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Happy Birthday, Internet!

samzenpus posted more than 4 years ago | from the not-a-kid-anymore dept.

The Internet 213

NobodyExpects writes "I'd like to wish a happy birthday to the Internet! Today marks its 40th birthday! In fall 1969, computers sending data between two California universities set the stage for the Internet, which became a household word in the 1990s. On September 2nd 1969, in a lab at the University of California, Los Angeles, two computers passed test data through a 15-foot gray cable. Stanford Research Institute joined the fledgling ARPANET network a month later; UC Santa Barbara and the University of Utah joined by years end, and the internet was born."

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Looking forward... (5, Interesting)

alain94040 (785132) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293417)

Before everyone starts posting stories about how they grew up on their Apple II using a 300 baud modem, let's have a forward looking discussion.

The Internet as we define it today was born 40 years ago when two big computers were hooked up with a cable and exchanged data. Let me ask: what are the milestones that will matter 10, 30 years from now? Some guesses (pick your favorites):

- wires, what wires?: The Internet goes wireless, with the invention of Wifi (circa 1991 - yes, really that old)

- device, what device?: The Internet goes ubiquitous, we don't even have to carry those bulky iPhones around (circa ???)

- telepresence: I see you, you see me, in HD, anytime, wherever you and I are. Maybe we can even shake hands. Definitely coming in the next decade.

- oracle: all knowledge, all questions, answered all the time (that might change the way we think of our education system!)

Who said innovation is slowing down? We are still in the stone age of the Internet.

Re:Looking forward... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29293439)

I fucked your dead great grandmother while posting this message on the interwebs.

Re:Looking forward... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29293755)

And I posted pictures of it to 4chan.

Re:Looking forward... (2, Funny)

the_Bionic_lemming (446569) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293467)

Apple 2?

Gosh, that was out of the question back then - too expensive.

Re:Looking forward... (5, Interesting)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293833)

$1000 for an Apple II isn't that bad. Certainly cheaper than the first Macintosh at around $4000. Hmmm. I guess that's why most home hobbyists owned the cheaper $400 Ataris and $200 Commodores.

Milestones:

Killer App (circa 1993) - The hypertext web browser. Prior to its invention few people had a reason to get internet. They were satisfied to just keep using local bulletin boards, but once they saw the Mosaic web browser running on their friend's or their college's IBM or Mac or Amiga, they immediately wanted it.

Carterphone decision (circa 1981) - It eliminated the monopoly AT&T had on the modem and brought competition. People always ask why is competition is needed? This is a perfect example. From the 1950s to the 1980s the only speeds available were 110 bit/s and 300 bit/s. The monopoly caused stagnation. After the breakup of AT&T multiple companies began a "speedwar" that rapidly moved speeds from 300 to 56000 in only ten years time. If AT&T still had a monopoly over 300 baud modems, the 90s's web explosion would have been impossible (too slow).

Usenet/Fidonet (circa 1982) - They weren't originally part of the internet, but they helped set the standards. Most of the emoticons ;-) and abbreviations (ROTF-LOL) we use today originated on these early text-only forums. And they allowed people to communicate not just locally, but all around the world like today's web. And it was free (no long-distance charges).

DSL/cable internet (circa 2000) - Allowed people to escape the 56k barrier and download videos, as well as streaming TV shows.

That's about all I can come-up with. Most of the advancement has been gradual.

Re:Looking forward... (3, Insightful)

Jafafa Hots (580169) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294639)

You're the only person other than me who I've seen that realized that without the Carterphone decision, there would be no internet as we know it.

There were even books published in the 80s about how the AT&T breakup was a disaster for technology. Bet that author feels stupid now.

Re:Looking forward... (4, Insightful)

Nimey (114278) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294797)

Are you kidding? The author's probably convinced he's still right, and weeps for the wonders we'd have had if only the government had left Ma Bell alone.

Maybe not, but you'd think that from the political atmosphere in this country.

Re:Looking forward... (-1)

FlickieStrife (1304115) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293519)

all knowledge, all questions, answered all the time (that might change the way we think of our education system!)

Who said innovation is slowing down? We are still in the stone age of the Internet.[citation needed]

There, fixed that for ya.

Re:Looking forward... (5, Insightful)

Shakrai (717556) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293593)

all knowledge, all questions, answered all the time (that might change the way we think of our education system!)

Yes, by providing even less incentive for people to actually study anything ;) To quote a friend of mine: A masters in Google and a doctorate in speed reading.

Re:Looking forward... Al Gore (-1, Flamebait)

screenbert (253482) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294103)

Al Gore was just getting his doctorate... Maybe his thesis was entitled "How to take credit for great ideas". BTW di I mention I helped Al gore invent the internet?

Re:Looking forward... (1)

Sum0 (1245284) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294197)

Competency exams exclude that particular loophole.

Re:Looking forward... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29294217)

haven't you heard of open book exams. I can have google but that doesnt make me a brain surgeon or a rocket scientist

Re:Looking forward... (2, Funny)

SBrach (1073190) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294375)

I totally know what your talking about. Imagine how happy I was when the Mayo Clinic interviewed me for their open Neurosurgeon position by handing me a laptop and a multiple choice test.

Re:Looking forward... (5, Interesting)

NotQuiteReal (608241) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294267)

No doubt Google can deliver far more information faster than ever before.

This is not a bad thing -- IF you can figure out which information is worthless and which is the the right answer.

That should be the motivation to learn enough to learn enough so that you can decide which Google results pass "the sniff test".

Of course the topic of your query has a lot to do with how well you will be able to tell if the results are the real deal.

I thought I was done, but that last sentence made me realize the "quick answer" future could either hasten or slow an "Idiocracy" future...

Re:Looking forward... (2, Insightful)

Capt. Skinny (969540) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294651)

Who was it that said books would mean the end of academics (academics consisting, at the time, entirely of lectures)? I wonder if the "which is worthless and which is right" question was pondered when books were first mass produced?

Re:Looking forward... (1)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294317)

when you have the entire collective works of humanity wired into your brain you'll wonder what exactly it is you're talking about right now.

Re:Looking forward... (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294715)

I don't think so. The new major decision in life will be, what not to learn.

Besides: What do you think studying consists of, if not learning some material from others (e.g. through reading)?

I can make professional games, music, 3d objects, software, websites, a bit of matte painting, AND am an expert in nutrition and psychology.
I also learned English trough the Internet. Mainly from learning material on the above subjects, Slashdot, The Daily Show and some torrented TV shows. I kid you not!

I don't think I would have been able to do that without the Internet! (Especially the professional tutorials, e.g. via Torrent or books ;) Not even remotely.

Re:Looking forward... (5, Insightful)

WoodenTable (1434059) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294729)

A masters in Google and a doctorate in speed reading.

This has actually been somewhat true (if you replace Google with Searching, that is) for a lot longer than the internet has existed. One of the most important things to learn at medical university/college, for example, is how to look stuff up. Ever wonder why doctors have giant libraries sitting around in their offices? That's all knowledge they gained in university, then promptly forgot, like any sane person would. They learned the reference system available to them at the time, and know how to use it - where one person gets hopelessly lost, they can find something useful. My mother collected a ridiculous number of books over the years for her practice - and she says her laptop and the internet almost invalidated nearly half of them.

Some basic training will always be required to understand certain things without a reference, though. Very simple example: nowhere in the wikipedia article on "clouds" does it say they're too diffuse to stand on. :) Don't go skydiving with intent to land on one, folks!

Re:Looking forward... (4, Insightful)

Quothz (683368) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293657)

Let me ask: what are the milestones that will matter 10, 30 years from now?

Amazingly, you missed the invention of DNS and the World Wide Web, arguably the two most popularizing developments.

wireless Internet is much older (4, Informative)

JoeBuck (7947) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293805)

See the Wikipedia packet radio article [wikipedia.org] as a starting point. There was packet radio using Internet protocols back in the 1970s. The protocol that became "Wifi" was first deployed in 1991, but it was far from the first usable packet radio protocol.

Re:wireless Internet is much older (1)

raddan (519638) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294803)

For anyone looking for even more depth, Tanenbaum [amazon.com] 's chapter on Media Access Control also talks about ALOHA in great detail before moving on to Ethernet, which is based on the work done by the University of Hawaii's packet radio experiments.

Re:Looking forward... (2, Insightful)

MrKaos (858439) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293847)

Some guesses (pick your favorites):

You forgot

Nuclear disarmament: No one can afford internet downtime from emp anymore.

I know thats why it was originally invented, but I don't think the modern internet is emp resistant.

Re:Looking forward... (1)

religious freak (1005821) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294005)

Depends on what you mean by "EMP resistant". Yes, it is resistant in that you could take out nine major cities in the USA and you'd still have workable communication because communication would automatically be routed around the affected areas.

Of course, the affected cities wouldn't have a workable Internet, but they'd have much bigger problems. EMP resistance was never meant to mean resistant at the point of attack, only in flexible routing around the area. Also, EMP wasn't necessarily the whole reason for creating the Internet in the first place either.

Re:Looking forward... (1)

MrNaz (730548) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294587)

but they'd have much bigger problems

Yea, like how to tweet about the radiation-mutated flesh eating zombies when all local routers are fried.

Re:Looking forward... (1)

Capt. Skinny (969540) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294765)

EMP wasn't necessarily the whole reason for creating the Internet in the first place either.

Nukes were not a motivation for creating the Internet; they motivated the development of packet switching: http://www.isoc.org/internet/history/brief.shtml#rand [isoc.org] See footnote 5, and note the authors.

Re:Looking forward... (3, Informative)

klapaucjusz (1167407) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294561)

I know thats why it was originally invented, but I don't think the modern internet is emp resistant.

That's an urban legend [isoc.org] .

Re:Looking forward... (4, Insightful)

IorDMUX (870522) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293883)

Before everyone starts posting stories about how they grew up on their Apple II using a 300 baud modem,

Too late. Did you watch the movie? There's some heavy handed "Get off my lawn"-ness going on in the article itself. To quote:

a lot of the youngsters nowadays have no real idea how primitive things were a few years ago.

"This is the first one I could say was my computer [...] You would have to plug it in because there was no battery, and you would work forever to get very little out of it..."

today's children have no concept of a life before computers.

Regardless, I say Happy Birthday, Internet! I can't wait to find out what sorts of wonders you will bring to my kids in another decade or so.

Re:Looking forward... (4, Funny)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293971)

"There's some heavy handed "Get off my lawn"-ness going on in the article itself."

Quit yer whinin', you young punk. When we moved out of the caves, we had to WALK to the next village to get our packets!! Now get back out into the street where you belong, you're crushing my grass.

Re:Looking forward... (1, Interesting)

grumling (94709) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293949)

Let me ask: what are the milestones that will matter 10, 30 years from now?

  • Everyone switching to IPv6 and elimination of IPv4.
  • Adoption of a true IP infrastructure across the board... no more IP over (insert your favorite old tech, like ATM or GSM), and all the extra overhead it causes.
  • Useful video search
  • True global mobile coverage, either by satellite or well placed towers.

Re:Looking forward... (4, Insightful)

RedK (112790) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294171)

Adoption of a true IP infrastructure across the board... no more IP over (insert your favorite old tech, like ATM or GSM), and all the extra overhead it causes.

Uh... ? What is a true IP infrastructure in your eyes ? Because I don't see anything in IP that permits physical interconnexion like ATM or GSM does. IP will always be over (insert some link layer and physical media here). Otherwise, IP wouldn't work.

Re:Looking forward... (0)

religious freak (1005821) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294017)

Two words: Semantic Web - once we have that, hold on to your hats... outside of the creation of the PC, and Internet itself, I don't think there will have been a larger revolution in information technology.

Re:Looking forward... (1)

Nursie (632944) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294219)

Semantic web?

You mean the stuff that's been shouted about by universities across the world as th next big thing for... well as long as I've been in the software game, which is only 12 years I'll admit.

Call me when it escapes from a lab.

Re:Looking forward... (1)

antirelic (1030688) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294159)

Hehe... I was thinking about doing a car analogy to make a mockery of your post (to the meta-mods: parent making far fetched predictions about future of the internet), but I guess I can sum it up asking where is my flying car?

The internet was the most unlikely of inventions to begin with, and the personal civilian application of the internet being the most unexpected application of computers and networking. I cant think of much fiction pre-dating the early 80's that predicted the internet as it is today (yes yes, porn... I know).

Re:Looking forward... (1)

Sir_Lewk (967686) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294419)

telepresence: I see you, you see me, in HD, anytime, wherever you and I are. Maybe we can even shake hands. Definitely coming in the next decade.

That's a tad optimistic, in a few decades I can buy but I don't see it happening in the next ten years.

Re:Looking forward... (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294625)

- wires, what wires?

It's a common misconception, that in the future everything is wireless. But if you actually think about it for so much as a minute, you will notice, that wired connections will always be faster and more efficient. Therefore they will never go away. There will be a place for both. But I think some stuff will always continue to be better and cheaper when wired.

- device, what device?: [...] those bulky iPhones around

Actually, we already were over the sweet spot for size. Remember that old tiny Nokia that everyone had in circa 2000? People later decided, that bigger sometimes is better. Especially with displays.
The second wave will come, when displays finally will be independent and integrated into contact lenses, glasses, etc. But then there is still the point of processing power and lifespan. As long as it fits my pocket, why make it smaller. It's good enough. :)

- telepresence: I see you, you see me, in HD, anytime, wherever you and I are.

Already exists in east Asia.

Maybe we can even shake hands. Definitely coming in the next decade

Naah, I don't think that someone would wear a tactile glove all day long, just to shake hands. Maybe with more, it will become a fashion. And Matrix-style BCIs are still a bit too far away.
But I wouldn't want to shake virtual hands anyway.

Re:Looking forward to ... (1)

bintech (37449) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294843)

Ok, now that I have my flamebait out of the way. Looking forward to what will be the next milestones.

1) Speed, the hunger for data transfer will definitely keep increasing so backbone upgrades to support 100Gbit and 1Tbit speeds will be coming. On what medium, that is a good question of which I believe fiber's potential has not been even remotely reached yet.

2) Input method to computers, I think this method will stay with the keyboard for sometime but like all input methodologies, it will eventually get improved upon. Currently we are limited to the speed of our fingers which is nowhere near the speed of our brains, so bridging this gap I feel will be a major overhaul at some point in time, say 20 or 30 years? (Hopefully before I die, I would love to see it ) Anyone remember the scene in Star Trek IV where Scotty talks into the mouse thinking its a mic? LOL
Maybe something along the lines of Minority Report would be the next step combined with voice

3) Identification technology as well. There are already companies that are working towards doing face recognition as you walk by to tailor ad's to you on their monitor as you walk by. One example here (http://www.designer-daily.com/billboards-are-watching-you-2566)

4) And definitely wireless communication tied in with wireless power. There is already the project set in motion to put solar panels in orbit to beam power back to earth as well at wireless power through resonant coupling continuing to be researched. I think the combinations will help us eventually spreading our wings from this planet and enable the transmission of data from deeper and deeper parts of space to take place. Maybe playing MMORG's from the moon will be possible in the near future :)

15 foot? (3, Funny)

bcmm (768152) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293475)

That's an extremely thick cable...

Presents (5, Funny)

TheWizardTim (599546) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293481)

I hear the internet wants a pony.

Re:Presents (1)

EkriirkE (1075937) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293535)

I want one~ (It's my birthday, too!)

Re:Presents (1)

Sooner Boomer (96864) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294681)

Well....Happy Birthday Erik.

and here [hedweb.com] you are!

Re:Presents (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29293933)

Perhaps in the near future, but not the presents.

Re:Presents (3, Funny)

nmb3000 (741169) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294133)

I hear the internet wants a pony.

The Internet is 40, not 4. It's not a pony it wants, but a Mustang [wikipedia.org] .

It also wants you off its lawn.

Re:Presents (1)

Nimey (114278) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294805)

OMG!!! PONIES!!!

happy b-day (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29293511)

thx for the porn

Re:happy b-day (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29293587)

And for all the fish.

Re:happy b-day (5, Funny)

FlickieStrife (1304115) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293641)

I believe the term is "inter-species erotica"

Re:happy b-day (1)

von_rick (944421) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294689)

The Vulcans and Romulans are hooking up?

Re:happy b-day (4, Interesting)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293965)

>>>thx for the porn

I still remember my first downloaded porn "video". It was about 64 kilobytes, took about 10 minutes to download, was a grainy 320x200, and only lasted 1/2 a second. It looped repeating the same "action" over-and-over which I'm sure you can guess what that was.

I then upgraded to a 4000-color 7 megahertz Amiga so I could get something more realistic-looking. ;-) Anyway here's that original movie that I downloaded ~25 years ago (porn) http://girls.c64.org/a_porno_movie_02.gif [c64.org] . And if for some strange reason you want to download it, you can find it here (porn) http://girls.c64.org/a__show.php?squery=&sfield=&cat=ani&style=&offset=41 [c64.org]

Re:happy b-day (1)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294135)

Here's another fullscreen "video" from around 1985. It took all of the Commodore 64's 1 megahertz and 16 color power to generate this gem. Presumably she removes her top after you press the spacebar. (no nudity) http://girls.c64.org/a_anime-tion_02.gif [c64.org]

Re:happy b-day (1)

Jafafa Hots (580169) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294667)

I call fake. She's shaved. Nobody was shaved back then!

They got started young back in the day.... (4, Funny)

Shakrai (717556) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293523)

Apparently Al Gore had his first child at the age of 21 ;)

Re:They got started young back in the day.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29293721)

"They're saying that now Al Gore has won the Nobel prize, Al Gore has a huge international platform to fight global warming. Kind of sad. Today, he stepped on the platform and it collapsed." --Jay Leno

Re:They got started young back in the day.... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29293727)

Didn't take long for a wingnut to bring up Gore (Yes I saw your ;) )

Gore never claimed that he "invented" the Internet, which implies that he engineered the technology. The invention occurred in the seventies and allowed scientists in the Defense Department to communicate with each other. In a March 1999 interview with Wolf Blitzer, Gore said, "During my service in the United States Congress, I took the initiative in creating the Internet."

The sentence, means that as a congressman Gore promoted the system we enjoy today, not that he could patent the science, though that's how the quotation has been manipulated. Hence the disingenuous substitution of "inventing" for the actual language.

Re:They got started young back in the day.... (1)

Shakrai (717556) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293897)

Didn't take long for a wingnut to bring up Gore (Yes I saw your ;) )

I like how you acknowledge the fact that I was being sarcastic but call me a wingnut anyway.

Re:They got started young back in the day.... (2, Funny)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294257)

>>>Gore said, "...I took the initiative in creating the Internet."

That's quite a trick considering the net was created in 1969, and Al Gore did not join the Congress until 1977. Maybe he borrowed an Omni from Time Voyager Phineas Bogg and zipped back to the 1960s.

Re:They got started young back in the day.... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29294269)

yes, a wingnut. because if you're not a goose stepping democrat you're automatically a republican or a right winger.

take the blinders off!

no wonder people hate assholes like you.

Pity it won't last long (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29293531)

With the exhaustion of IPv4 addresses [wikipedia.org] coming in a couple of years, combined with extremly low IPv6 deployment [wikipedia.org] , the Internet expansion will grind to a halt very soon. You can use NAT for the clients, but the servers still need real IP addresses.

Re:Pity it won't last long (2, Insightful)

FlickieStrife (1304115) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293619)

It's not like people just WONT start using IPV6, the deployment may be extremely low now, but people aren't just going to let the internets run out of room.

Imminent death of Internet predicted. (2, Interesting)

Ungrounded Lightning (62228) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293747)

With the exhaustion of IPv4 addresses coming in a couple of years, combined with extremly low IPv6 deployment, the Internet expansion will grind to a halt very soon.

Imminent death of Internet predicted. Film at eleven.

= = = =

And for those of you who weren't on it back then: This was a running gag on netnews virtually from its initial deployment. Seems like every week there was a new prediction of some mechanism by which the rapidly-doubling internet would break - yet it still kept going.

As someone who works as an engineer in a big-name company that builds Internet infrastructure boxes: I can tell you that "able to do IPV6 when we get around to turning it on" is one of the major checkboxes for new equipment purchases.

Re:Imminent death of Internet predicted. (1)

HomelessInLaJolla (1026842) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294401)

Imminent death of Internet predicted. Film at eleven

Has netcraft confirmed it?

Re:Imminent death of Internet predicted. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29294671)

Cisco kicks ass! :D

Re:Pity it won't last long (1)

Thinboy00 (1190815) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294149)

When we run out of room, everyone who wants to be on the internet will say "hmm, I guess we need IPv6 (and so do our clients).".

When did ARPAnet become "internet" (4, Interesting)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293533)

When did that transition happen? Late 70s?

I've been using the net since 1987 (shortly after Star Trek TNG premiered). It's been a fun ride going from 1.2k bit/s and pure text. There were a few graphical bulletin board services added in 1989, but they were little more than vector-based graphics and took several minutes to load! None of them had music or video like we have today.

Re:When did ARPAnet become "internet" (1)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293563)

>>>little more than vector-based graphics

Ooops I forgot. There was the Q-Link graphical service, which eventually evolved into America Online. Its drawback was that it only worked with Commodore's CASCII set, not IBMs or Apples or Ataris. - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_Link [wikipedia.org]

Re:When did ARPAnet become "internet" (5, Insightful)

lapsed (1610061) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293653)

1982, depending on who you ask. The migration to TCP/IP on ARPANET occurred in 1982 and was completed by January 1, 1983. The Internet was designed primarily by Cerf beginning in the early seventies. See Inventing The Internet by Janet Abbate.

Re:When did ARPAnet become "internet" (1)

city (1189205) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294179)

Yes but would any of this matter to anyone but military strategists if the "web" wasn't released into the public domain by CERN in 1993? [bbc.co.uk] I think definitely not.

The web's first site, still around today: http://info.cern.ch/ [info.cern.ch] .

Re:When did ARPAnet become "internet" (1)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294439)

> Yes but would any of this matter to anyone but military strategists if the
> "web" wasn't released into the public domain by CERN in 1993?

Yes. Google "Gopher" (and other candidates).

Re:When did ARPAnet become "internet" (4, Informative)

klapaucjusz (1167407) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293729)

When did that transition happen? Late 70s?

Winter 1982/1983. On 7 December 1982, 130 out of 315 hosts speak TCP/IP (RFC 832). On 22 February 1983, that's 230 out of 320 (RFC 846).

Re:When did ARPAnet become "internet" (2, Funny)

bruno.fatia (989391) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294459)

Year 2029. All stealth bombers are upgraded with neural processors, becoming fully unmanned. One of them, Skynet, begins to learn at a geometric rate. It becomes self-aware at 2:14 a.m. eastern time, August 29.

Re:When did ARPAnet become "internet" (1)

jmcbain (1233044) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293743)

One definition of the Internet is that it's a collection of nodes running TCP/IP (where IP is the Internet Protocol at the networking layer). By that definition, the Internet started on January 1, 1983 (the "red letter day"), when all nodes on the Arpanet had to switch to TCP/IP (many were running NCP prior to that).

Re:When did ARPAnet become "internet" (1)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293995)

>>>By that definition, the Internet started on January 1, 1983

Ahhh. So we're actually celebrating ARPAnet's birthday. The internet is still only 26 years old.

Re:When did ARPAnet become "internet" (1)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294455)

By another definition the Internet is a network of networks.

Re:When did ARPAnet become "internet" (1)

Jafafa Hots (580169) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294695)

By another definition, the Internet is people communicating. Happy 4 millionth birthday, internet!

Re:When did ARPAnet become "internet" (2, Insightful)

MrKaos (858439) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293791)

There were a few graphical bulletin board services added in 1989

I remember the newsgroups were the main thing for me, I wasted alot of time on them. Now I waste a lot of time on /.

Re:When did ARPAnet become "internet" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29294517)

I've been on since '85, but I think the "glory years" were in the late 80's to *maybe* 1991 or 2. After that, it got bigger (more quantity) but went downhill in quality.

Of course, there are things now like wikipedia which didn't exit then, and they are useful. You can order anything from amazon now. But still, the original internet culture has been destroyed and can probably never return. With the masses comes those who would spam, scam, zombie, DDS, a zillion windows PCs, a dumbing down of everything, little web-based fiefdoms instead of the formerly "mostly" uncontrolled usenet, ads, banners, flash, a tracking of your every move, closed protocols...

(ObGetOffMyLawn: get off my lawn)

And one hour later... (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29293561)

the first spam e-mail was sent.

Re:And one hour later... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29293681)

Immediately followed by FW: FW: Fw: Fw: Re: THIS IS FUNNY (CATS ON A PIANO)

Re:And one hour later... (4, Informative)

chill (34294) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293775)

No, it was actually about 8 1/2 years later, if you don't count the birthday announcements, etc. May 1, 1978 to be exact.

http://www.templetons.com/brad/spamreact.html [templetons.com]

Re:And one hour later... (2, Funny)

CorporateSuit (1319461) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293793)

Well, that's because the prince of Nigeria just happened to die the day BEFORE the internet was invented. It was in his dying will that he bequeathed his entire fortune $250,000,000 (TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTY MILLION US DOLLARS) to a man that one of his friends had once encountered in his many travels across the world. Although that man has been contacted hundreds of times, he has yet to respond to the email address that will complete the neccessary correspondance with the late Prince's estate.

Re:And one hour later... (1)

Mr. Roadkill (731328) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293967)

the first spam e-mail was sent.

No, that was about nine years later [templetons.com] .

Seriously, though, from what I've read on the subject, they were pretty happy to just get packets flowing. There's a quite readable section on the connection of the first two IMPs in M. Mitchell Waldrop's book on J.C.R.Licklider, but there are probably entire books on the subject out there somewhere.

First image of the interenet (1)

naz404 (1282810) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294331)

And this is believed to be the 1st image on the internet [wikipedia.org] . It was of the parody doo-wop girl band Les Horribles Cernettes [wikipedia.org] from CERN.

Now it is a small box... (2, Funny)

fyoder (857358) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293895)

watched over by the Elders of the Internet [youtube.com]

A perfect time... (1)

bakedpatato (1254274) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293943)

to sing Still Alive. Happy Birthday is too cliche. After all, Happy Birthday doesn't mention cake, which we all like!

4 Interracial relationships (0, Offtopic)

mixedlove (1629103) | more than 4 years ago | (#29293969)

Hi there! Im very glad I found a nice place ******** mixedmingle.com ******** a platform for people with different races, ethnicity and cultures to seek friends and ideal match. You can meet sexy women, nice gentlemen and many many friends! wish u good luck!!!! Cheers!!

Re:4 Interracial relationships (1)

Gizzmonic (412910) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294131)

Does spamming Slashdot really work? Are you a millionaire yet?

Doubts about the date (3, Informative)

99luftballon (838486) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294069)

I've seen similar birthday plans scheduled for October 29th (first hard link) or even December. It's one of those unknowable things, but an entertaining article nevertheless.

hey faggots! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29294123)

why don't you go suck another faggot cock or eat the shit out of the ass of another man? fucking scums.

kdawson can go fuck himself too.

where is the (1)

PPNSteve (1287174) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294139)

Cake? We want cake! (and ice cream too)

Happy 40th Birthday you series of tubes we now know as the internet, the interweb, cyberspace.

Re:where is the (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29294201)

The cake is a lie.

silicone chip? (1)

jvschwarz (92288) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294165)

From the article: VOICEOVER (English) no name given: "In the 70s, the silicone chip became the basis of a new generation of computerized devices .
Following the silicone chip, came games and e-mail, creating a social and industrial revolution.

Wow, I want a computer with one of those silicone chips, mine only has a silicon chip.

Nobody expects (1)

HomelessInLaJolla (1026842) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294193)

The Spanish Inquisition [google.com]

Go ahead. Mod me down. You all know where that comes from.

Al Gore... (-1, Troll)

bintech (37449) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294227)

Ohhhhh! So THAT'S where Al Gore was on September 2nd 1969. [sic] Now it all makes sense being that he was the brainy type, that he is also a key figure in leading us to salvation on Global Warming with the 'Inconvinient Truth'. Everyone, quick to the cap'n'trademobile. (na na na na na na na na Goreman!)

Oh, ahem, btw Happy Birthday Internet!

So how old is that (1)

zlel (736107) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294261)

in human years?

And On A Personal Note... (1)

Nom du Keyboard (633989) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294345)

And on a personal note, I was just starting college. What a great time to have a life-long interest in computers.

Gen X (1)

davitur (1112845) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294533)

Well, if it was born in '69 then the internet is definitely can be classified as a member of Generation X. Gen Y, go find your own network. Oh, and get off my lawn.

Let's sing the birthday song! (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294557)

Let's sing all along!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eWEjvCRPrCo [youtube.com]

(There are too many funny comments. I can't decide, so I'll let you do it. ^^)

Anonymous Coward (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29294593)

If I remember correctly, September 2, 1969 was still summer, not fall. :-)

Dear Internet, (1)

hohack (604323) | more than 4 years ago | (#29294655)

I love you. Really, I do.

YUO FAILY IT... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29294811)

hobbyist d1lettaNte

Party (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29294823)

I hear there's rumors on the Internets that there is no birthday party.

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