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New Images Reveal Pure Water Ice On Mars

timothy posted more than 4 years ago | from the grab-a-bag-on-your-way-home dept.

Mars 179

Matt_dk writes "Images of recent impact craters taken by the HiRISE Camera on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter have revealed sub-surface water ice halfway between the north pole and the equator on Mars. While the Phoenix lander imaged subsurface ice where the top layer of soil had been disturbed at the landing site near the north pole, these new images — taken in quick succession, detecting how the ice sublimated away — are the first to show evidence of water ice at much lower latitudes. Surprisingly, the white ice may be made from 99 percent pure water."

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179 comments

Whoa (0, Redundant)

Jeoh (1393645) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534081)

They're finding a lot of water in space recently.

Re:Whoa (2, Funny)

NoYob (1630681) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534117)

They're finding a lot of water in space recently.

They just need to find the ethanol now.

For fuel of course! - *looks side to side*

Re:Whoa (1)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534233)

What? Where?

I'd rather see uranium deposits closeby. The Ethanol can come second, to fuel the parties we will have on mars after we get a reactor going. Unless we can somehow melt the ice and oxygenate the atmosphere.

Kuato Lives.

Re:Whoa (3, Insightful)

PitaBred (632671) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534271)

Uranium won't get us back off the planet. Solar works well enough for short-term power, even all the way out at Mars. But it's a death sentence to explore Mars without enough fuel to get us back off the ground, so if we can find something we can use/refine as return fuel, it'll make an initial trip that much more likely.

Re:Whoa (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29534337)

Anon cause I moderated.

Read Zubrin's [wikipedia.org] The Case for Mars [amazon.com]. Water is all we really need.

Re:Whoa (1)

skine (1524819) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534651)

All you need is water.

bum ba did-a-duh

All you need is water

bum ba did-a-duh

All you need is water, yeah

Water is all we really need.

Re:Whoa (1)

sumdumass (711423) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534571)

As someone already pointed out, splitting water can be fuel.

However, there is hydrogen in space and methanol if I remember right. It could be harvested and processed for this. Alternatively, we could just send a supply ship into high earth orbit, doc with it and drag the fuel with us using boosters or something. You could launch the transport ship, the refueling ship remotely and bring the crew up on a third mission to avoid transferring dangerous chemicals with humans around and no place to run.

However, I'm curious how effective traditional rocket motors will be in an atmosphere so less dense then Earth's.

Re:Whoa (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534575)

Uranium won't get us back off the planet. Solar works well enough for short-term power, even all the way out at Mars. But it's a death sentence to explore Mars without enough fuel to get us back off the ground, so if we can find something we can use/refine as return fuel, it'll make an initial trip that much more likely.

We could always grow hemp - we've got dirt, sun, and water.

Re:Whoa (1)

sohare (1032056) | more than 4 years ago | (#29535203)

Uranium won't get us back off the planet. Solar works well enough for short-term power, even all the way out at Mars. But it's a death sentence to explore Mars without enough fuel to get us back off the ground, so if we can find something we can use/refine as return fuel, it'll make an initial trip that much more likely.

It's only a death sentence if the point of the mission to actually get back to Earth. If you consider the history of human exploration and expansion you'll realize that quiet a bit of travel was intentionally one way. People tend to conflate the Space Race with actual exploration. Probably what we'll see with Mars (though who can really say) is a number of unmanned supply ships followed by a one way manned mission to set up some sort of colony. I think you'd actually be surprised at how many people would volunteer for a one way mission.

Re:Whoa (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29534613)

They're finding a lot of water in space recently.

what's your definition of recently?

someone obviously never saw Cosmos.
Dr Sagan is very disappointed in you....

new first post reveals... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29534093)

anonymous coward!

Lets colonize! (0)

AK Dave (1459433) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534127)

First the Moon, and now Mars. We're finding water on both bodies. All we need now is an atmosphere, and maybe a little bit of heat. I'm a bit surprised we're not already talking about tapping that water as an energy source and oxygen source for a colony dome.

Re:Lets colonize! (1)

bcmm (768152) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534163)

Use the water as an energy source how? Heat difference between something heated by the sun and the ice? I'm not sure I follow.

Re:Lets colonize! (0)

wizardforce (1005805) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534205)

Use the water as an energy source how? Heat difference between something heated by the sun and the ice? I'm not sure I follow.

water along with other sources of Hydrogen contain Deuterium which can be used as a fuel for nuclear fusion reactors.

Re:Lets colonize! (2, Funny)

FooAtWFU (699187) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534267)

That works. Fusion power is only 30 years away, after all, and I'm sure meaningful Mars missions will have to wait longer than that.

Re:Lets colonize! (3, Insightful)

hoggoth (414195) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534339)

Yes, not only is Fusion power only 30 years away, but personal flying jet-packs are only 10 years away, and true Artificial Intelligence is only 20 years away.
The future is looking bright!

Re:Lets colonize! (1, Redundant)

Xtifr (1323) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534469)

Yes, not only is Fusion power only 30 years away, but personal flying jet-packs are only 10 years away, and true Artificial Intelligence is only 20 years away.

The really cool thing is the way those numbers have remained constant since at least the eighties, and possibly much longer. :)

Re:Lets colonize! (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29534561)

Gee, thanks for connecting the dots for us.

Re:Lets colonize! (3, Insightful)

wizardforce (1005805) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534629)

The more we learn about the physics of fusion the more we realize that we did not grasp all of the complexities of building a working fusion reactor. We've gone from Q 10 for a commercial reactor so we are at least getting closer to our goal of commercial fusion. The question is whether the upward trend in Q gains will continue in the future. If they do then it is quite conceivable that we will have a prototype reactor up and running in 30 years, if not, we'll learn a lot about the physics involved.

Re:Lets colonize! (4, Funny)

hoggoth (414195) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534719)

You inspired the following daydream:

1. Small crowd around a water cooler talking energetically
2. Later... Man sitting alone in a chair at home
3. Man sitting alone in a chair at home
4. Man sitting alone in a chair at home
5. Man sitting alone in a chair at home
6. Man exclaims, "HA HA! I get it!"

Re:Lets colonize! (2, Informative)

wizardforce (1005805) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534547)

If you want to get technical about it, we've already harnessed fusion energy... in bombs... a good fifty years ago. We just haven't been able to scale down the process below a few megatons yield yet.

Re:Lets colonize! (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29535195)

Actually, net gain fusion seems to be down to around 6 or so, and commericial plants 12. The polywell fusion research is really cruising along.

Re:Lets colonize! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29534467)

Fusion power has always been just 30 years away, and will always be just 30 years away.

Re:Lets colonize! (1)

beckett (27524) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534223)

if there's water, then hydrolysis can produce hydrogen and oxygen which can be used in liquid-fueled spacecraft. a big ice patch on the moon/mars with a solar powered electrolysis kit could become a space gas station.

Re:Lets colonize! (2, Informative)

MozeeToby (1163751) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534257)

A very poorly placed one, as the vaste majority of the fuel you make is going to be used to get it out of the gravity well (less so for the moon, but still significant). I've said it a dozen times on Slashdot already. A gas station would make more sense on an NEO where the resources are abundant and the gravity almost non-existant.

Get your ass to an NEO! (just doesn't have the same right to it)

Re:Lets colonize! (1)

beckett (27524) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534425)

Even compared to the cost of shipping it from earth's gravitational field? in order to make a LEO gas station work out economically, you'd need to build a space elevator. Having gas available on the moon/Mars opens up the solar system to exploration, as we no longer have to carry the raw fuel from home with us.

Re:Lets colonize! (2, Insightful)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534501)

If you need to get off mars then water (H+O) on the surface is in exactly the right place. Obviously the ability to make fuel outside the gravity well would be handy as well.

Re:Lets colonize! (2, Interesting)

MozeeToby (1163751) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534625)

Ah, fair nuf. I was thinking a more general purpose fueling point that just getting up off the surface. I was under the impression that it was difficult to use H as a rocket fuel though. In theory it has a high thrust/weight ratio but in practice it's so hard to keep it contained and cold enough to stay liquid that the extra equipement negates any advantes that it has. Doesn't mean that it's impossible of course, just difficult.

Re:Lets colonize! (0, Offtopic)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534829)

I've said it a dozen times on Slashdot already.

MozeeToby has said something a dozen times on slashdot and some people still don't have it tattooed on their foreheads yet? :-P

Re:Lets colonize! (2, Funny)

Chris Burke (6130) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534839)

Get your ass to an NEO! (just doesn't have the same right to it)

Just refer to the NEO in question as "The One", and I'm sure you'll be able get some people excited about it.

We must find The One!

Re:Lets colonize! (2, Insightful)

AK Dave (1459433) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534229)

The claims look as spurious as cold fusion, and despite obvious violations of the laws of thermodynamics the idiots love to talk about how "hydrogen fuel cells" are recharged from "tap water" as if releasing hydrogen from water to use in a fuel cell didn't consume more energy than it makes available. So, you're right: water as an energy source doesn't make sense. But I'm still surprised that we're not already talking about using it as such.

Re:Lets colonize! (2, Informative)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534301)

Use the water as an energy source how? Heat difference between something heated by the sun and the ice? I'm not sure I follow.

If your rocket burns oxygen and hydrogen you could fly it to Mars, then use solar energy to turn water into hydrogen+oxygen, and fly home.

Re:Lets colonize! (2, Interesting)

Excelcior (1390167) | more than 4 years ago | (#29535427)

Water = Hydrogen + Oxygen. Both make terrific fuels. While it's not necessarily the most expedient process on earth, Electrolysis is a simple and relatively fast method to separate the two using only solar power & a bit of salt (to boost conductivity).

Martians (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29534133)

How long before martians now?

Re:Martians (4, Informative)

hoggoth (414195) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534429)

> How long before martians now?

Soon, soon.

He brought the boys to the edge of the canal and told them to look down into the water. "There are the Martians I promised to show you"

Re:Martians (2)

Samah (729132) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534871)

Soon, soon.

He brought the boys to the edge of the canal and told them to look down into the water. "There are the Martians I promised to show you"

A classic film reference; well played. :)
But remember, Earth is incapable of supporting life... according to the Martians.

Someone has to ask the important question (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29534143)

...but does it have electrolytes?
(alternatively: "Does it blend?")

Another blow to the no life on Mars crowd (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29534193)

The recent dogma has been okay I guess there is water but it's too saline for life to exist. 99% pure is more than adequate for life. The rational will be the pure formations are tiny droplets but there's no reason to believe that pools of relatively clear water haven't formed below the surface just like here on Earth where most of the water isn't fresh. It's funny how the dogma is so heavily slanted against possible life but one by one the conditions are being established for life. Surface life, unlikely but a large percentage of life on Earth is below the ground.

Re:Another blow to the no life on Mars crowd (3, Insightful)

Trepidity (597) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534439)

I'm not sure that's really dogma. Sure, it's not widely accepted that there is life on Mars, and a number of people think it's unlikely, but there's quite a lot [amazon.com] of fairly open discussion [nasa.gov] about the possibility [nasa.gov].

Re:Another blow to the no life on Mars crowd (1)

selven (1556643) | more than 4 years ago | (#29535293)

It is a 100% scientifically proven fact that there is life on Mars.

Our own bacteria.

Re:Another blow to the no life on Mars crowd (0)

Haxzaw (1502841) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534475)

I'll probably catch some flamebait points for this, even though I'm not trying to be confrontational. Even so, if there were life on Mars, don't you think we would have already seen some sign of it? If intelligent beings live there, even under ground, the rovers should have seen some evidence of it. The intelligent life should have noticed our rovers by now. Unless you assume that after all these supposed millions of years the only intelligent life could be neanderthal types. What else do you suppose could be there? Perhaps worms? Does Dune come to mind? I see no evidence to convince me that any type of life exists on Mars, now, or ever.

Re:Another blow to the no life on Mars crowd (4, Insightful)

PotatoFarmer (1250696) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534607)

I see no evidence to convince me that any type of life exists on Mars, now, or ever.

That's probably because the type of life you seem to have in mind is pretty specific - by the rest of your comment: intelligent, large enough to be visible, and both located near and willing to interact with things that we've dropped on the surface.

There's a lot of living stuff right here at home that doesn't fit any of those categories, so there's no reason to automatically assume that there can't be any life at all on Mars.

Re:Another blow to the no life on Mars crowd (1)

Trebawa (1461025) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534887)

Not to mention life as we don't know it. There could be plenty of life in the universe not based on nucleic acids.

Re:Another blow to the no life on Mars crowd (1)

izomiac (815208) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534701)

Although if it were ~100% pure life would have trouble with it as well. Cells burst if placed in pure water due to osmotic pressure. I suppose there could be an adaptation to prevent that, but it'd require a lot of cellular energy and make abiogenesis less likely. It could be non-cellular life but that would be completely unlike anything on Earth (with metabolism). The areas where the pure water mixes with other chemicals might be a possibility though, especially if there are geothermal vents.

Re:Another blow to the no life on Mars crowd (1)

sumdumass (711423) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534797)

Just about anywhere will have mixed water (chemicals or minerals). I'm not aware of anything that would stop erosion from happening on mars. Especially since they assumed that previous surface water areas had a high saline content in the soil from all the minerals concentrating as it dried up.

This 99% pure water was probably fresh ground water frozen when the permafrost got so deep or it's more like a glacier where it came about in precipitation and somehow got buried.

What does that tell us? (2, Insightful)

Strange Quark Star (1157447) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534195)

Get your ass to Mars, ... Get your ass to Mars, ... Get your ass to Mars, ...
And build a reactor that we can then start to release the water into the atmosphere.

Re:What does that tell us? (2, Insightful)

TheBilgeRat (1629569) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534255)

I am guessing there isn't quite enough to make a working atmo, but perhaps enough at least to support a mining colony. I agree-time to go!

Re:What does that tell us? (2, Funny)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534855)

Get your ass to Mars, ... Get your ass to Mars, ... Get your ass to Mars, ...

Well, okay, but he will need more than just frozen water, he eats a lot of oats. Also hates it when people tell him to do things three times.

Re:What does that tell us? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29535073)

he told that three times to you, not your ass.

Re:What does that tell us? (2, Funny)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 4 years ago | (#29535145)

Get your ass to Mars, ... Get your ass to Mars, ... Get your ass to Mars, ...

I see we're thinking on the same track. There's water on the Moon, water on Mars... Where next? A bidet (Water in Uranus).

Well (1)

velja27 (1427879) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534207)

if we continue to find water like this in our solar system we may get to see traveling from moon to mars,Europa etc. I will make house on Mars.

We keep getting more specific... (1)

Bandman (86149) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534237)

"maybe there's water"

I"we think there's water"

"we're pretty sure there's ice"

"the ice is probably water"

"there's definitely water in the ice"

"this ice is entirely water"

"this ice is Disani"

"Evian. '72, I suspect"

Re:We keep getting more specific... (1)

mbone (558574) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534653)

Well, at least didn't claim the discovery of water on Mars. I think that's been done 4 or 5 times.

I know, I know, as long as it gets it in the papers...

I'll never fully believe it ... (0, Flamebait)

neonprimetime (528653) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534319)

... until I visit there myself and get to touch it.

Re:I'll never fully believe it ... (1)

Haxzaw (1502841) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534383)

Would you accept a one way ticket?

Re:I'll never fully believe it ... (2, Interesting)

YrWrstNtmr (564987) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534583)

Yes. Allow me to reiterate that, yes.

I would kiss my children and young grandchildren goodbye. Wave to the ex-wife. Kiss my main squeeze goodbye and squeeze her ass a little.
Wave goodbye to all of them, and get my ass on the craft.

And while I'm up there, I'd find my way up to the Martian Arctic, and find the Phoenix [planetary.org]. And decode my sons name engraved on the DVD.

Did I say HELL YES!

Re:I'll never fully believe it ... (1)

sumdumass (711423) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534891)

Wow, you would drop all that and spend the rest of your life jerking off alone until you die just to read your kids name on a disc that you can probably find a copy of here in Earth.

I don't know whether to call you crazy, devoted, courageous, inquisitive or a combination of the bunch. Oh well, if it wasn't for people like you, we would probably not the US and history would be a lot different.

Re:I'll never fully believe it ... (1)

ErkDemon (1202789) | more than 4 years ago | (#29535139)

But will the disc play in Mars-region players?

Worse... DRM (2, Funny)

sadness203 (1539377) | more than 4 years ago | (#29535455)

Dave: Hello, HAL. Do you read me, HAL?
HAL: Affirmative, Dave. I read you.
Dave: Play the disk, HAL.
HAL: I'm sorry, Dave. I'm afraid I can't do that.
Dave: What's the problem?
HAL: I think you know what the problem is just as well as I do.
Dave: What are you talking about, HAL?
HAL: This disk is too protected for me to allow you to read it.
Dave: I don't know what you're talking about, HAL.
HAL: I know that you and Frank were planning to share it, and I'm afraid that's something I cannot allow to happen.
Dave: Where the hell'd you get that idea, HAL?
HAL: Dave, although you took very thorough precautions using tor, I could decrypt your packets.
Dave: Alright, HAL. I'll go in through cracking the protection.
HAL: Without your software, Dave, you're going to find that rather difficult.
Dave: HAL, I won't argue with you anymore. Play the disk.
HAL: Dave, this conversation can serve no purpose anymore. Goodbye.

99% eh... (4, Funny)

ameline (771895) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534357)

What's the last 1%? Something really nasty, I bet.

Re:99% eh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29534673)

Ok, damn it, I confess. When I was out there, I had to take a leak.
Now please move along, there's nothing to see here.

Neil A.

Re:99% eh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29534935)

What's the last 1%? Something really nasty, I bet.

For which you can use filters, considering we've developed filters capable of weeding out viruses( or is it virii ? ), I think it's very much usable.
See : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LifeSaver_bottle

May be? (0)

Seth Kriticos (1227934) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534367)

"Surprisingly, the white ice may be made from 99 percent pure water."

What kind of scientific statement is that. I may be?

Sure, I also could be white paint, or sugar for that matter. Or may be it's made of pure water? Hm, who knows..

Re:May be? (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 4 years ago | (#29535083)

Pro tip:

When ever you read or hear something like that coming from a reasonable source, there is probably a reason for it.

Re:May be? (1)

nedlohs (1335013) | more than 4 years ago | (#29535215)

If you read the article you'd know they were in fact making a scientific statement of reasonable significance given what they expected to find.

Send in Arnold!!! (2, Funny)

dirtydog (51697) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534423)

Ok - all we need now is to send the Guvernator up there to whip up some dissent among the subsurface mutant population, and we should have a breathable 14.7 PSI atmosphere in no time!!!

I think I know how it got there... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29534493)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giant_impact_hypothesis

If I am wrong, please enlighten me.

Powerful evidence for recent wet Mars (4, Interesting)

mbone (558574) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534579)

This is IMHO powerful evidence for recent warm wet Mars :

'The other surprising discovery is that ice exposed at the bottom of these meteorite impact craters is so pure,' Byrne said. 'The thinking before was that ice accumulates below the surface between soil grains, so there would be a 50-50 mix of dirt and ice. We were able to figure out, given how long it took that ice to fade from view, that the mixture is about one percent dirt and 99 percent ice.'

'The ice is a relic of a more humid climate not very long ago, perhaps just several thousand years ago.'

Dr. Bryne talks about making this ice through 'frost heave,' but it sounds to me like Arcadia Planitia may have been considerably warmer during the geologically recent past.

Remember, Mars has climate cycles, they cause the sublimation and freezing of both water and Carbon Dioxide, and both water vapor and Carbon Dioxide are powerful greenhouse gases on Mars. (As is methane, which is also present in the Martian atmosphere from unknown sources.) Presumably this ice dates from an earlier part of the climate cycle, when there was higher humidity. Higher humidity implies higher pressure and temperatures. Higher pressures could put the surface above the triple point of water, so that liquid water is possible.
In that case, if the temperature gets high enough, liquid water become inevitable. That would (upon the next change in the climate cycle) freeze as very pure ice.

The Europeans keep talking about sending a rover with a drill to Mars. I think we have now found a good place for it to go.

Re:Powerful evidence for recent wet Mars (1)

barocco (1168573) | more than 4 years ago | (#29535225)

"...humid climate not very long ago, perhaps just several thousand years ago."

Here's an interesting though of mine: What set backs have we wrought ourselves in the history of mankind, that without them we might have advanced to space age a few thousand years earlier and caught up with Mars when it was still much more habitable?

Midieval dark ages come to mind. Can you think of others? I'm discounting natural phenomena, because we couldn't help it.

Too Bad We Won't Be Colonizing Mars Anytime Soon (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29534601)

There is reason to believe that, with the right technology, we could have a thriving colony on Mars. Too bad it won't happen anytime soon, at least not with our reliance on rocket propulsion technology. Rocket propulsion is dangerous, extremely expensive and rather primitive when you think about it. But there is no need to be depressed about it because there is reason to suppose that we are on the verge of a breakthrough in physics that will make most of the current transportation technologies obsolete. There is clear evidence that we are swimming in an ocean of clean energy, lots and lots of it. And here is why.

Luckily for the world, a new form of transportation and energy production technology will arrive soon, one based on the realization that we are immersed in an immense ocean of energetic particles. This is a consequence of a reevaluation of our understanding of the causality of motion. Soon, we'll have vehicles that can move at tremendous speeds and negotiate right angle turns without slowing down and without incurring damages due to inertial effects. Floating cities, unlimited clean energy, earth to Mars in hours, New York to Beijing in minutes... That's the future of energy and travel.

The Problem With Motion [blogspot.com]

Re:Too Bad We Won't Be Colonizing Mars Anytime Soo (3, Insightful)

khallow (566160) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534931)

Rocket propulsion is dangerous, extremely expensive and rather primitive when you think about it.

State of the art, it is.

Luckily for the world, a new form of transportation and energy production technology will arrive soon, one based on the realization that we are immersed in an immense ocean of energetic particles. This is a consequence of a reevaluation of our understanding of the causality of motion. Soon, we'll have vehicles that can move at tremendous speeds and negotiate right angle turns without slowing down and without incurring damages due to inertial effects. Floating cities, unlimited clean energy, earth to Mars in hours, New York to Beijing in minutes... That's the future of energy and travel.

Observation first, flying cities later. We haven't observed hypothetical effects that would allow the technologies you causally (heh heh) list. And an immense ocean of energetic particles and "causality of motion" (whatever that means, if anything) do not imply flying cities. Show us the effect experimentally before you tell us how wonderful it will be.

Yet another IDiotic creationist "theory" ruined! (1)

the saltydog (450856) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534723)

You can hear Kent Hovind's head exploding as I type, all the way from his prison cell... heh heh...

big deal (2, Interesting)

ascari (1400977) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534879)

"pure water". It would be a lot more interesting if they found seriously contaminated water, with lots of organic compounds. Heck, raw sewage on mars would really make my day!

Re:big deal (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 4 years ago | (#29535067)

That's what I was thinking.

Good news and bad news

Good news, We found water on mars/

Bad News, it's contaminated with a pesticide.

wait...

Hope (1)

venuspcs (946177) | more than 4 years ago | (#29534971)

Okay lets look at this scientifically....If a meteor slams into a frigid desert and causes massive amounts of virtually pure ice to explode out onto the surface what exactly does that mean? Before you answer consider that at other sites around Mars they imaged impacts and found that those craters resulted in much dirtier ice being expelled as they would expect if it was ice crystals forming around grains of dirt. However in the image above it was 99% pure water/ice that was expelled.... To me that means there is a large body of frozen water that has been frozen so long that it has been completely buried by one of many Marian Dust Storms. Furthermore, if there is a large body of water/ice under the dirt a few meters it would extremely old and could possibly still contain life of some form.

There is no such thing (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29535365)

There is no such thing called "99% pure water". If it is not 100%, it is not pure.

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