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US Fed Gov. Says All Music Downloads Are Theft

timothy posted more than 4 years ago | from the bit-of-a-broad-brush-there dept.

The Internet 451

BenEnglishAtHome writes "Nearly all US government employees and contractors are subject to mandatory annual information security briefings. This year the official briefing flatly states that all downloaded music is stolen. The occasionally breathless tone of the briefing and the various minor errors contained therein are funny but the real eye-opener is a 'secure the building' exercise where employees stumble across security problems and resolve them. According to the material, the correct response to an employee who is downloading music is to shout 'That's stealing!' No mention is made of more-free licenses, public domain works, or any other legitimate download. If this were a single agency or department that had made a mistake in their training material it might not be so shocking. But this is a government-wide training package that's being absorbed by hundreds of thousands of federal employees, both civilian and military. If you see a co-worker downloading music, they're stealing. Period. Who woulda thunk it? Somebody should mirror this. Who wants to bet that copies will become hard to find if clued-in technogeeks take notice and start making noise?" Warning: this site gives a whole new meaning to "Flash heavy."

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Non-Flash Equivalent (5, Informative)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207593)

Warning: this site gives a whole new meaning to "Flash heavy."

They have a non-flash site [disa.mil] if you need to complete this training and receive your certificate and you can't have flash. Not sure how they are running the audio but that's available as well.

I gotta admit it's not as entertaining as the zoom down into the city flash animation when instead of that you get:

Screen 1 of 48. Screen title, Intro. A block in any city, U S A. The camera zooms into a bank A T M. The A T M screen reads, no funds available. The camera zooms into another A T M, and again, no funds are available. Cut to an office in a building. Camera zooms into computer screen on desk. C N N website is on screen, displaying news headlines that support audio. Camera zooms to P D A on desk. P D A displays news headlines that support audio. Camera zooms to fax machine. Document on machine displays news headlines that support audio.

Also, you might encounter some problems with words and acronyms that are pronounced like IA (Information Assurance)

Screen 4 of 48. Screen title, What is I Ay? Image of worker at desk with computer. The computer monitor displays a warning ...

Re:Non-Flash Equivalent (4, Insightful)

reginaldo (1412879) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207713)

Thanks for the link, but I like the flash site. The website has audio, so while you are instructed not to download music (hey, spoken word is a type of art/music), you are in fact downloading music.

THAT'S STEALING!

Re:Non-Flash Equivalent (2, Interesting)

amicusNYCL (1538833) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207929)

Just to point out, this isn't a "Flash-heavy" site, this is an online training course (CBT = computer-based training). The vast majority of CBT courses are done in Flash, for a variety of reasons (animation and audio are two). The company I work for creates CBT courses, including for the military. The LMS they run on disa.mil is the Meridian LMS I believe, we have several of our own courses sitting on their LMS. None of them are publicly-available though, I'm not sure why this course is.

It's nice that they bother to create a non-Flash version, that's not something that we normally offer. The vast majority of our clients are fine with having their courseware delivered as a Flash package.

Re:Non-Flash Equivalent (1)

Simulant (528590) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208017)

"I Ay"? Why "I Ay"? (IA = Information Assurance, a government acronym for "network security", more or less) Did they use audio > text software? Wouldn't surprise me.

If you really want to see what kind of bureaucracy we're dealing with, check out the glossary.

Re:Non-Flash Equivalent (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29208263)

I prefer "=>" for "into" instead of ">"

While ">" is perfectly valid, and has that "old-school" coolness, "=>" is just as fun in a lambda sort of way and doesn't have the same ambiguity problem (no confusion with the binary operator). :)

Re:Non-Flash Equivalent (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29208355)

I wonder if the JEWS could possibly be behind this!

No, I forget - they're too busy working on all those manual jobs - you know, digging roads, picking crops, canning factories, factory work, making clothes...

No, I'm mistaken - that would be THEIR 'CATTLE' who do all of those jobs, wouldn't it...

Oy vey... ve can't have ze poor Jews getting their hands dirty, can we! After all, they are "God's chosen people", apparently. How modest. And not at all 'racist' or anything like that.

What's the Big Deal (3, Funny)

Ozric (30691) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207619)

When is the last time they were right about anything? .. .. ..
Can't think of one? Yea Me either.

Nuff said

Re:What's the Big Deal (2, Insightful)

Jeng (926980) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208123)

My question is what are they being accused of stealing?

The music?
Or the bandwidth?

I assume they are talking about downloading music at work.

Re:What's the Big Deal (1)

idontgno (624372) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208345)

That's the new grammatical paradigm: "theft" and "steal" are intransitive verbs. They don't need objects.

"You stole."

"What? What did I steal?"

"You stole."

Closed minded (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29207623)

It just shows how closed minded government employees can be.

No, Gov't policies were on sale at 50% off! (4, Insightful)

denis-The-menace (471988) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207877)

And the RIAA bought congress critters for cheap!

Otherwise you'd see the gov't suing RIAA and friends for the payola-by-proxy currently going on.

Apple's iTMS may beg to differ (5, Insightful)

Ralph Spoilsport (673134) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207625)

given that the only way you can get music from it is by downloading.

RS

Re:Apple's iTMS may beg to differ (4, Funny)

Professor_UNIX (867045) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207893)

It specifically excludes music you've purchased from being listed as illegal in the explanation if you pick the choice it doesn't want you to pick. The only thing I see wrong with their explanation is that it excludes legitimately "free" music such as stuff released into the public domain or under something like a Creative Commons license, but for the most part their definition is perfectly acceptable to the target audience (non-technical DoD users).

Re:Apple's iTMS may beg to differ (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29207959)

Agreed. Such "free" music is just a drop in the bucket to the illegal downloads going on.

Re:Apple's iTMS may beg to differ (3, Insightful)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208223)

That's still no reason to falsely accuse someone.

Some people might not be bright enough to distinguish from actual downloading
of some sort and streaming from some site like Hulu or Pandora. How does Pandora
or radio streams fit into this particular bit of government propaganda?

Re:Apple's iTMS may beg to differ (4, Insightful)

supernova_hq (1014429) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208235)

A drop in the bucket or not, somebody is still going to get harrased/sued/imprissoned for downloading something completely legit just because some dumbass in the government doesn't understand the law they are writting about!

If you're downloading music at work... (3, Insightful)

KingSkippus (799657) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207627)

If you're downloading music at work, it probably is stealing...

...of company time. And given that my taxes are paying these people's salaries (that is, you and I are "the company"), I'd really rather them not. Granted, I do wish that they would convey correct information, and I don't expect government workers to go zombie-like through the day without taking a break now and then, but still, I am glad that rampant goofing off in this particular manner is discouraged.

Re:If you're downloading music at work... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29207695)

From what I've seen, government employees downloading practices are a very small percent of their "free time."

Re:If you're downloading music at work... (1, Insightful)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207731)

To be perfectly honest, the fact that most of them are employed is stealing my tax dollars. It seems that government offices are quite fond of creating messes to create more jobs which just sap productivity and money. But such is the way if you don't ever need to make a profit and just keep leaching off of the masses....

Re:If you're downloading music at work... (1, Interesting)

gnud (934243) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208133)

If _any_ government employee makes a mistake, all opposition politicians and media outlets might bitch about it for months (depending on who got fucked). So it's natural that a bureucracy evolves and more workers are needed because 60% of time is spent on asscovering.

Re:If you're downloading music at work... (4, Insightful)

squidfood (149212) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207875)

If you're downloading music at work, it probably is stealing...of company time.

Many government offices have sane guidelines that include that the allowance of a strictly limited amount of personal use is permissible: e.g. occasional personal internet use. A (legal) song or two would easily fit under these guidelines. (whether you're allowed to have the software to play it on a work machine is another matter). It strikes me that this is a sane policy for any company.

Re:If you're downloading music at work... (1)

squidfood (149212) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208007)

Here's a policy example I found by googling "[Agency] personal internet use":

[Agency] personnel may use the Internet for non-official use (Internet searches, e-mail, etc.) provided:

-Use does not adversely affect the employee's performance or accomplishment of the [Agency] mission;

-Use is during non-working hours; and

-Use does not reflect adversely on [Agency], e.g., does not result in any appearance of impropriety or unnecessary costs to the Federal Government.

Why the focus on music, though? (5, Interesting)

langelgjm (860756) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207931)

If the summary is accurate, whoever wrote this needs an encounter with a clue-by-four. Let's not even bother with stuff like Creative Commons licenses or public domain recordings - just take the briefing at face value for a minute. All music is copyrighted; downloading copyrighted material is stealing; therefore, downloading music is stealing.

Do they also not realize that in every Berne signatory country, all "creative" written text (i.e. anything other than raw facts), drawings, and photographs are also automatically copyrighted? So, using that logic, downloading any text or images is stealing. Congratulations, you've just made the entire Internet illegal!

Re:Why the focus on music, though? (2, Funny)

0racle (667029) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208289)

I think you'd find half the internet IS illegal.

Re:Why the focus on music, though? (2, Funny)

cthulu_mt (1124113) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208311)

If the summary is accurate

You must be new here.

Re:If you're downloading music at work... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29207961)

As opposed to Congresses rampant goofing off enacting new legislation that will never be enforced. Interesting.

Re:If you're downloading music at work... (4, Interesting)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207987)

I read an opinion once that the reason the US government is so incompetent and inefficient is because we as Americans expect it to be. Since then I've decided it's kind of true, can you imagine working at a job where people are always blaming you for being inefficient, bad workers and lazy? Who would want to work there? Some people might, but then you get things like this. I am ok with not pirating music, but.........

imagine if your workplace had a policy where if you saw someone downloading music, you had to approach them, then shout, "That is stealing!" Wow. Talk about demoralizing policy. I would feel like an utter tool. I mean, do I have to shout? Can't I at least say it in a soft voice?

When managers start implementing policies like that, it's time to quit. What competent person would want to work for the government if they can work someplace nice? Some, I'm sure, but they are pushing a lot of good people out.

Re:If you're downloading music at work... (2, Insightful)

forkazoo (138186) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208209)

If you're downloading music at work, it probably is stealing... ...of company time. And given that my taxes are paying these people's salaries (that is, you and I are "the company"), I'd really rather them not. Granted, I do wish that they would convey correct information, and I don't expect government workers to go zombie-like through the day without taking a break now and then, but still, I am glad that rampant goofing off in this particular manner is discouraged.

What if you are a government employee who makes powerpoint presentations and you want to include a snippet of a public domain recording? Then you would be legally downloading music as part of your job. Hard to call that "STEALING!"

OTH (1)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208213)

I would rather that the "employees" stay up on the net. If somebody has their nose just to their labourous work and never gets the opportunity to learn what is going on, then we will not have educated workforce. Sadly, I am guessing that you really do not want that. But downloading MUSIC per se is NOT always stealing, nor is it always goofing off.

Re:If you're downloading music at work... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29208359)

Isn't posting on Slashdot technically stealing company time too?

I'll show em.. (1)

NervousNerd (1190935) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207633)

I'll make a song where Microsoft Sam reads out the article with a click track made in Audacity in the background.

US Fed Gov't says all trolls are faggots (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29207641)

Lol (5, Funny)

jayhawk88 (160512) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207643)

According to the material, the correct response to an employee who is downloading music is to shout 'That's stealing!'

WTF is this, Dora the Explorer? Swiper, no swipey! Nice job, lame ass contract media company who probably got paid $10 million to create the worst instructional videos ever.

Re:Lol (-1, Troll)

A. B3ttik (1344591) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207763)

That's how government contracts work. They overspend money to create sub-par pieces of crap, and there's nothing the government can do about it since they can't back out of a contract or even fire anyone without being taken to court. Yes, I have plenty of first hand experience with this. Government contracts are pure bureaucratic bloat where you merely have to prove that money is spent in order to get a check for the following fiscal year.

And everyone agrees with me. +5 Insightful.

But suddenly I say: and some people want this same government in charge of our healthcare and now I'll be modded troll into oblivion.

Re:Lol (5, Insightful)

amicusNYCL (1538833) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208091)

That's not entire true, and not everyone agrees with you.

The company I work for makes CBT courses like what you see here, and the military is one of our clients. We don't get broad open contracts, we have to bid and compete for them, and the scope of work is limited to the CBT that we're creating. The prices the military pays are the same prices that corporations pay (in fact, we even discount the military's price because they've been so consistent in giving us work).

And, finally, I'll add that our company has won several training industry awards (including [especially] for work we've done for the military), and we employ a staff of highly-qualified writers and artists. You can sit there and say the government spends too much money to get sub-par "pieces of crap" without detailing what exactly your "plenty of first-hand experience" is, but quality is all about the vendor. If you choose a good vendor, you get a good product. If you choose a sub-par piece of crap vendor, then you get a sub-par piece of crap product. And this comes from my own experience of working for a government vendor that produces exactly the type of thing you're critiquing (although the CBT in question is not ours).

Sorry if that influences your mod, but I don't think you're as insightful as you would like others to believe.

Re:Lol (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29208205)

Your post is very strange considering my only experience with the acronym CBT is Cock & Ball Torture. *shrug* No mod for you.

Re:Lol (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29208211)

Well, I get about 30-80 CBT's a year, and the problem is that they're all crap. Granted, some have better art work, and some have better interfaces, but here's the thing. They don't work. They just don't work. Sorry that your life's work is crap, but you're clearly doing a good job of making superior products. Keep doing it; the government and other corporations will pay anyway, might as well do a good job.

Re:Lol (5, Insightful)

bky1701 (979071) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208153)

But suddenly I say: and some people want this same government in charge of our healthcare and now I'll be modded troll into oblivion.

I would never suggest something so stupid. Just look at the USPS and the Interstate System. Wonderful examples of utter failure. Imagine if we let private companies build and control our essential infrastructure instead. We'd be so much better off!

Re:Lol (1)

supernova_hq (1014429) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208295)

Like they did with ISP's...?

Re:Lol (4, Insightful)

raddan (519638) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208187)

But suddenly I say: and some people want this same government in charge of our military and now I'll be modded troll into oblivion.

Fixed that for ya. Oh wait, still a dumb thing to say...?

The government is a very large and diverse group of people. Some [fema.gov] of those people do legitimately deserve to be criticized, but many [nist.gov] , many [usmc.mil] , many [fs.fed.us] of them do not. They do their jobs daily and with excellence, often for little compensation.

To infer that the government would be bad at managing health care because of a single instance of idiotic training materials is an example of woefully poor logic...

Re:Lol (4, Insightful)

vertinox (846076) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208239)

But suddenly I say: and some people want this same government in charge of our healthcare and now I'll be modded troll into oblivion.

I think the problem is that private care is too efficient. If the contract says you can't throw pre-existing conditions to the curb then I'm all for it.

Its really impossible to use capitalism with a health care system because in order to make the most profit you have to deny people healt hcare and that, as we see, does not not work that well.

Imagine you would a private military, police force, fire department.

They'd only go out and help when there is a profit to be made. A lot of crime and houses burn down simply because its not cost effective to stop everything.

Re:Lol (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29208335)

Correct me if I'm wrong, but offering universal insurance does not involve any contracts or bidding.

Oh but wait! I forgot that medicare is so poorly run that is has a whole 3% overhead.

Re:Lol (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29207769)

" According to the material, the correct response to an employee who is downloading music is to shout 'That's stealing!' WTF is this, Dora the Explorer? Swiper, no swipey! Nice job, lame ass contract media company who probably got paid $10 million to create the worst instructional videos ever. --" A think the tone of the article shows the person who wrote it probably doesn't understand government, but this statement definitely gets it right. A government IT office probably hired some media company contractor who came up with this approach. Its hardly an action of some mysterious unified entity called "the government" forwarding an agenda on copyright.

Re:Lol (1)

Simulant (528590) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208053)

Nice job, lame ass contract media company

I willing to bet it was produced by a DOD employee. Be afraid.

Re:Lol (1)

stuntpope (19736) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208313)

According to the material, the correct response is to say "that's stealing" when an employee says "come here to my cubicle and see this cool site that lets me download music for free."

It does not advise shouting. That's dramatic editorializing on the submitter's part.

The explained risks are pertinent and correct. The material does not take into account legal free music, but the main point is to protect the networks from threats due to using P2P software, plus legal liability for copyright or IP violation. In the same way that an entire company can be at financial risk if an employee is surfing porn (hostile workplace lawsuit), an organization could be placed at risk if they are lenient about their employees downloading copyrighted material.

What you choose to do on your own time is up to you. But organizations and workplaces have bigger responsibilities to think about.

Can I quit the government? (2, Interesting)

tiedyejeremy (559815) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207667)

I remember when I recorded my band in the living room and copied the cd to my computer. When iTunes told me I didn't have the required rights to make a cd copy I quit using iTunes.

Is there an easy way to quit using the government?

When did that happen? (3, Insightful)

argent (18001) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207733)

I remember when I recorded my band in the living room and copied the cd to my computer. When iTunes told me I didn't have the required rights to make a cd copy I quit using iTunes.

I've been using iTunes for at least six years and I've never had it tell me I didn't have permissions to burn music no matter WHERE it came from.

Re:When did that happen? (3, Interesting)

Binestar (28861) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207785)

Most likely he was running as a standard user instead of as an administrator. If iTunes doesn't have admin rights or an admin process deeper down to allow burning you'll get the invalid rights.

Re:When did that happen? (1)

A. B3ttik (1344591) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207943)

Fuck iTunes for running responsibly!

Bloated piece of software that iTunes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29208301)

Fuck iTunes for being a bloated turd.

Re:Can I quit the government? (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207779)

You see, this is the fundamental flaw of a government that does more than protect against fraud and force. Theres no way to opt out. Theres no way to protest in a meaningful way, sure, march up to Congress with posters but in the end they still throw you in jail if you choose not to support them by paying taxes.

With a private company, they screw you and you can screw them in the bottom line. If the government screws you either have to bend down for more or risk going to jail where they screw you more.

Re:Can I quit the government? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29207907)

no, see, the private entities conglomerate, thus making it impossible for you to resist without severely limiting/ruining your life. Of course, whatever government does exist in such a scenario is likely a wholely owned subsidiary itself thus bringing us back to the original problem.

Re:Can I quit the government? (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207951)

However, businesses also look at how their brands are doing. Just look at the Edsel, while it was owned by Ford, it failed because consumers didn't like it. Similarly, if no one buys Sony CDs because of the rootkit scares, yet people buy, say Sony Cybershot cameras, eventually Sony will stop making CDs but keep making cameras. Sure, you still give money to Sony, but in the end it still will make them stop producing an offending product.

Re:Can I quit the government? (4, Informative)

djrogers (153854) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207829)

Troll - you lose. iTunes has never been capable of making DRM encumbered copies of CDs. Windows Media Player on the other hand has been capable of it, and in fact that was the default setting for several versions.

All music ripped via iTunes goes into non-DRM'd MP3, AAC, or ALC (Apple Lossless Codec). Any or all of the above formats can also be burned back to CD by iTunes. in fact, even the old DRM'd FairlPlay AAC files from the iTunes Music Store could be burned to CD.

Re:Can I quit the government? (1)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207991)

Yeah. That has happened to me with Windows Media Player. Itunes just aggravates me in small ways that aren't worth mentioning. Its not bad, but not the revolutionary piece of software that it was hyped as by my Apple loving friends prior to the windows version.

Re:Can I quit the government? (1)

gestalt_n_pepper (991155) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207891)

>Is there an easy way to quit using the government?
Sigh. No easy way. After all, all ecologies develop symbiotic parasites, including social ecologies. So, you can move, but unless the local social ecology is sparse, you can't avoid an infection of government. The trick is finding one that's minimally pathological.

Re:Can I quit the government? (4, Funny)

hansamurai (907719) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207945)

Is there an easy way to quit using the government?

Shrug.

Re:Can I quit the government? (5, Funny)

Mr2001 (90979) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207949)

Is there an easy way to quit using the government?

Move to Somalia. It's a government-free paradise!

Re:Can I quit the government? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29208129)

I would guess that there are many parallels between Somalia in the 21:st century and for example Germany in the 11:th century. There are many minor kings and warlords that you probably have to pay taxes to in one form or another. While they may allow unlimited piracy of music, there are plenty of activities that are forbidden to you, and only allowed to the king/warlord. Like piracy of ships for example...

They ARE stealing (2, Insightful)

Nickodeimus (1263214) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207669)

The government's bandwidth, paid for by we the people. Quit wastin gour tax dollars you thief.

That would be all (1)

camperdave (969942) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207687)

Would be all music, or all music except that music which is public domain, freely donated, given away as samples, distributed under a creative commons or similar licence, or prepaid for by some other means?

This is a GOOD thing! (2, Interesting)

pegr (46683) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207691)

Well, in at least the whole music/copyright discussion. Here's how. The position is obviously childishly absurd, even to the most brain-dead government worker. It negates itself quite effectively.

Unfortunately, it also negates the rest of itself as well, and I'd like to believe that there is something useful about it.

Oh, and don't be in a hurry to connect to a .mil site... (just sayin'...)

They should know (0)

amiga3D (567632) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207693)

Who, after all, knows more about theft than the Feds? They've taken billions of dollars of tax money and given it to all sorts of our corporate overlords.

So then... (1)

Ardaen (1099611) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207699)

Where I an employee under this program and a fellow employee found me downloading music I myself had created from my own server the correct response would be for them to yell "That's Stealing!" and publicly embarrass me?

Would it then be correct for me to say "lawsuit"?

Re:So then... (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208367)

You are improperly using company equipment and bandwidth.
That is often called stealing*.

yes, it's not actually stealing, but you see my point.

Simmer Down... (1)

swanzilla (1458281) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207711)

Anyone with a moderate level of intellect or cultural lituracy will disregard this as being the product of a dolt in HR. I cannot imagine that any of the trainees would change his/her view of the legality of downloading media based on this training.

Re:Simmer Down... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29207853)

Anyone with a moderate level of intellect or cultural literacy will disregard this as being the product of a dolt in HR.

This is the government we are talking about. No chance of finding anyone like that there.

Wrong category (1)

AcidPenguin9873 (911493) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207725)

Slashdot editors, please put this story in "Your Rights Online", or maybe "Politics". Anything other than "Technology". I can find no interesting technology of note in this story.

Re:Wrong category (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207831)

What are you talking about? There is perfect examples of technology here! The lack of a real title in TFA, (unless master_iaa is somehow a real title), the total lack of HTML other than to embed in an ugly-looking flash plugin, the off center-ness of the flash object, everything just screams state of the art!

But that's the song name?!? (5, Funny)

dspkable (773450) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207743)

So what if the name of the song is "THAT'S STEALING!". Sales will skyrocket for that band.

Re:But that's the song name?!? (2, Funny)

AME (49105) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208115)

Sales will skyrocket for that band.

Or downloads will.

Our tax dollars at work. (1)

Simulant (528590) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207753)

This is what mindless bureaucracies produce and why I no longer work for the DOD.

If it makes you feel any better, many (most, I hope) government employees don't this stuff too seriously.

Someone needs to make a website... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29207755)

Someone needs to make a simple website in the vein of lmgify.com to show people in no uncertain terms and using many monosyllabic words the difference between IP infringement and theft. Yes, both are illegal, but there is a difference between going one mile an hour over the speed limit, and a violent felony.

OK but (1)

dedazo (737510) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207757)

Number of people who use Magnatune < people who download the latest Britney Spears wreck from LimeWire.

Yes, this is wrong. But government employees are adults and I don't think they're being indoctrinated by this. And it makes no difference, because people who download crappy pop or rap music from P2P networks are the last ones who would ever even think of looking into freely-licensed music (and I'd agree with them since most of it is crappy, in my opinion).

Also, of course it ignores things like iTunes and Amazon MP3 sales, for example.

But let's cut down on the outrage here, please. This is not the way to communicate the problems with illegal vs legal content sharing, it's just more hand waving at dumb policies that make no difference either way. Ultimately the only thing the government and companies are trying to do is inoculate themselves from liability. The policy could have been worded better to reflect that instead of piling on legitimate file sharing, but again, Magnatune users are the least of their problems, and we all know that very well.

Darn those New Zealand teenagers... (1)

Kral_Blbec (1201285) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207861)

(read the pda screen in the video)

Promo (1)

seven of five (578993) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207871)

Downloaded music should count as free promo. Record labels themselves follow downloads to gauge popularity. Someone should clue the gov't in on this.

Flash isn't all it's heavy with (3, Interesting)

serutan (259622) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207899)

"Occasionally breathless tone" is an understatement. Take a look at some of the other training material. The whole site has a Reefer Madness tone, as if it was produced by the same person who directed anti-commie films in the 1950s. I wonder if government training material in general has been given the "War On [fill in the blank]" treatment.

Re:Flash isn't all it's heavy with (3, Insightful)

Zaurus (674150) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207983)

Eurasia?

Re:Flash isn't all it's heavy with (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29208033)

War On [fill in the blank]

SMURFS!!!

What a piece of schlock (1)

meerling (1487879) | more than 4 years ago | (#29207997)

It's basic sensationalistic everything is the worst possible case stupidity combined with Dora the explorer guidelines, RIAA false information, and a quantity of Shatneresce voice acting.

For the most part, it's the standard dry government garbage that is used to give insomniacs some sleep time while racking up at-work hours.

I've seen worse (1)

ArcadeX (866171) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208021)

I had to take the test, and I laughed as I got that question wrong, but no one cares. They hire a contractor to create a test, it's only reviewed by pointed haired managers, accuracy is optional. Just because it's there doesn't mean it's official belief, just that the agency creating the test put opinions down.

Not at all surprising (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29208027)

I've worked in the defense industry, with a security clearance, for going on twenty years now, and you have to understand, this kind of stupidity is not at all unusual. On the military side, the security officers are usually MPs (or SPs, for the Air Force) who've been dragooned into doing information security. They aren't stupid (well, most of them aren't), but they also aren't trained for that kind of work--they're supposed to be cops. But "one size fits nobody," so they get assigned by their branch to information protection slots, receive a couple of weeks of Power Point slide training, and then they're placed over engineers and techs whose knowledge of the IT systems runs rings around them. As a result, their response to anything new is hard-wired: "no."

It's even worse on the civilian/contractor side. Security jobs don't pay well, and because you get what you pay for, the dregs of the organization tend to filter down to those positions. What's worse, once there, your average security guy/gal has power over smarter/more competent people for the first time in their careers, and a small but very present minority of them proceed to abuse that power and act arbitrarily, usually out of ignorance, but occasionally out of pure spite. This kind of mindless "training" presentation is what most of them do all day. As you can see, the results are less than impressive.

Best Voice Over EVER (1)

thedbp (443047) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208035)

Whoever they hired to do the voice over for this obviously was having trouble keeping a straight face. The tone is incredibly facetious. Like "I'm saying it, but I really really really think this is utter bullshit."

You're all missing the point. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29208045)

In short they're predisposing future Jurors for any RIAA / MPAA trials.

Re:You're all missing the point. (1)

jamstar7 (694492) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208371)

In short they're predisposing future Jurors for any RIAA / MPAA trials.

That tends to keep those multimillion dollar awards coming. Whether or not the defendant can pay them is immaterial.

must be a band called "Stop Stealing" (1)

Dan667 (564390) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208107)

I am totally going to go check them out by downloading their songs. If the government thinks they are that good to tell people to shout the band name I will give them a listen!

Jamendo? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29208113)

According to them Jamendo is illegal too?

reminiscent... (1)

retchdog (1319261) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208131)

A coworker went off on me, for no particular reason, about not downloading any music because he would (somehow) get in trouble for it, in case the BSA raided our offices for (again) no particular reason.

I downloaded a pile of public domain/CC music just on principle. Then I decompiled one of his "utilities" in order to remove a gratuitous pause he had added, just for job security. I felt bad about the latter thing, afterwards, but not the former.

Some people are natural parasites, and can't grasp that other people are not just like them.

Re:reminiscent... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29208253)

Then I decompiled one of his "utilities" in order to remove a gratuitous pause he had added, just for job security.

The pause was there to give the server a head start on processing transactions, Dave. Sheesh!

Copyright act of 1790 (5, Interesting)

symbolset (646467) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208191)

Copyright as envisioned by the authors of the US Constitution was written to law as the Copyright Act of 1790 [wikipedia.org] .

Under that act protection was 14 years with a 14 year extension available if the copyright holder was still alive and it was renewed.

So... that's what they meant by "for limited times". They wrote it down for us. Under that law all works prior to 1980 would be in the public domain as would many prior to 1994. Every time copyright has been extended those works that would be public domain have been stolen from each of us. THAT'S stealing.

A little elevator music (1)

SEWilco (27983) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208257)

I wonder if their elevators download music. I look forward to hearing "That's stealing!" echoing through the elevator shafts whenever someone gets on board.

Slander (1)

b4upoo (166390) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208273)

Loudly accusing someone of theft in the workplace when in fact no theft has occurred just might be enough to sue somebody into the next century!

You know, it makes me want to Shout... (1)

snspdaarf (1314399) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208275)

My first thought was, "...you shout, 'Look out! There are Llamas!' "

While being paid? (1)

markdavis (642305) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208293)

If they are downloading music while at work, they probably really are "stealing". They *might* be "stealing" if they are downloading copyrighted works without paying for them... but they are *absolutely* stealing from the tax payers if we are being taxed to pay for them to be at "work" and while "on the clock" they are doing personal crap. And they are also probably breaking a dozen or so work policies in the process.

Yeah right... they are "on break" (using company/taxpayer computers and company/taxpayer bandwidth to obtain the stuff).

Don't get me wrong- I the whole idea that it is automatically "stealing" to "download music" is just stupid oversimplification. But I would think the bigger issue would be that while being paid to work, they should be working.

Going a little overboard, eh? (1)

rnturn (11092) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208309)

I didn't read any actual policy but one can easily see this as a rather innocent departmental policy whereby you aren't supposed to be listening to music from the Internet using government computers. That's not much different than many corporate policies regarding use of the company's assets. One wonders, though, if someone read "inappropriate" and interpreted that to mean "illegal". It wouldn't be the first time some bureaucrat interpreted something in such a way as to make themselves seem more powerful than they really are. Either way, violating the policy could still mean you're out of a job so why push it? Last time I read the news, unemployment was bad. Probably why said bureaucrat feels they can add things like this to the acceptable use policy.

I don't understand what they are stealing (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208317)

the music, or bandwidth?
If it's bandwidth, then they ahve a point.(not that they actually loose anything unless it's peaked.)

I couldn't sit for more then 30 seconds to that blatantly stupid and scaremongering video.

This is crap (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29208347)

Wait, so if I make music and put it up for on the net, it would be illegal for people to download it???

So lets say (1)

Icegryphon (715550) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208353)

You see a music video on youtube uploaded by the owners company
and use Youtube downloader or Keepvid.com to download the file.
Then you extract the Audio to MP3 or another Audio format
Would that be Stealing?

Information is like water, it flows and seeps everywhere, and everything on the internet is information(ie, 1's and 0's).
Information screams to be free and finds ways to get everywhere, You can't stop it

Copyright is theft (1)

Stormwatch (703920) | more than 4 years ago | (#29208373)

Copyright itself is theft from the public domain. So we steal back because we don't have the big monies to lobby for the right thing -- ABOLISH COPYRIGHT. [dklevine.com]
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