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What the DHS Knows About You

kdawson posted about 5 years ago | from the shirt-size-and-toothbrush-color dept.

Government 402

Sherri Davidoff writes "Here's a real copy of an American citizen's DHS Travel Record, retrieved from the US Customs and Border Patrol's Automated Targeting System and obtained through a FOIA/Privacy Act request. The document reveals that the DHS is storing: the traveler's credit card number and expiration; IP addresses used to make Web travel reservations; hotel information and itinerary; full airline itinerary including flight numbers and seat numbers; phone numbers including business, home, and cell; and every frequent flyer and hotel number associated with the traveler, even ones not used for the specific reservation."

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What??? (4, Funny)

camperdave (969942) | about 5 years ago | (#29349561)

What?? No shoe size? What's the point of taking off your shoes at the checkpoint then?

Re:What??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29349599)

They just like smelling them.

Re:What??? (0)

teh kurisu (701097) | about 5 years ago | (#29349727)

Glad you asked! [wikipedia.org]

Every time I do that I wonder... (4, Funny)

wiredog (43288) | about 5 years ago | (#29349811)

What if Richard Reid had been the Underwear Bomber instead of the show Bomber?

Re:Every time I do that I wonder... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29349883)

What if Richard Reid had been the Underwear Bomber instead of the show Bomber?

Airports in California would be very popular...Airports in New Jersey, not so much.

Re:Every time I do that I wonder... (1)

Daver297 (1208086) | about 5 years ago | (#29349965)

was he the "Show Bomber"? I thought it was something about his "Shoes"

Re:Every time I do that I wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29349977)

Buttplug bomber?

Re:Every time I do that I wonder... (1)

ZekoMal (1404259) | about 5 years ago | (#29350027)

It's a little known fact that Richard Reid only put the bombs in his shoes to try and stop the terrible shows he was forced to watch.

Re:Every time I do that I wonder... (4, Interesting)

bhima (46039) | about 5 years ago | (#29350069)

In Atlanta, Ga I was pulled out of the line for an airport security, threatened and subjected to scrutiny which can only be characterized as "harassment"... for making this exact comment.

Re:Every time I do that I wonder... (4, Insightful)

snspdaarf (1314399) | about 5 years ago | (#29350157)

"No, Ma'am, the [Department of Homeland Security] do not have a sense of humor we are aware of."

Re:Every time I do that I wonder... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29350273)

It's always seemed strange to me that when people think of the shoe bomber, they think of Richard Reid instead of the guy that actually succeeded. [wikipedia.org]

Reminds me... (5, Interesting)

matt4077 (581118) | about 5 years ago | (#29349571)

This reminds me of the current idea to charge a 10$ entrance fee for foreign visitors. The money is supposed to go into a marketing fund. It's not only borderline schizophrenic to raise a new barrier in order to promote it, it might be even more sinister: that fee can apparently only be paid by credit card. Since 10$ doesn't seem to be enough money to be worth collecting, I'm wondering if getting all the credit card data isn't the real goal.

Or maybe the US wants to finally catch up with the third world in unfriendliness.

Re:Reminds me... (4, Insightful)

Cow Jones (615566) | about 5 years ago | (#29349703)

Yeah, I liked travelling to the US better when all I had to do was check the correct boxes on the amusing green form:

[x] I am not a terrorist
[x] I am not planning a child abduction in the US

Re:Reminds me... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29349831)

Now now, you're forgetting the most diffcult one "[x] I have not committed genocide"

Re:Reminds me... (4, Interesting)

xaxa (988988) | about 5 years ago | (#29349853)

Yeah, I liked travelling to the US better when all I had to do was check the correct boxes on the amusing green form:

[x] I am not a terrorist
[x] I am not planning a child abduction in the US

I visited the US before 9/11:

[x] I am not a communist

Re:Reminds me... (1, Troll)

easyTree (1042254) | about 5 years ago | (#29349917)

That only seems appropriate if the leaders of your country could tick the same boxes truthfully.

Re:Reminds me... (1)

erroneus (253617) | about 5 years ago | (#29350159)

That depends on what your definition of "is" is...

Re:Reminds me... (2, Insightful)

easyTree (1042254) | about 5 years ago | (#29350207)

If I've been caught waterboarding someone, is is isn't otherwise it's is and vice-versa. How about you?

Re:Reminds me... (1)

the_other_chewey (1119125) | about 5 years ago | (#29350095)

As ridiculous as those questions are, they serve a near-sensible purpose:
If somebody is caught doing $bad_thing he denied planning on the form,
even if the case is tricky, he can be prosecuted for lying to immigration.

It's a sort of legal backup.

Re:Reminds me... (1)

Rogerborg (306625) | about 5 years ago | (#29350153)

To prove he lied to immigration, you first have to prove that he actually did $bad_thing.

Security Theatre has found its target audience, I see.

Re:Reminds me... (1)

bishop32x (691667) | about 5 years ago | (#29350289)

The standard of proff required for deportation is different from the standard of proof required for conviction. It's similar to how conspiracy charges are easier to prosecute than the crime itself.

Re:Reminds me... (1)

camperdave (969942) | about 5 years ago | (#29350339)

If you're caught doing $bad_thing, it is pretty easy to prove you actually did $bad_thing. Your hand will be red [phrases.org.uk] .

Re:Reminds me... (2, Insightful)

Timex (11710) | about 5 years ago | (#29349835)

What if you don't HAVE a credit card? What THEN? "Sorry, we can't let you enter the country without a credit card."

If the sole purpose is to fund advertising (as you say they claim), then cash should be an acceptable form of payment. If it is really a ruse to get a credit card number, then one shouldn't have to pay it if one doesn't have one. I, for one, refuse to get into a drawn-out discussion with Border Patrol about my financial decisions.

Re:Reminds me... (0, Troll)

bleh-of-the-huns (17740) | about 5 years ago | (#29349955)

I'll bite and play devils advocate here for a minute. Regardless of the reasons they want the number for, advertising, or collecting information, it could also be said that if you are entering the US, and you don't have a credit card, for say emergencies, or you get mugged and all your cash is taken, or you lose your cash, or you accidentally burn your travelers cheques, that you need a credit card for purchases, you are now going to be a leach on the US tax payers in the event you end up in hospital (if you dont have any travel insurance).

Just saying, having a credit card is not always a bad thing (if you know how to use one responsibly), and I as a tax payer, would prefer that travelers have some sort of method to pay for emergencies rather then using tax payer funds should the need arise.

And I could be shot dead too (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29350085)

so how does having a credit card help my corpse?

Re:Reminds me... (2, Funny)

Big Hairy Ian (1155547) | about 5 years ago | (#29350155)

How is having Credit Card going to help if it's stolen by the mugger???
Of course they might spend less than my other half :)

Re:Reminds me... (1)

M-RES (653754) | about 5 years ago | (#29350221)

"You accidentally burn your Travellers Cheques"? Well surely you could just as easily accidentally burn your credit card too, so where's the advantage?

If you have a record of your Traveller's Cheque numbers you can get them replaced anyway ;)

Re:Reminds me... (2, Insightful)

DarthBart (640519) | about 5 years ago | (#29350007)

If you don't have a credit card, then it must mean that you're trying to do things with untraceable cash. And that means you're a terrorist!

Re:Reminds me... (4, Funny)

M-RES (653754) | about 5 years ago | (#29350089)

Ya see - I always knew Bush's speech impediment would cause this sort of confusion. It's all because nobody could ever tell whether he was saying tourist or terrorist, so they decided to play it safe! ;)

Re:Reminds me... (5, Interesting)

LLKrisJ (1021777) | about 5 years ago | (#29349837)

Well just so you know, I live in Belgium and if I want to get my paperwork to travel to the US I have to CALL the US embassy (I cannot just go there, no sir, we're all terrorist here in Europe, you see) and without so much as getting a human operator to respond, like to - I don't know, ask me what the hell I want - I just have to hand over my CC number so I can be charged xx dollars, just to get them to make an appointment.

I find that very disturbing, off putting and blatantly rude... It is not because the US can do that that it bloody should. I do not want to go to the US but sometimes the circumstances force me to, but when I do I am treated like a piece of s**t with no rights... It really makes me want to go through all the hassle of getting my visa, then canceling my card and getting a new one.

Re:Reminds me... (4, Insightful)

palegray.net (1195047) | about 5 years ago | (#29349945)

then canceling my card and getting a new one

Assuming U.S. authorities are using your credit card information to track behavioral patterns, that won't help you much if the card is issued by the same bank. Even banks in Switzerland are routinely turning over information on account holders these days.

Re:Reminds me... (5, Funny)

Rogerborg (306625) | about 5 years ago | (#29350181)

Even banks in Switzerland are routinely turning over information on account holders these days.

And that is why I only trust Nigerians to handle my financial affairs.

Re:Reminds me... (1)

LLKrisJ (1021777) | about 5 years ago | (#29350281)

You are probably right, but still it is one of my futile attempts to jus try and make it harder on them :)

It is just sad to be treated like this and there is nothing one can do about it.

Re:Reminds me... (4, Insightful)

nimbius (983462) | about 5 years ago | (#29349933)

so we need to revise a few docs to say "bring me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses with cash, check, or money order for $10 us..."

Re:Reminds me... (4, Informative)

Natales (182136) | about 5 years ago | (#29350055)

The US already collects vasts amount of information as part of the visa application process for any foreign national, all paid by the applicant.

Different countries pay different amounts. I wish the $10 would be the case. Chileans pay $131 just for a visitor's visa [embajadaeeuu.cl] , and that doesn't even include all the expenses in getting the required paperwork.

The US unfriendliness towards visitors you mention has been here for a long time, and it's manifested in many different ways, some subtle, some not.

Are they PCI compliant with those #'s? (1)

khasim (1285) | about 5 years ago | (#29350183)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PCI_DSS [wikipedia.org]

Oh, yeah. The rules are different if you're the government than if you're a regular company.

Re:Reminds me... (1)

jgardia (985157) | about 5 years ago | (#29350211)

I (as most South americans) have already to pay us$45 to enter USA, in cash, every time I enter, plus us$130 for the visa, if you get one (I've never had troubles, but a friend was rejected twice). Please don't give me more reasons not to enter USA again.

Dupe (5, Informative)

Arkaic (784460) | about 5 years ago | (#29349577)

Hrmm. I think this was pretty much covered in this past article: http://yro.slashdot.org/story/09/01/06/2238228/A-Peek-At-DHSs-Files-On-You?art_pos=4 [slashdot.org] Perhaps a different person's records, but basically the same deal, from what I can see so far.

Re:Dupe (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29349661)

Similar, but tracking credit cards is different.

Hush, citizen. (4, Insightful)

TheSpoom (715771) | about 5 years ago | (#29349581)

Your full, unencrypted credit card information available in our logs to every DHS employee is necessary for us to fight the evil terrorists.

Re:Hush, citizen. (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29349619)

Absolutely right! You wouldn't believe the number of hookers and the amount of blow needed to keep up our morale here at DHS.

Re:Hush, citizen. (5, Insightful)

commodore64_love (1445365) | about 5 years ago | (#29349665)

Technology has changed, therefore it's necessary for the Supreme Court to rethink some of its past decisions. "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects..." should apply to ALL papers/data even if it's not in the citizen's immediate possession. The government should not be able to obtain your personal credit cards numbers from a 3rd party without first getting a warrant from a judge.

Re:Hush, citizen. (4, Insightful)

zach_the_lizard (1317619) | about 5 years ago | (#29349765)

Citizen, you have dared to question the supreme legal, moral, and constitutional authority of our anti-terrorism methods. Not only that, but you have also exposed yourself as an EVIL anti-American communist socialist fascist islamist anti-war drug doing child molesting hippy. Our officers will arrive promptly to detain you. Have a nice day, DHS

Re:Hush, citizen. (4, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 5 years ago | (#29349767)

More likely, we'll get some cryptofascist who calls himself a "strict constructionist" to tell us that, if the founding fathers wouldn't have recognized it on sight, it couldn't possibly be covered by the constitution.

Re:Hush, citizen. (1)

deblau (68023) | about 5 years ago | (#29349975)

The government should not be able to obtain your personal credit cards numbers from a 3rd party without first getting a warrant from a judge.

Your fingerprint is personal. Your DNA is personal. Your credit card numbers are not personal, they are assigned to you by a large, multinational corporation that lobbies the government for things like overlooking large executive pay packages.

Re:Hush, citizen. (1)

isa-kuruption (317695) | about 5 years ago | (#29350235)

Your credit card number isn't your property.. it's the property of the credit card company that issued the card. Therefore, they can distribute the number to whoever they want, including the US government. If you don't like them doing this, then protest and possibly stop using credit cards altogether.

At least the probably don't know how to use it... (4, Funny)

Timothy Brownawell (627747) | about 5 years ago | (#29349589)

If they have that much useless detail on everyone, chances are they won't be able to actually find anything in it. Yay for security through obscurity.

On the other hand, someone's probably going to break in and get all those credit card numbers...

Re:At least the probably don't know how to use it. (4, Interesting)

jomegat (706411) | about 5 years ago | (#29349625)

Since they have your CC number, what would stop them from using it to buy something incriminating? Hey DHS, can't find the missing link? Provide it yourself then!

Re:At least the probably don't know how to use it. (1)

savuporo (658486) | about 5 years ago | (#29349645)

If they have that much useless detail on everyone, chances are they won't be able to actually find anything in it

They'll fix the problem by hiring a metric buttload of data mining consultants.

Re:At least the probably don't know how to use it. (1)

Dan667 (564390) | about 5 years ago | (#29350093)

Exactly what I was thinking. They had no idea what was going to happen before 9/11 and it is pretty obvious why when you look at stuff like this. Invasion of privacy and a wasted effort all at the same time.

Nothing special. This is a PNR (4, Interesting)

aepervius (535155) | about 5 years ago | (#29349603)

Look at the record detail. You can even see on what CRS it was reserved : 1A. If you reserve everything with the CRS (for example at a travel agency) then ultimately everything is linked and saved there. Then most airline do not bother filtering they just send the whole kludge to the DHS. I commented the same, and yes indeed he blacked the name out, but left the RECORD LOCATOR, which is identifying the person too, if you have access to the CRS system.

Re:Nothing special. This is a PNR (1)

Punctuated_Equilibri (738253) | about 5 years ago | (#29349887)

Actually sounds like a business travel profile. American Express has all my frequent flyer numbers as well as all the other information needed to book travel. If DHS was getting that, they would have everything mentioned. I travel every week so it would be extremely inconvenient if Amex did not have that stored. But DHS would need a warrant for that, I hope!

Re:Nothing special. This is a PNR (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29350185)

It may sound like a business travel profile, but I agree with the previous poster that it is indeed a PNR (Passenger Name Record). I used to work for an airline that used TPF for reservations and that's what they look like.

Thank you Navy and EFF (1)

emotionus (657937) | about 5 years ago | (#29349613)

awesome. http://www.torproject.org/ [torproject.org]

Re:Thank you Navy and EFF (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29349797)

Tor wouldn't help in this situation. All it would do is alter the IP address that you accessed your travel agent's website from. It wouldn't do anything about the need to provide your real name, credit card info passport info, and everything else required to get airplane and cruise tickets.

Re:Thank you Navy and EFF (2, Interesting)

M-RES (653754) | about 5 years ago | (#29350323)

What happens if somebody else buys your airline ticket for you with their own credit card? Surely there's no right to hold the information of an individual not even entering the US? Oh this is a test case waiting to happen :D

Re:Thank you Navy and EFF (3, Interesting)

lakin (702310) | about 5 years ago | (#29349833)

Id be a bit concerned about using a service like Tor when booking your flights. After all, is letting them know your IP when they know so much else really a big deal? They already know a lot about who you are, yet it looks quite dodgy if you tried to mask yourself. Also, what if the pc you tor out to the internet from is flagged no-fly? Sure, you could probably eventually prove it was nothing to do with you, but it wouldnt be a fun day in the airport!

Re:Thank you Navy and EFF (1)

emotionus (657937) | about 5 years ago | (#29349891)

May be a good point. Right after I posted it I realized....hmm, sure, I am proxied but they still have a whole bunch of other identifying information.

The shoe issue (1)

HasHPIT (1582373) | about 5 years ago | (#29349623)

You can read all about the shoe issue in:
"Shoes: Comfortable piece of clothing or The Ultimate Hiding Spot!" (unfortunately nobody RTFA that concluded that they were indeed just comfortable and not a particular good for hiding stuff).

Just imagine the things I could hide in my shoes....and not in my pants/shirt/other. The posibilities are endless.

Virtual Credit Card Number? (2, Interesting)

2phar (137027) | about 5 years ago | (#29349653)

If you book with a one-use virtual credit card number, is that what appears on the record? Does it produce all previously used cc numbers too? This looks like just the airline passing on their booking/customer db record, but if it was the actual CC that would be real tin foil hat time.

And people bitch about British intrusiveness. (3, Insightful)

EWAdams (953502) | about 5 years ago | (#29349681)

I'd rather have all the CCTV in the world than giving my entire identity, credit cards and all, to any DHS cocaine addict who happens to need a fix. At least CCTV can't read my passport and credit cards.

Re:And people bitch about British intrusiveness. (4, Insightful)

Cyberax (705495) | about 5 years ago | (#29349725)

"At least CCTV can't read my passport and credit cards."

Yet.

Re:And people bitch about British intrusiveness. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29349823)

Okay then, let's install some CCTV cameras in your house/car/office cubicle. Thank you for making the world a saver place.

Re:And people bitch about British intrusiveness. (1)

xoundmind (932373) | about 5 years ago | (#29349863)

Your CC number -> dealer's paypal account?

That's what they call new efficiencies, I believe.

Re:And people bitch about British intrusiveness. (2, Insightful)

pjt33 (739471) | about 5 years ago | (#29349881)

Do you keep your passport in a Faraday cage?

Re:And people bitch about British intrusiveness. (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | about 5 years ago | (#29350029)

I'd rather have NOTE OF ALL THIS! One bad does not make the other bad good!

It's still totalitarian terrorism (and I mean the real definition of that word)!

I guess they won't know too much now... (1)

NJRoadfan (1254248) | about 5 years ago | (#29349751)

...since the site is slashdotted.

Question... (1)

emotionus (657937) | about 5 years ago | (#29349757)

Can you copyright your personal data? And then sue the DHS for infringment?

Re:Question... (1)

SirGarlon (845873) | about 5 years ago | (#29349979)

Be careful what you wish for ... your credit card company might copyright your personal data and sue _you_ for using your own name!

Re:Question... (1)

mcgrew (92797) | about 5 years ago | (#29350383)

You can't copyright facts, only their presentation.

PCI Compliance? (4, Interesting)

atchijov (527688) | about 5 years ago | (#29349769)

Any business which is retaining credit card numbers and other personal information has to be PCI compliant. What about DHS?

Re:PCI Compliance? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29349799)

I was wondering this very same thing.

Re:PCI Compliance? (3, Interesting)

dannyrap (1897) | about 5 years ago | (#29349919)

Not exactly. Any business that processes credit cards has to be PCI compliant. That means truncating the credit card number or encrypting it. So any company that give the DHS access to unencrypted credit card numbers no longer PCI compliant and is liable for damages in the event of a breach (which this may be).

Re:PCI Compliance? (1)

isa-kuruption (317695) | about 5 years ago | (#29350279)

Chances are that Visa-Mastercard know these numbers exist in the US government system, but do not care. You really only need to be compliant if Visa-Mastercard enforces the compliance with fines... but then again, the fine is $25,000... so to the US government, they may just pay the non-compliance fine to get VM off the government's back.

As a person with a greencard (5, Interesting)

OzPeter (195038) | about 5 years ago | (#29349771)

The DHS knows a shitload more about than just my travel records. And I had to pay a shitload of money for the privilege.

Re:As a person with a greencard (3, Interesting)

microbox (704317) | about 5 years ago | (#29349937)

At least somebody is keeping the records in order. A FOI request may be useful for when you want to write your autobiography.

Re:As a person with a greencard (2, Informative)

hol (89786) | about 5 years ago | (#29350329)

Not as a green card holder - do that and they deny you the renewal. An "isolated incident" of course.

Re:As a person with a greencard (2, Interesting)

Hurricane78 (562437) | about 5 years ago | (#29350147)

So the only question remaining is: WHY?? I mean are there no better places in the whole world to go? Perhaps even some place with friendly people and fair jobs?

Ah! Comrade!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29349793)

Welcome to the United Soviet States of America!

Don't go away, we know who you are, we know where you live. :-)

lucky (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29349905)

Now I'm glad I've only ever used offshore booking agents.

Other nuggets (2, Interesting)

i_want_you_to_throw_ (559379) | about 5 years ago | (#29349911)

Looks like he went Tampa to London via Houston (used to be Intercontinental) and then mysteriously flew from Charles DeGaulle in Paris back to Tampa via Newark. (Hmmmmmm.. what of the missing segment? Hmm? Hmm?!!!)

Seat numbers are clearly visible at the end of each flight segment as well.

The history of every PNR (personal name record) has ALWAYS been tracked by CRS systems.

Looks like the flights he was scheduled for had some schedule changes and his seat had to be changed also.

Certainly does a lot of international travel huh?

Customs and Immigration has always been interested in suspicious behavior though.

1. Fly to South America and pay cash for your ticket? Expect to be stopped at re-entry
2. Didn't eat your meal on the way back from Central or South America? Expect to be stopped at re-entry
3. Fly international more than twice a month? Expect to be stopped at re-entry


It's good ole profiling at it's best and there's nothing you can do about it. It's a "national security" issue. I speak from experience. I have been stopped 30 consecutive times on international flights. Every flight I ever took until that passport was renewed.

Re:Other nuggets (4, Informative)

Curmudgeonlyoldbloke (850482) | about 5 years ago | (#29350091)

Looks like he went Tampa to London via Houston (used to be Intercontinental) and then mysteriously flew from Charles DeGaulle in Paris back to Tampa via Newark. (Hmmmmmm.. what of the missing segment? Hmm? Hmm?!!!)

They have these crazy things in Europe called "trains" that connect city centres without having to hang around in an unfashionable suburb for a few hours waiting to be put into a metal tube. You don't even have to take your shoes off to get on them.

Re:Other nuggets (1)

ahankinson (1249646) | about 5 years ago | (#29350229)

That may be true, but even your European superiority wouldn't make a train travel from Houston to Paris.

Re:Other nuggets (1)

russotto (537200) | about 5 years ago | (#29350267)

They have these crazy things in Europe called "trains" that connect city centres without having to hang around in an unfashionable suburb for a few hours waiting to be put into a metal tube. You don't even have to take your shoes off to get on them.

You do, however, have to go through passport control ("E.U., schmee-you, that's what we say -- Gordon Brown") to take a train between London and Paris, so I'm surprised the missing segment isn't shown.

Re:Other nuggets (4, Insightful)

nomadic (141991) | about 5 years ago | (#29350357)

They have these crazy things in Europe called "trains" that connect city centres without having to hang around in an unfashionable suburb for a few hours waiting to be put into a metal tube. You don't even have to take your shoes off to get on them.

Silly Europeans always have such a skewed sense of geography. Newark to Tampa is 1,000 miles, exactly. It's a two and a half hour flight and a 20 hour train ride.

Re:Other nuggets (1)

ndege (12658) | about 5 years ago | (#29350373)

You don't even have to take your shoes off to get on them.

...yet.

Unfortunately, nothing new... (5, Informative)

shrtcircuit (936357) | about 5 years ago | (#29349953)

I worked for a large company post-9/11 with fingers in most major industries, including a significant presence in travel (whether you knew it or not). Part of the data collection they did was essentially building profiles of everyone, including all of the information this guy obtained. The government couldn't legally collect the data, but being a private corporation, this place could. Naturally collecting all of that is really only useful for spying on people, so there was never any real doubt as to what happened to it. The rabbit hole goes a fair bit deeper into what you do and how that information is linked, and that was all just at this one company.

UGH!! (1)

exunil (1630819) | about 5 years ago | (#29350031)

I am SOOO going to figure out a way to live with some privacy.

If you have... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29350035)

Done nothing wrong, then you have nothing to hide and worry aboot...

WAIT !!?? credit card number and expiry date ? wtf !!??

Since when did it become acceptable to monitor everybody in case on is a terrorist instead of only the potential suspects ?

How on earth this level of incompetency and waste of ressources is considered state of the art ?

Re:If you have... (1)

erroneus (253617) | about 5 years ago | (#29350297)

Though I am 99% atheist (I occasionally have fantasies of being God and turning people I dislike into pillars of salt or exploding their heads with my mind) I have to say there are amazing similarities between revelations and what we are seeing today. First they get everyone using the same money and/or money networks, then they track them, then they stop those who disagree from using their money completely. Number of the beast.

Seriously, though. The DHS collecting financial instrument data is more about tracking where the money came from than anything else. Suppose the travel was paid for by "Death to America, Inc"? And while I agree there are aspects that are quite worrisome, I am not terribly worried about it. People have to reveal their "secret numbers" every time they want to use them. It's all part of opting into the system.

If I had anything to say about it, I'd change the U.S. into a "Mind Your Own Business" nation that disallows meddling in the affairs of other nations by policy and taking care of our own problems at home first! It works pretty well for the Swiss. When we stop pissing off the world, we will have a lot less to worry about from "terrorists" both foreign and domestic.

Question: How does any of this stop terrorism? (3, Interesting)

Newer Guy (520108) | about 5 years ago | (#29350063)

How does the Govt. having this information help the govt. stop terrorism? Anyone?

Re:Question: How does any of this stop terrorism? (4, Insightful)

ralf1 (718128) | about 5 years ago | (#29350135)

A better question might be 'How does ANYTHING that DHS does curb terrorism?'

Re:Question: How does any of this stop terrorism? (2, Insightful)

hol (89786) | about 5 years ago | (#29350355)

It stops terrorism about as well as the Canadian Gun Registry, London CCTV, and the Patriot Acts combined = 0, at least officially according to the General Accounting Office or their countries equivalent. Of course the real number they say, is secret, and zero isn't a real number...

And where is the manual... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29350073)

...which explains all the meanings of the data?

credit card data not safe (1)

dickens (31040) | about 5 years ago | (#29350137)

What do you bet we have no recourse when they inevitably release all this credit card data to crooks ?

Here's an update, folks! (0)

Datamonstar (845886) | about 5 years ago | (#29350285)

The so-called wall that supposed to built to keep illegal immigrants out of our country and away from our jobs does just as good a job at keeping US in! You're not going to get out of this country if they don't want you to.

site /.ed google cache of the site (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29350335)

looks like the site is down due to capacity.

Here is the Google cache of the site http://tinyurl.com/nrt7rm

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