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ESA Sent Takedown Notices For 45 Million Infringements In Fiscal 2009

Soulskill posted about 5 years ago | from the can't-say-they-aren't-trying dept.

Announcements 81

eldavojohn writes "The Entertainment Software Association has released this year's fiscal report (PDF), putting out their numbers to level the finger at new targets. Following up on last year's published report, this one has a whole bunch of new numbers to ponder. The top five P2P game piracy countries this year are: Italy, Spain, France, Germany, and Poland. The ESA's anti-piracy program notes, 'Chief among this year's actions were five separate law enforcement raids against game pirates in California, resulting in the seizure of several thousand games and dozens of modded consoles, and the arrests of five individuals.' But don't worry, they've expanded to other countries. 'The ESA sent takedown notices to ISPs covering more than 45 million instances of infringement of member company games in more than 100 countries worldwide.' They also strive to show they are actually doing things, like endorsing 43 bills aimed at regulating content or controlling access to video games — with not a single one of them making it into law. They did put some into effect at the state level; mostly making it a crime to sell mature games to minors. You can also find their activities localized to you, as this report has sections arranged by state and country. Conspicuously absent this year are any global numbers of what piracy cost the entertainment industry, so unfortunately Ars Technica will have to find someone else to audit, although Venture Beat has a good breakdown."

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Go go (3, Insightful)

Dyinobal (1427207) | about 5 years ago | (#29243883)

' They also strive to show they are actually doing things, like endorsing 43 bills aimed at regulating content or controlling access to video games -- with not a single one of them making it into law. They did put some into effect at the state level; mostly making it a crime to sell mature games to minors.

Go go nanny state!

Re:Go go (2, Funny)

ijakings (982830) | about 5 years ago | (#29244777)

Surely you mean Go Go Gadget Nanny state!

Go Go DIC Entertainment (1)

Alaren (682568) | about 5 years ago | (#29256313)

Not unless he wants to get a takedown notice from DIC [wikipedia.org] ...

ESA (1)

Kagura (843695) | about 5 years ago | (#29244947)

There's one thing NASA has over the ESA. ;)

Re:ESA (1)

Z00L00K (682162) | about 5 years ago | (#29247555)

I also read ESA as the European Space Agency.

Be careful with those acronyms please!

Re:ESA (1)

laejoh (648921) | about 5 years ago | (#29249819)

There are only 17,576 tla's [wikipedia.org] so collisions will occur.

Re:ESA (1)

tenco (773732) | about 5 years ago | (#29250669)

Maybe ESA can send ESA a letter...

Re:ESA (1)

Fred_A (10934) | about 5 years ago | (#29258191)

I also read ESA as the European Space Agency.

I was fairly puzzled as well, figuring it must be getting awfully crowded up there :

"take down those 45 million space probes at once !"

I'm relieved it's just another bunch of clueless media cretins.
Wait, no I'm not, it means there's yet another such stupid agency I've never heard of. How many such things are there ?

It's a crime to modify your own hardware (4, Insightful)

selven (1556643) | about 5 years ago | (#29243959)

And here I was thinking that kind of thing is reserved for cyberpunk dystopias.

Re:It's a crime to modify your own hardware (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29244691)

Well of course. The moment any society recognizes property on ideas, they must necessarily give up the idea of private property since the two are completely incompatible.

Re:It's a crime to modify your own hardware (1)

7-Vodka (195504) | about 5 years ago | (#29245023)

Not really. There's no reason it has to be 0% or 100%.

The patent system works really well for physical inventions like if you invent a better pogostick and you want to patent that design.

It works horribly for business plans and software...

Why throw the baby out with the bathwater? Like most things in life, the elegant solution is not as simplistic as your statement.

Any mention of (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29244011)

How all the bans of sales to minor keep getting thrown out by the courts over and over?

Fact checking? (4, Informative)

VGPowerlord (621254) | about 5 years ago | (#29244033)

They also strive to show they are actually doing things, like endorsing 43 bills aimed at regulating content or controlling access to video games -- with not a single one of them making it into law. They did put some into effect at the state level; mostly making it a crime to sell mature games to minors.

You have that backwards. The ESA is against these laws because it would limit their sales numbers. They're the ones suing to have these laws repealed [joystiq.com] .

Re:Fact checking? (1)

Toridas (742267) | about 5 years ago | (#29244621)

The summary has it backwards. Or whomever wrote it doesn't know the meaning of "endorsed."

Re:Fact checking? (1)

VGPowerlord (621254) | about 5 years ago | (#29244687)

I thought they might have not understood "endorsed" either, but the next sentence is implying the ESA got some laws passed at the state level.

Re:Fact checking? (1)

Toridas (742267) | about 5 years ago | (#29245045)

Ok maybe the summary writer just doesn't understand English very well then.

The summary is just flat wrong. (1)

EWAdams (953502) | about 5 years ago | (#29244879)

You're right, it's completely backwards. The ESA fights these laws, it doesn't support them.

Woo! (4, Funny)

LBt1st (709520) | about 5 years ago | (#29244051)

'Chief among this year's actions were five separate law enforcement raids against game pirates in California, resulting in the seizure of several thousand games and dozens of modded consoles, and the arrests of five individuals.'

I feel so much safer now knowing the streets are clean of those terrible video games.

Re:Woo! (1)

westlake (615356) | about 5 years ago | (#29246079)

I feel so much safer now knowing the streets are clean of those terrible video games.

In the American system, violent crimes are almost always prosecuted at the state and local level.

The federal government usually takes the lead in the prosecution of economic crimes with an interstate or international dimension.

GTA IV grossed $500 million in sales in its first week of release.

The geek can't hype the game industry as a high tech employer - a $10 billion dollar economic powerhouse - and expect the feds to ignore the pirate - the counterfeiter. Video Game Industry [wikipedia.org]

So this works out to what... (5, Interesting)

KarrdeSW (996917) | about 5 years ago | (#29244061)

1.427 notices per second assuming they work constantly...
Course they probably don't work weekends or holidays: more like 2.075 notices per second with taking time off. Oh... wait! They only work 9 to 5, right? Assume an hour for lunch... that takes it to 7.143 notices per second!

I don't really know how long an individual notice is in words, or how many are sent through email. We can probably assume that for any given delivery it gets printed out at least once... so that makes about 5400 trees worth of copy paper.

Once again, assuming it only takes one page, and assuming they are using a relatively efficient printer... this works out to what? $1,800,000 worth of ink just to print all this out once?

I guess it really didn't say 45 million notices, just infringements. So I guess I'm also assuming from all this that one infringement = one notice. I'm sure that I'm also being conservative that one notice also only takes one page.

Re:So this works out to what... (3, Insightful)

Darkness404 (1287218) | about 5 years ago | (#29244123)

Its pretty reasonable, lets say you have a ROM site that has every NES game on it, that there is over 600 games. Knowing that most ROM sites have more than one console and pretty much all the games for at least a single console, its not that unreasonable to claim 45 million "infringements".

Re:So this works out to what... (1)

KarrdeSW (996917) | about 5 years ago | (#29244181)

Its pretty reasonable, lets say you have a ROM site that has every NES game on it, that there is over 600 games.

This is a good point.
So then you just have to wonder how slimy the lawyers are and whether or not they want to drown these people in paper. I suppose we could fit 600 games on a few pages, but why bother when we have document templates and laser printers :)

Re:So this works out to what... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29244333)

I get the feeling that that company has adopted RIAA's calculation-method : every assumed infingement must be regarded to be standing for at least a 5.000 un-detected ones. That means that if you send about 26 take-down notices a day (*every* day) you can calculate them up to "having detected" those 45 million infringements.

The worst thing is that even if they officially spread those numbers to the politicians they won't even get a raised eyebrow from them, let alone a punishment for trying to defraud. :-\

Captcha : vulture. How apropriate.

Re:So this works out to what... (1)

sowth (748135) | about 5 years ago | (#29253281)

No, more likely, they use spam-bots which look at file names and if it "matches" a game they are "protecting" (such as doom3.zip [slashdot.org] ), then they send a DMCA complaint and call it an "infringement." Much like the other copyright "protection" associations.

Double edged sword... (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | about 5 years ago | (#29244085)

Don't they realize by restricting access to games they lose new talent? In general most kids have an idea what they want to do when they are around 15, they might not know which exact field, but at least a general idea (law, medical, computers, etc.) and by restricting kids access to "mature" games that are very often considered some of the better games they play crappy games and might not be interested in learning do develop video games.

Re:Double edged sword... (2, Insightful)

KDR_11k (778916) | about 5 years ago | (#29244435)

Perhaps game devs should tone down the violence then. It's getting absurd how much violence is going into games lately. It's no longer enough to show a blood splat and have the enemy fall over, no, you have to show all the organs being ripped out in every detail.

Anyway, there are plenty of videogames that are both good and not M rated. Nintendo is known for making great games that you can give to a child without having to freak out.

Re:Double edged sword... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29244743)

Why should death detail matter? How are cartoon depictions of death ethically superior to ludicrous gibs? Isn't the significant bit that a life has been lost? If not, you're just bitching about aesthetics.

Death is horrible. Making it cute, cuddly, and consequence-free seems like perversity best left for adults.

Death != death (1)

tepples (727027) | about 5 years ago | (#29247937)

How are cartoon depictions of death ethically superior to ludicrous gibs?

Less-detailed depictions leave open the possibility that the "death" isn't really death [tvtropes.org] . Pokemon, for instance, only faint, and death in most console RPGs comes to resemble fainting with fairly easy access to resurrection artifacts like Phoenix Down from the Final Fantasy series. Super Smash Bros. Brawl has hardening instead of death.

m0d do3n (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29248211)

steve jobs hardens when he catches a glimpse of your micropenis, you jewish nigger faggot

Re:Death != death (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29248645)

Pokemon, for instance, only faint, and death in most console RPGs comes to resemble fainting with fairly easy access to resurrection artifacts like Phoenix Down from the Final Fantasy series. Super Smash Bros. Brawl has hardening instead of death.

So a kid is led to believe that if they whack someone over the head with a baseball bat for stealing their lunch money they'll only
faint or harden? How is deceiving them really helping?

How are kids supposed to know its wrong to lie when parents do it all the time. Death is a part of life... accept it.

Re:Death != death (1)

tepples (727027) | about 5 years ago | (#29250737)

Death is a part of life... accept it.

But if your $50 game stops working because your character had an accident while you were still learning to control her, I don't think that would be popular.

Re:Double edged sword... (4, Insightful)

Dutch Gun (899105) | about 5 years ago | (#29245129)

First you say this:

Perhaps game devs should tone down the violence then. It's getting absurd how much violence is going into games lately. It's no longer enough to show a blood splat and have the enemy fall over, no, you have to show all the organs being ripped out in every detail.

then this...

Anyway, there are plenty of videogames that are both good and not M rated. Nintendo is known for making great games that you can give to a child without having to freak out.

If there are plenty of videogames that are both good and not M rated, then what's the problem?

I've worked in the game industry for well over a decade now. I have yet to work on a game that wasn't Teen-rated or lower, and I've made no special effort to do so. The simple fact of the matter is this: like you said, there are a HUGE NUMBER of great Teen-rated or lower games out there. And yet a small number of M-rated games get so much of the attention. Why are you blaming developers for that?

Re:Double edged sword... (1)

westlake (615356) | about 5 years ago | (#29246227)

The simple fact of the matter is this: like you said, there are a HUGE NUMBER of great Teen-rated or lower games out there. And yet a small number of M-rated games get so much of the attention. Why are you blaming developers for that?

There are a small core of developers - Rockstar comes first to mind - that push the M rating to extremes - beyond the limits of public tolerance - generating a backlash that sweeps across the entire industry.

It has become almost impossible to introduce genuinely adult themes into video gaming because the "M" rating universally translates as blood, gore and adolescent soft-core porn: The button mashing sex play of "Hot Coffee."

Re:Double edged sword... (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | about 5 years ago | (#29245361)

Nintendo -used- to be known for that. But seriously, since the GameCube, Nintendo finally figured out how to make everything they touch gold again so we get crap games with no replay value and that are little more than tech demos (Wii Sports anyone?) or repeat the same formula over, and over and over again to the extreme (how many Mario Party games are we up to now? 9 in 10 years?). While they do make some stellar games (Super Smash Bros. Brawl) their better games are often their more violent games.

Re:Double edged sword... (1)

KDR_11k (778916) | about 5 years ago | (#29246383)

Last I checked Wii Sports was EXTREMELY popular and it wouldn't be a stretch to say the majority of Wii sales happened because of it. What are Nintendo's more violent games? Prime 3 Corruption, Disaster and Battalion Wars? They're all pretty minor titles and if you add them up you don't even get half of Galaxy's sales.

Re:Double edged sword... (1)

Hatta (162192) | about 5 years ago | (#29245043)

I doubt that whether a game is "mature" or not in any way correlates to quality. Yeah you have your Metal Gear Solids and GTA3s that are violent and excellent. But you also have games like Manhunt that are violent for the sake of violence, without any really redeeming gameplay value. And you also have E rated games like Ocarina of Time, Pikmin, Ikaruga, etc. I'm not sure how the last three could be improved upon by including mature themes in any way.

Re:Double edged sword... (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | about 5 years ago | (#29245513)

I don't think that I've ever played a truly excellent FPS that wasn't rated M or at the very least T. About the only two exceptions would be Portal which is more of a puzzle game, and Chex Quest but that was a mod of Doom II which was rated M. Had Zelda not done a few things to avoid getting a T rating, I have little doubt that it would be rated T (green "blood" rather than red blood, etc). The two most looked at games recently are FPS games and sandbox games. Both of which usually have M ratings.

Re:Double edged sword... (1)

Dutch Gun (899105) | about 5 years ago | (#29245935)

FPS games are a pretty narrow genre, albeit a popular one. By definition, it involves the player running around with a gun and shooting things. That tends to get at least a T, and if it involves shooting people, probably an M.

That's sort of like saying: "All the fighting games I've looked at seem to involve a high degree of physical violence." Technically true, but it doesn't really mean anything when cherry-picking one specific genre which is, by definition, probably more violent.

Re:Double edged sword... (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | about 5 years ago | (#29248473)

In general though popular games tend to have larger budgets and more impressive games. Every generation has its "popular" game, at first it was Pong, then it was Space Invaders games, then it was platformers, then it was fighting games/RPGs, etc.

Re:Double edged sword... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29249463)

You're an idiot. Seriously.

Re:Double edged sword... (1)

Dan541 (1032000) | about 5 years ago | (#29249543)

When I face a restriction, such as drm i just download instead.

Guess... (1)

Mashiki (184564) | about 5 years ago | (#29244157)

They haven't figured out that the RIAA/MPAA model doesn't work yet.

Oh come on! (3, Insightful)

Frosty Piss (770223) | about 5 years ago | (#29244225)

Well, you know, don't pirate games, it will not be an issue.

Look, this issue is fundamentally different than the RIAA/MPAA issue. Here we are not talking about making backups, or having reasonable control over something you bought and paid for. We're talking about pirated goods, like fake Gucci hand bags and what not. Selling fakes is wrong, unlike the RIAA/MPAA concept of "stealing", this hits closer to the real definition.

Re:Oh come on! (1)

the_womble (580291) | about 5 years ago | (#29244889)

reasonable control over something you bought and paid for

Like modding a console you own?

Re:Oh come on! (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29245055)

I wouldn't be so sure about that.

I got a copyright infringement notice for downloading a no-cd patch.

Re:Oh come on! (1)

Mashiki (184564) | about 5 years ago | (#29245275)

What modding your own hardware should be illegal? K! So where's the refund store when you wear out your console?

Re:Oh come on! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29247693)

> Well, you know, don't pirate games, it will not be an issue.

With them sending over 1 infringement notice/second, what makes you think they're doing due diligence?

I seem to remember a printer that got a DMCA notice once. I wouldn't be surprised if it came from these guys...

Define piracy (0, Flamebait)

tepples (727027) | about 5 years ago | (#29247951)

Well, you know, don't pirate games, it will not be an issue.

Define "pirate". Is KFoulEggs a "pirated" copy of Puyo Pop? Is Gnometris a "pirated" copy of Tetris?

Re:Define piracy (1)

sowth (748135) | about 5 years ago | (#29253137)

Flamebait? After reading about these "copyright" associations for several years, it is obvious they want to define any product competing with their member companies as "pirate." How many times have they sent DMCA complaints about works which they do not own? [slashdot.org] Is this not a copyright racket [wikipedia.org] ?

Re:Oh come on! (1)

Doctor_Jest (688315) | about 5 years ago | (#29249371)

The fundamental difference between "piracy" and "infringement" is being subverted these days by the entrenched media conglomerates. A fake Gucci bag or a bootleg copy of a theatrical release sold for $5 on the street corner is considered criminal infringement (and has been for many decades). Making a copy of "1001 Duck farts" for a friend, or posting a torrent to a website where 500 people can get the duck farts over the tubes is not criminal, but civil. In terms of the law, it's a tort. Now, enter the RIAA/MPAA/BSA. They want infringement "without monetary gain" (the definition of what was "lost" doesn't get proven easily when you're dealing with P2P and Torrents) to be criminal. They want to put you in jail. They just can't get around that pesky freedom and Constitution thing (here in the States, I mean). Give them time.

I do agree that the fake merchandise (cloned by Chinese government funded businesses at times) is stealing, and I applaud those who go after that type of infringement. I do not however, subscribe to the notion that P2P is just as harmful. That's just me. I've not found a compelling argument that would change my opinion of that. So "pirating" a game is not simply infringing on copyright (via bittorrent or P2P). The fundamental argument doesn't change w/r/t piracy, but it certainly eliminates most of what the BSA labels as "piracy" (and thereby attaching a criminal aspect to the infringement.) To me, this is a moral issue, and like someone once said "you can't legislate morality." It only ends up making criminals of us all.

Raids (3, Insightful)

pgn674 (995941) | about 5 years ago | (#29244307)

On page 20 in a big text box:

Chief among this year's actions were five separate law enforcement raids against game pirates in California, resulting in the seizure of several thousand games and dozens of modded consoles, and the arrests of five individuals.

It sounds like you could get the same thing from raiding any dorm hall on my university campus. This is a sound bite, good for news media to repeat, and to me it makes what could be a completely legal community sound like a gang of high profile game-pirate-for-profit lords.

Re:Raids (4, Funny)

Dyinobal (1427207) | about 5 years ago | (#29244379)

They were dangerous I tell you! They had the cheat codes for all weapons and infinite ammo!

Re:Raids (1)

univalue (1563403) | about 5 years ago | (#29245011)

So where can I get the cheat codes for life?

Re:Raids (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29251503)

I think Carmack has some. But be careful not to use them in after-life. You'll explode.

Top Five? (3, Informative)

Bob Esponja (1416343) | about 5 years ago | (#29244407)

I live in Spain and the 80% of my torrents peers are from EEUU. Uhmm! RIAA/MPAA and partners are pushing governement to convert in criminal actions the right to share contents. Now in Spain, for now, is legal to share, because we pay a tax for the 'private copy right': The right to made private copies and share-it.

Re:Top Five? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29247215)

You are wrong, in Spain is only legal to share music, movies, books... but not programs or games. The programs and games are under a different law that the content that is affected by the 'private copy right'.

Re:Top Five? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29251605)

Now in Spain, for now, is legal to share, because we pay a tax for the 'private copy right': The right to made private copies and share-it.

Sharing software is NOT legal in Spain.

The 'private copy right' only covers music and movies, for software we only have the right to make backup copies of programs or games we already legally own.

Pirates! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29244413)

If any other business is failing, they get introspective. They re-examine their business model, make necessary adjustments and move on.

In the digital content industry, they just go LOLPIRACY MOAR POLICE RAIDS PLZ

Where's the USA? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29244419)

Come on, USA - looks like tbere is a dangerous P2P piracy gap. You can't let all those commie, pinko, gay, lesbian surrender-monkey euro-freetards take the lead. Lets see some serious closing of this gap. Come on, the Whole Non-negotiable American Lifestyle depends on you being Number One.

The European Space Agency did what?! (2)

CdXiminez (807199) | about 5 years ago | (#29244441)

Don't tell me there is another thing called ESA that is spoiling our Space Agency's good name...

ESA? Oh, that ESA. (1)

Rich Klein (699591) | about 5 years ago | (#29244459)

Well, better that the Entertainment Software Association does this than the European Space Agency. :P

Did they have to come in again? (1)

hcdejong (561314) | about 5 years ago | (#29244877)

Chief among this year's actions were five separate law enforcement raids against game pirates in California, resulting in the seizure of several thousand games and dozens of modded consoles, and the arrests of five individuals.

Did the PR flack reading the press release sound like John Cleese at all?

They should be required to escrow the source (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29244897)

Currently, the majority of the commercial software industry is getting protection of both copyright and trade secret on their software. If they want to gain the protection of copyright, they should be required to escrow the corresponding source, so that the public eventually gains access to it.

doesn't look accurate (1)

samuX (623423) | about 5 years ago | (#29245033)

page 16 (or 14) there are the top 10 isp supporting p2p piracy: Telecom italia is named twice at 11.6% and 1.6%... how come they are twice ? Iunet is named but the provider is named wind/infostrada . later in the page they named what they DID in December 2009 ... clearly a typo but.. does anyone re read it before publishing it ?

Re:doesn't look accurate (1)

aronzak (1203098) | about 5 years ago | (#29248771)

Hmm, this certainly doesn't inspire confidence in their methodology. Right there on page 14, after the diagram with two Telecom Italia's, it reads "In early December 2009, IP Policy staff circulated to Piracy Working Group members a draft plan for engagement on ISP Responsibility issues. "

How many of them are for actual infringers? (5, Interesting)

seebs (15766) | about 5 years ago | (#29245211)

We got one of those once. We host a mirror of the IF Archive (text adventures), including three games named Days of Doom 1, Days of Doom 2, and Days of Doom 3.

Here's the local copy:

-rw-rw-r-- 1 seebs users 116471 Oct 17 1999 Doom3.zip

They sent us a threatening letter because they believed this was the retail version of Doom 3.

I assume the rest are comparable.

Re:How many of them are for actual infringers? (1)

noidentity (188756) | about 5 years ago | (#29249509)

-rw-rw-r-- 1 seebs users 116471 Oct 17 1999 Doom3.zip

They sent us a threatening letter because they believed this was the retail version of Doom 3.

Clearly it's Doom 3 with some super-duper compression scheme that makes a CD-ROM or whatever compress down to under 200K. I think the NSA needs to be notified as well...

Re:How many of them are for actual infringers? (1)

hansamurai (907719) | about 5 years ago | (#29265009)

You can compress anything down to 1-bit if you have the right decompression algorithm.

Doom is a trademark (1)

tepples (727027) | about 5 years ago | (#29253447)

We host a mirror of the IF Archive (text adventures), including three games named Days of Doom 1, Days of Doom 2, and Days of Doom 3. [...] 116471 Oct 17 1999 Doom3.zip

October 1999? Both Doom and Doom II were out by then; wouldn't Id Software have had a legit trademark claim by then?

In other news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29245265)

researchers today discovered that while 95% of the global email traffic is considered spam, a whopping 99% of that is caused by the mafiaa and only the remaining 1% is the friendly neighbourhood viagra and indian heritage spam.

WOOtL FP (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29245561)

[tu8edo.o8g],

Did the ones sent to canada count? (1)

PC and Sony Fanboy (1248258) | about 5 years ago | (#29245589)

I've received several of these from my university. Each one has been forwarded back to the ESA, suggesting that they try sending them to people with the relevant nationality. I wonder if these are included in the report?

ESA Sent Takedown Notices... (3, Funny)

brianc (11901) | about 5 years ago | (#29246527)

the European Space Agency did what!?!?

Re:ESA Sent Takedown Notices... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29249301)

Yep, a takedown notice:
Take that satellite down, or we'll sue you for infringing the copyright the ESA bought from the estate of Arthur C. Clarke, a European national. Putting up a satellite is just simply translating Clarke's written idea into the analog format of 'reality'. So just like if you translated Rendezvous with Rama into Klingon, you have to pay us ex-orbit-ant royalties or TAKE IT DOWN.

firsT post!? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29247099)

cou7d sink your guys are usually

What's wrong with modding hardware? (2, Interesting)

xkcdFan1011011101111 (1494551) | about 5 years ago | (#29247375)

They bought it, it's theirs. Sure they were pirating games and that's illegal, but there is nothing wrong with modding the hardware. I'll bet they learned a bit about electronics in the process. I'm sure they were aware that they voided their warranty.

There is nothing wrong with modifying hardware you own!

DMCA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29250443)

They consider it a DMCA violation because they figure you're using it for piracy.

No, it doesn't matter what you actually use the modchip for, either.

High import duties (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29248161)

I'm not sure its the case since EU membership, but Italy used to have extremely high import duties on software CDs. I'm sure this helped create a culture more tolerant of piracy.

Please stop tarnishing the ESA brand (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29250023)

I hate the fact that someone is trying to usurp ESA - ESA is and should always be used as a reference to the European Space Agency...

Piracy costs nobody anything. (0)

Mistoffeles (1172809) | about 5 years ago | (#29252599)

The RIAA and other such bodies like to quote statistics indicating what piracy cost their industry in whatever given period of time they are touting at the time, but in reality it's 100% BS. People who pirate wouldn't have bought it in the first place, nor would they if they were reliably prevented from pirating, so this mythical dollar figure is nothing but smoke and mirrors.

Just wondering... are these Nuisance Complaints? (1)

serutan (259622) | about 5 years ago | (#29265469)

This may seem like trolling but I mean it as a legitimate question. If I repeatedly call the police to report that stuff has been stolen from the seat of my car, and they keep finding that I park my car on busy streets with the windows open, eventually they are going to stop responding to my calls. If the digital content industry insists on trafficking in materials that are extremely simple to copy and redistribute, why should the public pay good money to have the justice system process their endless complaints of losses? It seems more rational to tell them that if they can't protect their assets better they should get into a different line of business.

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