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Data Center Flood Captured By Security Cam

samzenpus posted about 5 years ago | from the we're-going-to-need-a-bigger-mop dept.

Idle 66

miller60 writes "Torrential rains last week in Istanbul led to a flood that overwhelmed a data center for Vodafone. The event was captured on the data center security cameras, which shows waters rising and then raging through the security area before flooding the raised-floor equipment area."

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Oops! (1)

Locke2005 (849178) | about 5 years ago | (#29443427)

Looks like somebody forgot to empty the bit bucket!

Computer says... (1)

kirill.s (1604911) | about 5 years ago | (#29444499)

NOOO!!!

Re:Computer says... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29527169)

That is hilarious. I guess nobody else got the Little Britain reference.

Remember the episode where the computer said yes?

wowzers (1)

j00r0m4nc3r (959816) | about 5 years ago | (#29446609)

talk about a flood attack..

Re:wowzers (1)

ta bu shi da yu (687699) | more than 4 years ago | (#29503137)

The perils of cloud computing...

Now featureing (2, Funny)

TornCityVenz (1123185) | about 5 years ago | (#29447797)

Vodaphone Istanbul now features water cooled servers!

It's funny 'cause... (2, Interesting)

BeneathTheVeil (305107) | about 5 years ago | (#29448247)

"voda" means water in a few languages.

Re:It's funny 'cause... (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | more than 4 years ago | (#29557479)

In more than a few languages, actually - certainly in all Slavic languages [wiktionary.org] .

close the door moron (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29448841)

I mean Jeez, if kept the door closed, could have barricaded real easy with some plastic sheeting and filecabinets

Re:close the door moron (1)

ekhben (628371) | about 5 years ago | (#29450833)

Did you see the plate glass window collapse at 5:13 or so? I'm not sure if plastic sheets and file cabinets would be enough against the pressure of that much water.

Re:close the door moron (1)

Turiko (1259966) | more than 4 years ago | (#29505895)

Actually, it didn't break.... it fell out,but i guess the water broke its fall. Who knows what made it so weak against pressure.

Re:close the door moron (2, Insightful)

SEWilco (27983) | more than 4 years ago | (#29530333)

The building twisting the frame so the glass no longer fit in the frame is probably the reason it fell out. These are not the forces which you're looking for, they are forces much greater, which encompass the water, forces which flow around and through you.

Re:close the door moron (1)

Neanderthal Ninny (1153369) | more than 4 years ago | (#29586969)

Like screen doors on a submarine.
Glass doors and panels are designed withstand some wind and water but never this much mater. Standing water pressure is one thing but flood waters are moving so the extra pressure on the glass and frame they didn't anticipate must have collapsed the glass & frame and they still had street traffic which didn't help any.
I don't know what building standards they have in Istanbul Turkey and what flood risk information they had before building this data center but obviously that doesn't work or they had no good information on.

Ooozing sympathy ... (3, Interesting)

RockDoctor (15477) | about 5 years ago | (#29451675)

Leaving aside that this looks like a pretty anonymous security desk/ reception area which could fron any sort of business, not just a data centre, the important point is, "what a fucking stupid place to build anything".

You can see from the window that this sort of flooding is nothing to be surprised at. The water is rising slowly and there's little apparent current, which implies that the site is a fair distance from the source of the rising river. Odds on, this is not a "flash flood", but a perfectly normal flood on the flood plain of a river.
Rivers flood ; they flood onto their flood plains ; floods can be avoided by the simple process of not being where the water ends up. I.E. don't stay on flood plains when there's significant rainfall.

OK, so people who have brought property on flood plains don't like this because they're going to lose money ; a lot of money. But that's their own fault for being so stupid as to invest in property on a flood plain.

No fucking sympathy at all. Let the stupid bastards drown as they go bankrupt.

I was on holiday recently in Mallorca, and also looking at photos of other firend's holidays in Spain. Where other people see a nice wide park area running through the middle of a town, with a tiny stream in a broad concrete channel, they see a public park. But I see a flood channel designed to take flash flooding. Same landscape, different perceptions.

Last month, we had the worst local rainfall for over 30 years (I've only lived here for 26 years). The rain was hammering down solidly for nearly 3 days ; the ignition leads in my car started complaining. And the drains outside my house overflowed ... and the water ran away downhill to cause flooding on the flood plain at the bottom of the hill. Well, that was a really difficult decision for me to make when I was house hunting, and it's paid off time and again already.

Learn some basic geography ; look at the shape of the landscape determined by the average climate of the last few thousand years. Then apply what you've learned and let someone else suffer the flooding.

Re:Ooozing sympathy ... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29452115)

Leaving aside that this looks like a pretty anonymous security desk/ reception area which could fron any sort of business

It is clearly not in America - there are no supersized tubs of lard in shot.

Re:Ooozing sympathy ... (1)

Charles Dodgeson (248492) | about 5 years ago | (#29462205)

I largely agree. When we moved to Texas, my wife wanted a house by a creek. Everything we looked at was built above the flood line, but by quick inspection I could see which houses were going to be undermined by repeated flooding of their creeks. (For some houses the "upper" backyards were already peeling away.)

Once we moved into a place (with a very solid retaining wall just where it needs to be) I had to convince my wife that we shouldn't put in benches or swing sets in the "lower" back yard. She thought I was nuts until our first really big set of rains when we had a swing set delivered to our back yard from somewhere upstream.

Re:Ooozing sympathy ... (1)

RockDoctor (15477) | about 5 years ago | (#29471223)

by quick inspection I could see which houses were going to be undermined by repeated flooding of their creeks

It is not exactly rocket surgery, is it? Or even "brain science".

Re:Ooozing sympathy ... (1)

Charles Dodgeson (248492) | more than 4 years ago | (#29498527)

It is not exactly rocket surgery, is it? Or even "brain science".

Indeed, it is not. And so, as politically incorrect as it may be, I sometimes question the wisdom of rebuilding a city that is largely below the water line of a huge river.

Re:Ooozing sympathy ... (1)

RockDoctor (15477) | more than 4 years ago | (#29501865)

And so, as politically incorrect as it may be, I sometimes question the wisdom of rebuilding a city that is largely below the water line of a huge river.

What's politically incorrect about it?
I can see that it would be politically incorrect to say that it's stupid to rebuild this city but not stupid to rebuild that city, when the only significant difference is the countries that they're in.
So, as a geologist (not that that matters much), I've always been happy to snort contempt at the London Barrage, and I snigger at the efforts to "save" Venice (if I were an Italian taxpayer, I might not be sniggering, but as a European taxpayer my personal liability for this white elephant is small enough to be sniggered at) ; why I don't snigger at such efforts in the Netherlands is that they've got centuries of investment in their dyke systems, and are in a much better position to continue their investments in a manageable manner.
Whether downtown Dacca is going to gurgle, I don't know, but I rather fear it. Poor fuckers.
I have heard on other fora enough bleating about Mississippi flooding to be considered a hard-hearted bastard for saying "let them tread water". Ditto for New Orleans.
I'll be in Cairo in the not too distant future ; I would expect from their 5000+ years of Nilotic flooding that they know what they're in for, and I recall that the way was blazed up and out of the flood plain by the Pharaohs when they looked for a long-term home for their dead bones.
There's nothing politically incorrect about saying "that's a fucking stupid place to build". The people listening may not want to hear you say that, but their desires don't make the place where they're building (or rebuilding) any the less fucking stupid a place to build. If they've asked for my advice as a geologist, then they'd better pay my fucking bill for telling them "that's a fucking stupid place to build".
I don't work in that area of geology, "hydrology", and if I did then the question I'd be asked is more likely to be "how can I best mitigate or manage the flooding risk at this location?", or "what are my flood risks if I were to buy this property?" These are very different questions, and fully deserving of an appropriate answer. Accompanied by an invoice. See the comments about Netherlands above : the Cloggies have serious flooding risks and problems, and they face them square on, not ostrich-fashion.

Re:Ooozing sympathy ... (1)

Whorhay (1319089) | more than 4 years ago | (#29509159)

I've always gota good laugh about the flooding along the Ohio River. It happens to some extent somewhere along the river every freaking year. Yet the news would always make a big deal about it washing away a bunch of trailer homes that were stupidly placed right on the bank of the river.

Re:Ooozing sympathy ... (1)

RockDoctor (15477) | more than 4 years ago | (#29511977)

Yet the news would always make a big deal about it washing away a bunch of trailer homes that were stupidly placed right on the bank of the river.

I feel the sympathy that you ooze. Have you found a good viewpoint where you can park up, crack a few tinnies and observe the bedraggled evacuees from a position of calculated safety? Free entertainment.
Hey - an investment opportunity : find such a site, buy the appropriate few 10s of sq.m, then charge rental for the film crews when they come along.
What's the rest of the meme ... oh yeah :
"...
6. Profit!"
(Did I get it right? I'm still a beginner at this "ruthless capitalism" lark. Fun isn't it?)

Re:Ooozing sympathy ... (1)

Jared555 (874152) | more than 4 years ago | (#29561587)

Other methods of making profit:
1. Charge reservations. Want a dedicated spot for your film crew when the floods happen next year? Pay me $x
2. Charge for advertising space. Want to advertise your construction business? Pay me $x

Re:Ooozing sympathy ... (1)

RockDoctor (15477) | more than 4 years ago | (#29585633)

Other methods of making profit:
1. Charge reservations. Want a dedicated spot for your film crew when the floods happen next year? Pay me $x
2. Charge for advertising space. Want to advertise your construction business? Pay me $x

You're clearly a lot more experienced than me at this ruthless capitalism lark. Would you like some freshly-sliced peon with your paupers-blood cocktail?

Re:Ooozing sympathy ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29522973)

In a country where taxes and public spending and insurance for everybody are seen as evil, yes, a place that requires public infrastructure to stay intact is a fucking stupid place to build. You're not going to maintain the dike that protects your house all by yourself. In a country where the common good is a value, it's different.

Re:Ooozing sympathy ... (1)

Pyrion (525584) | about 5 years ago | (#29464561)

Or at very least, don't build your data center on the ground floor in an area prone to flooding.

Re:Ooozing sympathy ... (2, Interesting)

KORfan (524397) | about 5 years ago | (#29473463)

I beg to differ on the current. If you look at the buildup of the water on the door and window supports, it looks like there's at least half a foot of pileup due to water velocity. There are some pulsating waves so you know it's not just head difference between inside and outside. That water appears to be moving a couple of feet per second, especially after the breakthroughs. It's not a seeping flood, they're getting real velocity.

I don't think I've ever heard of flood water velocity as a measure of distance from channel before, though.

Re:Ooozing sympathy ... (2, Insightful)

pjtp (533932) | about 5 years ago | (#29474821)

Leaving aside that this looks like a pretty anonymous security desk/ reception area ...

I take it you didn't watch the entire clip. Jump to near the end and you can see the feed from a different camera. This one covers the actual data centre.

Re:Ooozing sympathy ... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29476369)

Isn't it funny how everyone wants the best property, but only some people end up having it?

Re:Ooozing sympathy ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29484143)

"what a fucking stupid place to build anything"

You mean to tell me that having anything other than a port in New Orleans is a bad idea?
And here I thought it was good planning to be between a lake, the sea, a constantly overflowing river, on sand, in hurricane alley, and below sea-level.
Next you'll tell me I shouldn't have a city and state government too corrupt/inept to come up with real evacuation plans or build adequate levies.

No fucking sympathy at all. Let the stupid bastards drown as they go bankrupt.

[kanyewest]RockDoctor doesn't care about black people[/kanyewest] [youtube.com]

Re:Ooozing sympathy ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29511331)

Yeah and being on a hill is a fire hazard. Living on the West Coast of the US has earthquakes and fires, East Coast hurricanes, in the middle you get river flooding and tornadoes.

Pffft, whatever dude. There is no perfectly good place to build. Even if you have the money and resources to get a "good" place then you won't be able to get anything done because you'll be inside a granite mountain.

You know, there is a reason why coasts are popular and it's not just because people like to be near water for the hell of it.

Re:Ooozing sympathy ... (1)

dkone (457398) | more than 4 years ago | (#29511867)

Seriously, did you watch the first 10 seconds of the video and come to your conclusion based on the fact that your car got rained on? You can see water rushing into the room from the hall. This is inside a building, I can't imagine how fast the water must have been moving outside.

Re:Ooozing sympathy ... (2, Informative)

BountyX (1227176) | more than 4 years ago | (#29522853)

I respectfully disagree. This is not a case and their data center was NOT on flood plains. That area of Istanbul is NOT prone to flooding. Furthermore, it was the heaviest rainfall in the last 8 decades [yahoo.com] . That section of Istanbul is even on top of an elevated slope [kappa.com.tr] (compared to the rest of the city). This is primarily a case of outdated infrastructure throughout the city. Istanbul is one of the oldest cities in the world. They still have roman-built brick elevated roads they rely on for water draining. Upgrade the infrastructure you say? Ha, good luck upgrading a massive city of 12 million, three times the size of chicago and ranked the 5th largest city proper in the world. I'm sure the government can afford to replace the massively ancient city infrastructure /sarcasm. I think the real stupidity here was placing the data center one the first story of a building (and in an earthquake zone). Not the same as you make it sound...

Re:Ooozing sympathy ... (1)

RockDoctor (15477) | more than 4 years ago | (#29526433)

I respectfully disagree. This is not a case and their data center was NOT on flood plains. That area of Istanbul is NOT prone to flooding.

It sounds as if you know the area well enough to have identified it - I don't recall the original article having enough information to locate it more precisely than "Istanbul", at which point I only have a very vague idea of the topography.
So, there's something more complex going on in this particular case than simply being sited in a flood plain - which does nothing to make building in flood-prone area any more sensible.

Furthermore, it was the heaviest rainfall in the last 8 decades.

For my home address, I've chosen a place that is going to be secure from flooding on a millennial time scale. In fact, the highest likelihood of flooding in the next couple of centuries is going to be evenly split between the consequences of extreme global warming (I'd need around 50m of sea level rise to start getting worried) and if the Haltenbanke/Storegga slopes collapse again (which hasn't happened for some 9000 years ; about 30% chance of touching my home at peak, if it lives up to past performances). Since I live in a house that was built 70 to 80 years ago, I wouldn't find the prospect of getting flooded by an "80-year flood" too reassuring!
It's not rocket surgery doing this. Or brain science.
My employer's office ... well, that's in a much more vulnerable area. Which is why the important stuff - the contents of the file server - gets backed up off site daily. The rest of it - who cares? I really should have a talk with the Boss-of-Bosses about this, but since he's a geologist too, I'm sure that he's done his calculations. I'm sure that we're in profit on the building already, so it's just a question of finding a sucker to sell it to, and suckers are still in ready supply. I'd guess that means Westhill for us next time we need to move to larger premises.
As for Istanbul's history - well, don't forget that you're not talking to an American (not a normal experience on SlashDot, I know). I've got a choice of 4500-year-old stone monuments to drive to if I want to take lunch al-fresco, and a lot of the country's road system follows the lines laid down after the Roman invasion 1953 years ago. I'm sure the Roman drains of Istanbul will get fixed as soon as they've finished fixing the Roman drains of ... err ... Rome. That's been a source of complaints for only a couple of millenia now, so it should get fixed RSN.
Or maybe, one needs to be really sceptical about any promises implicit in "infrastructure" and look for more fundamental things like "geography". Which makes your comment about "the real stupidity here was placing the data center one the first story of a building (and in an earthquake zone)" peculiar.
Oh, hang on, by "first story" you mean "ground floor", not "first story"?
Now it makes sense.
Yes, it would have been sensible - and sufficient in this case - to have put the data centre on the first story (UK sense) of the building, and to have ensured that the power supply cables, data cables, UPS, emergency generator, etc are up on that 4m-above-ground-level level too, with only isolated power circuits going down into what we would call at work "the splash zone".
Ohh, err. That makes me think. Unless my knowledge of the geography of the ceiling spaces at work is terribly wrong, there's a water pipe in the ceiling above the server room. I'll have to get someone to check that out, sharpish!

Istanbul, earthquake zone ... this is not news ; this is history. If it worries you, leave and encourage your friends to leave. If you think the infrastructure needs improvement (and judging from Izmit/1999, well, you judge), then you've got a lovely carreer in politics ahead of you.
Quakes
[I'm assuming that you're Turkish and/ or resident in Turkey] Did you know that there is a serious proposition from some seismologists (not undisputed, but not dismissed out-of-hand) that there is a cycle of a few centuries in quakes along the "North Anatolian Transform" (the system of linked faults that defines the northern edge of Turkey and the southern edge of the Black Sea ; simultaneously the boundary between the Eurasian plate (loose sense ; the Black Sea is a bit of an oddity, but it gets more conventional around Istanbul) and the Turkish (Anatolian) microplate?
The general proposition is that stress building up along the transform fault (moving in a right-lateral sense) at a uniform rate tends to lead to a fault segment at the eastern end failing in a large quake; this transfers stress to east (where it goes into the general Caucasus rumbling) and to the west. At the west, another fault segment has an additional load of stress (OK, strictly "strain", I don't know if you're up to speed on structural geology) dumped on it in addition to it's accumulated stress from years of not moving.
This fault fails within a few years (or decades), producing another big quake. That dumps stress to the east (onto a fault segment that has only recently moved, so has relatively little stress on it) and to the west (onto a fault segment which hasn't moved for a long time and has accumulated a lot of stress on it).
Lather, wash, rinse, repeat.
The Izmit/1999 quake is interpreted (by some ; not unchallenged ; not laughed out of discussion either) as being the western end of a cycle which has been going on for about a century now ... and means that the Marmara area is next in line for a big quake, and in the not too distant future. Seismologists await the next "big one".
You may wish to include this in your list of considerations if moving home in the near future. Obviously you'll have a long list of other considerations too - from climate and building quality to what the neighbours are like. But it may be worth taking a look at.

Re:Ooozing sympathy ... (1)

pegdhcp (1158827) | more than 4 years ago | (#29576753)

Some additional points;

I fortunately do not live near to that flood area but the place was on my way from home to work. I was lucky that my car was diesel during the event, otherwise it was very possible to stuck in sub floods feeding the main "river" that materialized. Aside from political bickering between municipality officers and all related offices, that area IS IN a valley. Albeit it is not a deep one and it is higher than most of surrounding area, valleys are by definition prune to be flooded. That is why river deltas are very favorable agricultural areas. Rain was incredible, water stıorage in local dams in Istanbul increased more than 10% overnight, something like 80 million cubic meters or so, some near areas to the flood saw rain close to 200 kg/m^2 in 12 hours etc. There were deaths as well, like 20+ people. So it was a disaster and infrastructure could not handle it.

My point is that, these are what you need to take into consideration when you are building a datacenter. Thus it is not important if it is an event that is not likely to happen again in my life time -ignoring climate changes we all see around...-. The important thing is that if they had their MAIN PHONE EXCHANGE for the whole country on a properly prepared building they would not cut the GSM service for thousands of people during a natural catastrophe for half a day or more. Some people lost their portable phone service, when they need it most. What should be taken into consideration is that Vodafone acquired the building, when they bought Telsim, which was a small GSM operator here. They did not choose the location. But what they did have was some four years after acquisition, that can be used for improvements, redundant communication links etc...

Re:Ooozing sympathy ... (1)

RockDoctor (15477) | more than 4 years ago | (#29586031)

Aside from political bickering between municipality officers and all related offices, that area IS IN a valley. Albeit it is not a deep one and it is higher than most of surrounding area, valleys are by definition prune to be flooded.

So ... detecting that a location is in a valley is ... rocket science? Difficult?

That is why river deltas are very favorable agricultural areas.

An excellent place to put flooding-tolerant crops. Data centres are not, to the best of my knowledge, flooding-tolerant crops.

My point is that, these are what you need to take into consideration when you are building a datacenter. Thus it is not important if it is an event that is not likely to happen again in my life time

Is one lifetime an adequate timescale to consider these things over? Obviously it depends on the expected lifetime of the building, of the technology. But as the rest of your comments show, a building can end up being used for longer than expected.

Some people lost their portable phone service, when they need it most.

Huh? There are warnings pasted all over mobile phone services in the UK that warn that they are not suitable for relying on in emergencies. Do people not believe such warnings? Probably not. Oh well, Darwin Award territory.

Re:Ooozing sympathy ... (1)

umghhh (965931) | more than 4 years ago | (#29592797)

well this may be but it may also be that people got building permission to build in normally dried river beds and when the big rain came then water did not have any place to go but raised above the level it would normally raise to which means morons that build in the river plains and river beds as in Istambul should be held accountable for what they did.

Re:Ooozing sympathy ... (1)

RockDoctor (15477) | more than 4 years ago | (#29598743)

which means morons that build in the river plains and river beds as in Istambul should be held accountable for what they did.

Some degree of culpability - quite a lot - attaches to the morons who do not do due diligence before buying (or leasing) premises. Of course, if more of the morons refused to buy such shit, then fewer people would try such scams, because they'd know they might get stuck with an unsalable lemon ...
Oh, who're we trying to kid? Idiots will continue to lose large amounts of money and occasionally large numbers of lives by not doing due diligence. Let's just hope that they kill themselves or their offspring before the next generation gets inseminated. It's less cruel in the long run.

Re:Ooozing sympathy ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29599375)

A few years back in Prague there was a flood that hit the old city for the first time in many, many centuries.

What had happened is that people had built in the hills, and by causing erosion and deforestation they made the risks of flash-floods higher in the valleys, because there was no vegetation to slow the runnoff.

Don't jump to conclusions...

Boring... (1)

triso (67491) | about 5 years ago | (#29455377)

Man, that was boring. No sea-monsters attacking unsuspecting techs and no tidal waves toppling racks of computers. I think there should be something to balance the ax-murder scene. Don't you?

Interesting to know Elbonia exists (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29514301)

It's now true I saw it in the Internet

Re:Boring... (1)

masmullin (1479239) | more than 4 years ago | (#29554521)

Ohhh DUUUUDE, it would be so fucking awesome if there were sea monsters in that video.... OR SHARKS... that would be sweeeewweeeeeeettt!

Re:Boring... (1)

artg (24127) | more than 4 years ago | (#29572769)

There's a seal (a SEAL ?) swims though at 3:10 - 3:20. And Nessie's visible between 5:00 and 5:10.

don't worry (1)

distilate (1037896) | about 5 years ago | (#29462967)

Don't worry

Its standard procedure when dealing with 'lp0 printer on fire!' errors

Overflowed Toilet... (1)

realsilly (186931) | about 5 years ago | (#29470291)

Ok who dropped a cherry bomb in the toilet at the data center?

Re: (1)

clint999 (1277046) | about 5 years ago | (#29483983)

Don't worryIts standard procedure when dealing with 'lp0 printer on fire!' errors

Furniture (2, Funny)

kylben (1008989) | more than 4 years ago | (#29487315)

Ikea office furniture floats. Noted for future reference.

Re:Furniture (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29523163)

Wood chips, some glue, lots of air, coated with a thin layer of plastic. A cookie floats. Would you build a life raft out of cookies?

Re:Furniture (1)

Spazztastic (814296) | more than 4 years ago | (#29593077)

Wood chips, some glue, lots of air, coated with a thin layer of plastic. A cookie floats. Would you build a life raft out of cookies?

That sounds like a delicious raft.

So close, yet so far (1)

Aereus (1042228) | more than 4 years ago | (#29488839)

I think the funniest part of that video is at 5:25 where the cabinet falls over that the guy had tried putting things on top of earlier to save them...

Re:So close, yet so far (1)

name_already_taken (540581) | more than 4 years ago | (#29520145)

I think the funniest part of that video is at 5:25 where the cabinet falls over that the guy had tried putting things on top of earlier to save them...

I started laughing when he was trying to save the contents of what looks like a cash drawer, but ends up dumping the thing over in the water. It just needed the yackety sax music from Benny Hill dubbing over it.

Re: (1)

clint999 (1277046) | more than 4 years ago | (#29489701)

I beg to differ on the current. If you look at the buildup of the water on the door and window supports, it looks like there's at least half a foot of pileup due to water velocity. There are some pulsating waves so you know it's not just head difference between inside and outside. That water appears to be moving a couple of feet per second, especially after the breakthroughs. It's not a seeping flood, they're getting real velocity.I don't think I've ever heard of flood water velocity as a measure of dis

Oops! (1)

clint999 (1277046) | more than 4 years ago | (#29496097)

I largely agree. When we moved to Texas, my wife wanted a house by a creek. Everything we looked at was built above the flood line, but by quick inspection I could see which houses were going to be undermined by repeated flooding of their creeks. (For some houses the "upper" backyards were already peeling away.)Once we moved into a place (with a very solid retaining wall just where it needs to be) I had to convince my wife that we shouldn't put in benches or swing sets in the "lower" back yard. She thou

Electrical!? (1)

maxrate (886773) | more than 4 years ago | (#29522889)

Anyone catch 8:10? The cabinet in the lower-left corner glows blue for a moment! - maybe something out of the cameras direct field of vision, something electrical, just "popped"? !!?

The location is... (1)

SEWilco (27983) | more than 4 years ago | (#29530251)

The location is probably Google Maps: Vodaphone Ikitelli Istanbul Turkey [google.com] . A news report [hurriyetdailynews.com] says the Ikitelli district was flooded and Vodaphone was affected. Similarly, in Google Earth searching for "Vodaphone Turkey Ikitelli" takes you to that location, next to the 34-25 highway...with the right options turned on you'll see an "i" icon labeled Vodaphone.

Move the cursor around the highway's region and watch the altitude info in Google Earth and you'll see the highway is a low point. The flood followed the highway. The highway goes past an area 1.5 miles northeast where three 100-foot-deep ravines join into one, feeding a lake which usually has one small outlet that flows toward the highway. This five-foot-wide creek vanishes into a culvert under the highway. The highway was built over the stream which drains the region.

What you see outside the building is not rising backwater. You're seeing the river flowing through their parking lot.

Re:The location is... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29565055)

Move the cursor around the highway's region and watch the altitude info in Google Earth and you'll see the highway is a low point. The flood followed the highway. The highway goes past an area 1.5 miles northeast where three 100-foot-deep ravines join into one, feeding a lake which usually has one small outlet that flows toward the highway. This five-foot-wide creek vanishes into a culvert under the highway. The highway was built over the stream which drains the region.

What you see outside the building is not rising backwater. You're seeing the river flowing through their parking lot.

Wait, the highway is a low point and it's near the only outlet to a lake? I think the turks are doing it wrong...

Re:The location is... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29565395)

They're not used to heavy rain. Drainage system in Istanbul is pretty bad to start with, when you combine bad drainage and amount of rain not seen since... well... nothing like this on record, this is what you get. There are some videos of buses under water and people scrambling for their lives. Around 40 died.
Interestingly, few km to the east it was just a drizzle. I was unaware what was happening because I don't watch news (all news channels are in Turkish and I don't speak it).

Electrical!? (1)

clint999 (1277046) | more than 4 years ago | (#29535815)

It is not exactly rocket surgery, is it? Or even "brain science".

Day-um!! (1)

DaMattster (977781) | more than 4 years ago | (#29548809)

That's a bad day for Vodafone. I wouldn't want to see the millions in damage that little incident caused

Re:Day-um!! (1)

Jared555 (874152) | more than 4 years ago | (#29561631)

I wouldn't mind seeing it. Just not paying the bill. Also, if it is anything like the US they just made it on a 'do not insure' list...

DNS Error..... (1)

IHC Navistar (967161) | more than 4 years ago | (#29560061)

Error "GOD": Server Under Water.

Water + Electricity = (1)

Dynamoo (527749) | more than 4 years ago | (#29577613)

Water + Electricity = Death. Try to remember that if you ever find yourself in a similar situation!

Re:Water + Electricity = (1)

egcagrac0 (1410377) | more than 4 years ago | (#29582769)

Yeah. And CRTs have high voltages involved (30kV-ish). LCD's with certain types of backlights do, too (but less high - 1kV-ish).

Re:Water + Electricity = (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29600617)

but less high

Lower?

The location is... (1)

clint999 (1277046) | more than 4 years ago | (#29582801)

Yet the news would always make a big deal about it washing away a bunch of trailer homes that were stupidly placed right on the bank of the river.

Oops! (1)

clint999 (1277046) | more than 4 years ago | (#29591793)

Aside from political bickering between municipality officers and all related offices, that area IS IN a valley. Albeit it is not a deep one and it is higher than most of surrounding area, valleys are by definition prune to be flooded.

LOL (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29602961)

LOL

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