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How To Hire a Hacker

samzenpus posted about 5 years ago | from the kid-have-you-rehabilitated-yourself dept.

Security 370

itwbennett writes "If you want to hire a hacker, you need to take a more psychology-based approach to the entire interview process to determine whether he or she has changed their ways enough to be a trustworthy employee, says Mich Kabay in a recent Network World blog post. But this approach is also 'germane for highly skilled staffers, even those that don't come with arrest records or who have done something questionable in their pasts,' says David Strom. For example, in your next interview, ask a question that will suss out how much of a sense of entitlement a candidate has — or how much you or your company has. 'One time when I interviewed with Microsoft in Redmond I couldn't get over this sense of corporate entitlement — it was one of the biggest turn-offs that I had during my interviewing day there,' says Strom. 'I got the feeling that I wasn't going to fit in, no matter how smart I thought (or they thought) I was.'"

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5 min (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29294637)

and nobody here yet?

Re:5 min (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29294673)

Put a gun to his head, give him a blowjob and tell him to break AES256?

Re:5 min (1)

buswolley (591500) | about 5 years ago | (#29294779)

in other words...not on /.

wait...

Re:5 min (1)

sopssa (1498795) | about 5 years ago | (#29294847)

Get him to show some work example. Almost everyone of us coders have done games, random programs or other code in the past and as our teenage years. Now if they are hacker like, it still doesn't mean he's a bad worked. Best in the IT have always had the hacker mind, something that goes beyond what everyone else does. But make sure he likes your workplace too and do basic security audit;

But whatever you do, keep in mind that there's no really an easy, computer security answer - if they're hackers, they will get around it.

Re:5 min (2, Insightful)

Nefarious Wheel (628136) | about 5 years ago | (#29295207)

and nobody here yet?

You kidding? We've all gone off to update our resumes.

If you can't beat 'em... (1)

judolphin (1158895) | about 5 years ago | (#29294645)

...join 'em!

Re:If you can't beat 'em... (1)

Mishotaki (957104) | about 5 years ago | (#29294735)

so... the people who are trying to hire hackers should... become hackers?

If you can't beat 'em... (2, Funny)

maxume (22995) | about 5 years ago | (#29295111)

...get a gun.

Re:If you can't beat 'em... (5, Funny)

nitehawk214 (222219) | about 5 years ago | (#29295177)

... arrange to have them beaten.

What if you are hiring to be a hacker? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29295335)

Best reason to hire them is to do stealthy, illegal stuff. But if they have an arrest record, or they say they are a hacker, it means they aren't very stealthy or discreet.

Sounds more like (5, Insightful)

wampus (1932) | about 5 years ago | (#29294663)

Sounds more like "how to hire a self important misanthrope" to me.

Re:Sounds more like (4, Funny)

Jewbird (596227) | about 5 years ago | (#29294815)

If you aren't hiring self-important misanthropes, you aren't even trying.

In fairness (5, Insightful)

SlappyBastard (961143) | about 5 years ago | (#29294819)

The article is about how to not hire a self important misanthrope.

Re:In fairness (5, Interesting)

e9th (652576) | about 5 years ago | (#29295065)

I wonder how Terry Childs [slashdot.org] would have done if the guy who hired him had read this?

Wish I had mod points (3, Interesting)

SlappyBastard (961143) | about 5 years ago | (#29295103)

Because that is an interesting real world scenario to consider in this context. In fact, it would make for a good litmus test: would your hiring process stop the SF admin problem from occurring?

Re:Wish I had mod points (4, Informative)

Timothy Brownawell (627747) | about 5 years ago | (#29295139)

Because that is an interesting real world scenario to consider in this context. In fact, it would make for a good litmus test: would your hiring process stop the SF admin problem from occurring?

Particularly given that it's not at all clear that the admin was even the problem...

Re:In fairness (1, Insightful)

wampus (1932) | about 5 years ago | (#29295155)

Indeed it is, but the thread is filling up with people I wouldn't want to work with. I award myself half credit.

Re:Sounds more like (5, Insightful)

CAIMLAS (41445) | about 5 years ago | (#29295047)

Calling such people "misanthrope" is a bit harsh, I think.

Someone who is intelligent, competent, and has a difficult time finding acceptance (or even a modicum of comfort-with-others) in new environments could very easily get falsely labeled a misanthrope. If they're capable and know up from down, calling them self-important is a wee bit counter-productive - and I dare say, quite possibly why they'd be viewed as misanthropic.

A better characteristic descriptor would probably be "socially clueless". I know a lot of guys who come across harsh - myself included. They are usually some of the most open people I've known; they're also very amiable - but havent' a clue how to relate to others unlike themselves.

Re:Sounds more like (5, Insightful)

Nefarious Wheel (628136) | about 5 years ago | (#29295265)

I have a friend in the high energy physics field. Four advanced degrees. I had the good fortune to have hired him as a contractor once when I was in a narrow bind, and I know he's bright. A bloody Klieg light amongst candles.

He's also often distressed by the stupidity of the people he works with. "Mate" I said, "Everybody you work with will be stupider than you. Get used to it."

I don't know if it helped much, but it's indicative. In a world of so-so thinkers, any bright sparks will have trouble fitting in. And it takes a fairly bright spark to be even a mediocre sysadmin, to be honest.

Re:Sounds more like (1)

NecroPsyChroNauTron (1541583) | about 5 years ago | (#29295399)

Labeling the use of the term misanthrope as being harsh is a bit harsh, I think. :D

Re:Sounds more like (1)

rastilin (752802) | about 5 years ago | (#29295461)

Well I get called a "misanthrope" as well. It has nothing to do with being socially clueless. I've always felt that there was an understanding, you get summoned to perform a function, you turn up and you do it; then you leave. if you have nothing in common with your co-workers, then there's no real reason for you to bond with them and there's nothing wrong with working in companionable silence.

Team building exercises are a blight on co-operation. Getting a bunch of people who may have legitimate reason to not get along and forcing them together. The best part of them is complaining about them afterwards.

Re:Sounds more like (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | about 5 years ago | (#29295133)

Sounds like you're just being jealous, to me. ^^

Re:Sounds more like (1)

Spy der Mann (805235) | about 5 years ago | (#29295181)

Sounds more like "how to hire a self important misanthrope" to me.

Where do I sign? :D

Re:Sounds more like (0, Offtopic)

poopdeville (841677) | about 5 years ago | (#29295451)

Eat a dick dude, that job is mine. /me shoves you out of the way, asshole. ;-)

Had any scary interviews? (5, Interesting)

WaywardGeek (1480513) | about 5 years ago | (#29294669)

Like a lot of big geeks on Slashdot, I take pride in always receiving a job offer after an interview... accept once. Once I interviewed with the EDIF reader group at Cadence, and the manager had exactly one technical question for me: "Do you understand recursion?" "Well... yes I do." "Well, then, you have all the skills that matter. What really counts is that you know how to fit in, and you don't impress me there."

I'm still shaken up over that interview.

Re:Had any scary interviews? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29294717)

Do you also take pride in fucking up heterographs?

Re:Had any scary interviews? (1)

bennomatic (691188) | about 5 years ago | (#29294871)

Don't you mean homophones?

Re:Had any scary interviews? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29294997)

No, he doesn't. The words "accept" and "except" don't sound the same unless you're a tongueless mongoloid.

Re:Had any scary interviews? (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29295285)

You inthenthitive clod!

Re:Had any scary interviews? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29295135)

I'm not into that gay shit.

Re:Had any scary interviews? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29294733)

You failed to get the offer because you don't know how to use "accept" and "except"

I was hoping there was a joke in there (5, Funny)

SlappyBastard (961143) | about 5 years ago | (#29294851)

When you said that he asked, "Do you understand recursion?" I was hoping that you'd say, "Then after that, he asked, 'Do you understand recursion?' And I said yes. And then he asked . . . (wait for it) . . . 'Do you understand recursion?'"

I'm sorry. It just felt like a setup for a joke about recursion.

The joke was too easy (5, Insightful)

MyLongNickName (822545) | about 5 years ago | (#29294905)

The interviewee must answer: "Yes, but to fully understand it, you must first understand recursion"

Re:The joke was too easy (1)

NightLamp (556303) | about 5 years ago | (#29295245)

once, just once, I'd like to be in the position to answer that question that way,
nice one

Re:I was hoping there was a joke in there (5, Funny)

plover (150551) | about 5 years ago | (#29294923)

Re:I was hoping there was a joke in there (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29295467)

A joke from google [google.ca]

Re:I was hoping there was a joke in there (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29295021)

FAIL!
Mere repetition is not recursion.
Please turn in your geek card on the way out, poseur!

Re:I was hoping there was a joke in there (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about 5 years ago | (#29295209)

It's ok, when you get to the bottom, push the back button on your browser a lot of times. It will work.

Re:Had any scary interviews? (4, Insightful)

ezratrumpet (937206) | about 5 years ago | (#29294971)

Marshall Goldsmith nailed this in "What Got You Here Won't Get You There."

In many (most?) business structures, expertise only gets us so far - after that, it's all about how we deal with people.

If you want to have a part in the problem-solving drama called "Your Employing Company," you have to get along well enough to be allowed at the table.

There's not much justice or fairness in this - just some hard reality along with enough exceptions to make the rule fuzzy.

Re:Had any scary interviews? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29295039)

But we're not sure what happened. Maybe you meant: Lickin' a lot of gawks in LashALot, I tack plaid inns, all ways wrecking a jib hawser after an inn view... except wants. One sea I inner viewed, with the eaten eyes reefer grope at Kay dense, endy manger head Exacto 1 dreck nice all guest tee flour mi. "Toon there stands wrecking?" "Y'all SeaDoo." "Wall thin, ewe heave awl these kills hat meters. Hatter lycans eat yuck now. Toe feet in an djiboui. Tim, press me there."

I have an ironic recursion story (5, Funny)

plover (150551) | about 5 years ago | (#29295083)

A coworker's boss once hired a "programmer" while my buddy was on vacation (avoiding the technical interview in the process.) The guy's first task was a simple program, but it always core dumped. He made no progress trying to get it fixed, so my friend held a code review. Each and every function looked like this:

void foo()
{
...
some irrelevant but incomprehensibly bad code;
...
main();
}

Yes. He called main() at the bottom of each function. When asked about it, the "programmer" said 'that's so it'll return back to main.'

I think the biggest mistake we made was not firing that stupid manager on the spot. But I suppose if we fired managers based solely on incompetent decisions, ... well... you know.

Re:Had any scary interviews? (0)

Hurricane78 (562437) | about 5 years ago | (#29295097)

Well, what he basically was saying: "Me want to dominate you like slave! Me no like independent think! You not look like me can dominate you. Me no like you! Boowroagh!"
Be lucky that you did not "get" that job. Or better: That he did not get you, by fuckin' it up for himself.

A good boss hires people, because they can bring something to the table, that you did not think of, and possibly were not even able to think of.

---

This "culture" of "I have to appeal to the boss" but "the boss does not have to appeal to me" because he is somehow better or higher than you, is sickening!
What we need in companies, is not salary, but budget or billing, with the free choice to hire people below oneself. And with the free choice to work for anyone in the company. But why stop at the company? Just work with anyone you want. Leave multiple choices. Leave the choice to also fire one of your "bosses". Tadaa: Now it's equal.

In a way, a hierarchy is always a monopoly. And as we know, these are bad for the economy as a whole. I argue, that a unidirectional hierarchy is an, if not the enemy of a free market.
That does not mean communism. No. It means to use all features of the natural structure called "graph" as opposed to a simple "tree".

Re:Had any scary interviews? (1)

FrozenGeek (1219968) | about 5 years ago | (#29295239)

I've worked in a graph or grid style environment. I reported to X, but was typically working for A, B, C... Not a good scene. Better to have a contract or 'at will' environment. Don't like the current situation? Find another. There will always be some form of hierarchy, even if it is very flat. Someone has to be responsible for the success of failure of a project (or a company) - may be the owner or an employee. That someone has to have the right to make decisions (rights and responsibilities are the opposite sides of the same coin).

Re:Had any scary interviews? (4, Interesting)

Nefarious Wheel (628136) | about 5 years ago | (#29295383)

I'm still shaken up over that interview.

Don't be. Although one can often tell in the first five minutes of an interview if you want the geek or not (I'm being generous with the time here) that sort of perfunctory questioning and the glib dismissal you received most likely means they already someone else had in mind for the job, and are just following procedure at this point - often you're competing with an internal promotion or other reasons not related to technical competence.

Where you might need to improve is in believing your first impressions about a firm interviewing you. Hunches count, and your ability to drive the interview the way you want is a good indication of what level of person they're really after. I wasn't there, but my off-the-cuff opinion is that you were either bloody well jobbed, or the juxtaposition of the "Reader" group in the name and your choice of words (e.g. an "accept once" in your resume) was a deal killer. But they shouldn't have brought you in if that were the case.

Disclosure: I've interviewed about five hundred candidates for technical jobs. I've hired one hundred, of which two turned out to be poor choices. It's a serious, expensive business to bring the right people on board.

Re:Had any scary interviews? (1)

Nefarious Wheel (628136) | about 5 years ago | (#29295455)

...they already someone else had in mind for the job

Gaah! Apologies the Yoda-speak for.

I need alcohol.

On Personality (5, Funny)

overbaud (964858) | about 5 years ago | (#29294679)

"Another problem is that some criminal hackers may exhibit traits associated with clinical personality disorders such as the narcissistic personality disorder." I'd say a large amount of IT staff exhibit personality disorders. Not just 'hackers'.

Re:On Personality (1)

SlappyBastard (961143) | about 5 years ago | (#29294901)

In the writer's defense, there is a wide difference between malignant narcissism and most other personality disorders. Dealing with a true narcissist is a soul-killing experience. Many other personality disorders range from the ho-hum (adjustment disorders) to the downright funny (obsessive compulsive personality disorder).

Most personality disorders are fairly dealable. NPD is just a nightmare that never ends, short of someone one shooting the narcissist.

Re:On Personality (1)

Timothy Brownawell (627747) | about 5 years ago | (#29294973)

Many other personality disorders range from the ho-hum (adjustment disorders) to the downright funny (obsessive compulsive personality disorder).

It's only funny for the first couple minutes. Then it starts to get old, and then it starts to drive you insane.

Think this one needs a Part 2 (5, Interesting)

mysidia (191772) | about 5 years ago | (#29294693)

How to Fire a Hacker

(Without getting pwned by her/him or his/her friends)

Because (let's face it), there's a chance you hired one on accident, without realizing it, and that they don't have an arrest record, for one reason or another.

Re:Think this one needs a Part 2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29295009)

...and that they don't have an arrest record, for one reason or another.

-... like they are *good* hackers?

Re:Think this one needs a Part 2 (2, Interesting)

Nefarious Wheel (628136) | about 5 years ago | (#29295509)

Because (let's face it), there's a chance you hired one on accident, without realizing it, and that they don't have an arrest record, for one reason or another.

Having no arrest record might be an excellent qualification for a hacker. Think about it.

Re:Think this one needs a Part 2 (1)

mysidia (191772) | about 5 years ago | (#29295529)

Sure... I suppose: either they're a white/gray hat and never did anything really illegal.

Or they were a black hat and successfully covered their tracks

The trouble is, if they're in the second category, they could hurt you..

Interviews for the Entitiled... (3, Funny)

shoemakc (448730) | about 5 years ago | (#29294705)

I've found the best thing is to doze off during the interview, and when woken...ask for a raise.

Remember, no sleep and no coffee are your friends here...

-Chris

MS entitlement - everything (1)

Serindipidude (939235) | about 5 years ago | (#29294737)

Your Microsoft reference reminds me a of technical blog I read recently that was completely devoted to the author's internal conflict (don't think he realised what he was revealing) about being excited to be promoted into Redmond and his dissapointment at loosing his platinum frequent flyer status as a result of that.

This article seems to be anti-hacker (4, Informative)

mysidia (191772) | about 5 years ago | (#29294777)

I consider this blatant hacker discrimination morally reprehensible.

Is hacker culture so bad that anyone who identifies as a hacker needs to pass special scrutiny?

Isn't it a bit insulting to the hacker community to say they shouldn't be hired, unless they've "reformed", and imply they have arrest records, suggesting they are all criminals ?

Perhaps you mean cracker

Re:This article seems to be anti-hacker (4, Insightful)

Timothy Brownawell (627747) | about 5 years ago | (#29294869)

Perhaps you mean cracker

"If I was a real cracker, I'd want to be topped with a real cheese, maybe a strong stilton."

And I thought "hacker" actually meant someone who (literally) hacked on things. With a hatchet or similar. Or maybe language just changes, and we need to all get over it.

Re:This article seems to be anti-hacker (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | about 5 years ago | (#29294941)

This is Slashdot, not the mainstream media. When we say hacker, we usually mean someone like Richard Stallman or Eric S. Raymond, that is people who are naturally talented at writing code. A hack is an interesting way of using something, such as using CPU fans to cool a cooler. Just because the mainstream media misuses tech words, does not mean that it is really correct. It would be like saying that RNA is simply half a strand of DNA, even though it might give the general picture to people without basic knowledge about biology and genetics, that doesn't mean that its not incorrect.

Re:This article seems to be anti-hacker (3, Funny)

wampus (1932) | about 5 years ago | (#29294975)

So hacker means blowhard?

Re:This article seems to be anti-hacker (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29295005)

slashdot misuses words like "free" and "open".

Re:This article seems to be anti-hacker (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29295025)

... Eric S. Raymond, that is people who are naturally talented at writing code.

Lord, mod this guy +1 Funny!

Re:This article seems to be anti-hacker (1)

Timothy Brownawell (627747) | about 5 years ago | (#29295049)

Just because the mainstream media misuses tech words, does not mean that it is really correct.

The thing is, it's not a technical word. It's more of a social/identity word, and that consists just as much of people identifying you as it does of you identifying yourself. It's a case where "everybody does it" makes it correct.

Re:This article seems to be anti-hacker (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29295199)

As far as I can tell the "hacker vs. cracker" debate is over. When two non-Slashdotters mention the word 'hacker' to each, the malevolence is mutually implied. Sure, it may be that there was a distinction between the two words, but in the common vernacular there simply isn't anymore.

It's not so much the mainstream media is misusing the word 'hacker'. They've completely taken it from you, and the new definition is permanent as far as I can tell. Condolences.

Re:This article seems to be anti-hacker (1)

Nefarious Wheel (628136) | about 5 years ago | (#29295539)

It's not so much the mainstream media is misusing the word 'hacker'. They've completely taken it from you, and the new definition is permanent as far as I can tell. Condolences.

It's a matter of context, I think - words have entirely different meanings in different contexts. For example, walk into an iron-ring School of Engineering seminar somewhere and identify yourself as a "Sales Engineer". You will be used in undergraduate packaging experiments.

Re:This article seems to be anti-hacker (4, Funny)

bennomatic (691188) | about 5 years ago | (#29294883)

Mmmm. Crackers make me hungry. I'm a snacker.

Re:This article seems to be anti-hacker (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29294927)

linux users are fudge packers.

Fudge Packers? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29295395)

I am diabetic you insensitive clod.

Re:This article seems to be anti-hacker (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29294965)

Most of the world nowadays uses the word hacker for people who breaks into computer systems.

Re:This article seems to be anti-hacker (3, Funny)

Geoffrey.landis (926948) | about 5 years ago | (#29295193)

Perhaps you mean cracker

Cracker is a derogatory slang term for people originating in rural areas of the southern part of the US.

If you want to hire a cracker, just look for the baseball cap and check for a pickup truck with a gun rack-- or a John Deere tractor-- parked outside.

Re:This article seems to be anti-hacker (1)

Timothy Brownawell (627747) | about 5 years ago | (#29295255)

Perhaps you mean cracker

Cracker is a derogatory slang term for people originating in rural areas of the southern part of the US.

If you want to hire a cracker, just look for the baseball cap and check for a pickup truck with a gun rack-- or a John Deere tractor-- parked outside.

...so what's "redneck" mean, then?

Re:This article seems to be anti-hacker (1)

mysidia (191772) | about 5 years ago | (#29295481)

Let's just say blackhat, then.

Why would you even want to hire a cracker? (1)

vxvxvxvx (745287) | about 5 years ago | (#29295287)

Yes, I agree. Article seems to be more focused on hiring crackers. As any hacker knows, crackers are not generally skilled geniuses. I don't see why you'd want to hire one anyway, at least not for their cracker experience.

Re:This article seems to be anti-hacker (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29295367)

Perhaps you mean cracker

That's European-American, you insensitive clod!

Re:This article seems to be anti-hacker (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29295369)

All of the really good "hackers" I know have done something illegal by todays standard. When we were doing it wasn't illegal. We broke into systems and wrote exploits when it was considered an arcane art that no one really talked about. We did it to learn about systems and how things worked.

But I do agree with you. It is insulting to assume we're criminals. I don't know anyone that caused intentional harm to anyone as a result of their actions.

Nice questionnaire (1)

russotto (537200) | about 5 years ago | (#29294887)

Even the stupidest hardened criminal can pretend remorse when it'll get him something... do hiring managers really think they're going to screen out the unrepentant with questions whose "right answers" are obvious. I mean, the few fools who suggest in an interview that the way to handle a bad supervisor is to break into his account and use it to download child porn are going to be pretty obvious in any case.

Re:Nice questionnaire (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29294991)

The sad thing about that is for at least one of the people I used to work for I wouldn't have needed to hack his account to get his computer to download child porn. I didn't have access to his computer or anything, either. But that's what they get for hiring a convicted child molester.

Not really (1)

SlappyBastard (961143) | about 5 years ago | (#29295001)

What you're talking about when exhibited by a person with a criminal record would be considered a psychopathic personality. Believe it or not, some personality types simply cannot fake their way through their disorder. And narcissists are among the weakest at faking neurotypical behavior. NPDs generally have a hard time grasping what is so wrong about their bad behavior, and often are flagrant in their gloating and celebration of every evil deed they ever did.

I have a relative who is a full-fledged malignant narcissist, and he couldn't disengage from his behavior even when he was standing in front of a judge. I swear to God he tried to talk his way out of a traffic citation that involved putting the car airborne at 80 mph. He just plain doesn't understand why the entire world doesn't thing his shit is the awesomest shit ever shat. And he cannot turn it off.

Yes, a lot of personality types can bullshit their way out of a screening process. But, let's be honest: a person with a psychopathic personality disorder isn't applying to be a coder. They're usually fighting their way into upper management.

u mean cracker. (0, Redundant)

markringen (1501853) | about 5 years ago | (#29294981)

u mean cracker. hacker means something else.

Re:u mean cracker. (1)

orkybash (1013349) | about 5 years ago | (#29295271)

Not in this decade it doesn't. But I get the hint, and will depart from your lawn forthwith.

Simple plan: (1, Offtopic)

Hurricane78 (562437) | about 5 years ago | (#29295031)

1. Go to a big forest.
2. Follow the loud noises.
3. ...
4. HACKER!

How to... (4, Interesting)

Darkness404 (1287218) | about 5 years ago | (#29295041)

The easy way to hire tech people and keep them happy is have them work on, wait for it... technology. That is, most of them, unless they signed up for help desk basically want to be given a problem, some hardware, some software and then them to fix the problem. Thats it, no "team building", no pointless meetings, in general most tech people are happy simply working. The less social interaction with most people is the best.

Re:How to... (4, Insightful)

wampus (1932) | about 5 years ago | (#29295115)

That's a hard way to make a decent product. If Billy's app doesn't talk to Sue's service because the two never speak to one another or sit down to do a review, it doesn't matter how brilliant either of them is. Their shit still doesn't work.

Re:How to... (1)

FrozenGeek (1219968) | about 5 years ago | (#29295173)

It really depends on the size of the project. There are plenty of one-geek projects out there. Then again, there are even more projects that require a multi-geek approach. Those projects absolutely require geeks who can work with other geeks. That's where good team leads (or, dare I say it, project managers) are really important - they can help keep things running smoothly. The really good ones do it so well you don't even notice them. Look at Linux or the BSDs (Free, Open, Net). Those projects have to have many geeks. The projects work well (or not) based on the guys running the show (I'll leave y'all to make your own judgments on the success / failure thereof). Unless you're into extreme programming, even a multi-geek project tends to break things into fairly independent parts. Yes, you need to coordinate the interfaces, but that doesn't require that much interaction between the implementers. Moreso the overall design team.

That's the Project Manager's Job (1)

xdor (1218206) | about 5 years ago | (#29295301)

They don't need to sit down with each other, the project manager needs to define the project goals: i.e. give them problems to work on. Mating the systems is part of that and would be in the requirements.

Re:That's the Project Manager's Job (1)

wampus (1932) | about 5 years ago | (#29295315)

But requirements can be vague or just plain wrong, or incorrectly implemented. One of those pointless meetings is a really good way to shake those problems out before you have a bunch of useless code written.

Re:How to... (4, Insightful)

Alpha830RulZ (939527) | about 5 years ago | (#29295157)

I don't agree. If this were true, then the foosball table in our kitchen wouldn't be busy all the time.

I think it's a subtler truth here. Many technical folks are more comfortable on working technical problems than people problems. Tech problems have at least one right answer that is unambiguous. People problems may not.

I think the way to keep tech people happy is to give them good problems to work on, serve as a diplomatic layer to insulate them from the annoying people surrounding them in the world, and facilitate making the rules clear on the floor to minimize conflict among the team. And provide free pop.

Re:How to... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29295233)

Are you hiring?

Its Easy! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29295077)

Suck my cock.

Easy (1)

hardburn (141468) | about 5 years ago | (#29295149)

Just offer them a Miata, X-Men number 1, and a subscription to Playboy.

Quoth the Grove: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29295151)

"Only the paranoid survive."

The catch 22 (4, Funny)

fireheadca (853580) | about 5 years ago | (#29295243)

A good hacker shouldn't be looking for work. He should be running....

---
When they outlaw computers only outlaws will be free.

Surely Slashdot can get cracker vs hacker right? (1, Interesting)

Grail (18233) | about 5 years ago | (#29295267)

Surely a site dedicated to news for nerds can get the distinction between hacker and cracker right?

Nothing more to say.

Re:Surely Slashdot can get cracker vs hacker right (2, Insightful)

wampus (1932) | about 5 years ago | (#29295277)

Words mean things. Everyone has to agree what those things are. If your definition of a word doesn't match the rest of the world's definition, you have a problem, not the rest of the world.

Re:Surely Slashdot can get cracker vs hacker right (2, Funny)

pipedwho (1174327) | about 5 years ago | (#29295449)

Word.

Re:Surely Slashdot can get cracker vs hacker right (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29295521)

Ohh?

So when the entire world said the world was flat, and one man said it was round, that one man was wrong?
And when everyone burned witches, and one man said there are no such thing as witches, that man was wrong?...

You're an idiot.

Re:Surely Slashdot can get cracker vs hacker right (1)

jmerlin (1010641) | about 5 years ago | (#29295419)

TFA is not written by slashdot.

If it had been, we would've had CmdrTaco instantly it him to -1 ignorant.

On that note, the entire article sucks. I don't like this guy, I'm modding him -1 ignorant IRL.

what the fuck is this faggot shit? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29295333)

go jam a knife up your ass. bitch.

Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29295363)

It's 2009 and people are still scared of hackers? People are needed in security roles, hire based on skills and personality just as one would in any other role. If one really needs to get specialized with it base it off how sales guys are hired: sure, they probably did blow in their past and lied to customers, but that was their job.

from the kid-have-you-rehabilitated-yourself dept. (1)

zimage (6623) | about 5 years ago | (#29295407)

Love the Arlo Guthrie reference here :)

How to Hire a Hacker (3, Insightful)

falconwolf (725481) | about 5 years ago | (#29295505)

When it is safe to have a hacker on your IT staff

It is always safe to hire and employ a hacker. If they don't follow the hacker ethic [he.fi] they aren't a hacker. Maybe a cracker, hackivist, or script kiddie but not a hacker.

Falcon

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