face dept.

Windows 164

adeelarshad82 writes "Chinese court has jailed four people for spreading their bootleg 'Tomato Garden' version of Microsoft's Windows XP program, in what the Xinhua news agency called the nation's biggest software piracy case. One of the four men Hong Lei, the creator of the downloadable 'Tomato Garden Windows XP' software, was jailed for three and a half years by a court in Suzhou in eastern China, Xinhua."

cancel ×

164 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Sounds Good (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29152043)

Is the Tomato Garden version of Windows XP as good as it sounds, and can it install Windows XP in English?

Re:Sounds Good (4, Funny)

Sulphur (1548251) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152633)

Have you ever been to a sewage plant, and seen the tomatoes they grow there?

Re:Sounds Good (3, Interesting)

timlyg (266415) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152891)

Well, I do wonder, given the nature and history of piracy in China, if this action of China is truly due to justice? or is it some personal jealousy political revenge thing?

Use Linux (5, Insightful)

dedazo (737510) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152045)

Seriously. I'm not one to loudly advocate using Linux on the desktop, but if it's a choice between jail and Linux... choose Linux. Use WINE if there's something you can't do without.

(I was going to make a Soviet Russia/Communist China joke here but I decided not to)

Re:Use Linux (4, Interesting)

wizardforce (1005805) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152213)

well said- MS may be hurting its self big time by cracking down on the pirates- its probably the easiest way they could have created an MS centric Chinese software market. Now people have a better reason to use FOSS based OSes than under a Chinese Windows pirating culture.

Re:Use Linux (3, Interesting)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152887)

I am unsure how much MS wants this crackdown. I think the government wants to clean up the piracy, because they can see clearly how invasive and pervasive Windows is. Red Flag Linux is the official operating system of Red Flagged China.

And, the crackdown WILL benefit China. No money being sent to the western Capitalist Pigs, for starters - not even for legal copies. People who are forced away from MS holding their hands (Hail, Clippy!) will be forced to learn how an operating system works - thereby creating more potential hackers to attack the Pentagon. China gains in their own security - there just aren't a lot of virus and trojan infections running on Linux.

Gates is on record, favoring piracy of MS Products over legal acquisitions of *nix: http://articles.latimes.com/2006/apr/09/business/fi-micropiracy9 [latimes.com]

Re:Use Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29153195)

People who are forced away from MS holding their hands (Hail, Clippy!) will be forced to learn how an operating system works

Umm... what?
I use both Windows and Linux. I have no real idea how an operating system works - sure, I know a little about how to USE a computer (i.e. I can format and reinstall my OS without calling tech support), but I definitely could not get remote access into any system that had even a simple password protection - at least not without learning much, much more than I ever need to do my day job.

Re:Use Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29153921)

No money being sent to the western Capitalist Pigs

What makes you think the Communist Pigs are better? It's not like "The Masses" are benefiting when the ruling elite gets paid instead. Since that's the case, why do you care where your money goes?

Re:Use Linux (1)

ciderVisor (1318765) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152313)

Use WINE if there's something you can't do without.

I can't do without Propellerheads Reason, you insensitive clod !

Re:Use Linux (1)

friesandgravy (1086677) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152881)

i know! seriously, as soon as reason can run under WINE i'm finally done with windows. it's honestly the only thing left.

Re:Use Linux (2, Informative)

X0563511 (793323) | more than 4 years ago | (#29154163)

But, it will run fine in virtualbox [virtualbox.org] , using the asio4all [asio4all.com] driver inside the VM. FLStudio will too, for that matter - though the GUI takes a bit more CPU than it normally would.

You still need a copy of windows however :/

Re:Use Linux (1)

mqduck (232646) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152771)

(I was going to make a Soviet Russia/Communist China joke here but I decided not to)

Which would have been ironic, because China is here going all-out to demonstrate their dedication to capitalist (private) property.

Re:Use Linux (5, Informative)

CharlyFoxtrot (1607527) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152949)

These aren't 4 random guys pirating Windows for their own use, so your suggestion to just use Linux isn't relevant. These assholes were trying to be 1337. From TFA:

Hong "created the Tomato Garden version of the Windows XP," which crippled the program's authentication and certification barriers, said Xinhua, allowing users unrestricted access to the popular Microsoft software. Millions of Internet users then had free access to the software on a website, tomatolei.com, which made its earnings from advertisements on the site, it said.

I think 3,5 years (and 2 years for 2 others) for maliciously ripping off someone else's work and distributing it is quite mild by China's standards. Hell with the current laws it might be mild by US standards.

Re:Use Linux (2, Funny)

fyoder (857358) | more than 5 years ago | (#29153209)

Hong "created the Tomato Garden version of the Windows XP," which crippled the program's authentication and certification barriers, said Xinhua, allowing users unrestricted access to the popular Microsoft software.

Huh? Isn't crippling crippling like a double negative? In effect they uncrippled it allowing unrestricted access to the software, something that paying customers don't even get. I think they're on to something. Microsoft should take note.

Big nothing. (5, Insightful)

Kuano (705538) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152067)

So let me get this straight. The largest piracy case ever in the largest country in the world with the most piracy in the world included 4 people?

Re:Big nothing. (5, Funny)

LaskoVortex (1153471) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152133)

So let me get this straight. The largest piracy case ever in the largest country in the world with the most piracy in the world included 4 people?

Yes. It's a shame. My heart really goes out to Microsoft on this one. I mean, the amount of disillusionment they must be feeling right now must be unbearable. All those years of fighting for justice and trying to make a good product and this is what they get? It's like a slap in the face. A real shame. It's like China doesn't give a rat's ass whether Microsoft turns a profit in their country or not, or any other American software company. I tell you what, I'm not going to buy Chinese products any more if they are going to treat American software producers like this. What a farce!

Re:Big nothing. (0, Offtopic)

cheftw (996831) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152311)

mod parent +1 Insightfunny?

Re:Big nothing. (4, Funny)

adolf (21054) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152321)

That's OK -- you'll likely be buying Chinese stuff anyway.

I bought a new thermostat for my car today from the local big-chain auto parts store. A quality Stant unit, at a quality price. Printed on the box it said "Made in USA" in about six different languages, but on the thermostat itself, stamped right into the metal, were the words "Made in China."

I'd have returned it, on this basis alone, but it was the only thermostat in stock in this town which would work with my old BMW, and I needed to get it fixed today.

Re:Big nothing. (5, Funny)

LaskoVortex (1153471) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152377)

Printed on the box it said "Made in USA"

They were talking about the box.

Re:Big nothing. (0, Redundant)

adolf (21054) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152855)

Oh.

Re:Big nothing. (2, Funny)

Migity (1199059) | more than 4 years ago | (#29153943)

That's right. You're a proud owner of a box made in the US. Don't tell me you just went and threw it away?!

Re:Big nothing. (0, Redundant)

BikeHelmet (1437881) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152993)

Why is this modded funny?

Re:Big nothing. (1)

lazyDog86 (1191443) | more than 5 years ago | (#29153179)

Why isn't this modded funny? Ironic incomprehension atop ironic incomprehension atop ironic... wait, why hasn't this be modded funny yet?

Re:Big nothing. (0, Redundant)

adolf (21054) | more than 4 years ago | (#29153717)

Precisely.

Re:Big nothing. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29153665)

It's a good reason to return it i guess (false or misleading advertising).

However, If you were searching for quality, you had probably found it. ..and if you want to make sure your $ stayed in the US, well you returned it to the store (in the US) meanwhile the factory (in China) already got paid.

Re:Big nothing. (1)

SL Baur (19540) | more than 5 years ago | (#29153421)

Yes. It's a shame. My heart really goes out to Microsoft on this one.

Nice post and you deserve the +5 funny I see on it.

When I worked at Turbolinux in 2000/2001 the hardest problem we had to solve in 6.5 was getting the retail price below the equivalent of US$10 in China (our secondary market).

Vast wealth is accumulating in China but it's not spread out very much. Vast population doesn't mean much market if most of the population doesn't have much yuan to spend.

Re:Big nothing. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29152135)

Yes, but they were very large people...

Re:Big nothing. (1)

skirtsteak_asshat (1622625) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152351)

I know right? China has, like, a BILLION PLUS PEOPLE! Surely they can make a better display by jailing a measly hundred thousand or so... I'm sure they have people picked out on rosters for the purpose... so what's holding them back? Windows 7 release candidates? Come ON!

Re:Big nothing. (0)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152457)

2 billion plus people actually.

Re:Big nothing. (1)

agnosticnixie (1481609) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152789)

No

Re:Big nothing. (1)

Zontar The Mindless (9002) | more than 5 years ago | (#29153531)

-1, Wrong [wikipedia.org] .

Re:Big nothing. (5, Informative)

PsychicX (866028) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152373)

I don't think you quite understand. These people didn't go to some torrent site and download Windows. They took Windows XP, built an illicit distribution with the activation bits etc removed, and sent that around -- probably for money. IOW, they enabled millions of other people to run stolen copies of Windows XP, possibly without even realizing it (third rate vendors have a nasty habit of using these bootleg Windows copies on their machines).

Re:Big nothing. (1)

tonycheese (921278) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152721)

Completely agree with this person. On top of that, China in my opinion has a terrible reputation for allowing these things to happen and turning a blind eye. Sentencing these people to a few years jail time signals to others that they can't be quite so blatant about their piracy anymore, as China is changing their stance on it.

Re:Big nothing. (2, Informative)

vintagepc (1388833) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152835)

The exact same thing happens with DVDs. You'll have vendors selling them for the equivalent of about $1 US, and they are all bootleg- nary impossible to find an original DVD.

Re:Big nothing. (3, Interesting)

SL Baur (19540) | more than 5 years ago | (#29153483)

On top of that, China in my opinion has a terrible reputation for allowing these things to happen and turning a blind eye.

Hey, when per capita yearly income is in the US$100s, how much demand do think there is for Microsoft Windows (or anything else) at a substantial percentage of that?

Sentencing these people to a few years jail time signals to others that they can't be quite so blatant about their piracy anymore, as China is changing their stance on it.

It's a slap on the wrist and probably the result of some kind of deal.

When I worked for Turbolinux in the early 2000s we sold to 3 markets - Japan, China and the US. In Japan we were #1 for awhile due to all the proprietary goodies we could attach to the system. China was #2 and US was #3. I don't think Turbo ever turned a profit in the US.

I spent a week in 2001 in Beijing with the Chinese office as we were working on getting the price point below US$10 per retail sale. That's still rather expensive.

Re:Big nothing. (1)

anarche (1525323) | more than 4 years ago | (#29154195)

On top of that, China in my opinion has a terrible reputation for allowing these things to happen and turning a blind eye.

Hey, when per capita yearly income is in the US$100s, how much demand do think there is for Microsoft Windows (or anything else) at a substantial percentage of that?

So by that logic all "poor" countries should be allowed to pirate? China is the third-largest and the fastest growing economy in the world; if their people are so poor, where is all their money?

Perhaps their workers need to sort their sh*t out and organise decent wages?? Or the government could let them get away with piracy, stealing money from the west while maintaining low wages and maintaining its status as the manufacturing centre of the world (resulting in more western goods being sent there to be pirated)..

Re:Big nothing. (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29153145)

They took Windows XP, built an illicit distribution with the activation bits etc removed

Sounds nicer than the copy most of the world pays for. Considering I've seen "Activation" shut down a small business who was using Windows 2003 legitimately before, I'd say it sounds a lot less like running your business on a minefield than with the usual copy of Windows...

Re:Big nothing. (1)

belmolis (702863) | more than 5 years ago | (#29153167)

With all the trouble Microsoft has been having recently, they'd probably be smart to hire these guys.

Re:Big nothing. (1)

ozmanjusri (601766) | more than 4 years ago | (#29154219)

third rate vendors have a nasty habit of using these bootleg Windows copies on their machines

Why nasty?

Independent distros of Windows are a lot better than the official releases.

Try TinyXP, for example. It's compact, fast, doesn't report you activities to its masters, and has better default tools and settings than the MS version. What's to complain about?

Re:Big nothing. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29152447)

Does that mean that there are bigger piracy in my dorm than China ? haha...

Re:Big nothing. (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29153229)

In China, it's traditional to round up a "Gang of Four" when the state sees fit to make some dangerous or rascallian element the object of a show trial.

Not to be confused with this [amazon.com] .

Re:Big nothing. (1)

tufa.king.nerdy (1622029) | more than 5 years ago | (#29153381)

4 isn't a big nothing. That's 2.98816767476587e-7% of the population!

Re:Big nothing. (1)

anarche (1525323) | more than 4 years ago | (#29154173)

And the main "offender" got 3 and a half years...

interesting (1, Informative)

wizardforce (1005805) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152077)

I wondered why China would bother upholding the copyright of a foreign country now when CHina has a history of lax copyright enforcement in the past until the BSA got involved that is:

In June last year, the Business Software Allianceâ"a business coalition campaigning against commercial piracyâ"complained to Chinese authorities, and Hong and his colleagues were arrested later in the year.

Re:interesting (2, Interesting)

lonefolf (1621311) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152113)

Maybe their worried about upholding US copyrights because we make their firewall software...

Re:interesting (1)

wizardforce (1005805) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152153)

either that or the BSA found a few of the higher ups in the govt. and decided to send them a fruit basket. BSA gives them a gift for nailing these guys for infringement, China gets to look more responsible in so far as copyright law and the population get one more reminder who is boss. it's a win for everyone but the Chinese people.

Re:interesting (1)

anarche (1525323) | more than 4 years ago | (#29154205)

...it's a win for everyone but the Chinese people.

And Microsoft shareholders. Have they found all distribution points for the window overlooking the tomato patch?

just to say that we do uphold them (2, Insightful)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152117)

just to say that we do uphold them

Because they're about to start writing software (4, Insightful)

copponex (13876) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152227)

Some of the big bosses in the party have a lot of industries that they run. They're probably realizing that:

1) Intellectual Property and Copyright laws are becoming acceptable in most of the world

2) Pretty soon they won't be just manufacturing things, they will be designing and selling Chinese ideas on foreign soil.

Sorry, but hardly anyone America can compel anyone in China to do anything. They are in their second millennium of being a civilization. They are stockpiling oil, uranium, and millions of tons of other raw materials with all of the American dollars they have. They will be the major economy of the 21st Century, no matter what we do. They are probably looking into the future, and realizing they will have no legal pretext to sue or invade if we start pirating their technology, unless they start obeying the "law" now.

Re:Because they're about to start writing software (2, Interesting)

wizardforce (1005805) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152251)

realizing they will have no legal pretext to sue or invade if we start pirating their technology, unless they start obeying the "law" now.

I didn't think China needed a legal reason to do whatever it wants outside of its borders... especially if it indeed does become the dominant economy on the planet... presumably that entails the strongest military and really if they wanted to invade some country at that point there probably wouldn't be much the world would do about it.

Re:Because they're about to start writing software (3, Insightful)

copponex (13876) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152307)

Colonial powers have always had some sort of excuse or pretext. It's not necessary for the victims of their empires - they usually know what's going on - it's so that their internal populations are on board with the operation.

The "because we want to" method hasn't worked well since the 60s, and it never hurts to have a more believable excuse for sending a generation of children to fight and die in a foreign land.

Re:Because they're about to start writing software (1)

wizardforce (1005805) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152353)

as I understood it, China has control over the vast majority of media- would the population even need a reason more than whatever the govt told them? eg. they are taking our resources... why bother with copyright?

Re:Because they're about to start writing software (1)

mqduck (232646) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152841)

You're right except for one part:

[Pretext]'s not necessary for the victims of their empires - they usually know what's going on

On the contrary, framing the invasion as just is nowhere more important than at the target of invasion. Do you think we hold elections and set up ostensibly sovereign governments in the places we invade for our own benefit?

If the war goes well, there's no need to give more than some small token justification (if that) to the citizens of the invading nation, whose default attitude is to "support the troops".

Third, of course, is justifying your invasion to the rest of the world, a problem made obsolete by the brilliant strategy of fucking a people over and then declaring that you have the moral obligation to stay and make things better, changing your head of state and declaring the criminal nature of your actions to be no longer relevant.

Re:Because they're about to start writing software (1)

vintagepc (1388833) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152853)

No... "because we want to" has turned in to "because we can" with regards to the MAFIAA and RIAA. What they're doing is basically quasi-legal extortion, IMHO.

Re:Because they're about to start writing software (1)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 5 years ago | (#29153301)

if it indeed does become the dominant economy on the planet... presumably that entails the strongest military and really if they wanted to invade some country at that point there probably wouldn't be much the world would do about it.

It is unlikely to become dominant the way the US has been for the last couple of decades. We'll see a transition from the mono-polar world of US hegemony to multi-polar with China, the US, the EU and maybe India if they get their heads out of their bureaucratic asses. In that situation China may perhaps be #1 but only in a very close race such that an alliance of any of the others would be more powerful than China.

Re:Because they're about to start writing software (1, Informative)

colinrichardday (768814) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152309)

They are in their second millennium of being a civilization.

More like their third, at least. Chinese civilization certainly extends back past 1 BCE.

Re:Because they're about to start writing software (1)

mindbrane (1548037) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152421)

Chinese civilization can be said to have begun about 1500+ BCE, but, as always, it depends on the criteria. Early Chinese civilizations didn't use stone to the same extent as Mediterranean area early civilizations so the artifacts aren't as easy to come by. The problem I have with trying to think in terms of China's position over the near future is that I'm unsure to what extent China is a coalesced entity or a fiction. It's history is one of amalgamation by various warring peoples and even today there are signs of unrest in Muslim areas. Written Chinese is interesting in that the characters, though far too numerous, allow for disparate spoken dialects to share the same printed material. E.O. Wilson wrote that China is the test case for the modern world surviving over population and pollution; but I can't see 'China' as it is today being the China that will come out of the wash of its current state.

Re:Because they're about to start writing software (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29152359)

Several industries made the joint venture with China, and the tradeoff would be the access to a huge market. The fact is that this market is not interested in buying stuff from the company: they create a excuse where a great part of orders must be cancelled.

They pirated processes from every kind of products around the globe, and now they want to pose as paladins of copyright. Very soon they will pirate Al Gore and will be the paladins of green and clean world after burning tons of coal and flooding several cities.

Personally, Im not buying even nails from them.

Re:Because they're about to start writing software (1)

Type44Q (1233630) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152867)

"no legal pretext to... invade"

That damn legal pretext thing again - constantly interfering with the plans of invading armies since... ?

Re:Because they're about to start writing software (0, Troll)

Stormwatch (703920) | more than 4 years ago | (#29153549)

Intellectual Property and Copyright laws are becoming acceptable in most of the world

Weird, I thought people were finally realizing that this "intellectual property" thing is a massive scam.

Re:Because they're about to start writing software (1)

anarche (1525323) | more than 4 years ago | (#29154223)

Because most people do not create, only consume.

IP is not a scam, patents are; they disallow someone from independently researching, experimenting and creating something from scratch if it is close enough to an existing product that a more expensive lawyer can defend the existing product.

Re:Because they're about to start writing software (5, Insightful)

Zontar The Mindless (9002) | more than 4 years ago | (#29153589)

They are in their second millennium of being a civilization.

Second millennium? More like fifth or sixth.

In lieu of a car analogy, I offer the following:

Just imagine what things would be like in Egypt if the Egyptians still wrote with hieroglyphics and worshipped at temples dedicated to Ra and company... and that the Pharaohs had been overthrown only within the last century or so.

Now substitute "China/Chinese" for "Egypt/Egyptian", "ideograms" for "hieroglyphics", "Shangdi" for "Ra and Co.", and "Chinese Emperors" for "Pharaohs".

That's China.

China is beyond "old"; it was already old when the Romans kicked out Tarquin the Proud.

Most Westerners -- especially Americans, for whom "ancient" means "more than 250 years ago" -- simply do not get this.

Re:Because they're about to start writing software (1)

anarche (1525323) | more than 4 years ago | (#29154217)

They have a pretext prepared: "Taiwan was ours and we want it back"; the same excuse they used for Tibet in 1949.

The US has promised to defend Taiwan if the Taiwanese want

Is the world ready for a war between the US and China? And can India come to the power table? Personally I hope the British join the EU in full...

Re:interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29153735)

This is how it works;

The big software companies in China will use a 'softly' approach to anti-piracy with big-easy-target users.

Call up their IT deptmartments, tell them they know they are using pirated licenses, offer them a great deal to make it legal.

The more resistance from the user and the more 'evidence' the software company can find the closer they go to an actual legal case.

The smart software companies avoid letting it get to anything significantly 'legal', since this is expensive (ie lawyers) and this makes an enemy of your future 'customer'.

In some kind of cycle, the users in a given area get less and less interested in playing ball with the software companies, until something scary happens.

usually, thats when the software company will call up their buddies at the BSA and they dig up some big pirate they already know about and either raid them, sue their ass off or arrest them (or all three). Then comes the big PR blitz to make sure everybody knows about it.

Of course it is rarely the big SOE company or big user who is targeted, it usually a foreign owned company or piracy source. The goal is to put fear back into market place.

For the BSA to make this happen they have to have support from the local IP protection office, which is where the fruit basket etc comes in. Actually I noticed last year the 'fruit basket' was more often 'provide funding for xyz IP education project'.

Recently, in fear of social instability, the IP protection office has been told to keep it quiet for a while. The central government much prefers companies are able to keep paying workers wages as opposed to what is usually considered a luxury item; software licenses.

Actually the days of sue first, sell later are disapearing in China rapidly. The new-wave of successful software companies operating in China are focusing on services and good old fashioned sales-fu to get user to become legal.

Panties STINK! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29152081)

Panties Stink!
They really, really stink!
Sometimes they're red, sometimes they're green,
Sometimes they're white or black or pink
Sometimes they're satin, sometimes they're lace
Sometimes they're cotton and soak up stains
But at the end of the day, it really makes you think
Wooooooo-wheeeee! Panties stink!

Sometimes they're on the bathroom floor
Your girlfriend- what a whore!
Sometimes they're warm and wet and raw
From beneath the skirt of your mother-in-law
Brownish stains from daily wear
A gusset full of pubic hair
Just make sure your nose is ready
For the tang of a sweat-soaked wedgie
In your hand a pair of drawers
With a funky feminine discharge
Give your nose a rest, fix yourself a drink
cause wooooooo-wheeeeeee! panties stink!

Re:Panties STINK! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29152959)

You're doing it wrong!

Their Biggest One? Really? (1, Redundant)

Greyfox (87712) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152111)

Four guys pirating windows and that's their biggest case of piracy? Really? You could only find four guys doing that? I think your search method could use a little refining there, buddy...

Re:Their Biggest One? Really? (1)

wizardforce (1005805) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152181)

how many does it take to run a website? p2p network? the number of people can be very small considering that electronic data can be copied cheaply and for all intents and purposes infinitely with little effort.

Re:Their Biggest One? Really? (3, Funny)

ubrgeek (679399) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152225)

> I think your search method could use a little refining there
Yeah, next time try Bing ;)

Re:Their Biggest One? Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29153227)

They were using Bing. That's what they get for not using Google. Or Baidu.

Re:Their Biggest One? Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29153567)

How many people were being sued for the pirate bay?

Tomato garden (3, Funny)

jack2000 (1178961) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152115)

This is actually a veggie mafia thing. See the Tomatoes were getting uppity and the Corn boss had them canned....

Re:Tomato garden (1)

alienunknown (1279178) | more than 4 years ago | (#29153693)

This is actually a veggie mafia thing. See the Tomatoes were getting uppity and the Corn boss had them canned....

Veggie mafia conflicts always end badly. [pbfcomics.com]

This is why (1)

Marko DeBeeste (761376) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152183)

In America, we PADLOCK our dumpsters, just to prevent such mischief

Woo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29152217)

It is about time China starts to believe in intellectual propertz.

tomato garden? (1)

SHaFT7 (612918) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152219)

FCKGW?

This is why I don't subscribe... (1)

Kawahee (901497) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152369)

Off the four men

You mean "of", right? I know it's China, but do we really want to off them?

Re:This is why I don't subscribe... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29153653)

Off the four men

You mean "of", right? I know it's China, but do we really want to off them?

I'll see your month and lower you two weeks.

Windows XP? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29152371)

Whew! Good thing they're starting to crack down on this copyright infringement. Wouldn't want it to cut into sales of this no-longer-available product.

Re:Windows XP? (1)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152613)

No, but it would cut heavy into Vista/7 sales. Those "pirates" will remain untouched. For now

There they go... (0, Flamebait)

nature_geek (1280632) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152395)

... exporting poisonous toys again.

Tomato Garden? (2, Funny)

cffrost (885375) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152407)

I suspect that China came down on these four not for distributing their counterfeit "Tomato Garden" version per se, but for their failure to supply the proper MSDN VLK "Corporate" Professional edition.

Misleading summary! (4, Funny)

Nicolas MONNET (4727) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152495)

I believe there is an error in the translation; the ideogram for "piracy" is very close to the one for "massive pile of stinking shit", and therefore, the headline should actually read: "China jails four for still Using IE6"

i see most of you dont understand why this is big (1)

indents4 (1622641) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152545)

i see most of you dont understand why this is named the biggest case.it was not made by lots of people,but it was used by nearly all the nation.considered of its effect, it is the biggest one. --- for linux in China, thanks to the banks and the biggest IM company,on-line games and the p2p movie software, It is really hard for you to choose linux totally

Business feasibility (4, Interesting)

stimpleton (732392) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152577)

A friend of mine has been doing business as a foreign company in china for a few years.

He is very matter of fact about it. You build into your budget, the kickback amounts.

I have thought about this a bit, and the attutide is somewhat akin to the tipping/no tipping cultures. I spent time in the US and once I accepted tipping I saw it was a better system. Without kickbacks/bribes you just cannot operate as a foreign company. A kickback is almost regarded as a tip in China.

Re:Business feasibility (1)

gujo-odori (473191) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152653)

I used to live in Viet Nam, and things are pretty much the same way. I can't speak to the kickback issue personally, but WRT bribery, I can say that bribery fuels pretty much everything. Stopped by a traffic cop? A bribe will avoid a ticket.Not getting the service you need at a government office? A bribe will fix it.

Sadly, getting proper care for my mother-in-law when she was in the hospital also involved bribing the nurses, so nothing is perfect, but by and large, bribery smooths over a lot of bumps there.

Re:Business feasibility (1)

Merls the Sneaky (1031058) | more than 5 years ago | (#29152975)

So if you're broke you're screwed?

Re:Business feasibility (1)

belmolis (702863) | more than 5 years ago | (#29153275)

Yes. Of course, capitalist countries without a health care system manage this without bribes.

Re:Business feasibility (1)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 5 years ago | (#29153283)

Yes. Of course, capitalist countries without a health care system manage this without bribes.

If only we could have socialized government services so you don't need to bribe that cop or the local building inspector or the licensing clerk or the judge...

Re:Business feasibility (1)

adolf (21054) | more than 4 years ago | (#29153739)

Oh, please. We deserve pay-through-the-nose private health care for everyone who manages to work hard enough -- we've earned it!

Capitalism FTW!!!!1!!!, er sth.

(I write this as I contemplate calling a surgeon about a half dozen or so lypomas [wikipedia.org] that have grown since the last time I had some excised. They're probably nothing, but there's a significant chance that they're a horrible cancer that will kill me in a hurry. So great it is, living as a tax-paying, insurance-card-holding American, that I must contemplate having these things looked at before actually doing it. Yeah.)

Re:Business feasibility (1)

tobiah (308208) | more than 4 years ago | (#29153743)

+1 insightfunny

I know what they said when they grabbed them: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29152775)

SUPPLIES!

Well?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29152863)

Where the fuck is the website where I can download this thing and take a look at it? It's not on any torret sites. Nobody has any fucking links. The articles mention a website but I can't find stink of it anywhere. What the fuck?!?!!!

srsly (5, Interesting)

grrrl (110084) | more than 5 years ago | (#29153073)

so making MONEY from setting up a business distributing copies of XP you altered intentionally and distribute to millions gets your 3 1/2 years but downloading a few songs for personal use gets you whacked with millions in damages which will cripple your life?

Re:srsly (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29153193)

so making MONEY from setting up a business distributing copies of XP you altered intentionally and distribute to millions gets your 3 1/2 years but downloading a few songs for personal use gets you whacked with millions in damages which will cripple your life?

In all fairness, many types of music today that people download for personal use will cause a "disappearance" in China. Which may be good or bad, depending on how you think we should treat the people who still support some of the crap that comes out today.

Pirate Microsoft Windows, go to jail (0, Troll)

SL Baur (19540) | more than 5 years ago | (#29153371)

W00t! Throw away the key while you're at it, too.

I am willing to bet that everyone who mods me down has pirated Microsoft Windows. So many of the fan bois here claim to do it ...

In other news... (1)

sethstorm (512897) | more than 4 years ago | (#29153889)

...someone fell out of favor with the Communist Party of China. Perhaps they forgot to bribe someone?

Tomato Garden Windows XP? Never heard of it before (2, Funny)

consumer_whore (652448) | more than 4 years ago | (#29153909)

I'm going to download this to find out what all this hubub is about. Anyone have a torrent?

It's the same everywhere.... (1)

XB-70 (812342) | more than 4 years ago | (#29153981)

This just proves that criminals are dumb.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>