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Swedish Authorities Attempt Pirate Bay Shutdown

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 4 years ago | from the like-a-virtual-bullfighter dept.

The Internet 348

Several sources are discussing the recent attempted shutdown of The Pirate Bay by Swedish authorities. It seems that following the recent court defeats and the pending civil actions, Swedish authorities threatened TPB's main bandwidth supplier with a hefty fine in order to get them shut down. Not surprisingly TPB has relocated and is back online although the tracker still seems to be down. As a gesture of their "appreciation" TPB plans on sending a mocking t-shirt to the people believed responsible for the takedown attempt.

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348 comments

How long can they fight it (4, Interesting)

sopssa (1498795) | more than 4 years ago | (#29177749)

This is really just the last attemps to remain online. How long will it take until they're closed at another ISP again? (TPB is down again btw). And how long will it take until their domain is pulled down?

This time they're not just arguing against media companies/RIAA/MPAA in USA, but their own goverment and courts. Shit is going to hit the wall.

And with the latest GGF buyout news and suspected inside trading with stocks, losing in swedish courts and everything happening with them recently, this just seems like the last attemps to get the remaining money off the site.

Personally, I would like to see them stay online and fight for the values they have (or are giving to people). But it really doesn't seem like its going to happen.

The thing is, The PiratePirate Bay's talk about "but we only host the .torrent files, not the files" didn't work out for them. It's also pretty clear what was The Pirate Bay's purpose, along how they mocked companies asking to remove content. The point being they are clearly breaking the law and giving technical excuses for it, while the purpose counts just as good (and I'm saying this as a swedish person)

Sadly, it seems like the world is going to more closed place again by what goverments do. I dont want USA's laws here either. But instead of the clear pro-warez propaganda of all of the Pirate Parties, they should go more for net neutrality, freedom of speech and making people understand why they should be valued and what can happen if those rights are taken away. "But we just want free warez and dont want to pay for entertainment!" is not going to work, and it is the wrong kind of agenda. You should pay for people who spend tons of it, or just not use it like any other product. Just because it can be digitized on your computer doesn't mean you should be able to get it for free.

It's interesting to see how this develops however. Persons behind TPB have a great idea about freedom and net neutrality. It would be sad to see them getting beaten, even if I dont agree with TPB's main purpose.

Re:How long can they fight it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29177833)

Wow. Did you have that block of text all ready to go? Because the time of your comment (4:44) is the exact same minute as the story (4:44), and it's clearly too much text to write in less than 60 seconds.

Re:How long can they fight it (2, Informative)

hansamurai (907719) | more than 4 years ago | (#29177881)

by sopssa (1498795) *

That * means he's a subscriber. Gets to see into the future or whatever.

Re:How long can they fight it (1)

SoVeryTired (967875) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178463)

Muad'Dib could indeed see the Future, but you must understand the limits of this power. Think of sight. You have eyes, yet cannot see without light. If you are on the floor of a valley, you cannot see beyond your valley. Just so, Muad'Dib could not always choose to look across the mysterious terrain.

Re:How long can they fight it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29177909)

He's a subscriber, and so gets to see the stories early. Ha Ha, yew must b gnu hear!

Re:How long can they fight it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29177921)

Subscribers get early access to stories.

Re:How long can they fight it (1)

NotQuiteReal (608241) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178259)

Wow. Did you have that block of text all ready to go? Because the time of your comment (4:44) is the exact same minute as the story (4:44), and it's clearly too much text to write in less than 60 seconds.

I knew you were going to say that. Because it is only 2:21 where I am, so I must have early access to the replies to first posts by subscribers! Whee...

Re:How long can they fight it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29177875)

But instead of the clear pro-warez propaganda of all of the Pirate Parties, they should go more for net neutrality, freedom of speech and making people understand why they should be valued and what can happen if those rights are taken away. "But we just want free warez and dont want to pay for entertainment!" is not going to work, and it is the wrong kind of agenda

What pro-warez propaganda are you talking about? And the rest, you really should read to clue you in a little more before starting to ride the high horse.

Re:How long can they fight it (0, Troll)

sexconker (1179573) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178003)

I know, because we only use TPB for Linux distros, right?

You're a pirate and you steal movies, music, programs, and games.
At least fucking admit to it.

Re:How long can they fight it (4, Funny)

computational super (740265) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178315)

Well, in my defense, I'm too dumb to figure out *how* to use bittorrent, so I don't use it to download anything, legal or illegal. But I'm still rooting for them.

Re:How long can they fight it (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29178411)

nope.. it's about ensuring that value is actually transferred. for example, I buy a game and the drm bs doesn't let me play it properly. I can download a cracked copy. Sure, most people just dl, but as long as content providers feel entitled to my money, my rights, and even the product I BUY from them post sale, safety valves like this will exist. Fuck 'em.

Re:How long can they fight it (5, Interesting)

Crunchie Frog (791929) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178561)

I know, because we only use TPB for Linux distros, right?

You're a pirate and you steal movies, music, programs, and games.

At least fucking admit to it.

No he's not a pirate and no he doesn't steal yada yada.

He may be a copyright infringer, and he may be infringing on the copyright of movies, music, programs and games. There's a difference, despite what Big Money would say / like you to believe. Maybe that should be admitted, because its closer to the truth than your rhetoric.

Re:How long can they fight it (0, Flamebait)

sexconker (1179573) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178655)

Derp derp.
I took something I didn't pay for.
I'm not stealing.

Derp derp.
We do it on a massive scale, and we're an organized band of non-stealers.
We're not pirates.

Derp.

Re:How long can they fight it (4, Insightful)

g253 (855070) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178683)

I personnaly don't steal anything, but I do share those things.

Re:How long can they fight it (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29177893)

The point being they are clearly breaking the law

Are you a legal expert? Decision is still pending, and you're spreading weasel words trying to make a point that what they are doing is illegal? I smell a troll somewhere....

Re:How long can they fight it (2, Informative)

sopssa (1498795) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178195)

I'm just telling that the intention counts in courts aswell. If its as clear as The Pirate Bay is and how they handled to all the DMCA requests (even if theres no such law in sweden, but common sense works long way), judges are going to see and punish for it. You cannot get around that with technical reasonings like "but we dont host the files, we just provide .torrent files". And before anyone jumps on the "but then Google should be sued and shutdown too" bullshit, everyone can see the difference between TPB and Google.

Re:How long can they fight it (4, Insightful)

digitalunity (19107) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178295)

I fully support any foreign governments that choose to ignore the draconian DMCA. The law is nothing more than a legislative grant to content owners to use criminal laws to preserve their own profit.

The law is widely misused and doesn't do anything to protect citizens fair use rights. It's just a bad law that won't go away.

Re:How long can they fight it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29178453)

The DMCA sucks, especially the anti-circumvention garbage.
That said, The Pirate Bay has nothing to do with protecting "citizens fair use rights [sic]." It's about getting stuff for free, and everybody knows it.

Re:How long can they fight it (4, Insightful)

Fulcrum of Evil (560260) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178347)

You cannot get around that with technical reasonings like "but we dont host the files, we just provide .torrent files".

Why not? The law is replete with examples like that.

Re:How long can they fight it (3, Interesting)

sopssa (1498795) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178421)

Like I said in both posts, courts in scandinavia look into purpose too and it can count a lot. I do not know how its in USA or elsewhere, but I know its so in here. But I guess if Google were being a search engine only for warez and illegal content, they would be shutdown quite fast too. Even if they have lots of DMCA issues and are linking to illegal content, they are a general search engine and do what they need by law to remove such content (and fight for net neutrality too). But its obvious what is The Pirate Bay's purpose and why everyone of their users are using it.

Re:How long can they fight it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29178405)

What sort of common sense you are talking about? Their responses certainly were not very nice, but the basic idea was clear and sane: in our country there is no DMCA, if you want anything from as take us to Sweden court, but we think you wont succeed.

Re:How long can they fight it (5, Insightful)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178433)

I think that it's important to point out that "rights holders" are perfectly willing to break the law. Sony rootkits, RIAA's illegal "investigations", and more. Worse, the "rights holders" are intent on bending, folding, mutilating, and spindling the law. Today's copyright law is a horrid mutilation of the spirit of the law. I dare say that if the law were fair and equitable, there would be very few people actually ripping off the content found on the web. In fact, if the law were truly "just", I suspect that thieves would be turned in by parents, freinds, and associates. People actually respond to crimestoppers requests for information, after all.

Re:How long can they fight it (3, Insightful)

I cant believe its n (1103137) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178673)

You cannot get around that with technical reasonings like "but we dont host the files, we just provide .torrent files".

You can not get around that with technical reasonings like "but I did not stab anyone, I just sold him the knife".

Re:How long can they fight it (0, Troll)

sopssa (1498795) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178781)

You cannot get around that with technical reasonings like "but we dont host the files, we just provide .torrent files".

You can not get around that with technical reasonings like "but I did not stab anyone, I just sold him the knife".

More correct analogy would be "but I did not stab anyone, I just gave the movement to the knife. It wasn't me who stabbed him, it was the knife!"

Re:How long can they fight it (4, Funny)

linhares (1241614) | more than 4 years ago | (#29177917)

Hopefully that torrent with the entire pirate bay can still be dowloaded... oh shit [thepiratebay.org] I had to go here [74.125.93.132] only to find it he [alivetorrents.com]-re [onlytorrents.com].

Don't you just hate it when they just accidentally the entire pirate bay?

Re:How long can they fight it (2, Funny)

camperdave (969942) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178385)

Don't you just hate it when they just accidentally the entire pirate bay?

No, but it sometimes annoys me when people leave critical words out of their sentences.

Re:How long can they fight it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29178563)

This is either:

A. Whoooooooosh!

B. Get off my lawn!

Re:How long can they fight it (5, Insightful)

Omnifarious (11933) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178025)

I don't think of it as "But we just want free warez and dont want to pay for entertainment!", but as "Your silly model based on restricting distribution is a total fail, get another one!".

Ultimately the models that restrict distribution reward distributors more than creators anyway. I say good riddance to them. This isn't about getting paid, but who's in control of what you see and hear and when you see or hear it.

The getting paid part is just the convenient justification of the moment because stating the real reason wouldn't get them anywhere.

Re:How long can they fight it (4, Insightful)

Desler (1608317) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178175)

I don't think of it as "But we just want free warez and dont want to pay for entertainment!", but as "Your silly model based on restricting distribution is a total fail, get another one!".

Yeah because all the users of the site would totally stick around if they were no longer getting all the content for free. *rolls eyes* Why must everyone make up bullshit excuses instead of just admitting that they were downloading stuff because they wanted to get it for free? No one is falling for these bullshit excuses anyway.

Re:How long can they fight it (1)

Kokuyo (549451) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178299)

I only download stuff because I don't want to pay for it... at the very least until I know it's something I like.

Re:How long can they fight it (1)

digitalunity (19107) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178337)

What some people call a "bullshit excuse" I consider a legitimate argument. TPB didn't directly host any copyrighted materials.

I would rather see the content owners suing P2P users directly than trying to shut down those who merely host a glorified index of P2P users. At least then the public has the option of using copyright violation as a pseudo-civil disobedience to put pressure on the content producers to make more meaningful products worthy of purchase.

Re:How long can they fight it (1)

Facegarden (967477) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178645)

What some people call a "bullshit excuse" I consider a legitimate argument. TPB didn't directly host any copyrighted materials.

I would rather see the content owners suing P2P users directly than trying to shut down those who merely host a glorified index of P2P users. At least then the public has the option of using copyright violation as a pseudo-civil disobedience to put pressure on the content producers to make more meaningful products worthy of purchase.

I would much rather NOT see them suing individual users. A group like TPB has some money to fight fights like this, most users don't.

-Taylor

Re:How long can they fight it (1)

migla (1099771) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178685)

Why must everyone make up bullshit excuses instead of just admitting that they were downloading stuff because they wanted to get it for free? No one is falling for these bullshit excuses anyway.

Yeah of course people "just" want stuff for free, but you say that as if it's a badf thing. If you can provide something virtually for free to billions of people, it's obviously the right thing to do.

Re:How long can they fight it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29178265)

> This isn't about getting paid, but who's in control of what you see and hear and when you see or hear it.

Who's in control? Are you joking? That's a really ridiculous statement. Entertainment companies do NOT control what you see anymore than theaters control what you see when they tell you that you have to buy a ticket to enter the theater. Or, do you demand the right to enter movie theaters and concerts for FREE as well? I wouldn't be surprised if you said yes to that.

Re:How long can they fight it (1)

Idiomatick (976696) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178099)

The GGF deal at the moment is dead in the water. And thank god for that. Apparently the GGF offered to buy TPB with money they don't have lol.

Re:How long can they fight it (3, Interesting)

cliffski (65094) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178101)

what 'values' are they fighting for exactly?
giving away everyone elses work for free whilst selling ad space?

Re:How long can they fight it (1)

sopssa (1498795) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178359)

Read my comment again and you should see what I mean. They have values for freedom of speech and net neutrality and defend that (probably for their own cause too of course). Those things I value, but not the warez stuff they're doing.

And seeing who I'm responding to, you are doing exactly how game companies should be doing, but people still pirate games and give these stupid reasons for it. If people can get it for free, obviously they will, and sites like TPB are making indirect money off others work. You can compare them to warez sellers, but just that they're not selling it directly but generating revenue indirectly from ads.

I love Democracy and Kudos btw and have bought them :) And I could think that pirating games will hit most bad the innovaters and indie game developers, because they cant get the game out to masses and stores the same way EA and so on. There's lots of bashing for EA and similar companies for doing the same thing for over and over again, but who still pirate indie game developers who actually make out of the box thinking games.

Re:How long can they fight it (2, Interesting)

cliffski (65094) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178401)

I agree with you in that I strongly value freedom of speech too, I just think that TPB are the WORST cheerleaders for any free-speech cause.
The minute you lump in freedom of speech and censorship issues with torrents of The Sims and Spiderman 3, you trivialise the whole issue.

There is a whole generation of politicians who look at people defending TPB in the cause of free speech, and see just a petty excuse for virtual shoplifting.

Anyone who really believs in free speech online should distance themselves from a site based around viagra adverts and hollywood movie torrents.
TPB is (and always has been) about making money. Anything else is just PR to give them covering fire.

Re:How long can they fight it (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178105)

Well, according tho the RIAA/MPAA, the music *industry* is dead in 5-7 years. So in their delusional panic, they are in a hurry, to attack what won't save them, faster and faster.

But I think even TPB will survive that. And you should not meet trouble halfway, by acting as if it just were a matter of time. Because you got nothing to back that argument in your comment. :)

Let's wait, dink grog (like real pirates), and see... ^^

Re:How long can they fight it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29178209)

Yes, their technical excuses are lame. It is like tying a rope to a cat and to the trigger of a gun, and then saying that you did not pull the trigger, and blame it all on the cat.

On the other hand, I do not have much sympathy for the "content" creation companies either. All they do is having loads of fun producing all those movies, while the rest of us have real jobs, and do all the hard work to keep the society running. They should just accept the fact that "sharing" is part of the game.

Re:How long can they fight it (2, Informative)

Tom (822) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178219)

You should actually read the programs of the various Pirate Parties. You'll find that they list exactly what you're looking for, plus some anti-censorship, patent-reform and other intelligent proposals.

Re:How long can they fight it (1)

computational super (740265) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178247)

But instead of the clear pro-warez propaganda of all of the Pirate Parties, they should go more for net neutrality, freedom of speech and making people understand why they should be valued and what can happen if those rights are taken away.

"Protecting ourselves with laws is not enough. We must also protect ourselves with mathematics." - Bruce Schneier

Re:How long can they fight it (2, Insightful)

Jawn98685 (687784) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178329)

Sorry, but you are incorrect in your assertion the TPB is engaging in illegal activity, unless you are prepared to argue that any purveyor of a particular technology is guilty of a crime if someone uses that technology to commit a crime.
Yes, yes, we needn't exchange winks. We all know that a huge portion of the traffic that TPB facilitates is illegal file-sharing, but TPB is no more guilty of file sharing than any of the technology providers along the entire path over which those files are shared, which is to say, "not at all". It is the user who employed the technology for illegal purposes that committed the crime, not his ISP, their bandwidth providers, and certainly not TPB.

Re:How long can they fight it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29178573)

actually you could make the argument that the passing of those laws was the real crime. lobbyists are very wealthy people..and very friendly if you'll just give 'em what they want at the people's expense.

Now you know why there's no Linux version of Rage (-1, Troll)

bonch (38532) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178497)

Remember in the story earlier where you guys were wondering why John Carmack wasn't making an Linux version of Rage? Well, why should he cater to your community which clearly sides with pro-piracy rings like Pirate Bay that directly impact what he does for a living?

Now you know why Carmack no longer gives a shit about Linux.

Re:How long can they fight it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29178615)

What bothers me the most about the TPB trial is that somehow, along the way, we've legitimized the legal argument "you're within the letter but against the spirit of the law, so you should be convicted anyway." As much as I hate the slippery slope metaphor, this is just that. It's not like Sweden is trying to enact new laws to make doing what TPB does illegal, because frankly, I don't think they could without endangering many other businesses which are within the "spirit." As much as their actions don't make them look great to international corporate eyes, I just don't see why they should try to cater to them. When did intimidation become acceptable?

well (1)

ionix5891 (1228718) | more than 4 years ago | (#29177799)

does anyone actually care anymore, the pirates have sold out...

Re:well (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29177999)

Maybe, but they put up a damn good fight compared to everybody else in that situation.

It makes me feel warm and fuzzy inside to seeing a gang of hooligans consistently thumb their nose at the system while the entertainment goons continue to waste their resources playing whack-a-mole with The Pirate Bay and p2p in general.

TPB knew what they were up against and they are fighting it to the very end. It's debatable whether they have big balls of if they're just stupid -- or both -- but since when have big media's rabid lawyers respected the spirit of the law? They don't even respect the letter of it and they are fast making a mockery of the US judicial system and the executive branch. At least TPB are honest enough to openly mock the system rather than throw enough money at it to pervert it.

Besides, and some of you may not know this, there are other torrent trackers besides TPB. Just fucking Google it, or ask somebody here. They'd gladly tell you.

-- Ethanol-fueled

Re:well (1)

Pulse_Instance (698417) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178041)

So what torrent tracker are you using now?
<Not a RIAA/MPAA lawyer>

Re:well (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29178275)

The first rule about tracker club is you don't talk about trackers. The second rule of tracker club is you DON'T TALK ABOUT TRACKERS!

Re:well (2, Informative)

linhares (1241614) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178011)

That's actually crazily unclear... from a href=http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2009/08/swedish-court-rules-tpb-admins-too-broke-to-pay-damages.ars>ARS:

The deal that might provide such assets, a buyout offer of SEK60 million from Global Gaming Foundry, is mired in problems. The company's chairman quit this week amid reports that GGF could not come up with the cash, that it was misstating the facts surrounding its negotiations, and that some insider trading of its stock might be taking place. The company's stock has been suspended from trading for the second time in the last three months, though GGF still says that it will present the buyout plan to its board this Thursday. But who might GGF even buy the site from? The Pirate Bay defendants say that they transferred control to another company in 2006, which then transferred or sold ownership to a Seychelles-based company called Reservella. Ars has been able to confirm that "Reservella" was in fact registered in the Seychelles by the Mayfair Trust Group, a company which often sets up offshore corporations for others, though Mayfair would say nothing about the real owners. Everything about the deal suggests that The Pirate Bay defendants are still involved--including the fact that they still run the site, they were the ones who set up the negotiations with GGF, and they were the ones who explained the decision to sell.

Re:well (1)

MonsterTrimble (1205334) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178089)

That was my thought almost exactly. Actually, it was more like 'So why should we care?'

The Pirate Bay has been taken out. They are in the process of being sold (insider trading or not) and are simply not relevant. They are another Napster/Caldera: "Remember when they were cool? Those were the days. (Now get off my lawn!)" They were the flagship (pun intended), but certainly are not the biggest nor baddest of the torrent sites. (isoHunt is my personal choice)

Let the past be past - let's not spend good money after bad (so to speak).

What is the point? (2, Interesting)

rehtonAesoohC (954490) | more than 4 years ago | (#29177805)

I'd like to see TPB's revenue streams, and if they are actually profitable or even break-even in any way.

I mean, I can understand fighting against the MAFIAA in some respects, but this is getting ridiculous. It's like people just pirate for the sake of pirating, just to stick it to "the man" so to speak. But then you have to question why they started pirating in the first place? I mean, are they seriously denting retail sales all that much? It doesn't seem like game and movie companies are all that concerned overall, (films especially), and films are still earning tens and hundreds of millions of dollars on movie release weekends.

I am just saying, if they are trying to prove a point or communicate a message, there has to be a better way.

Re:What is the point? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29177865)

I put poop in your shoe.

Re:What is the point? (5, Insightful)

maharb (1534501) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178199)

The short: People pirate because they can. The long: Pirating is so easy and does so little damage to the media companies that people don't even feel remorse for doing it. Most people think that the prices for media today is far too high and if they were lowered they would likely buy more. I doubt the media companies are really losing much business because the movies people truly want to see still get bought. In other words, if media prices were dropped the companies revenues would likely be similar to what they are now. People would buy more but at a lower price. Most pirates are not exclusive pirates. They still go out to the movies, buy new releases, and buy their favorite bands music. They pirate things that they were less likely to buy.

I don't think the average pirate is trying to prove a point or communicate a message. I think they do it because they want something but not enough to pay the asking price.

Re:What is the point? (1)

migla (1099771) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178571)

I am just saying, if they are trying to prove a point or communicate a message, there has to be a better way.

I don't know... I think TPB have done pretty well communicating a message and bringing people over to the side of freedom (or crime or entitlement or whatever you wanna call it).

They knew how to do the smart-ass punk thing and to me it seems they've made quite an impact in our culture. Other people work in other ways (and with more or less different goals).

Personally, I'm more interested in Free software and Creative commons than gratis Britney Spearses or Hollywood blockbusters, which seems to be what TPB excels in.

Re:What is the point? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29178723)

Similarly to how someone would throw perfectly good tea into a river just because he has to pay taxes?

Arrogance and stupidity in the same package. (5, Insightful)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#29177835)

How efficient of them.

The piratebay guys keep pulling these idiotic stunts, like not showing-up to their own trial, and pretty soon they will lose. If they would at least TRY to put-up a rational defense instead of acting like teenagers, maybe they can win their cause.

Re:Arrogance and stupidity in the same package. (1)

Trepidity (597) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178001)

I think at this point their main interest is in the other stuff--- they've gotten bored with just running a torrent site, and are more interested in engaging in some variety of performance art.

Re:Arrogance and stupidity in the same package. (5, Insightful)

CHJacobsen (1183809) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178083)

The stunts are part of their public image. It's not stupidity. People who are otherwise unbiased are likely to find their positive, humorous attitude more appealing than the strict suit-only approach of their opponents. They are, most likely, very well aware of what they're doing.

Re:Arrogance and stupidity in the same package. (2, Interesting)

dunezone (899268) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178727)

The stunts are part of their public image. It's not stupidity. People who are otherwise unbiased are likely to find their positive, humorous attitude more appealing than the strict suit-only approach of their opponents. They are, most likely, very well aware of what they're doing.

And look at how well that did for them. They had two options, they could have worked with these industries and tried to make a deal with them or they could have fought the system. They decided to fight the system but they fought the system like children and were treated like children by the system.

And as a sidenote I always found it funny that people defended them by saying it hosted legimate material which is true, but the site itself is called, "The PIRATE Bay" and the majority of the top 100 was pirated material.

Re:Arrogance and stupidity in the same package. (1)

R2.0 (532027) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178145)

"The piratebay guys keep pulling these idiotic stunts, like not showing-up to their own trial, and pretty soon they will lose. "

Welcome to 2008. They've ALREADY lost, multiple times, in court. The antics are because they lost (or expected to lose), not vice versa.

Keep the internets free!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29177849)

Keep the internets free. Freedom of thought baby!!

Just use wikipedia (3, Interesting)

FunkyELF (609131) | more than 4 years ago | (#29177981)

Forget DNS... just publish the most recent IP address in the Wikipedia article on The Pirate Bay.

== last known address ==
[12.34.56.78 Clikz here 4 teh warez]

Here to stay (3, Insightful)

viking80 (697716) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178013)

Just a simple observations:
- From the beginning of ARPAnet, through BBS and 2400bps modems to today, material, restricted or not, has become exponentially easier to access. This is despite napster shutdown, DRM, and pirate bay verdicts.

- Even China and Iran that tries to censor the internet with draconian measures have been largely unsuccessful.

- Intellectual property lobbyists have won every battle, and have succeeded against fair use consistently.

Re:Here to stay (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29178109)

If your point is "you can't eliminate piracy entirely", then, yes, you're right. If your point is "you can't eliminate piracy entirely, therefore, we should stop fighting it", then you're absolutely wrong. You can marginalize and reduce piracy. Take, for example, the fact that you can't stop shoplifting - even the most draconian store policies can't bring shoplifting to 0%. So what does that mean? That we should just live-with shoplifting? No. You work to marginalize it so that stores can survive despite some losses due to shoplifting. Same thing with piracy, you suppress it so that creation of digital media can continue to thrive.

Re:Here to stay (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29178213)

But if I shoplift I take an item from you, and you are minus one item. If I pirate, all I made was a digital copy (usually from a third party), and I haven't taken anything from you. Oh dear.

Re:Here to stay (-1, Troll)

sexconker (1179573) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178417)

Nobody gives a shit about the lost item.
People give a shit about the last sale for that item.

Theft = lost sale.
Piracy = lost sale.

"If I weren't going to pirate it, I wouldn't have bought it otherwise."
"If I weren't going to steal it, I wouldn't have bought it otherwise."

For there to be any difference (because after piracy, the copyright owner can still sell the original copy, which is not true in the case of physical theft) you basically have to believe the line above by the pirate. And if you believe that bullshit, you're beyond help.

Re:Here to stay (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29178775)

"If I weren't going to pirate it, I wouldn't have bought it otherwise."

you basically have to believe the line above by the pirate. And if you believe that bullshit, you're beyond help.

What, you actually think every J. Random Pirate has the many many thousands of dollars/euros that would be required to legally purchase their multi-terabyte media collection? You're crazy. Of course there are a ton of people downloading stuff they would never and could never buy.

Re:Here to stay (1)

Jeff Carr (684298) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178805)

Piracy = lost sale.

"If I weren't going to pirate it, I wouldn't have bought it otherwise.""

For there to be any difference (because after piracy, the copyright owner can still sell the original copy, which is not true in the case of physical theft) you basically have to believe the line above by the pirate. And if you believe that bullshit, you're beyond help.

Not true. Is there any software, movie, or music that slightly interests you that you would never purchase?

If it's software that could save you time (Photoshop over Gimp for example), then pirating it didn't remove a sale, it only saved you time.

If it's a movie or music, you might find that you liked it instead of just never knowing about it. Once again, you gained, and nobody lost.

If you can't think of anything that might interest you that you will never purchase, then you either have too much money, or too few interests.

Re:Here to stay (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29178471)

First, I never said piracy was equivalent to shoplifting, I said there's very good reasons to deal with it the same way you deal with shoplifting - marginalize and suppress it. (I swear, it seems like you write "piracy" and "shoplifting" in the same sentence and it triggers the "piracy is not shoplifting" auto-response.)

Second, if I spend $10 million dollars creating some software, and everyone thinks that it's perfectly okay to pirate it because "piracy isn't like shoplifting because I haven't deprived you of anything", then I go bankrupt, I stop producing any software because of greedy pirates, and the creation of digital content ceases to *thrive*. You did notice that I used the word "thrive" didn't you? Piracy is inherently incompatible with the "getting paid for your work" that the rest of the world uses to incentivize people for their labor.

Re:Here to stay (1)

ijakings (982830) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178409)

- Intellectual property lobbyists have won every battle, and have succeeded against fair use consistently.

To paraphrase (points if you know where from) They can win every battle, but I can not see them winning the war.

There are just too many people out there that are moving against them. All they will do is push it more underground.

Re:Here to stay (1)

Heddahenrik (902008) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178677)

Yes, since 2000 basically everything has gone in the wrong direction when it comes to legislation. The technology and social window to fight freedom of speech and piracy just isn't there yet, but it will eventually be.

China is moving towards that everyone must have a spyware installed on their computer and if you try to hide what you're doing, you'll be in trouble. In USA innocent people are sued for millions of dollars just because they have copied a harmless file that anyone can get access to, not to mention arrested for things they say online.

What seems to be happening with the Internet is the same that happened to pirate radio in Europe. When everyone is using things like Facebook and other "official" ways of connecting, then the authorities will simply shut Internet down so that you can't communicate directly with someone without a government controlled server in between you. Facebook already filter the private messages so that you can't send your friends what you want. Just like no one can listen to radio that isn't indirectly government controlled today, even though the station is run by a private company.

And people will accept it because everything they use Internet for still works OK. And THINK OF THE CHILDREN and TERRORISM will be great excuses for doing all sort of evil things.

Even the net neutrality conspiracy idea is a threat to the Internet. It calls for nothing else than government control of the Internet. When the control is there, it will be used to turn Internet into a fancy cable TV. We need many interconnected Internets to select from, not some more or less government run technology. If for example USA paid the same price for Internet as we do in Sweden, Americans could afford to get Internet from 3 companies and maybe a public Internet too at the same time, so who cares about net neutrality then? But USA has selected the monopoly regulated way and will soon be irrelevant, I guess. Only companies who have bribed politicians will be able to sell there. Worse is that USA is still able to push its bad ways on the rest of the world (China, France, Israel and I don't know what are trying too, but they don't succeed that much). THINK OF THE CHILDREN and then the foreign poker sites were blocked, for example. No one cared because there are still local poker sites. But this will be repeated for every aspect!

Optimism/pessimism (1)

Sippan (932861) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178087)

This is going to replace the "glass half empty/glass half full" thing.

I'm from the country that spawned The Pirate Bay and the Pirate Party, and voted the latter into the European Parliament!

...not from that country that screwed The Pirate Bay over in a corrupt trial with a biased judge and started to indirectly censor them by taking down arbitrary ISPs...

I wonder if their political party (4, Interesting)

G00F (241765) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178107)

I wonder if them getting involved in politics is what is causing them to be more of a target that previously?

Think about it, it wasn't that long ago they where untouchable, but since they formed their own party they are actively in court all the time, getting their equipment confiscated, or some other blow dealt against them.

Decentralize (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29178121)

Can we get a tracker that is capable of utilizing freenet links before pulling the relevant information into the client? It shouldn't be technically difficult--although it unfortunately introduces a ridiculously bloaty java dependency. There'd be a bit of latency--but this is the sort of thing freenet was *made* for. With almost no maintenance, popular torrents would propagate and have the tracker load quicker--and low popularity ones would drop off the network.

It'd be virtually impossible to close it down. I'm sure somebody could integrate it into the client reasonably easily--and there's a lot of CLI tools out there you can point at your local node and fetch a file easily enough...

Go not gently TPB...

Re:Decentralize (-1, Offtopic)

sexconker (1179573) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178343)

Decentralize what?
Someone somewhere makes a torrent, and uploads it somewhere.

You can't get away from that.
There's always someone to go after.

If you're talking about just getting away from the idea of using a large site for searching and using a large tracker, then...

If you completely decentralize torrent posting, then you're never going to get shit distributed, and you'll fail.

No one wants to play 6 degrees of find that torrent, and no one wants to maintain lists of IPs to add as peers.

mod UP (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29178139)

Case yo0 want, to Niggers everywhere

Yes... information *IS* free (5, Insightful)

neo (4625) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178245)

Stewart Brand was close. He almost understood.

You can't make someone pay for information unless you're the only one that can provide it. Everyone. Every single person reading this... you are a potential content provider. You could make every bit of information on your computer available, right now.

Sue us.

All of us. ...because that's the only way you can stop the tidal wave that will crush your monopoly of distribution.

You're idea of how to define property are antiquated and you're about to become extinct unless you mutate. The only people making money now are your lawyers.

And when you've lost. When you've bled yourself dry and lost all support from the public you think you pander to, the dust will settle and we will still be here distributing information. Not because we are cheap. Not because we don't want creativity to win... but because information is free.

Hint: creating information is a service people will gladly pay for...

Re:Yes... information *IS* free (2, Funny)

cliffski (65094) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178481)

who are you talking to?
I'm a small 'content producer' who has 100% embraced digital distribution, does not employ lawyers, and does not support the RIAA, MPAA or any other government lobbying organisation.

And hey, guess what, TPB rip me off along with everyone else. Could it be that they just dont give a fuck about the effects of their actions? Lumping in TPB with some sort of anti-corporate crusade is silly. Those guys just sold out for millions, and were originally financed by a right wing millionaire called carl lundstrom.
TPB are as corporate as walmart.

Right or wrong (1)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178287)

You've got to admire any small group of people (short of murderers or terrorists) who have managed to thumb their noses at the powers that be, for so long, and so effectively. They might be geeky little bastards, but they are BALLSY geeky little bastards!!

Scrape Errors (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29178309)

Well, I guess this explains why a good portion of my Azureus torrents are unable to connect to their tracker.

more nets to cast (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29178599)

To bad for TPB. I shall miss their services. However, there are many more torrent sites to download from. The Man cannot stop all of them. Fucking Aholes!

What court defeats? theyre still appealing! (4, Insightful)

plasmacutter (901737) | more than 4 years ago | (#29178729)

It's quite obvious the corruption involved in the initial raids on TPB in 2k6 was/is much more widespread than previously thought.

They are appealing, and from all accounts the initial lower court ruling does not get applied until their appeal is decided a year plus from now.

This is persecution plain and simple, a textbook case of political harassment by plutocrats intent on keeping their hegemony.

By Neruos (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29178793)

The problem with free software is which software helps humanity and which is completely entertainment. And out of that software which has an opensource alternative. The problem with these sites is they picked on hollywood (RIAA/MPAA) and those companies have only 1 major product and that is entertainment.

If blizzard was to shut down tomorrow, there would be some whines and crying, but in the end, no one who was anyone would care? Would I? I bought all the blizzard software and payed for some WoW time, but if they go away, would I suffer? No, and in a year I would have forgot about it. That business model doesn't last forever and it's all about here and now. Software gets old, it goes out dated, it gets replaced every 6 months. ID and EA are not out there taking 13 year old girls to court over burned copies of doom2 and FIFA 1999. Cause it's useless.

Hollywood on the other hand, isn't about here and now, they are about forever. The music, songs and movies are all they have. They can't retire a song every 6 months, cause the royalities last years and those people have to get paid. It's a crap deal and they have the FBI, interpol and the governments backing them. Get used to it. Software warez was the biggest positive boom to software world because it was a double edge sword. Some people pirate version 1 of a software, talk about it, use it in the real world and test/debug it. The companies took all that free information back from the users and came up with version 2, a better product and so on and so forth.

MPAA/RIAA don't care what you think of their products, they will do what they want with .01% public response cared about. They know people will buy them, they start the fads. If you haven't learn it yet, learn it now, until the government changes its relationship with big hollywood you better not be sharing/trading/burning/torrenting/etc with their products or you will get burned.

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