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Japan's Cell Phones May Get DRM, At Music Industry Behest

timothy posted more than 4 years ago | from the pleae-don't-say-anonymous-coward dept.

Cellphones 189

An anonymous reader writes "The Japanese Music Industry is currently in talks with Japanese cell phone providers to introduce a new anti-piracy system in all cell phones in Japan. This new system would make DRM software mandatory in all cell phones; this would connect to a DRM server on the Internet whenever the cell phone user would try to play a song. The song would only play if the response of the server would be positive. Otherwise no song would be played. The system raises several questions and concerns that the Financial Times article did not address. These include ripped legally bought music and music that has been released under a CC license or similar. Who would pay for the costs of the DRM checks, and what would happen if no connection could be established?"

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189 comments

user would pay for all costs (5, Insightful)

postmortem (906676) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410663)

you think that some global company would rather "decrease their profits and shareholder value"?

Re:user would pay for all costs (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29410767)

didn't get to read the article because it requires a fucking registration and I'm unwilling to register just to read this tripe, but how would a system like this even work? If I load a ripped mp3 file onto the phone (or a free song or even an original song I just recorded), it will not have a hash or checksum that matches anything in their database. are they just going to check the name of the file to see if it matches a song I have purchased from them? isn't that ridiculously anticompetitive because it would force me to buy all of my songs from this one vendor that keeps records of what songs I am allowed to play? besides that, wouldn't it be easy to bypass? or maybe it will just refuse to play any unrecognized media file. wtf? what a USELESS, IDIOTIC system that will end up costing its users even more for a reduction in functionality.

Re:user would pay for all costs (2, Interesting)

Cheesetrap (1597399) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410905)

didn't get to read the article because it requires a fucking registration and I'm unwilling to register just to read this tripe

PrefBar [mozdev.org] allows you to change your user-agent, you may be able to use it to impersonate a GoogleBot (they seem to be indexed by google so it's worth a shot). I can't test it just now as I have 58 tabs open and some of them have large flash videos loaded, but this may be just the thing to facilitate your tripe-viewing in future. :)

Re:user would pay for all costs (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29411171)

I use user-agent-switcher, never heard of prefbar, anyway your crack (well not yours, its pretty well known) worked flawlessly. it isnt even necessary to hide cookies. a simple Googlebot 2.1 worked for me.

Re:user would pay for all costs (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29410869)

you think that some global company would rather "decrease their profits and shareholder value"?

What is the fucking problem here? Is everyone with a cellphone so bereft of imagination that they can't be disconnected from the electronic tit for ten minutes? Why the fuck do people have to have music, especially silly-ass ringtones, running between their ears minute-by-minute?

Just because some marketing whore thinks up a "feature" to put on a phone, everyone just _has_ to have it. Buy a goddamned mind. Every time you lap up the latest bullshit "feature", you're just furthering your slavery to the corporations. Tell them to go fuck themselves.

Now if you want to make a billion dollars, invent a bluetooth-activated dildo that fires up on every incoming call. It will certainly contribute to shorter calls so you can get the next one.

Re:user would pay for all costs (2, Interesting)

Jared555 (874152) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410923)

Now if you want to make a billion dollars, invent a bluetooth-activated dildo that fires up on every incoming call. It will certainly contribute to shorter calls so you can get the next one.

Ironically I am pretty sure this was on the screen savers/attack of the show (it was right around when they switched shows) at one point.... Pretty sure it detected the RF from the cell phone though.

pwned (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29410675)

ahaha! slashdot is down, last post?

Yet Another Sky Is Falling (5, Insightful)

mr_stinky_britches (926212) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410681)

Defective by design, as usual. I'm sure firmware hacks/mods will be created if this were to be implemented on a wide scale. No worries, really.

Re:Yet Another Sky Is Falling (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29410715)

No, not really, most people don't want to deal with hacking their phone... but then again most people with music on thier phone in Japan bought it over-the-air anyway, since the interface to the computer isn't usually all that convenient and most people don't have computers.

On the other hand, and people with computers and/or a lot of music probably already have iPods (or similar), so they won't much care.

As far as passing costs onto consumers, sure, they can raise the prices, but demand will fall, meaning it will cost the phone companies.. which gives them an incentive to resist it.

Re:Yet Another Sky Is Falling (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29410797)

most people don't have a computer? huh? what fucking desert did you just crawl out of? everyone and their grandmother has a computer. maybe if you replaced the words "have a computer" with "know how to use their computer" then your statement might be a little more accurate.

Re:Yet Another Sky Is Falling (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29410901)

People's cell phones serve as their computers mostly in Japan. It's a matter of space and personal time.

Re:Yet Another Sky Is Falling (3, Interesting)

Cheesetrap (1597399) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410967)

At first I thought, "No, wait, maybe he's talking about computer ownership in Japan..." but I see that's not statistically different from US/Aus either:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_number_of_Internet_users [wikipedia.org] (there's no direct computer ownership listing)

On a side note, there are certainly several countries where many people who have access to computers and the net don't have their OWN computers; making use of large 'net cafe' industries instead - Brazil, Portugal and the Phillipines, for instance. This would play havoc with the idea of restricting the syncing of ONE device to only ONE computer, and requiring a device to be wiped if it syncs with another comp, a la Apple.

Re:Yet Another Sky Is Falling (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29411153)

I live in Portugal and never heard of a "large "net cafe" industry around here. Most people access net from home, school or the office.

Re:Yet Another Sky Is Falling (3, Interesting)

GauteL (29207) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411191)

I live in Portugal and never heard of a "large "net cafe" industry around here. Most people access net from home, school or the office.

He's probably thinking as a tourist. All tourist places tend to have plenty of net cafes. Not to cater for locals, but to cater for the tourists.

When I last visited a tourist trap in Portugal, there was plenty of net cafes there, but they are probably very rare outside the tourist areas.

Re:Yet Another Sky Is Falling (2, Insightful)

Odinlake (1057938) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410933)

My Worry isn't that, but rather that laws and regulations are so hopelessly naive and outdated that industry can even consider these DRM stupidities.

Re:Yet Another Sky Is Falling (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29410937)

stop whining you pathetic little thief

Good Lord! (5, Insightful)

chef_raekwon (411401) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410687)

the skillz market for hacking phones just went up again. when will these music industries/RIAJ/RIAA/etc ever learn from Amazon/Ebay/etc? Its all about customer experience. This may be the same reason why top100 music generally licks balls.
my 2 cents.

Re:Good Lord! (4, Insightful)

tpgp (48001) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410791)

the skillz market for hacking phones just went up again. when will these music industries/RIAJ/RIAA/etc ever learn from Amazon/Ebay/etc? Its all about customer experience. This may be the same reason why top100 music generally licks balls.

Ebay and Customer service in the same paragraph? Incorrect..

Ebay and generally licks balls in the same paragraph? Correct.

Re:Good Lord! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29411629)

This may be the same reason why top100 music generally licks balls

Could you clarify - is this meant to be a good thing or a bad thing? Surely it depends on who the balls belong to and who or what does the licking.

The blowback from this wouldn't be good... (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29410693)

If the DRM system checks all songs against a server, regardless of origin, people will just end up using previous generation phones, or paying for a third party for a custom flash ROM to bypass this.

If the DRM system only checks flagged songs, I'm sure another black market will pop up allowing songs to be downloaded from somewhere, likely offshore.

Either way, Japan's analog of the RIAA loses long term for gains made in the short term. One can watch the lessons of DRM in the US, from the SDMI specs to FairPlay, to Apple just chucking DRM altogether to see what potholes are in store.

I hope the Music industry pays the connection chrg (1, Interesting)

freedom_india (780002) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410727)

Iam sure the RIAA will pay my internet connection charges or atleast the provider will make it free.
If not, am filing a suit on using my money illegally without my permission.
I will file the case against the provider, they are ones who connect my phone to 'net.
If many people file, am sure they will either stop helping RIAA or bill them.
If not, an legally obliged to defend my property against unauthorized assaults.

Re:I hope the Music industry pays the connection c (1)

solafide (845228) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410799)

Japan. Recording Industry Association of America. What do they teach these days in school?

Re:I hope the Music industry pays the connection c (-1, Flamebait)

jonbryce (703250) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411275)

If you are translating into English, you use an English word your readers will understand. Slashdot readers understand what the RIAA is even if they live in England and answer to the MCPA. Most slashdot readers won't understand what some Japanese acronym is, or even recognise MCPA.

Re:I hope the Music industry pays the connection c (4, Insightful)

gsslay (807818) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411331)

If you are translating into English, you use an English word your readers will understand.

What a depressing pandering to ignorance. What's wrong finding out who is involved and what they are? You know, actually stepping outside your insular little bubble and learning something new? Pinning this on the usual boogeyman is just lazy and dishonest.

By your logic, when the Japanese Prime Minister does something Slashdot readers should be told in translation what "Barack Obama" is up to in Japan. After all, who knows or recognises Taro Aso? Who cares they are completely different people?

Why stop there? I'm not sure about this "Japan", best translate it as "Hawaii".

Re:I hope the Music industry pays the connection c (4, Insightful)

Blue Stone (582566) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411439)

>Japan. Recording Industry Association of *America*.

Same arseholes, different toilet.

We still get shat upon.

Questions?

Re:I hope the Music industry pays the connection c (2, Informative)

Imrik (148191) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410891)

They wouldn't be using your money without your permission, by trying to play the song you'd be giving them permission. At least that's how their lawyers would probably argue it.

Re:I hope the Music industry pays the connection c (1)

umghhh (965931) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411033)

GP assumes too much I think. The prices on fragmented and assward mobile markets (like in US and to some extent EU) do not compare to what people in Japan experience. Most likely the japanese boys and girls would not have noticed a difference (except maybe that some music would not play). This of course does not make the bandwidth stealing in any way correct and the whole process good. That the whole thing is unethical and wrong will not stop anybody of course.

No effect whatsoever (2, Interesting)

BadAnalogyGuy (945258) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410753)

There isn't likely going to be any fallout whatsoever from this. The technology will go into place, be pretty much invisible, and provide enough benefits for legitimate users that no one will cry except for people who aren't connected in any way to Japan.

This is the way technology works. It gets implemented invisibly and no one ever knows they lost any sort of freedoms. In fact, they gain all sorts of benefits like better quality samples and higher bandwidth to support the increased usage.

In the U.S., it's pretty much the other way around. You can load up your phone with all sorts of pirated music and software, but the tradeoff is that the carriers don't give a damn about bandwidth or quality of service since they didn't plan on the increased traffic in the first place.

Do you take the red pill and live in a gilded cage, or do you take the blue pill and live a free life in squalor?

Re:No effect whatsoever (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29410773)

On the internet, nobody can hear you sarcasm. Or not. But if nothing else, the parent is perplexing.

It's like they've forgotten that cheap flash based mp3 players exist...

Re:No effect whatsoever (5, Insightful)

0123456 (636235) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410777)

The technology will go into place, be pretty much invisible, and provide enough benefits for legitimate users that no one will cry except for people who aren't connected in any way to Japan.

In what way will this provide _ANY_ benefit to legitimate users? They can already play their music, so they will see no benefit from having to 'phone home' to verify that they can, and will see significant risks of being incorrectly refused the right to play music they've been given or paid for.

Users can only suffer from this nonsense, because they can only be denied the right to do what they've been doing up until now.

Re:No effect whatsoever (3, Funny)

ragethehotey (1304253) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410805)

In what way will this provide _ANY_ benefit to legitimate users?

More music sellers will be willing to provide music through such a system, making the available amount of music larger as a whole. (Kinda like how the vast majority of legitimate paying mobile application developers have flocked to the iphone, where the largest successful DRM implementation is)

I'm not saying I at all agree with this plan, i'm simply answering your question.

Re:No effect whatsoever (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29410807)

That's not a very good analogy.

Re:No effect whatsoever (1)

cbreak (1575875) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410827)

Outside restrictions never bring any benefit for users appart from protecting them from themselves. In this case, the only ones that profit are those that control who can play music and who can not.

Re:No effect whatsoever (5, Insightful)

socceroos (1374367) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410851)

Bullcrap. Your premise is all up the creek. Telecom companies are not going to upgrade their infrastructure just because the music industry wants DRM everywhere. This has never happened in the past and it will not happen in the future. You're basically saying that the only reason that Telecoms are going to upgrade their networks is because they have deliberately increased the traffic themselves, not because of demand?!?!?

If this technology is getting implemented invisibly then why did it make front page news on slashdot?? Phail. Not even Echelon has been implemented invisibly.

Are you really telling us that because some people download pirated material we are not going to get any service upgrades? If not then why do you equate having phones without DRM with a free life in squalor?

Lastly, why on earth do you think that this isn't going to cause problems? DRM has caused major disruptions everywhere else it has been implemented. Do you think the Japs have the miracle fix for DRM that the rest of the world has been missing?

Re:No effect whatsoever (1)

Imrik (148191) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410919)

If this technology is getting implemented invisibly then why did it make front page news on slashdot?? Phail. Not even Echelon has been implemented invisibly.

Being implemented invisibly doesn't mean it isn't publicized. For example, converting broadcasts to digital in the US is being implemented invisibly. (for those that already have cable or a digital TV)

Re:No effect whatsoever (1)

socceroos (1374367) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410931)

Yeah, true. I came at that example from the wrong angle.

Even so, DRM has hardly proved to be implemented invisibly in the past. This mostly comes to light through the many problems DRM implementations have had. I cannot see how that is going to change.

Re:No effect whatsoever (1)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411475)

Telecom companies are not going to upgrade their infrastructure just because the music industry wants DRM everywhere.

Quite right. What we'll get is QoS to ensure that DRM traffic gets priority.

Re:No effect whatsoever (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29410861)

no thanks, i'll take the bandwidth and still load up my phone/computer/laptop up with all sorts of pirated media and software. you really think this technology is really going to have an impact on the people who were going to do that anyway? this crap will be hacked inside and out, and it's a waste of effort.

Re:No effect whatsoever (0)

awrz (1009247) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410871)

CA CA CA CA COMBO!

Mod Parent UP!!!! (I'm out of mod points :(

I'll prefer to stay in wonderland. No matter how wonky it may be. *goes back to dinking around with his rooted-G1 running CyanogenMOD 4.1.7*

Re:No effect whatsoever (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29411027)

Your Matrix analogy is backwards. The blue pill lets you live in a gilded cage, the red pill lets you live a free life in reality.

Re:No effect whatsoever (1)

Draek (916851) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411047)

The US' awful cellphone market isn't either standard in the western world, nor a result of being too 'free' (the opposite, actually).

Re:No effect whatsoever (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29411319)

Besides, the Japanese population behave like a bunch of sheep aat the best of times. So, even if this is passed in Japan, there is little likelyhood of it speading to other countries without a massive outcry from the idiots who live around their "phone"

No connection? (5, Insightful)

fucket (1256188) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410757)

What if you're on the subway and you want to play a song? You know, like 75% of all people do everyday on their way to and from work.

Re:No connection? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29410801)

In Japan cellphones work well anywhere, even on the subway. Same in Korea.

Re:No connection? (1)

Rakshasa Taisab (244699) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411707)

Bullcrap.

They don't work even in Tokyo's subways, with the exception of the stations. And the reason you're usually taking the subway is to get from point A to point B, not to camp out at a station.

Re:No connection? (2, Informative)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411751)

Given that there are incredibly strong cultural taboos in Japan against using a mobile phone on public transport (you should see the stares people get when they try), I would be very surprised if the networks had bothered investing in infrastructure underground.

Re:No connection? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29410809)

Correct me if I'm wrong, but unlike American subways, the Japanese subways actually have cell service.

Re:No connection? (1)

Francis (5885) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410823)

In Japan, they have cell coverage almost everywhere, including the subways. http://www.cellularabroad.com/japancellService.html [cellularabroad.com]

Re:No connection? (1)

Odinlake (1057938) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410911)

Not really true about the subways imho, though you may pass some station now and then where you barely have time to get some email transmitted. It is pretty neat to message your friends from the top of Fuji-san, 3800 meters up, though, but the connection is erradic.

Re:No connection? (3, Informative)

KamuZ (127113) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410945)

Not true. In the subway you lose the signal between stations.

Re:No connection? (1)

tapanitarvainen (1155821) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411261)

Interesting. In Helsinki metro there's pretty perfect coverage. I don't know if they actually have base stations or some kind of repeaters in the trains themselves or in the tunnels or whatever, but it does work.

Re:No connection? (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411757)

And they don't have Japan's taboos against talking on the phone on public transport. If you are in Japan, try talking on the phone on the bus or train and see the stares you get. In this situation, there is no point providing coverage underground. People might make calls at the stations, but as soon as they get on the trains the phones go away.

Re:No connection? (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410825)

What if you're on the subway and you want to play a song? You know, like 75% of all people do everyday on their way to and from work.

My bet is that it would be easier in Japan to make non-coverage maps, than coverage maps. And I reckon phones work perfectly in the subway.

Re:No connection? (2, Interesting)

coalrestall (973453) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410849)

Phones are supposed to work in the subways but most of the time they don't. It seems to be limited to certain lines.

Re:No connection? (2, Insightful)

ConceptJunkie (24823) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410837)

I would use my Rockbox'ed Sansa. If a user of this kind of phone wants to allow the corporations to control him like that, then that's his problem. Frankly, I don't want to hear anyone complain about it. There are always options. If you play by their rules, then you can't complain.

I make it a point to only deal with non-DRM music, and I pay for everything that I use. No one can take that from me. I have nothing to fear, unless open and hackable devices become illegal and the ones I now own all die... but if it comes to that extreme, I'll learn to build my own.

This is a ridiculous situation, but the best way to fight the rules of the game is simply not to play. As a private person, you often don't have any other choice. The government is a bitch of the corporations.

But they can't stop the individuals... yet.

Re:No connection? (1)

opposabledumbs (1434215) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410873)

Most countries in Asia tend to have good connections on subways and in tunnels. I can connect in Hong Kong even when I'm going under Victoria Harbour.

Unfortunately, you do pay a monthly fee for the service, but it's pretty small. Unlimited data usage (uploading and downloading) plans for mobiles with free sms's and a good 26 hours of free talk time cost about $30 US a month.

I'm sure it's the same in Japan - so no worries that you won't be able to connect to the server. Just sucks that you have to.

Re:No connection? (5, Insightful)

chetbox (1335617) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410983)

What if you're on a plane? There's no coverage there and it's one of the places I'm most likely to want to listen to my music.

Re:No connection? (1)

selven (1556643) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411323)

So cell phones will start sending out signals on planes? Expect a lot of opposition from the air traffic people.

Re:No connection? (-1, Redundant)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411479)

You need to get your priorities straight, son.

You should be more concerned about those fuggin' snakes...

Will all audio be screened? (3, Insightful)

raju1kabir (251972) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410831)

What if I record something myself using the "voice recorder" function and want to play it? Will that have to be run by the RIAA first? Will I be forbidden from exchanging my own recordings (of my baby laughing or whatever) with my friends?

If not, then surely someone will make a simple scrubber app that makes an MP3 look to the phone like a user-recorded sound.

Re:Will all audio be screened? (-1, Troll)

syousef (465911) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410959)

Will I be forbidden from exchanging my own recordings (of my baby laughing or whatever) with my friends?

One can only hope you'd ban yourself. No one needs to hear your baby laughing. It may be cool to you but every baby since creation has laughed and no one is interested in yours. If they pretend to be interested, they're not and in fact will discuss what a boring pain in the rear you are behind your back. I say this as father of a 1 year old that is fascinated by his every development but wouldn't dream of boring friends with it.

Re:Will all audio be screened? (3, Insightful)

raju1kabir (251972) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411133)

No one needs to hear your baby laughing.

My intention was to come up with an example in which there was no conceivable argument of corporate copyright interest. I should have thought that would be obvious given the context.

It's Not Already? (2, Interesting)

dancingmad (128588) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410839)

I am more surprised that this isn't already the case. I lived in Japan for several years and owned a few au phones. My first year I had a low end au phone and the two years after I had a higher end Casio. The higher end had some great features - good camera, 1seg TV, Japanese/English dictionary etc., but it was locked down to all hell. I couldn't even get my own ringtones on it, let alone MP3s or apps. As much as I wanted to customize my phone and not pay through the nose for approved stuff, I could do nothing.

Feature-wise my current Blackberry Curve is way behind my au phone, but I can at least use it's Bluetooth to connect to my laptop and use my own MP3s as ringtones.

Re:It's Not Already? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29411173)

Don't know about Japan but around here it's best to get your phone from a 3rd party, i.e. not the provider. Provider brand their phones and restrict the hell out of them to maximise revenue. If you to a phone contract reseller that subsidises unbranded phones, you get the original phone with all its capabilities.

You know the answer (5, Insightful)

acehole (174372) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410841)

"Who would pay for the costs of the DRM checks, and what would happen if no connection could be established?"

If anything the last decade has taught us about the modus operandi of music industries is that they simply dont care and want their dollars. Who would pick up the tab for the check? The phone user. What would happen if there was no connection? No music.

Re:You know the answer (2, Interesting)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411145)

... Resulting in network providers constantly receiving calls from phone users who couldn't play any music after only two days of ownership as the authorisation server was being hammered / poor network service, and thousands of consumers simply stopping the direct debits.

What can they do? "Urrr... You're contractually obliged for 24 months to pay us £25 per month for the service." "Oh, right. You're contractually obliged to provide the service I pay for. QED, bitch."

Re:You know the answer (4, Insightful)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411767)

You're contractually obliged to provide the service I pay for

You really didn't read that contract, did you?

will fail (5, Insightful)

xigxag (167441) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410855)

All these hypothetical examples are beside the point. If the music industry wants this implemented, it will likely happen.

But even so, it won't work. Japan's music industry is even more moribund than the US industry. It got fat and comfortable charging for singles the equivalent of what US consumers charge for albums, and for albums, the equivalent of US$30 or more. Meanwhile it pushes the same arthritic set of superstars that have dominated their pop scene for 10, 15, 20 years or more. The end result is that the cost of entry for unknown acts is too high, new music suffers. Japanese consumers have grown accustomed to buying albums used and ripping them. Locking mobiles will just increase the sales of walkmans and ipods and will make it more of a no-brainer to circumvent DRM'ed music.

This is ridiculous (4, Insightful)

Blue_Wombat (737891) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410857)

I't not just the legally purchased music that I can legally put on my ipod now - and will likely want to put on my new phone to minimise the number of devices I carry. Bad though that is, this is much nastier. For instance, one of my friends plays in an amateur band. He gives us MP3s of their material - in fact the 10 or so of us that get given this are probably the entirety of their regular audience. They do it for love and the delight that people are listening to their stuff - for the same reason they put cliups on youtube. Under this silly scheme, even the copyright owner couldn't listen to their own stuff on their own phone!

JASRAC Strikes Again... (5, Interesting)

Xin Jing (1587107) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410885)

I remember living in Okinawa back in 1993, JASRAC http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JASRAC [wikipedia.org] cracked down (and again in 2006) on club owners that played pre-recorded music at bars and nightclubs and profited by selling drinks and food to customers. Some clubs faced retroactive fines in the tens of thousands of Yen and were forced to close down. Just outside the gate near Kadena was the 'A-Sign Sound Bar' that used to play requests, the entire side of an album, man those were good times. Ah, the good old days: Okinawa and lots of Orion beer.

Thoughts About Okinawa... (-1, Offtopic)

Xin Jing (1587107) | more than 4 years ago | (#29410953)

Apparently someone else remembered the A-Sign Sound Bar, some chap named C-Bhudda:

"...I was there in 1987-9..."

"...In the middle of Okinawa City was the Air Force base called Kadena. Kadena is one the largest bases on Okinawa and is definately [sic] the largest base that is in a heavily populated area..."

"...Each entrance to the base is numbered and the rear gate is called "Gate Two." Outside gate two is a street with many retail businesses and bars geared toward the American serviceman. The G.I.'s referred to the street, in typical Americanese [sic], as Gate Two Street..."

"...We eventually wander towards Gate Two Street and the bar we like to go to late at night called the "A Sign." We never figured out what that meant but it had a cool wooden interior and they played rock album sides. Perfect for us..."

This was posted back in 2003 http://www.eddiemcdonald.com/2003_01_01_archive.html [eddiemcdonald.com], and I left Okinawa in 1994.

Re:JASRAC Strikes Again... (4, Informative)

rabiddeity (941737) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411189)

Some clubs faced retroactive fines in the tens of thousands of Yen and were forced to close down.

Don't mean to break your stride, but you do realize that ten thousand yen is less than US$100, right?

Re:JASRAC Strikes Again... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29411215)

Allow me to go out on a limb and suggest Xin Jing might have meant.. per song?

Re:JASRAC Strikes Again... (1)

Yuuki Dasu (1416345) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411517)

Just to be clear, it's actually a little more than $100 USD right now, due to the current strength of the yen and weakness of the dollar. The yen -> USD conversion I got quoted for a personal transaction this morning was 91.63 yen per dollar, which would make your ten thousand yen worth $109.13, less transaction fees.

You confused yen with dollar (1)

aepervius (535155) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411315)

Some clubs faced retroactive fines in the tens of thousands of Yen and were forced to close down.

To be a bit picky you either meant "club were forced down [independently of the money fine]" or you meant "fines in the 10 of thousand dollar", because 10000 1993 Yen are what, 90$ ? There is a conversion factor for those year of 120 Y to 110 Y to 1 $.

Brain Damage? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29411061)

"and what would happen if no connection could be established?"

OMG! I think I know the answer! There'd be no music! And then what would happen?!

Um - I don't know, what would happen if someone couldn't hear music the instant they wanted to?

Brain damage maybe...

"At Music Industry Behest" (1)

coaxial (28297) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411063)

Really? The DRM is being installed at the music industry's behest? You mean end consumers aren't clamoring for this? But the media industry keeps telling me how DRM is better for customers!

It seems like the assholes are winning (1)

hyades1 (1149581) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411107)

I'm increasingly glad that my Palm Tungsten E2 with its pathetic little 1G SD card is still my main source of music and e-reading when I'm out and about. I've got 90 songs (all at CD quality), 31 novels, and a bunch of pdf's and Office files, and a few games. And NO DRM! Yes, I shift songs in and out, so I don't have access to every song I ever listened to. So what? I use this stuff to pass time when I'm on public transit and sitting in waiting rooms, not when I'm in an environment where I want to kick back, get comfortable, and give the music and stories the attention the artists who made them really deserve.

Sometimes, I think, cutting edge isn't always the best. When this thing finally dies (it's about 4 years old), I'm going to get another one. I got it because it runs Office files and Outlook and do all the usual business stuff, and you can actually scrawl notes on it. More and more, though, I find the worry-free entertainment is what I'm using.

if that's ever implemented... (1)

OpenSourced (323149) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411141)

The like consequences would be:

a) Slowdown in sales of new handsets.
b) Bigger use of independent mp3 players
c) Growth of the second-hand handsets market.
d) Growth of Internet buys of foreign-made handsets.

All in all, a bad thing for Japanese handset makers

Re:if that's ever implemented... (1)

Lonewolf666 (259450) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411247)

e) Sales of new handsets move to really cheap ones because the (otherwise nice) features of the high end ones are too crippled by DRM.

I agree that this will hurt Japanese handset makers. Independent importers who are not bound by the deal might profit (your case d).

     

Enough of this bullshit. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29411177)

Enough of this bullshit. Off with their heads!

iPhone influence? (3, Insightful)

gashwrecker (1636987) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411181)

This may be a response to the growing popularity of the iPhone in Japan. There's an increasing number of people who download mp3s or buy DRM-free music from sites like http://www.hearjapan.com/ [hearjapan.com], and this is cutting into the profitable cell phone mp3 market.

Amateur's works ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29411255)

How will they perform those checks on amateurish works ? And derivative works ? "åOEä" (Doujin) musics regroup a lot of derivative and original works so a bad move would mean getting a lot of customers angry.

What if I have my own music? (1)

houghi (78078) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411279)

What if I recorded my own music and want to play that? Or any other legaly downloaded free music (or speech or whatever.) Most likely it will say something like: Unknown, so OK to play. That would mean that suddenly ALL the music will get such a signal.

Either that or they will only allow cellphones to play OK downloaded songs. That would mean that people will find another solution. Can you say mp3 player?

what about Linux based phones? (1)

Ponder Stibions (962426) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411299)

particularly those that make sure they are completely open source and hackable? It's just going die when it meets the G1 and the other android phones. Even to the point of having to load alternitive firmware, enough people will be able to do it that it will make a mockery of the law.

this is only the start (4, Interesting)

Wierdy1024 (902573) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411335)

This is just so they can get the infrastructure in place for per-play or per-minute music charging. It would be trivial to hook this server up to the phone companies billing system to bill users every time they played a song.

The next step is then to provide addons to contracts offering "unlimited" songs, for only an additional $15 per month...

Stoopid stoopid (1)

t0p (1154575) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411449)

This is just dumb. If my mobile provider started to pull this kind of crap, I'd get an mp3 player. It's nice being able to play music on my phone, but it sure isn't essential.

Stimulate demand (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29411463)

AC + late so no fucker will ever read it but......

Has anyone mentioned that in these days of phones shipping with several gigs of storage, or the capacity to add said storage, that this piece of legislation would once again give people a compelling reason to own both a cell phone and an MP3 player, both of which japan "makes" a significant fraction of.

MPAA - RIAA Scum (2, Informative)

im just cannonfodder (1089055) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411591)

lets not for get who is actually behind the MPAA - RIAA, these are the companies that need to be targeted and boycotted into changing their ways, purchase only 2nd hand media, & avoid all sony products as much as possible, why allow these scum suits to dictate hardware/software DRM anymore.

Name and shame the companies as all the **AA trade group name is for is to protect the corporate globalists gatekeepers from bad press.

RIAA, CRIA, SOUNDEXCHANGE, BPI, IFPI, Ect:

# Sony BMG Music Entertainment
# Warner Music Group
# Universal Music Group
# EMI

MPAA, MPA, FACT, AFACT, Ect:

# Sony Pictures
# Warner Bros. (Time Warner)
# Universal Studios (NBC Universal)
# The Walt Disney Company
# 20th Century Fox (News Corporation)
# Paramount Pictures Viacom--(DreamWorks owners since February 2006)



========

If Sony payola (google it) wasn't already bad enough to destroy all indie competition already you have this scam.


Is it justified to steal from thieves? READ ON.


RIAA Claims Ownership of All Artist Royalties For Internet Radio
http://slashdot.org/articles/07/04/29/0335224.shtml [slashdot.org]

"With the furor over the impending rate hike for Internet radio stations, wouldn't a good solution be for streaming internet stations to simply not play RIAA-affiliated labels' music and focus on independent artists? Sounds good, except that the RIAA's affiliate organization SoundExchange claims it has the right to collect royalties for any artist, no matter if they have signed with an RIAA label or not. 'SoundExchange (the RIAA) considers any digital performance of a song as falling under their compulsory license. If any artist records a song, SoundExchange has the right to collect royalties for its performance on Internet radio. Artists can offer to download their music for free, but they cannot offer their songs to Internet radio for free ... So how it works is that SoundExchange collects money through compulsory royalties from Webcasters and holds onto the money. If a label or artist wants their share of the money, they must become a member of SoundExchange and pay a fee to collect their royalties.'"

http://www.dailykos.com/storyonly/2007/4/24/141326/870 [dailykos.com]

Move it from phone to Home NAS. (1)

mattr (78516) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411673)

Most young girls will not realize or care about this I expect.

But to put this in perspective, yesterday I saw a tasty-looking home NAS on the shelf of a store in Akihabara, Tokyo. The high end model, which among other things has some terabytes of RAID and a mysql server in it, can download bittorrent without having a pc connected to it.

I figure people will put music or video on their home-NAS, and maybe if it can be made easy even share the NAS with a bunch of friends. Then just stream to your phone. Encoding for normal phones, and accessing from them, might be a pain. But I expect the more advanced phones will be able to work great with them. So if you move the media off the phone, then you can stream from a home NAS. Everything has SD or microSD in them now too. Will the DRM cover that too?

Ah, shades of the year 2000 (and 2005) (1)

bradley13 (1118935) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411737)

Remember the Sony statements from 2000: ""The industry will take whatever steps it needs to protect itself and protect its revenue streams... It will not lose that revenue stream, no matter what... Sony is going to take aggressive steps to stop this. We will develop technology that transcends the individual user."

In 2005, Sony came out with their rootkit [wikipedia.org]. This was met with less-than-wild enthusiasm (plus a few lawsuits).

So in 2009, the industry takes a new approach: owning your cellphone.

This will continue until they have either (a) gotten the technology through one way or another or (b) pissed their customers off enough to put themselves out of business. Sadly, given pliant politicians, the odds favor (a).

Here's an idea.... (1)

agorist_apostle (1491899) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411807)

Don't buy and put music on a cell phone. Live more simply, save money, let the a-holes who are so worried about losing a few bucks to song piracy have their business model turn to dust in their collective mouths!

It's so obviously full of /FAIL/ (1)

Nicolas MONNET (4727) | more than 4 years ago | (#29411811)

For a technical audience like /. this kind of crap is obviously going to fail on a dozen of levels; but those fucktards keep pushing this nonsense, and they probably even believe it. Without even thinking very hard,

  • What happens when you're out of coverage?
  • What about your own ripped CDs?
  • What about plain old mp3 you bought on eMusic or Amazon?
  • What about unencrypted AAC you bought on iTunes but want to listen to on your other phone?
  • Planes?
  • Going abroad?
  • Will the authentication servers always be up? All the time? Riight.
  • What about the added complexity? How often will the phone crash because of that useless crap?
  • What about CC-licensed works?
  • Who do you call when the damn thing doesn't work for one reason or another? Who's going to pay for customer service?
  • What happens when a user finds he can't listen to lawfully-acquired music? How mad is he going to get? Sword wielding samurai mad?
  • Will they pull a Sony or a Microsoft when they realize the exercise is pointless, and leave millions of former customers w/o service? (Answer is obviously YES)

But that won't stop that merry band of fucktards.

Tomorrow, Sarkozy's merry band of obedient scumsuckers is going to vote on the Hadopi law v2, which is equally absurd.

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