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The Informant Is Back At Work

kdawson posted about 5 years ago | from the supermarket-to-the-world dept.

Movies 155

theodp writes "Fortune catches up with former ADM exec and whistleblower Mark Whitacre, who talks about watching his life on screen in the dark comedy, The Informant!. Among other things, Whitacre apologizes to Fortune for duping the magazine in a 1995 interview when his bipolar-fueled compulsive lying was in its full glory. Thanks to a Ph.D. he earned from Cornell in nutritional biochemistry, and an understanding CEO who was involved in prison ministry, Whitacre is now COO of Cypress Systems, where he's been working since spending nine years in prison for embezzlement. And yes, his wife really did stand by him through the wild ride."

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The reason his wife stuck with him? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29561465)

His penis is HUGE.

Re:The reason his wife stuck with him? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29561479)

More importantly, he can control how it moves.

the system works! (5, Funny)

Trepidity (597) | about 5 years ago | (#29561525)

Glad to see that someone who stole $9 million is able to once again serve as a corporate executive.

Re:the system works! (1)

MickyTheIdiot (1032226) | about 5 years ago | (#29561579)

well.. the system works from THEIR point of view. What more do you want?

Re:the system works! (1)

Anpheus (908711) | about 5 years ago | (#29561593)

11.5 million. Wait, err... ;)

Your point? (5, Insightful)

bazald (886779) | about 5 years ago | (#29561611)

He helped the FBI to expose the price-fixing scheme of his company and served his time. Assuming someone is inspecting his work, what more do you want from the guy?

Re:Your point? (1, Flamebait)

unlametheweak (1102159) | about 5 years ago | (#29561733)

He helped the FBI to expose the price-fixing scheme of his company and served his time. Assuming someone is inspecting his work, what more do you want from the guy?

I'd like to know why he was in prison if he was so benevolent to the FBI and so harmful to the evil-doers in his company. Most criminals only tend to become remorseful after they've been caught. I'd also like to know how he could afford to get a Phd. I'd also like to know how he could have gotten job references from the company that he squealed about. I've got dozens of other unanswered questions.

Re:Your point? (1)

dave_d (22165) | about 5 years ago | (#29561895)

Well some of your questions could easily be answered - have you read the book/seen the movie/listened to the This American Life show? The TAL goes in pretty good detail about how he ended up in prison - haven't read the book/seen the movie, but based on what I've heard of both, the events are detailed there too..

Re:Your point? (-1, Flamebait)

unlametheweak (1102159) | about 5 years ago | (#29562069)

Well some of your questions could easily be answered

I have not read the book, etc. It was a rhetorical question. I could probably guess at the answers and probably be pretty accurate when I find out the actual facts. Some things are too predictable.

Re:Your point? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29562117)

Sounds like you have no interest in confirming your opinions with facts.

Re:Your point? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29562545)

Wow, you are a pretty huge faggot.

Re:Your point? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29563519)

I have not read the book, etc. It was a rhetorical question...Some things are too predictable.

You're telling me!

Re:Your point? (1)

skine (1524819) | about 5 years ago | (#29562473)

I can't be bothered to even RTFA. How do you expect me to watch movies or watch television?

Re:Your point? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29562903)

I only read the captchas.

Re:Your point? (1)

negRo_slim (636783) | about 5 years ago | (#29561907)

I'd like to know why he was in prison if he was so benevolent to the FBI and so harmful to the evil-doers in his company.

He didn't come clean right away with the feds, and when he did he put their entire multi year investigation at stake since he would of been the lone witness as to the date/time and people in the recordings. He also starting going a little crazy when his lawyer suggested he take a 2 year plea bargain. Started thinking everyone was out to get him, and he leveled some pretty wild accusations against one of the feds he workedc closely with during the investigation.

In the end they got one of the Japanese guys to be their witness for the tapes IIRC.

Re:Your point? (1)

nomadic (141991) | about 5 years ago | (#29564727)

I'd like to know why he was in prison if he was so benevolent to the FBI and so harmful to the evil-doers in his company.

Because in addition to helping the FBI, he was also committing crimes.

I'd also like to know how he could afford to get a Phd.

That question doesn't make any sense. I would assume he did it the same way most PhD students pay for it, through a combination of grants, work, maybe savings...I don't know. Why are you even asking this? Are you under the impression he got it while in prison? Or after prison? If so, why would you jump to such an illogical conclusion?

Re:Your point? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29561889)

After seeing the movie, I'm not entirely certain he didn't concoct and being the price-fixing scheme as a cover for his attempted embezzlement...

Re:Your point? (1)

RightSaidFred99 (874576) | about 5 years ago | (#29561917)

Yeah... about that. They had film and it was well documented what went down.

Re:Your point? (1, Troll)

syousef (465911) | about 5 years ago | (#29562131)

He helped the FBI to expose the price-fixing scheme of his company and served his time. Assuming someone is inspecting his work, what more do you want from the guy?

Maybe repay the people he ripped off? I know. Completely unreasonable isn't it.

Re:Your point? (2, Interesting)

interkin3tic (1469267) | about 5 years ago | (#29562353)

Maybe repay the people he ripped off? I know. Completely unreasonable isn't it.

I say start pestering him for that 9 million right after ADM pays the taxpayers back their billions and billions of dollars. [wikipedia.org]

...and no, the fact that what Whitacre did was against the laws but what ADM is doing isn't really doesn't matter much to me.

Re:Your point? (1)

nomadic (141991) | about 5 years ago | (#29564699)

Maybe repay the people he ripped off? I know. Completely unreasonable isn't it.

Yes, it is. After the stuff ADM pulled, and the small fine they got hit with, why are you so eager to see them get money?

Re:Your point? (1)

Tumbleweed (3706) | about 5 years ago | (#29562253)

He helped the FBI to expose the price-fixing scheme of his company and served his time. Assuming someone is inspecting his work, what more do you want from the guy?

A better movie about his story?

Just joking - I haven't seen it, and Soderbergh is a cinematic god.

Re:Your point? (1)

Xest (935314) | about 5 years ago | (#29563129)

I'll admit I don't know the details of this case or US laws particularly well, but in general investigation into people like him, his arrest, and the court case, as well as the prison sentence cost money. A lot of money. Money that wont be repaid by anyone other than the tax payer. So it's not unreasonable for the tax paying public to somewhat appalled if someone is making an absolute fortune based on his contacts in a similar important position of trust in which he will be making a fortune.

Fair enough, you have an issue whereby you can't take money off someone whose poor once they've done their time for burglary or whatever, because it'll cost them more when they undoubtedly reoffend because they have little choice but to commit crime to pay off the charges. In the case of someone like this though who is clearly making a lot of money, it seems perfectly fair to bill him for some of the costs. 90% tax on income above say, $30k seems fair until the debt is repaid.

The problem is if you do nothing you give people the impression that this sort of crime is worth trying, because at the end of the day even if you get caught you'll still come out extremely well off. In the meantime the tax payer foots the bill for investigation, incarceration and so on. Ultimately the people committing the crime win, whilst the tax payers- mostly comprised of honest joes lose.

Re:Your point? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29563725)

So everyone should be equal before the law except those who aren't?

Re:the system works! (1)

Ozlanthos (1172125) | about 5 years ago | (#29561623)

I guess they really have managed to get the prison system to be more about "reforming" inmates, as opposed to simply "incarcerating" them. He goes from being a convicted (for of all things..embezzlement) felon, to Chief "Operating" Officer. Almost makes me want to get busted for assault with a deadly weapon, extortion, and sodomy. Then I could be "reformed" into "CEO"-material!

-Oz

Re:the system works! (0, Troll)

unlametheweak (1102159) | about 5 years ago | (#29561765)

I guess they really have managed to get the prison system to be more about "reforming" inmates, as opposed to simply "incarcerating" them.

Everything that I've read about the U.S. penal system indicates the exact opposite. Things have been getting much worse for people in U.S. prisons over the last 20 years, and the trend continues. His is the exceptional case. Most prisoners can't afford to get PhDs. I wonder where he got the money and found the time for education like that (a PhD no less!); most prison jobs pay slavery wages.

Re:the system works! (3, Informative)

Rary (566291) | about 5 years ago | (#29561877)

Most prisoners can't afford to get PhDs. I wonder where he got the money and found the time for education like that (a PhD no less!); most prison jobs pay slavery wages.

He didn't get his PhD in prison. He had it long before his time at ADM.

Re:the system works! (1)

MorderVonAllem (931645) | about 5 years ago | (#29562591)

He actually got 2 more PhDs while in prison. (I forget what they were for though)

Re:the system works! (1)

JustOK (667959) | about 5 years ago | (#29562683)

I think one thesis was on the Forensic Linguistic Analysis of the Cultural Vectors Identified in the Mimetic Genesis of the Mememetic use of "Federal PITA Prison."

Re:the system works! (2, Interesting)

Geoffrey.landis (926948) | about 5 years ago | (#29561665)

Glad to see that someone who stole $9 million is able to once again serve as a corporate executive.

Well, he's an executive at a small company that sells selenium as a treatment for cancer, which is a treatment of very dubious efficiacy. ("dubious" in that the actual clinical trials didn't show any improvement.)

Re:the system works! (1)

mkell85 (1387519) | about 5 years ago | (#29561671)

Wait..... I thought it was $11 million. Was it $9 million or $11 million Mark?

Re:the system works! (4, Insightful)

Coda A27 (704451) | about 5 years ago | (#29561725)

Glad to see that someone who stole $9 million is able to once again serve as a corporate executive.

He served eight years in prison and, after finishing his sentence, found gainful employment with an open-minded employer with the skillset he possesses. I don't see anything wrong with that.

Re:the system works! (4, Insightful)

palegray.net (1195047) | about 5 years ago | (#29561757)

There isn't anything wrong with that. The man served his time, and he's a productive member of society again. The comments for this story are, unfortunately, going to be spearheaded by individuals who don't have the talents to serve as an effective executive in the first place. Thus, we get to read a hundred different spins on the "but he committed a crime" theme, all fueled by basic jealousy. Interestingly, this is the same crowd that seems to have no problem celebrating Kevin Mitnick's turnaround and subsequent success.

Re:the system works! (0, Troll)

timeOday (582209) | about 5 years ago | (#29561987)

You are projecting your envy of rich people, whom you consider superior to yourself, onto others. Some people think our system is flawed because reaching the top requires a callous disregard for others. Even if you don't seriously consider the idea of them being right, you should at least seriously consider the idea that people who say this genuinely believe it.

Re:the system works! (1)

palegray.net (1195047) | about 5 years ago | (#29562287)

You are projecting your envy of rich people, whom you consider superior to yourself, onto others.

That would be an interesting point, if it had any validity to it whatsoever. Did you somehow miss the entire point of my post? Envy (or jealousy) of "rich people" is absurd. I earn a healthy salary, and I'm quite comfortable with my station in life.

Re:the system works! (-1, Troll)

unlametheweak (1102159) | about 5 years ago | (#29562025)

There isn't anything wrong with that. The man served his time, and he's a productive member of society again. The comments for this story are, unfortunately, going to be spearheaded by individuals who don't have the talents to serve as an effective executive in the first place. Thus, we get to read a hundred different spins on the "but he committed a crime" theme, all fueled by basic jealousy. Interestingly, this is the same crowd that seems to have no problem celebrating Kevin Mitnick's turnaround and subsequent success.

Yes I am a Loser. People like you remind me of it all the time. You are wrong however in stating (or implying) that your opinion is in the minority. You are also wrong by stating that I am jealous. I'm more interested in why people like yourself will call me a Loser and treat me like shit. I don't really care if you think it's OK that criminals should be given good paying jobs. I'm more interested in knowing why people like you think that criminals should be given good paying jobs over honest people who can have the personality traits of honesty. Every large company will spend thousands of dollars making sure they hire the right people. They make sure that people don't smoke marijuana for example, and they check their Facebook accounts to find out what their sexual practices are, who there friends are etc. It amazes me that out of all the millions of people to choose from, criminals tend to be the ones who are chosen for the high paying leadership roles, and yet leaders who show their leadership by not stealing or submitting to peer pressure often get terminated from jobs as trouble-makers or people who are not "team players".

I know what your response is going to be; "I never said that...". and "You don't know me...". Yes I know you. I've been dealing with people like you all my life. You think that people who find something wrong with criminals and cheaters are "jealous". You spin things to make people of your own ilk look good. You get up-modded for your attitude and your behavior on forums like Slashdot, and in the real world people like you get promotions and pay raises.

Re:the system works! (1)

Philip_the_physicist (1536015) | about 5 years ago | (#29563283)

To prevent misunderstandings: Neither I, nor any of my friends or family, have ever been convicted of anything. For that matter, i have never even been fined or ticketed, so none of this is out of self-interest.

Once someone has paid their debt to society as ordered by a judge/magistrate, they should be free to go about their lives. I do believe that criminal records should be publicly available, for potential employers and so on to inspect, but at the end of the day, the decision to employ someone is a gamble, and any past crimes are just one more factor to take into account.

In this case, his employer thought that he would be good at his job and had turned over a new leaf, and so would be a good risk, and made a judgement call on that basis.

Re:the system works! (1)

Kneo24 (688412) | about 5 years ago | (#29563655)

I don't seem to recall the person that you're responding to actually snubbing their nose at you. If you're upset that you're not getting anywhere within your own job markets, maybe you should take a deep look at yourself! If you want to be an executive, get the necessary skill set, work for it, and then market yourself. The person that TFA is talking about has repaid their debt to society. If you did something wrong and repaid your debt to society, wouldn't you want someone to give you a second chance?

And you honestly do sound jealous. Hell, I'm a little jealous. I wish I could embezzle money from a company, go to jail, repay my debt to society through jail time, and then get a high paying job again. If you say you aren't jealous, I think you're deluding yourself.

Re:the system works! (1)

unlametheweak (1102159) | about 5 years ago | (#29564391)

I don't seem to recall the person that you're responding to actually snubbing their nose at you

The person is being a Troll and he got modded +5 Informative. I got modded -1 Troll. The vast majority of the comments here (towards me at least) have been about how people lie, cheat and steal are well socialized, and how it's my fault that I am not able to fit in. If you call my observations "jealous" then either I am totally devoid of reality and completely out of my mind, or the vast majority of people have little sense of morality, and are completely devoid of logic.

Re:the system works! (1)

Trepidity (597) | about 5 years ago | (#29562115)

This man clearly did not have "the talents to serve as an effective executive in the first place" either, since one of the very basic skills required in order to serve effectively in that position is not stealing from your company. His performance in his position was worse than leaving the position empty.

Re:the system works! (1)

palegray.net (1195047) | about 5 years ago | (#29562321)

Did you even bother to read the available information on the man's history (perhaps starting with the article)? Had you investigated the matter properly and applied a little critical thinking, I sincerely doubt your reply would have been the same.

Re:the system works! (2, Insightful)

timmarhy (659436) | about 5 years ago | (#29562197)

kiven's situation is vastly different.

this guy STOLE 11.5 million from his employer, then went on to accuse the FBI of all kinds of bullshit. he's a border line nut job as well as a rotten theif.

kevin on the other hand never stole a cent from anyone, just hacked a bunch of company's system to see how they worked. his only crime was making them and the FBI look like idiots.

Re:the system works! (1)

cawpin (875453) | about 5 years ago | (#29562311)

Interestingly, this is the same crowd that seems to have no problem celebrating Kevin Mitnick's turnaround and subsequent success.

You seem to be forgetting that Mitnick never actually broke any laws. He also never had any nefarious intentions, unlike this guy. Personally, I think time served is time served and he should be left alone, as long as he returned the money.

Re:the system works! (1)

palegray.net (1195047) | about 5 years ago | (#29562335)

Are you seriously putting forth the argument that Mitnick never broke the law? History seems to disagree [wikipedia.org] .

Re:the system works! (1)

cawpin (875453) | about 5 years ago | (#29562371)

The things he confessed to, and was charged with, were not crimes when he did the act. This is why he was held without charge, remember.

Re:the system works! (1)

mama1two (1645659) | about 5 years ago | (#29562679)

Famous over night

it took time for anyone to realize that he was a liar and a snitch.
Seen an interview and mark seemed more happy that he was known than being out of prison

Re:the system works! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29562917)

I don't think it's got anything to do with jealousy. High-ranking executives seem to be able to do no wrong sometimes. They ruin companies, then turn around and get golden-parachuted away, or get a new job doing exactly what they are worst at. It seems the only qualification for being a high-level executive is that you've previously held a position of that nature - actual ability be damned. This place is keen on meritocracies, and the way executives are treated in the USA is antithetical to that.

Re:the system works! (1)

ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) | about 5 years ago | (#29563085)

The man served his time, and he's a productive member of society again.

Since this logic does not apply to sex offenders, why should it apply to anyone else?

Re:the system works! (1)

V!NCENT (1105021) | about 5 years ago | (#29563507)

Interestingly, this is the same crowd that seems to have no problem celebrating Kevin Mitnick's turnaround and subsequent success.

Which leads me to the conclusion that you conclusions about other people appear to be the wrong conclusions...

I liked the part where the OP tried to be a smartass.

Re:the system works! (1)

dkleinsc (563838) | about 5 years ago | (#29564281)

don't have the talents to serve as an effective executive in the first place

You're absolutely right: I lack the "talent" to ruin people's careers, casually rip off customers, embezzle, not give a rat's behind about anyone but myself, and deny reality whenever that reality would be bad for me. Yes, there are executives who don't engage in that sort of behavior, but far more that do (especially at larger firms like ADM).

Re:the system works! (1)

palegray.net (1195047) | about 5 years ago | (#29564655)

Yes, there are executives who don't engage in that sort of behavior, but far more that do (especially at larger firms like ADM).

Please present hard evidence to back that claim up. While some executives are certainly bad apples, they are most assuredly in the minority. I'm not getting the sense that you have much experience in this matter.

dear shit for brains (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29564565)

i know plenty of people who have the ability to be an executive, but they are looked over since the system rewards greed and immorality more than competence and skill. its not about jealousy its about fairness you twisted fuck

Re:the system works! (1)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | about 5 years ago | (#29561911)

criminal - - officer - - criminal - - officer - - criminal - - officer

I don't know. It just doesn't have the proper ring. Let's try again.

felon - - officer - - felon - - officer - - felon - - officer

Maybe it's just me, but I can't get it to sound right. Maybe we should get West Point and Annapolis to start recruiting from Sing Sing, and see how it works. Maybe in the future, maybe the military can hold courts martial, and sentence the convicted to serving as officers.

Re:the system works! (1)

unlametheweak (1102159) | about 5 years ago | (#29561949)

He served eight years in prison and, after finishing his sentence, found gainful employment with an open-minded employer with the skillset he possesses. I don't see anything wrong with that.

Interesting how people (almost) always label me as socially dysfunctional because I don't lie (or cheat and steal). Interesting also how people don't think that there is anything wrong with a person who abuses his position of authority and profits from that abuse and is later rewarded with a job, and people like you claim there is nothing wrong. I've been turned down jobs because I didn't have any good references. Employers don't like me because I tend to want to follow the rules (in a chemical plant I worked at people got upset because I didn't want to dump chemicals down the drain, at a call center job people got upset because I didn't lie to the customers to get them off the phone, etc and so on). I'm very anti-social that way, and when I try to be dishonest like everybody else it makes me feel so physically and psychologically uncomfortable that I can't keep it up. People like this executive certainly have the right psychological make-up to succeed in life.

The last person who made a remark similar to yours got a +5 Insightful moderation. I've seen the same type of thing at work; people that I've "seen" stealing and cheating get promoted, while I end up getting terminated. I guess maybe it's my inability to demonize nice and honest people as being anti-social that will also make me into a loser with a bad attitude. It is my inability to value shrewd business practices that will keep people like me unemployed or marginally employed, while people like this crook will always be gainfully employed in very high paying jobs. They are certainly a lot smarter than I am.

Re:the system works! (1)

jdpars (1480913) | about 5 years ago | (#29562163)

You're really building yourself up to be this honorable but persecuted person, but you're really not. You've created an excessive moral code that is outside social norms just like someone who could never tell the truth. The inability to function well in society is just as morally wrong as telling small lies. While I thank you for not dumping chemicals down the drain, there is certainly a better way to respond than "No, I won't do it." Perhaps, "This is not SOP. We're going to do it the right way." And then getting something done. When all you do is hold up the system, you ARE the problem.

Re:the system works! (1)

unlametheweak (1102159) | about 5 years ago | (#29562735)

So far most of the replies to my comments are people making things up about me like this;

You're really building yourself up to be this honorable but persecuted person, but you're really not.

I never claimed to be honourable, not here nor in the workforce. I figured here (on Slashdot) some people may appreciate my comments (in the workforce I've learned to keep quiet except to say "I agree", and "yes boss" and "how high"). I have never claimed to be persecuted either. In terms of honourable and persecuted, I remember one time in grade six many people in the class room were harassing somebody, and the teacher asked for those people to stand up. One of the students told me to stand up, but the teacher told me to sit down. I guess I figured because I didn't try to help this harassed person out I wasn't being Honorable. Unfortunately there are many other areas in my life were I have failed to be honourable as well. For this reason I would never claim to be honourable. On the other hand, I wouldn't go out of my way to be dishonourable.

You've created an excessive moral code that is outside social norms just like someone who could never tell the truth.

I guess I've never had the intelligence to understand how being honest is "an excessive moral code" and how not wanting to hurt people is bad. In fact I've always found it difficult to lie. I've found it difficult to be honest at times as well, but I've never been able to understand why being honest and moral is such an issue with people. I remember one time somebody called me a "goody two shoes", I never thought of myself that way, but it appears that compared to most people I am.

The inability to function well in society is just as morally wrong as telling small lies. While I thank you for not dumping chemicals down the drain, there is certainly a better way to respond than "No, I won't do it." Perhaps, "This is not SOP. We're going to do it the right way." And then getting something done. When all you do is hold up the system, you ARE the problem.

I've never made an issue of it. In fact one time when I even mentioned the fact that I think thinks should be done differently I could tell their was a very negative attitude in the room towards me. Later that month one person even deliberately dumped a can of waste oil into the earth to see my reaction. I said nothing, and I did nothing, because I wasn't interested in having any accidents happen to me at work. I eventually quit that job, but I probably would have been fired anyways (the Foreman was very vocal about the fact that he didn't like me). I suppose it would be natural for people to incorrectly blame me for being disliked by my foreman, but when he was sick off work things seemed so very much nicer, and I tend to work better when people don't make me nervous.

Re:the system works! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29562195)

Interesting how people (almost) always label me as socially dysfunctional because I don't lie

Because they're right. Lying is a requirement for being socially functional. As an example, it's a common situation for most people who are insecure about some thing (say, the way they look) to ask someone they know for their opinion... if you tell them the truth, you are by definition being socially dysfunctional.

There's nothing wrong with being insecure about something, and so someone who is insensitive to that insecurity and seems to blame other people for being insensitive should seek professional help. Seriously - you need it.

Interesting also how people don't think that there is anything wrong with a person who abuses his position of authority and profits from that abuse

See, now you're just engaging in spurious logic (besides the part where you turned "paid his debt to society by completing a 9 year prison sentence" into simply "later".)

Show me people who honestly think that there's nothing wrong with someone abusing his position.

I've been turned down jobs because I didn't have any good references.

That's most probably because you're socially dysfunctional. If you were socially functional, you would be able to get good references. Most people value integrity very highly, however you're unable to see the difference between integrity and your own social dysfunction.

I don't cheat or steal (just like you), and yet I have never left a job where I was unable to get a reference. In fact, during the past 15 years, I've never left a job where I *needed* a reference. I've always had a minimum of two "open" offers available to me, and the reason is because people value my honesty.

Employers don't like me because I tend to want to follow the rules

Anecdotes aside, it's most likely that they didn't like you before you refused to disobey them, rather than because of it. If you're as socially dysfunctional as you claim, you probably offended them long before that.

I'm very anti-social that way, and when I try to be dishonest like everybody else it makes me feel so physically and psychologically uncomfortable that I can't keep it up.

Co-operating with people around you is not the same as being "dishonest". The fact that you see them both as the same thing speaks volumes about your level of dysfunction.

Clue for you: most people are as honest. If you believe others are dishonest, then the problem is with you, not with them.

People like this executive certainly have the right psychological make-up to succeed in life.

No, actually. People like you have the wrong psychological make-up to succeed, because you're unable to see that you're emotionally stunted.

Do yourself a favour and get some psychological counselling. You're not doing yourself (or anyone else) any favours by trying to convince yourself that you're OK and everyone else is dysfunctional.

Re:the system works! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29562271)

the reason is because people value my honesty.

If people valued honesty we wouldn't need whistleblower laws: corporations would have their HR departments lining up around the block to hire such an upstanding citizen.

Re:the system works! (1)

unlametheweak (1102159) | about 5 years ago | (#29562581)

Because they're right. Lying is a requirement for being socially functional. As an example, it's a common situation for most people who are insecure about some thing (say, the way they look) to ask someone they know for their opinion... if you tell them the truth, you are by definition being socially dysfunctional.

It's been said that I also have poor communication skills. In actuality I don't remember anybody asking me for an opinion, much less on how they look. If I were asked I would tell them the truth. If the truth were to be negative I would be as tactful as possible. With me telling somebody they were ugly and explaining to them how they can make themselves appear better looking, or explaining how people who judge people by looks are stupid and shallow is far better than telling an ugly person that they are beautiful.

I know one person who said that everybody looks down and gossips about a person at work who has body odor. I asked if anybody told him the truth about his body odor and he said no. Apparently nobody wants to be offensive, but instead would rather socialize with each other and gossip. I am not intellectually capable of understanding how dishonesty is good. You are wasting your time trying to explain it too me.

There's nothing wrong with being insecure about something, and so someone who is insensitive to that insecurity and seems to blame other people for being insensitive should seek professional help. Seriously - you need it.

Yeah, I've heard it before. Almost everybody says I'm crazy. Although I don't see how seeking "professional help" will turn me into a liar. It seems to be more of a personality trait than something you can easily be conditioned to learn. I've got quite a lot of social science education and I'm very familiar with the biology of how the brain works; I've yet to see any type of psychiatric drug that can make people lie and steal and cheat like normal people do.

Show me people who honestly think that there's nothing wrong with someone abusing his position.

I'm only aware of me, and some hypocrites. It's obvious that I'm the social deviant here.

That's most probably because you're socially dysfunctional. If you were socially functional, you would be able to get good references. Most people value integrity very highly, however you're unable to see the difference between integrity and your own social dysfunction.

Yes I already know I am socially disfunctional. People have told me before that I should lie on my resume and use "friends" as phony references like everybody else, but I can't bring myself to do it.

I don't cheat or steal (just like you), and yet I have never left a job where I was unable to get a reference.

I spend all my time trying to work when I am at work. I never have time to socialize with people. Of course, asking a Manager (who terminates me) for a reference doesn't make a lot of sense to me. I don't generally tend to quit jobs. In reality, I generally don't get jobs that require more than one (short) interview. I almost never make it to the qualification tests (of the interview process). One recruiter said she will have me do the test at home (over the Internet), when I got home I phoned her and told her that I never received the login information. She told me she will email it to me. I phoned again and again she said she will email it to me. I went back to the company and said I will do the test on their computers. They said it's better if I did it at home, so I went home and waited for the email. I'm still waiting. This is how most of my interviews go. When they ask me why I've been out of work so long I tell them it is because I was unable to find a job. People say I should lie about this, but I can't bring myself to be dishonest. Pretty much all of my interviews go like this. If I could figure out what I'm doing wrong (without having to lie) it would be helpful. Unfortunately the most lucid comment I received from an HR person was "We'll keep in touch". I've never heard from her since.

One employer (the HR person) said that I was "laid off" because of poor job performance, but he refused to give me details. I do remember on the last week of work a quality control person told me that I was working too fast and that I should slow down so that I wouldn't have to put things on the floor. I told the senior employee who trained me on the equipment and who was working with me that we had to follow the company rules and not create safety hazards. The person started telling me that if I'm tired I should go work on another machine. He was smiling and said it's OK if you can't handle the work. I said I'm not tired. He unexpectedly left for half an hour and then came back. He was smiling more than usual and very accommodating. The next day I was "laid off" because of poor performance reviews. I don't have the social intelligence to know what I did wrong. Too bad the HR department refused to tell me, because maybe that information could have helped me become less socially dysfunctional. In fact most of the jobs that I was terminated from I am not even aware as to what I did wrong or how I could have made things better (aside from lying, or involving myself in other socialization techniques that I find too morally reprehensible to involve myself in).

...and the reason is because people value my honesty.

Your being inconsistent in your messages. First you say honesty is for the socially dysfunctional, and now you say "people value my honesty". I'm starting to doubt how honest you actually are, especially considering the fact that you appear to be successful in the job market. On the other hand, I think what you mean to say is that people value your ability to make yourself and the company look good, which has nothing to do with honesty (but obviously I don't really know, just sayin'...).

Anecdotes aside, it's most likely that they didn't like you before you refused to disobey them, rather than because of it. If you're as socially dysfunctional as you claim, you probably offended them long before that.

You're confabulating here. I never disobeyed anybody. Sometimes I even go along with breaking some rules if it doesn't seem too immoral and if it makes getting along with people seem easier (like in the above example, I was breaking the rules until QC warned me not to). Same as in the call centre, I always obeyed the rules and that's why my "metrics" were so poor. When I asked people how they get such good metrics they said it was because they don't do what they were trained to do, but instead lie and cheat. They were never told to lie by the Management, but they were rewarded for lying by getting promotions and pay raises and other rewards. When I asked Management about this I was told that my perceptions were incorrect. In fact various supervisors from the company said I had poor English and communication skills. Perhaps my poor communication skills and dysfunctional social skills lead me to develop false beliefs. But at least I didn't urinate on the lavatory floor like some people did, or steel people's lunch from the fridge, or steal a computer from one of the desks, or steal the chairs in the lobby. I'm not sure who did the steeling or urinating, but I can presume they became very successful in the company, perhaps getting into executive positions. That's another job that I was terminated from. Unfortunately I don't have any good references their either, because of my poor socialization skills.

Co-operating with people around you is not the same as being "dishonest". The fact that you see them both as the same thing speaks volumes about your level of dysfunction.

Clue for you: most people are as honest. If you believe others are dishonest, then the problem is with you, not with them.

You seem to of the dishonest type, because you are claiming that I don't co-operate with people even though I never said that I don't. I have always gone out of my way to help other people in the company. If I notice somebody is doing something incorrectly I always offer to teach them to do things better. If they don't want my help then I don't force it upon them. Also, if people ask for help then I always try to accommodate. Sometimes it's difficult for me though when different people tell me contradictory things to do. For example some people tell me to work fast and some tell me to work slow, and usually at least one person gets offended when I have to choose who to believe. The shit starts rolling down hill from there.

Clue for you: most people are as honest. If you believe others are dishonest, then the problem is with you, not with them.

Again you're contradicting yourself. Most people who say things like "clue for you" tend to be people who are not yet Managers, but will be in the next few months. I wish you (a presumptuous) congratulations on your future promotion. Actually, by saying that most people are honest you are not only showing your ignorance but your dishonesty as well. Even a moderately intelligent person without a social science background will intuitively know that most people lie on a consistent basis. The fact that you are contradicting your earlier statement does not help your cause (unless you are just being a Troll).

No, actually. People like you have the wrong psychological make-up to succeed, because you're unable to see that you're emotionally stunted.

Do yourself a favour and get some psychological counselling. You're not doing yourself (or anyone else) any favours by trying to convince yourself that you're OK and everyone else is dysfunctional.

The science says that people who become executives tend to have psychopathic personalities. It seems like you are just going out of your way to demonize me (because of my observations) and rationalize your own lifestyle. It's sad but true, being dishonest is socially functional. The fact that you are playing games with me here indicates that you are probably successful in playing games in the corporate world as well.

Re:the system works! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29562971)

Massive blurb of text

The science says that people who become executives tend to have psychopathic personalities. It seems like you are just going out of your way to demonize me (because of my observations) and rationalize your own lifestyle. It's sad but true, being dishonest is socially functional. The fact that you are playing games with me here indicates that you are probably successful in playing games in the corporate world as well.

Sorry, but this doesn't just apply to "the corporate world". Being dishonest, and especially knowing when to do so and when not to, is pretty much a requirement to function in any part of society, be it work, family, a relationship, friendships, what have you.

Practical example, when I meet someone I know vaguely but haven't seen in a while on the street I'll greet that person with a "hey, how are you, long time no see". That doesn't mean that I have time to actually listen to how he/she is or even that I remotely give a shit, it's just how you greet people. The person on the other side knows that such a question isn't actually an invitation to spend half an hour telling me all his/her woes.

You very closely resemble a number of people I've met over the years, who all were unable to grasp what I like to call the "unwritten rules of society". Heck, it's taken me a ridiculously long amount of time to figure them out myself. If going through life like that is fine by you, that's great, but unless you hit a really lucky break there's a good chance you'll spend a big chunk of your life single, unemployed and miserable.

Science is well and good, and your understanding of biochemical processes is admirable, but in the right here, right now it doesn't seem to be doing you a whole lot of good. Unfortunately, in this particular case, the majority gets to decide what is sane and what isn't.

Re:the system works! (1)

unlametheweak (1102159) | about 5 years ago | (#29563179)

1st point I agree with (there are quantitative and qualitative differences for ordinary people).

2nd point doesn't seem relevant here. Social conventions, no matter how they appear, are not necessarily immoral, dishonest or even irrational. In my case I am more likely to want to say "hello" to someone, just out of politeness. Many people often bow there heads when they see me coming (although there's a lot of variability in people).

3rd point;

You very closely resemble a number of people I've met over the years, who all were unable to grasp what I like to call the "unwritten rules of society".

I think I know the rules, or at least some of them. Some I find distasteful (i.e. lying and gossip and stealing are the big ones for me. And yes most everybody steals, though it is more likely to be a can of coke or a staple-remover gadget than a car or a television set. Most people are more irritating than dangerous).

As far as trying to change, I can't see that happening. In many respects I would like to change, but psychiatry or psychology can't substantially change people. Lithium may make me more relaxed around assholes at work, but it won't make me fit in. A psychologist may be able to teach me how to use body language etc to help me better communicate with people, but really, (for example) it's like going to something like Alcoholics Anonymous or going on a diet; it just doesn't work in the long run. No matter how much education or support people have, they will eventually give in to the temptation to be themselves.

Re:the system works! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29562301)

You sound like you have a terrible attitude and personality. That's your problem. I don't lie, cheat or steal at my job, nor do I tolerate those who do. Yet I don't have these problems you do. I have a great job, with great people. And you know, in my ~25 years in the corporate world, that sort of problem really hasn't seemed particularly widespread in my career, unlike what you claim about yours. You really sound like you're the type of person who feels like the world is out to get you, and you know what, no one wants to deal with that crap. I wouldn't hire you either. You're an Eeyore. An emotional drain on everyone around you.

Take responsibility for your own life, stop blaming the world treating you like shit because "you're a good person and no one else is". Your problems with your life and your job are your fault. Not only is it entirely possibly to be an honest, successful person, it's incredibly insulting to the vast majority of us who are to to claim that we couldn't get where we are without being dishonest people. Fuck you.

Re:the system works! (1)

unlametheweak (1102159) | about 5 years ago | (#29562813)

You sound like you have a terrible attitude and personality.

Yes, many people have told me that I have a "bad attitude", primarily supervisors. I am unable to understand how I can have a "good attitude" like yourself. In fact, many human resources people and job recruiters just assume I have a bad attitude because I can't seem to find and keep a job.

And then you leave off with

Fuck you.

Like everything else you've said, it makes no sense (except for the part where you claim to have had a successful career in the corporate world; that I can believe). Unlike you I won't tell you to "fuck you" because it doesn't seem right. I wish I could think like you and be successful.

Re:the system works! (1)

iiiears (987462) | about 5 years ago | (#29562689)

@unlametheweak Your ethos has likely brought you inner calm when others have sought narrower selfish goals of praise with little depth or true worth,They have reaped the empty wind. After all, wealth is transitory and fleeting in a lifetime one may be poor then rich then poor again. The items purchased with it worn and discarded before inner calm returns and the internal compass is only steadied after worthwhile truths are learned. Those things gained by "shortcuts" the sacrifice of love, family, community, self are forgotten quickly by those we once sought to impress. What can be said of those individuals that seek praise for the base and corrosive elements of selfishness. Folly? Surely, the value of quiet confidence rooted in the firm fertile soil of a generous deeper truth is far more durable. Honesty, love, hope, compassion, are these things, and can be shared without limit a wealth that is never diminished by generosity. The foundation of relationships more comforting than vanity and manufactured comforts.

Re:the system works! (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | about 5 years ago | (#29563647)

He spent NINE freakin YEARS in a prison! Ask yourself this one question: How many years of your life equal $9 million? When would you consider it being forgiven?

To me personally, one single year of my life is worth more than those 9 million.

Additionally, physical reality has no concept called "guilt". It's just cause and effect. So what causes made this happen? And what causes made that happen? And so on, until the beginning of all time. Should we therefore punish the big bang, because we did not look further backwards??
I can forgive murderer, rapists, real terrorists, politicians, evil corporate people, weapon and drug dealers, and everyone else. Because I know that in the end, we're all just the result of what happened to us. And every single one of those people, can become or be someone good again, even after the worst things. If the world around him supports it.

So I'm trying to do my part. Do you?

Re:the system works! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29564137)

Ahhh... the Jedi mindset is strong within you. How bold. Once you give into the dark side, only then can you experience TRUE power. Strike down your foes and complete your journey to be by our side!

I think it boils down to seeing these crimes more and more often, therefore the punishments need to be ramped up... if you were to stick with the current reactive justice system. Overall, I think only sex-offenders are the ones that people _never_ forgive.

Re:the system works! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29564465)

Well, based on my current paycheck, I can tell you that 9 million is worth exactly 120 years at 10 hours a day, 5 days a week... even if he made 4 times as much as me, that's still 30 years.....

Re:the system works! (1)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | about 5 years ago | (#29563973)

If there was ever a comment deserving of a Troll mod, it's the parent.

All with mod points; Read more about the guy than you have heard from the media. This is not a simple issue, with opinions to be based upon hype and paper-selling hyperbole.

Re:the system works! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29564149)

Sounds more like a candidate for the U.S. Congress to me.

Re:the system works! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29564903)

Well, he'll not be working a MY company. Because we don't want people around informing on us.

Posted AC for obvious reasons, etc.

To Be Human (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29561663)

I've lived around bipolar people my entire life. I myself suffer from moderate OCD / ADHD, so when I run into a relative or friend who is in the manic phase, it's sort of like oil and water. I'm over-cautious, and they're just three sheets to the wind, mentally speaking. I remember finally learning about bipolar when I was 21, and wondering why nobody told me to brace myself when I was around these people. But the average person, I think, didn't know much about it until very recently.

I remember the one who broke into his high school to change his grades (almost as some sort of graduation present for a new detective on the force), the 60-year-old neocon woman who bought a very expensive car on a secretary's salary, then ditched it in a parking lot and rode cross-country with a friend to start a rock band, and the one who stopped taking his meds and switched to a "natural" cure that had him taking 40 vitamin pills every day, just to get "trace minerals" that ended up doing nothing for him but keeping him in bed all day, depressed. Or the one who submitted some INCREDIBLY Jackass-like videos to America's Funniest Videos back before Jackass was on TV. Those poor screeners must have been mortified, lol.

On the other hand, I've had some amazing moments with bipolar people. Just being there for them when they are bummed out, when they're sleeping on the couch all day with their boss calling every half hour, or their mom calling, freaking out that they're going to commit suicide like their dad did.

I am in awe of people who work in the mental health industry. I'm an illustrator/designer by trade, and among those who have used the services of mental health professionals are artists like Norman Rockwell, Georges Remi, Otto Preminger, etc. These are people who needed clarity and direction, among other things, just to get out of bed in the morning or start the next project.

Re:To Be Human (1)

Douglas Simmons (628988) | about 5 years ago | (#29561727)

Thank you for that.

Crime Pays (1)

unlametheweak (1102159) | about 5 years ago | (#29561679)

Thanks to a Ph.D. he earned from Cornell in nutritional biochemistry, and an understanding CEO who was involved in prison ministry, Whitacre is now COO of Cypress Systems, where he's been working since spending nine years in prison for embezzlement.

Another example of how references and credit checks are worthless for proving reliability. Executive class criminals are in high demand by corporations because of their untrustworthiness. The game of life is won by winners like Richard Hatch [wikipedia.org] . Winners are very rarely nice people, although they have so much money that they smile a lot, so it at least appears as if they are friendly. Winners are very positive in their demeanor.

Spoilers (4, Funny)

Arakageeta (671142) | about 5 years ago | (#29561743)

Gee, thanks for the spoilers!

Re:Spoilers (1)

Kozz (7764) | about 5 years ago | (#29561793)

Gee, thanks for the spoilers!

That reminds me, I'd like to tell you about some other great movies I've seen, including The Passion of the Christ, Titanic, The Usual Suspects and The Sixth Sense.

Which of these don't belong... (1)

Sir_Lewk (967686) | about 5 years ago | (#29562451)

Huh? Two of those four are hardly "spoiler-able" movies, while the other two are quite spoile-able.

Re:Spoilers (1)

flydpnkrtn (114575) | about 5 years ago | (#29562519)

That reminds me, I'd like to tell you about some other great movies I've seen, including The Passion of the Christ, Titanic, The Usual Suspects and The Sixth Sense.

Jesus dies, check. The ship sinks, check. Common history stuff most people know.

The Usual Suspects though? Sixth Sense? Did you really already know the endings to those?

Just sayin'.

Re:Spoilers (1)

pregister (443318) | about 5 years ago | (#29562527)

I see Verbal Kint (aka Keyser Soze) nailed to a cross which is sinking to the bottom of the ocean and about to become a dead person?

Re:Spoilers (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | about 5 years ago | (#29563799)

Guys guys (reffering to sibling comments)! You misunderstood this. He knows very well that two of those are the one side of the spoiler-able extreme, and the other two are the other extreme. That was kinda his point.

So WHOOOSHHH to all of you! :D

___
P.S.: No, I don't drive a Prius. Why?

Re:Spoilers (1)

caramelcarrot (778148) | about 5 years ago | (#29563983)

I've never heard this guy's story before (being from the UK) and was actually looking forward to seeing this film. Now slashdot has managed to give the entire thing away. Thanks.

Listen to This American Life podcast on Whitacre (4, Interesting)

Kozz (7764) | about 5 years ago | (#29561771)

It's really a fascinating story. A full nine years before the film was created, Ira Glass and crew at This American Life did a podcast on the event. Have a listen. http://www.thislife.org/Radio_Episode.aspx?episode=168 [thislife.org]

Re:Listen to This American Life podcast on Whitacr (1, Troll)

TheModelEskimo (968202) | about 5 years ago | (#29561813)

Amazing that there were podcasts NINE years ago.

Re:Listen to This American Life podcast on Whitacr (1)

MBCook (132727) | about 5 years ago | (#29561851)

There weren't, at least not This American Life. They've had their podcast for a while now, although it was available from Audible before that.

They just re-aired the episode last week (due the to movie, as Kozz said), so it's available for free right now. It was a really great story.

Re:Listen to This American Life podcast on Whitacr (2, Informative)

MonsterTrimble (1205334) | about 5 years ago | (#29564767)

I second listening to the podcast. It's a wonderful piece of storytelling and the stainless steel set this guy had blew my mind. Granted he was bipolar, but what he did was exceptional.

I want to see the movie because of the podcast. It's that good.

it is fascinating (1)

Edmund Blackadder (559735) | about 5 years ago | (#29561785)

The guy is and has always been a compulsive liar and he is still getting an executive job on his way out of prison.

Makes you think, doesn't it.

Re:it is fascinating (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | about 5 years ago | (#29562365)

The guy is and has always been a compulsive liar and he is still getting an executive job on his way out of prison.

Makes you think, doesn't it.

For me, the much more thought provoking bit is that he first managed to get his PhD in biochemistry. In contrast to executives, I don't normally think of chemists as being greedy unethical liars

Re:it is fascinating (1)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | about 5 years ago | (#29564013)

Agree completely!

However, my way of wording it is "The guy was suffering from bipolar disorder, causing him to latch onto any and all means of proving self worth at the expense of everything else. He was found out, put in prison, rehabilitated, and is now more in control of his neurological condition. He has found gainful employment by an employer who understands the issues fuelling his past behaviour, and has decided that the man's skillset is worth more than the risk (or the safeguards against) a repeat of prior events."

But I much prefer your way of putting it. It reminds me of political spin and headline-grabbing media coverage from the Daily Mail. I'm used to that kind of spoon-feed-me-my-morality reporting, after all.

ADM still incredibly powerful (1)

currivan (654314) | about 5 years ago | (#29562009)

When I read the book a few years ago, the most striking thing was that the names Archer Daniels Midland and Dwayne Andreas didn't appear on the cover or liner notes, and I actually had to look pretty deep in the book to figure out what company he worked for.

Now that ADM pleaded guilty and paid a $100 million fine, their lawyers have less to work with, but at the time the publisher was apparently pretty scared of them. The book is also exceedingly careful about alleging that the Andreases knew how their company did business.

Missing Piece (3, Interesting)

Killer Napkin (221026) | about 5 years ago | (#29562095)

A lot of people wonder about the strange events in the life of Mark Whitacre. As I was reading through the Fortune article, I immediately noticed the fingerprints of the life of a Christian. So I looked it up and it seems that Christianity played a huge role in the story of Mark Whitacre. Obviously, you can't put that in modern films, but he covers it in other sources and talks freely about it in numerous interviews. You can Google and find plenty of references. I thought I'd mention it, not just because I'm a Christian, but because it answers a lot of questions: his claim that his wife was his "moral compass", why she didn't leave him, and his contrite apology at the end of the interview. I suspect it also has much to do with the CEO who was involved in "prison ministry" that later hired him up at Cypress.

See? We're not all anti-evolutionist, racist, hate-mongers.* :-)

* Some of us are just ex-conartist/embezzlers :-)

Re:Missing Piece (1)

bendodge (998616) | about 5 years ago | (#29562463)

You are correct. WORLD Magazine had a good writeup on him. http://www.worldmag.com/articles/15856 [worldmag.com] (It's likely behind a paywall.)

Re:Missing Piece (1)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | about 5 years ago | (#29564001)

A lot of people wonder about the strange events in the life of Mark Whitacre. As I was reading through the Fortune article, I immediately noticed the fingerprints of the life of a Christian.

Okay, so this risks starting a flamewar, but what the heck...

Regarding the characteristics you noticed that made you think, "this guy's a Christian". Do some persons from other religions show such transformations as well?

And if not, then how narrowly must one slice the definition of "Christian" in order to get the cluster of people having what you referred to as "fingerprints"? I.e., Protestants vs. non-Protestants? Are Mormons or Jehovah's Witnesses in or out?

I'm asking because I've heard various Christian apologists / evangelists saying that Christianity changes lives. If that's true, I wonder if it's uniquely true among all the religions.

Re:Missing Piece (1)

dkleinsc (563838) | about 5 years ago | (#29564369)

Obviously, you can't put that in modern films

Sure you can. They might not all be big Hollywood blockbusters, but to say that religion is necessarily disqualified from film is incorrect. For instance, Stanley Kubrick, hardly a Christian-oriented filmmaker, made Christianity a key part of the film A Clockwork Orange. And films about biblical events are regularly quite popular and successful, whether we're talking about The Passion of the Christ or Prince of Egypt.

I'm not exactly sure though that Mark Whitacre's Christianity would be one I'd take for inspiration. It might be one thing if he'd taken all of his ill-gotten gains and given them away to charity, but he didn't. And I distinctly remember something about camels not being able to get through eyes of needles.

Re:Missing Piece (1)

elrous0 (869638) | about 5 years ago | (#29564685)

You should be grateful they didn't include it. If this is the kind of self-serving scumbag your religion produces, I wouldn't go around advertising it.

bipolar-fueled compulsive lying ? (0, Offtopic)

JeanBaptiste (537955) | about 5 years ago | (#29562173)

Huh, I'm quite bipolar and hate liars. Would kill them if I could.

Re:bipolar-fueled compulsive lying ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29562711)

then laugh and cry about it?

OT: Can anybody browse at -1? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29562211)

I can't browse articles at -1 any more. Can't get the comment score "Hidden" slider all the way down. Is this happening to anybody else?

Re:OT: Can anybody browse at -1? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29562543)

It's been that way for months. Probably because we're both gay as hell.

time to work (1)

sunfly (1248694) | about 5 years ago | (#29564309)

He did his time, he should be allowed to go back to work.

Great casting there, Soderbergh (1)

elrous0 (869638) | about 5 years ago | (#29564709)

The guy looks so much like Matt Damon it's creepy.
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