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Planck Satellite Releases First Images

CmdrTaco posted more than 5 years ago | from the i-can-see-my-house-from-here dept.

Space 59

davecl writes "The Planck Satellite has released its first images. These are from the 'First Look Survey' and show a strip of the sky scanned at a range of radio and submillimetre wavelengths. The results are already better than what was seen by the previous microwave background satellite, WMAP. More details and images available in English and French. The Planck Mission Blog contains more details of the project and continuing coverage. I maintain the mission blog but even I am impressed with these first images!"

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W00T! (-1, Offtopic)

PvtVoid (1252388) | more than 5 years ago | (#29452901)

Fucking excellent.

Re:W00T! (2, Funny)

Thanshin (1188877) | more than 5 years ago | (#29452985)

Fucking excellent.

stds, not so good.

Re:W00T! (3, Funny)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 5 years ago | (#29453019)

I don't even know what I'm looking at. It looks like something I could have made with my Commodore Amiga.

English and French Images (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29453111)

I don't even know what I'm looking at.

Were you accidentally looking at the French images? Try the English ones and see if that helps.

Re:W00T! (0, Flamebait)

MancunianMaskMan (701642) | more than 5 years ago | (#29453837)

This is really interesting research, way to go space scientists. We learn about the universe, its origin and destiny. Interesting question.

Money well spent compared to someone trying to shoot a dude/dudette to Mars just for the hell of it, and come up with a viable research question they may answer in the process as an afterthought.

Manned spaceflight is dick swinging.

Re:W00T! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29454877)

This is really interesting research, way to go space scientists. We learn about the universe, its origin and destiny. Interesting question.

Money well spent compared to someone trying to shoot a dude/dudette to Mars just for the hell of it, and come up with a viable research question they may answer in the process as an afterthought.

Manned spaceflight is dick swinging.

That would explain why you haven't figured out the difference between your dick and your head.

Re:W00T! (1)

node 3 (115640) | more than 5 years ago | (#29458973)

Manned spaceflight

Manned exploration. People opposed to exploration seem like they must be among the most uninteresting people imaginable.

Apropos, some people decry space science, because it won't tell us anything about things here on Earth (which is not entirely true, but true enough in the way they mean it). Some people explore space through a telescope, some from the tip of a rocket.

It's rather hypocritical to applaud one form of exploration, but deride the other. They're both important human endeavors.

Re:W00T! (1)

Gilmoure (18428) | more than 5 years ago | (#29460177)

Wouldn't it be easier to send eggs and sperm to Mars and then have them combine and incubate there?

Amiga created the universe??? (1)

syousef (465911) | more than 5 years ago | (#29458869)

I don't even know what I'm looking at. It looks like something I could have made with my Commodore Amiga.

I've heard ridiculous claims from Amiga fans before, but are you actually claiming that an Amiga can be used to create the universe?

Extra ! (1)

Fred_A (10934) | more than 5 years ago | (#29453047)

Breaking news !

The universe is green with blotches of red !
Details to follow !

Re:W00T! (1)

Afforess (1310263) | more than 5 years ago | (#29453437)

Oh my god, It's full of stars!

I've been Waiting For This (3, Interesting)

BeardedChimp (1416531) | more than 5 years ago | (#29452903)

I was involved for a while with a project within Manchester university where they were looking to map some of the cmb on the cheap using students/postgrads and a few Professors combined with some off the shelf tech.

To cut down on costs we were going to use the receivers from sky's satellite dishes since theres millions of the things, combined with a form of interference.
My job was supposed to be (until I suddenly was swamped with other responsibilities and had to leave the project) to write the code that would create montecarlo simulations of the project.
Was a while ago since I left I wonder how they have gotten on with it now.

"images available in English and French" (-1, Offtopic)

AmigaHeretic (991368) | more than 5 years ago | (#29452945)

...I always knew those French saw things differently!! By different I mean wrong!!

French Soldier: Un cadeau.
Other French soldiers: A what?
French Soldier: A present.
Other French soldiers: Oh. Un cadeau.
Other French soldiers: Oui oui.
French Soldier: Allons y!
Other French soldiers: What?
French Soldier: Let's go!
Other French soldiers: Oh.

Frenchman: You don't frighten us, English pig-dogs! Go and boil your bottoms, sons of a silly person! I blow my nose at you, so-called Ah-thoor Keeng, you and all your silly English K-n-n-n-n-n-n-n-niggits!
Sir Galahad: What a strange person.
King Arthur: Now, look here, my good man--
Frenchman: I don't want to talk to you no more, you empty-headed animal food trough water! I fart in your general direction! Your mother was a hamster and your father smelt of elderberries!

Frenchman:No, now go away or I shall taunt you a second time-a!
Frenchman:: (Fetchez la vache.) wha?
Frenchman:: (Fetchez la vache!) [moo]
King Arthur: If you do not agree to my commands, then I shall--
[twong]
[mooooooo]
Jesus Christ!
Right! Charge!

Re:"images available in English and French" (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29453215)

Ah yes, karma whoring with nothing more than a stock quote from Monty Python. A prime example of the failure of slashdot.

Re:"images available in English and French" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29453819)

Being moderated funny does not increase your karma. It only serves to help people to find comments that they might find funny.

Re:"images available in English and French" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29453969)

Ah yes, karma whoring with nothing more than a stock quote from Monty Python. A prime example of the failure of slashdot.

Are you French?

Re:"images available in English and French" (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29453337)

Franchement débile. I have no praise for your english reading skills...

More details and images available in English and French.

Mais il est vrai qu'après tout, c'est Slashdot.

Re:"images available in English and French" (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29453413)

During one of the wars that the French fought against the British, the French just happened to capture a British Major.

An officer brought the Major to the French General for interrogation.

The French General began ridiculing the Major for wearing "that stupid red tunic."

The French General said,
"Why to you wear that red uniform, it makes it easy for us to shoot you."

The British major replied,
"If I do get wounded, the blood will not show, and my soldiers will not get scared."

The French general said,
"That is a very good idea,"

The French General then turned to his orderly and said,
"From now on all French officers will wear brown pants."

From TFA (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29453001)

The detectors are looking for variations in the temperature of the Cosmic Microwave Background that are about a million times smaller than one degree â" this is comparable to measuring from Earth the body heat of a rabbit sitting on the Moon.

The body heat of a rabbit sitting on the moon? Interesting example.

Re:From TFA (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 5 years ago | (#29453213)

... Sitting on the moon during the day or sitting on the moon during the night?

Doesn't the temperature change from freezing the rabbit to frying the rabbit?

Re:From TFA (2, Informative)

jshackney (99735) | more than 5 years ago | (#29453217)

Perhaps a badger would be better.

Re:From TFA (1)

MadKeithV (102058) | more than 5 years ago | (#29453679)

Where? Behind the bunny?

Re:From TFA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29453499)

The detectors are looking for variations in the temperature of the Cosmic Microwave Background that are about a million times smaller than one degree â" this is comparable to measuring from Earth the body heat of a rabbit sitting on the Moon.

The body heat of a rabbit sitting on the moon? Interesting example.

Two temps...freeze dried and extra crispy...

Re:From TFA (1)

MadKeithV (102058) | more than 5 years ago | (#29453653)

Would that be an african, or a european rabbit?

Re:From TFA (1)

steelfood (895457) | more than 5 years ago | (#29453901)

Wouldn't it be the other way; find the rabbit on Earth by body heat from the moon?

Re:From TFA (1)

avandesande (143899) | more than 5 years ago | (#29453965)

From what distance could you detect a burning library of congress-

Re:From TFA (1)

Gilmoure (18428) | more than 5 years ago | (#29460245)

How many flaming moon bunnies = 1 burning LoC?

Re:From TFA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29454549)

That was an interesting example back in July [slashdot.org] .

Re:From TFA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29460553)

The rabbit is in the moon. Check Chinese mythology.

Re:From TFA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29461665)

The temperature of a rabbit on the moon is the same as the rest of the moon, since it died from a lack of air.

Re:From TFA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29462815)

if only King Arthur had had that technology.

Re:From TFA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29463827)

African or Indian?

Well worth it (1)

Raineer (1002750) | more than 5 years ago | (#29453049)

Very nice resolution. I can't wait to see further output from the project.

Am I hopelessly geeky... (3, Funny)

russotto (537200) | more than 5 years ago | (#29453359)

...if my first thought was "Planck? That's an awfully small satellite."

Re:Am I hopelessly geeky... (1)

Chemisor (97276) | more than 5 years ago | (#29453713)

With NASA's budget the way it is, that's all we could afford...

Re:Am I hopelessly geeky... (2, Informative)

davecl (233127) | more than 5 years ago | (#29453933)

Planck is actually an ESA mission, not NASA. Though our US colleagues have made significant contributions the bulk of the funding, the launch etc. has come from Europe.

I wish they'd post a bit of the sky from both... (3, Interesting)

Thagg (9904) | more than 5 years ago | (#29453577)

I am very curious to see Planck's resolution compared to the W-MAP. Just zoom into a bit of the map, and show them side by side, that's all I ask! They do have some nice zooms of the map on the french-language site, and I suppose if I wasn't so lazy I could find the corresponding sections in the W-MAP output. I know that Planck can detect the polarization of the CMB, I'm just dying to see what that will show us!

I've read several times that while Planck has many times the resolution and sensitivity of the W-MAP probe, there's really no more information to be gained beyond Planck. It will give us almost every bit of information that the cosmic background radiation has for us. It's kind of amazing, really.

Re:I wish they'd post a bit of the sky from both.. (3, Informative)

davecl (233127) | more than 5 years ago | (#29453985)

There's a lot more to do beyond Planck on polarization, but you're right that primary intensity anisotropies in the CMB will essentially be done by Planck. There are lots of secondary anisotropies, such as the SZ-Effect, on smaller scales to be done at higher resolution, though, and instruments like the SPT [uchicago.edu] are doing exactly that.

Re:I wish they'd post a bit of the sky from both.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29456687)

One such polarization experiment is EBEX [umn.edu] . This experiment seeks to map the CMB polarization from a balloon-borne telescope.

Re:I wish they'd post a bit of the sky from both.. (1)

PvtVoid (1252388) | more than 5 years ago | (#29454475)

I am very curious to see Planck's resolution compared to the W-MAP. Just zoom into a bit of the map, and show them side by side, that's all I ask!

Here you go. [lbl.gov] (The Planck data in this picture is simulated.)

Re:I wish they'd post a bit of the sky from both.. (1)

Ann Coulter (614889) | more than 5 years ago | (#29457705)

Here is a high resolution image from the article: http://www.esa.int/images/FIRST_LIGHT_SURVEY.jpg [esa.int]
Here is a high resolution image from the WMAP data: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e2/WMAP_2008_94GHz.png [wikimedia.org]

Enjoy.

Re:I wish they'd post a bit of the sky from both.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29458859)

i wish they could see the other side of the bubble.because seriously infinty goes forever therefore even something as large as our universe is a minor speck in a bigger something.

anyone notice the red patch on extreme left (1)

delete2kill (1449861) | more than 5 years ago | (#29453699)

emission from the Cosmic Microwave Background is pretty hot on the extreme left of the scan wonder what it may be ?? any idea

Re:anyone notice the red patch on extreme left (1)

Chris Burke (6130) | more than 5 years ago | (#29453909)

If you're talking about the image that shows the strip of sky Plank observed superimposed on a visible light picture, then that's the Milky Way.

If you're talking about the other images, then I'm not sure which patch we're talking about, since there's a number of bright-ish patches.

Re:anyone notice the red patch on extreme left (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29456257)

planck satellite image bottom left

Re:anyone notice the red patch on extreme left (1)

Chris Burke (6130) | more than 5 years ago | (#29457989)

No idea what that is... but you can see other similarly bright spots outside of the milky way, so whatever it is probably not unusual? Another galaxy maybe?

English and French (1)

sconeu (64226) | more than 5 years ago | (#29453921)

More details and images available in English and French.

What's the difference between an English image and a French image?

Re:English and French (2, Funny)

Chris Burke (6130) | more than 5 years ago | (#29454027)

What's the difference between an English image and a French image?

The French images are red-shifted.

Re:English and French (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29457545)

No they're wine-shifted.

Re:English and French (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29463849)

What's the difference between an English image and a French image?

The French images are red-shifted.

Actually, they are Sacre-bleu-shifted.

Plancks Scan Pattern Is Bad? (1)

llZENll (545605) | more than 5 years ago | (#29454059)

I was left wondering about the scan pattern shown in the animation "Planck scanning the sky". I have no idea if it matches what the satellite actually does, but if it does then it seems they would gain a much better image at 'the center of the galaxy' by altering the axis of the scan pattern so the 'poles' of the scan point to it. In the animation the scanning 'poles' are currently aimed at the the section in the galaxy with the least information (the very top and bottom of the light survey image), and it seems to me that the poles are where the satellite would have the best resolution (because it passes over the poles during its scan many times and then you could calculate a very high resolution scan from all of these passes for the circular section of overlap).

Therefor wouldn't it be better to alter the scan axis by 90 degrees so the poles of the scan point toward the center of the galaxy? Perhaps this doesn't matter as they are going to do passes until the end of time and refine the resolution, but the poles would still have many times the resolution of the rest of the scans.

Re:Plancks Scan Pattern Is Bad? (3, Informative)

davecl (233127) | more than 5 years ago | (#29454453)

The poles of the scan are actually the ecliptic poles, perpendicular to the plane of the planets within the solar system. This is set by the fact that Planck rotates with it's bottom pointing towards the line that joins the earth and the sun from it's position at the second Lagrange point. This ensures that earth and sunlight never impinge on it's sensitive detectors and helps to keep the whole instrument as cold as possible. The scan geometry is thus quite tightly restricted by these requirements and, as you say, the deepest fields will be at the ecliptic poles.

We actually don't want to study the centre of the galaxy with Planck as the galaxy is the major foreground contaminant to the CMB data. Fortunately the eclptic poles aren't aligned wiht the centre of the galaxy.

Yo Planck scientists! (1)

ZarathustraDK (1291688) | more than 5 years ago | (#29455285)

Your red-bluish widdle-waddle is important to science, I know, but that bitchin' hires-photo of our galaxy that you pair it with would make a nice skybox for compiz-fusion...wink-wing...nudge-nudge...y'know what I mean?

Image*s*??? (2, Funny)

3waygeek (58990) | more than 5 years ago | (#29455629)

I'd expect the Planck satellite to provide just one very small constant image.

I hope it helps disprove the Big Bang theory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29456911)

Very impressive. I hope that this satellite finally helps to prove that the Big Bang is a bogus theory full of fudge factors and that the universe is actually much older and much larger than we had ever imagined. Accomplishing that could have profound implications on understanding the origin of life itself.

Re:I hope it helps disprove the Big Bang theory (1)

Gerafix (1028986) | more than 5 years ago | (#29457691)

Yeah that would be great if the Big Bang had anything to do with the origin of life at all. You should try actually reading it sometime. Protip - what you're looking for is abiogenesis.

Re:I hope it helps disprove the Big Bang theory (1)

Chris Burke (6130) | more than 5 years ago | (#29458071)

Protip - what you're looking for is abiogenesis.

Yeah, I'm not sure he's "looking" for anything outside his own navel. :)

I do always love it when someone has a problem with existing theory because of "fudge factors" that help the theory fit experimental evidence, and their replacement is some ill-formed philosophy that is, essentially, one giant fudge factor with no experimental evidence or connection to reality. Because that's good science.

Hint to crackpots: Science, and especially physics, is prone to massive upheavals and revolutions. In every case, though, these upheavals come from people who are fully versed in the existing theory, and understand both its weakness and its extremely well verified successes. Since this doesn't describe you, you probably aren't the revolutionary you think you are.

Re:I hope it helps disprove the Big Bang theory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#29461447)

Actually there is a lot to this. If the universe is Googolplexs as opposed to billions of years old, then it substantially increases the odds of that life could have started elsewhere and evolved over a much longer period time giving it LOT more time to spread throughout the universe reaching Earth as well as other planets. (Spores in meteorites etc..)

The Big Bang is just religion masquerading as science and is full of holes. Refering to those who disagree with it as "crackpots" is making the same mistake that you are accusing the so called "crackpots" of making.

Re:I hope it helps disprove the Big Bang theory (1)

Chris Burke (6130) | more than 5 years ago | (#29462297)

If the universe is Googolplexs as opposed to billions of years old, it substantially increases the odds of that life could have started elsewhere and evolved over a much longer period time giving it LOT more time to spread throughout the universe reaching Earth as well as other planets. (Spores in meteorites etc..)

Panspermia is a possible origin for life on earth in either case. Sure, a ridiculously ancient universe means panspermia could have happened over larger areas, but why is that so significant? It's not like there's a lot of evidence that such a long time span is required for life to have arose and (if it didn't arise here) reach earth. We have no idea how common life is; it may have only had to travel a short distance. We've only just begun to be able to see exoplanets and we've already found hundreds, and found nearby earth-mass planets basically as soon as it was feasible for us to do so. And the universe as currently estimated is still pretty old, plenty of time for life to have crossed most of the galaxy. So what about abiogenesis is pointing to a ridiculously old universe?

The Big Bang is just religion masquerading as science and is full of holes. Refering to those who disagree with it as "crackpots" is making the same mistake that you are accusing the so called "crackpots" of making.

None of the actual educated and accomplished physicists -- i.e. the kind of person who every revolutionary in the history of physics was, and you crackpots aren't -- who disagree with the Big Bang theory think the Big Bang theory is "just religion". They know it's a valid scientific theory that yes has holes, but also has a lot of evidence, meaning experimentally verified predictions. They have their own well-crafted cosmologies that they prefer. But because these alternative cosmologies are well-crafted and based on an understanding of the evidence out there, they make many of the same predictions, they have their own holes and potential problems, and they can't yet experimentally test for the differences to definitively prove their version is right.

It's actually an exciting time in physics and cosmology. We know existing theories are flawed and need modification or replacement -- putting out to pasture the idea that it's "religion" -- but theoretical attempts to fix the problem are ahead of our ability to engineer devices to test them. But such devices are coming soon, and we'll be putting our theories to the test. Just like religion? Yeah, right.

There are competent physicists who disagree with the Big Bang theory, and then there are crackpots who claim it's all "religion" and in doing so prove their lack of understanding. Don't worry, I'm not the one making the mistake of conflating these two groups. Oh but just to make sure, please do tell me about your fantastic alternate cosmological theory, and how it's verifiably correct while big bang theory isn't. Lemme guess... plasmas and currents?

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