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Pirate Party Unites In Australia

kdawson posted more than 4 years ago | from the arrrr-no-worries dept.

The Internet 173

bennyboy64 writes "iTnews reports that the Pirate Party has opened a branch office in Australia and is recruiting office bearers and supporters. The group updated the Australian website it registered last year and advertised for a president, treasurer, secretary, and supporting positions. A party spokesman, Rodney Serkowski, said the group was close to establishing a beachhead in Australia. He said that with 300 supporters it was on its way to signing the 500 it needed to become an official Australian political party. 'We are currently an online community, working together with the intention of becoming a registered party, and we're coming closer to reaching that goal,' Serkowski said. 'If we can get the required 500 members, and be registered by year's end, I think it is highly probable that we will contest the next Federal election in Australia.' At the weekend about two percent of Germans voted for the Pirate Party, although it needed five percent to gain a seat in the Bundestag."

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173 comments

hooray (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29577783)

politics that excites people!

I like the labour goverment (with only one uber right wing govt for 12 years prior to compare with its hard not to) but i'd be happy to support a party that can potentially drag politics in general slightly to the left and present a few new ideas.

GL pirate party au

In other news.. (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29577787)

During the elections on Germany the Pirate Party there could rake in 2% of all the votes: almost a million people voted for them! Kudos, and keep going!.

Re:In other news.. (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578195)

During the elections on Germany the Pirate Party there could rake in 2% of all the votes: almost a million people voted for them! Kudos, and keep going!.

Any party can get 2% of the votes by favouring things which the other parties oppose. One nation regularly got 5% in Australia by doing this.

Re:In other news.. (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29578321)

The numbers prove you wrong.

There were 27 parties in total, some with agendas far from the mainstream (i.e. "things which other parties oppose"). The Pirate Party was the one with the highest votes among the non-established parties, even beating the radical nationalists, which is quite significant.

Background note: In German federal elections, parties need to gain at least 5% of the votes (or gain at least three direct seats) in order to properly participate in parliament. Therefore some voters shy away from "wasting" their votes on small parties. It's kind of a chicken and egg dilemma - if a party doesn't already have many voters, your vote effectively doesn't count.

Re:In other news.. (1)

ArsenneLupin (766289) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578797)

Background note: In German federal elections, parties need to gain at least 5% of the votes (or gain at least three direct seats) in order to properly participate in parliament. Therefore some voters shy away from "wasting" their votes on small parties. It's kind of a chicken and egg dilemma - if a party doesn't already have many voters, your vote effectively doesn't count.

Same as in the US: In US presidential elections, candidates need to gain at least 50% of the votes, in order to properly gain the seat. Therefore some voters shy away from "wasting" their votes on third party candidates. It's kind of a chicken and egg dilemma - if a party isn't already among the top 2, your vote effectively doesn't count.

Re:In other news.. (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 4 years ago | (#29579977)

That's not completely comparable, because the German 5% threshold is for all of Germany. So it doesn't help if the party has more than 50% in a single voting district, if the nation-wide count is still below 5% of all votes. There's an exception if some party gets the absolute majority in at least three voting districts (but the votes used for that are different than the votes used for the 5% threshold).

OTOH, the 5% threshold also means that your vote may have an effect even if the party you voted for doesn't get into the parliament: Since it increases the total number of votes, it decreases the percentage of the other parties. So if a party would be otherwise just above the 5% threshold, additional votes for any other party, including for those with no chance to get into parliament, may put that party below 5%. In other words, you cannot just vote a party into the parliament, you can also vote it out of the parliament.

Re:In other news.. (2, Informative)

Ihlosi (895663) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578453)

Any party can get 2% of the votes by favouring things which the other parties oppose.

There were over a dozen parties on the ballot that couldn't.

Re:In other news.. (2, Insightful)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578533)

Yeah but lots of parties don't even try to get votes. For example here there are parties for Christians, divorced fathers who don't want to pay child support, and the gun lobby who never get a significant vote.

The Pirate Party is a bit more like One Nation because they have a fairly open, vague policy platform. If they find out that in one place there are votes for opposing music festival (they won't let us pirate our music!) they will run on that in that place. Elsewhere the issue might be caps on internet downloads or something. You can drum up votes that way but you can't build a national platform.

Re:In other news.. (1)

walshy007 (906710) | more than 4 years ago | (#29579981)

and the gun lobby who never get a significant vote.

This is unfortunate, the shooter's party's policies [shootersparty.org.au] are rather nice, everyone assumes you have to be a gun nut to support them.. but all they really want is the government to butt out of what people like to do in their recreational lives.

Re:In other news.. (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 4 years ago | (#29579755)

During the elections on Germany the Pirate Party there could rake in 2% of all the votes: almost a million people voted for them! Kudos, and keep going!.

Actually, 845.904 did, according to the preliminary official result. [bundeswahlleiter.de] Note that the relevant votes here are the "Zweitstimmen" ("second vote"), as those determine how many people (if any) a party may send to parliament (well, that's not completely true, but the differences are only relevant if the party has larger support, and will be changed anyway because the current ruling has been declared unconstitutional by the Bundesverfassungsgericht (federal constitution court)).

Freedom is born where oppression reigns (4, Insightful)

BadAnalogyGuy (945258) | more than 4 years ago | (#29577789)

If the U.S. doesn't want its own Piratpartiet, the government had better consider that the reason these branch offices have popped up is precisely because of heavy-handed laws that attempt to usurp the inalienable rights of users to download content for free off the internet.

Any action against Net Neutrality, for one, will be one step towards establishing a Pirate Party here at home. Any action that tries to legislate morality on the internet will be one step towards a viable Pirate Party third party. The only real chance legislators have in the U.S. of stopping the growth of the Pirate Party here is ironically to embrace the tenets of the Pirate Party and implement the freedom of information it espouses.

Princess Leia once put it very succinctly, "The more you tighten your grip, Tarkin, the more star systems will slip through your fingers."

Re:Freedom is born where oppression reigns (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29577811)

You're a fucking idiot. Stop posting and find something else to do with your life.

Re:Freedom is born where oppression reigns (3, Insightful)

cjfs (1253208) | more than 4 years ago | (#29577875)

The only real chance legislators have in the U.S. of stopping the growth of the Pirate Party here is ironically to embrace the tenets of the Pirate Party and implement the freedom of information it espouses.

Which is exactly what the goal of the party should be. They'll never form a government, but by bringing attention to the issues they can do a world of good. When you see the major parties imitating your policy, you haven't obsoleted yourself, you've won.

Re:Freedom is born where oppression reigns (2, Funny)

zwei2stein (782480) | more than 4 years ago | (#29577885)

... inalienable rights of users to download content for free off the internet ...

All bet are on ...

+5 Insigtfull
-5 Troll
+5 Funny

?

Re:Freedom is born where oppression reigns (4, Interesting)

cjfs (1253208) | more than 4 years ago | (#29577937)

... inalienable rights of users to download content for free off the internet ...

Notice how the article takes the same outlook, it goes from "change the landscape of Australian politics by advocating fairer copyright, freer culture and ensuring the protection of civil liberties, sending a strong message to Mr Conroy that his censorship scheme is not welcome in Australia" to six paragraphs on getting free music.

The challenge is to inform the public that file sharing is only one part of one issue. Hopefully the AU pirate party can stay on message and educate people there's much more to be concerned about.

Re:Freedom is born where oppression reigns (2, Insightful)

IBBoard (1128019) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578129)

Hopefully the AU pirate party can stay on message and educate people there's much more to be concerned about.

How much of the general public is going to listen beyond the "free music" point? If you say your party politics revolve around "copyright changes that would allow them to download music for free, implementing fairer copyright terms, ensuring political civil liberties and protecting against censorship" then all they'll hear is "copyright blah blah blah download music for free, blah blah blah blah blah".

The majority of people don't care about the more important values that could be the focus of these policies, they just care about getting something for nothing and not having a potential law suit or internet connection threat hanging over them.

Re:Freedom is born where oppression reigns (2, Funny)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578251)

As freedom loving descendent of criminals all Australians will...

(sees new iPod)

Oh Shiny!

Re:Freedom is born where oppression reigns (2, Informative)

quenda (644621) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578823)

In Australia when the iPod was released there was no legal way to get popular music for it.
There was no iTunes or equivalent here, and it was illegal to copy your own CD collection. Yet iPod and other mp3 players sold like hotcakes.
Just like copying your CD to tape to play in the car was illegal. Time-shift recording on your VCR was illegal.
But nobody gave a damn. The laws have changed a little since, but since thy were never enforced, few people noticed.

So frankly, and sadly, I don't see the Pirate party getting much attention.

Re:Freedom is born where oppression reigns (1)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 4 years ago | (#29579825)

Hmm-hmmm. "Free Musicz for EVERYONE!" is a good soundbite. It's enough to persuade the average voter after all.

For that matter, nearly half of the music produced since about 1900 SHOULD BE in the public domain. With reasonable copyright law, much of what the record labels claim to "own" would be completely free, and completely legal to download, as well as legal to distribute by any means.

Let's be less than generous with the "content providers". 15 years for copyright. Face it - every extension beyond that limit has been bought and paid for by lobbyists. Greedy, money grubbing, crooked lobbyists with deep, deep pockets.

"Mr. Himmler, your race is awfully close, and your senate seat is in question. We can infuse 12 million dollars into your campaign, if you'll endorse copyright extensions for us."

"Is that legal, Mr. Lobbbyist?"

"Certainly not, Mr. Himmler, but we can launder the money - we have a network in place for things like this. It will cost us an additional million or so, but we can pump 12 million into your campaign tomorrow!"

"Well, I'm sold, Mr. Lobbyist, and I mean that literally. What's more, once I'm sold, I stay sold!"

Look at the history of copyright law. And, look at the money. Always, follow the money.

Re:Freedom is born where oppression reigns (1)

Ihlosi (895663) | more than 4 years ago | (#29579901)

Let's be less than generous with the "content providers". 15 years for copyright.

Let's be even more generous: 20 years. Just like for patents.

The way it is now, if I invent a gizmo that brings about world peace, general happiness, and has the answer to life, the universe, and everything, I can profit from it, and maybe my kids can, too. If I write a song, then my grandkids or even my great-grandkids can still reap the benefits. That doesn't make sense.

Re:Freedom is born where oppression reigns (1)

IBBoard (1128019) | more than 4 years ago | (#29580047)

For that matter, nearly half of the music produced since about 1900 SHOULD BE in the public domain. With reasonable copyright law, much of what the record labels claim to "own" would be completely free, and completely legal to download, as well as legal to distribute by any means.

And how much interest will there be in original recordings of songs from the 20s, 30s, 40s, etc? People either want new takes on old songs (which would be under new copyright) or they want new junk that has been mass-produced, in general. Teens are probably the ones with least disposable income, and they're probably the ones most likely to pirate, but they're also the ones most likely to want the latest songs that are going to be under any copyright term's length.

I've yet to work out where the sweet spot is for copyright. It obviously shouldn't be too long, because why should an artist record one track once and live off it forever by going back and getting more and more fees, but at the same time there needs to be something to stop people just ripping off someone else's work and claiming it as their own once the period ends. It's the one area that Open Source needs as well that anti-copyright groups ignore - the GPL relies on copyright, so too much messing with that and big corporations can treat GPL code like BSD and public domain code without any recourse for us getting their source code.

Re:Freedom is born where oppression reigns (1)

jbezorg (1263978) | more than 4 years ago | (#29579873)

How much of the general public is going to listen beyond the "free music" point? If you say your party politics revolve around "copyright changes that would allow them to download music for free, implementing fairer copyright terms, ensuring political civil liberties and protecting against censorship" then all they'll hear is "copyright blah blah blah download music for free, blah blah blah blah blah".

Plus, calling the organization "The Pirate Party" probably doesn't help people get past the "copyright blah blah blah download music for free, blah blah blah blah blah" part either.

Re:Freedom is born where oppression reigns (2, Interesting)

Kjella (173770) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578329)

+5 Funny

...for suggesting the Democans and Republicrats have anything to fear in a first-past-the-post system. Or maybe "+5, Sad truth" but that's not a moderation. Europe is the big threat, because to *briefly* try to describe ~30 different political landscapes most have proportional representation, a 4-5% lower limit, a big socialist block, a big conservative block and some smaller parties. These smaller parties can be both between the blocks (greens, christians, liberals) and extreme left/right wing parties.

This will very often lead to a distribution from left to right something like 5-35-20-35-5, one major party on each side who's looking to gather some adjoining parties for a coalition. Here's a very central point - it's not so that each side will necessarily want all their "own" parties in it. For example, many extreme right parties are shunned by the rest of the right side - they'll rather look to the center. This means that if you can get past the 4% and be in the center, you're very attractive. It's often easier for the big parties to swallow making some environmental or social policy changes than cooperating with the extremes, that has a price of its own.

That said, it's not so easy to start a new party in Europe either, even though it's easier in the US. Since there are more parties, they also tend to shift more trying to close up gaps of voters that aren't satisfied. Already you see a lot of parties moving in towards the Pirate Party trying to keep enough voters away so that it won't pass the limit. It's usually many years between a new party enters the parliament, the last round was really the greens.

Re:Freedom is born where oppression reigns (1)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 4 years ago | (#29577997)

By your logic, since the Greens in the US got less than 1% of the presidential vote in 1996, then got over 300% more votes in 2000, by 2012 they should be dominating the US political landscape..... Single-issue parties, though on occasion successful, rarely get more than the people that feel really passionate about their issue to vote for them.

Re:Freedom is born where oppression reigns (1)

rohan972 (880586) | more than 4 years ago | (#29579177)

Single-issue parties, though on occasion successful, rarely get more than the people that feel really passionate about their issue to vote for them.

When that issue is don't get sued for downloading you might be surprised how many would vote for it. Australians in general aren't very politically aware. I doubt that 10% could give you any sort of reasonable explanation of what a free market is, or what socialism is. Downloading without risk is potentially something that many, particularly under 30's, would consider a more compelling reason to vote than something obscure (to them) like policy on deficits, privatisation etc.

I know a man who was the regional president of one of our political parties, he could not give you an accurate description of our countries political development or where the concepts in our constitution come from though he could tell you a great deal about who is in power now. The ideology behind the differing political movements is lost on most people, even those involved in them.

Re:Freedom is born where oppression reigns (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29578015)

It really doesn't matter whether there is a pirate party or not in the US, because of US electoral system. The US is essentially an oligarchic system that was built with the roman empire in mind, it is not a democracy in the modern sense although it allows for the occasional shifting of power from one elite to another.

Re:Freedom is born where oppression reigns (1)

theTerribleRobbo (661592) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578067)

Australia has recently passed laws that make it possible to outlaw groups of people; that is, if you're deemed by the police to be a member of said group, you're breaking the law. It was used against a bikie gang to begin with, but no-one has any idea how this may... seep into other things.

How long until this group gets outlawed for Encouraging Rampant Copyright Infringement or something ridiculous?

(We have no constitutionally-upheld Free Speech law/clause/amendment/anything here, which doesn't help matters.)

Re:Freedom is born where oppression reigns (1)

Arkem Beta (1336177) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578299)

This is interesting to me, do you have a link about the illegal groups thing?

Australians do have a "constitutionally upheld" right to free speech according to the High Court, see http://www.aph.gov.au/LIBRARY/Pubs/RN/2001-02/02rn42.htm [aph.gov.au] for details. While the ruling isn't as broad as the the US 1st Amendment it still provides freedom of political communication. With this ruling it would be difficult for any Australian law to outlaw a political party.

Re:Freedom is born where oppression reigns (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29578855)

Germany has had a similiar law for ages (Â129a StGb). Left-/right-/islamist-extremist groups have been opposing the law, naturally. While I see the problems that can arise from such a law, German judges have been very careful when using it. This might change so we need to constantly watch how it is used. But I have no pity for small train-derailing, foreigner-smashing, hate-mongering groups that get punished by this law.

Re:Freedom is born where oppression reigns (1)

wtfamidoinghere (1391517) | more than 4 years ago | (#29579911)

While you say you can see the problems that can arise from such law, surprisingly you don't see that laws like this are completely redundant and unneeded. Many would agree with you that those groups of individuals you mention should get no pity, and should be handled by the law; but they should be punished for train-derailing, or for foreigner-smashing, or for hate-mongering ... not by being labeled a "terrist group" or something similar. These laws, while adding too little, can bring all sorts of wrongs within.

Re:Freedom is born where oppression reigns (1)

Ihlosi (895663) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578107)

If the U.S. doesn't want its own Piratpartiet, the government had better consider that the reason these branch offices have popped up is precisely because of heavy-handed laws that attempt to usurp the inalienable rights of users to download content for free off the internet.

The two large parties in the US can safely ignore any attempts at getting a Pirate party up and running. The election system there will make sure that such a party stays insignificant. Winner takes all and such.

Re:Freedom is born where oppression reigns (1)

Rogerborg (306625) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578229)

heavy-handed laws that attempt to usurp the inalienable rights of users to download content for free off the internet.

Why y'all be hating on the Klingons [blogspot.com]? It'll only lead to the Klingon Power Party stealing votes away from the Pirate Party.

Re:Freedom is born where oppression reigns (1)

zach_the_lizard (1317619) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578669)

inalienable rights of users to download content for free off the internet.

I disagree that downloading content for free from the Internet is a right. However, I would say that there is no right to be granted a legal monopoly on the production of any item, physical or not. This in effect makes the result the same, that users would be capable of downloading whatever they can get access to, but it is a possibly large disagreement on why they can do this.

I wonder about a system wherein copyright is not automatic or even guaranteed, a system where each producer of IP (say, an artist) establishes a contract that has a clause prohibiting the copying of the IP in question. It would be very hard to enforce, and likely not work in practice, but is has the benefit that the only people who can be charged with anything are those who agreed to and broke the contract. And then it would be a contract violation, a situation in which I feel judges are less likely to issue mega fines for copying music.

Re:Freedom is born where oppression reigns (1)

thomasw_lrd (1203850) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578903)

Unfortunately, the US political system doesn't care whether they can get a measly 2% or even 10% of the vote. Only 51% matters.

Re:Freedom is born where oppression reigns (1)

I_Voter (987579) | more than 4 years ago | (#29579417)


I am not claiming that forming a new political party in the U.S. is necessarily a bad idea. However, people should be aware of, what I believe, since the early 1900's, is the "exceptional" nature of political parties in the U.S..
Can You Define What a Political Party is? [google.com]

I_Voter

Wld U vote 4 a candidate that fails to mention if any other candidate agrees w/ them on a single (specific) issue!
See some: Modern U.S. attempts at realistic party platforms. [bit.ly]

Re:Freedom is born where oppression reigns (1)

dangitman (862676) | more than 4 years ago | (#29579697)

Any action against Net Neutrality, for one, will be one step towards establishing a Pirate Party here at home. Any action that tries to legislate morality on the internet will be one step towards a viable Pirate Party third party. The only real chance legislators have in the U.S. of stopping the growth of the Pirate Party here is ironically to embrace the tenets of the Pirate Party and implement the freedom of information it espouses.

So, you're saying that the US should be more draconian about establishing morality laws for the internet?

Yarr (4, Interesting)

acehole (174372) | more than 4 years ago | (#29577801)

I signed up as a supporter. If you're Australian and involved in IT so should you. Even if you're not but care about censorship and IP related issues, sign up. Dont let people whose policies are dictated by industries who only have how much profit they can squeeze out as their only lobbyists on such issues.

Help fight for your own rights, dont rely on others to do the work for you. Its time, step up.

Sign up! Sign up! Sign up!

Re:Yarr (3, Informative)

Andy_R (114137) | more than 4 years ago | (#29577901)

...and if you are not in Australia, sign up to your local party! [pp-international.net]

The Pirate Party will only become a major force in politics if people are prepared to put in the time, effort and cash needed to make it work. Here in the Pirate Party UK [pirateparty.org.uk], we are facing a huge challenge to raise enough money to put up a significant number of candidates in the next general election. We have 650 constituencies, each requiring a £500 deposit before we can give voters the chance to vote pirate.

Re:Yarr (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29577969)

10:15am May 2nd, 2018
Committee Chairman: You have been brought before the House Committee on Unamerican Activities to ask you are you now, or have you ever been, a member of the Pirate Party. Do you sympathize with the goals of the Pirate Party?

Re:Yarr (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29578433)

Having signed up, I also advise getting onto the IRC (#ppau at irc.piratpartiet.se). I'm a 23-year old australian IT worker with a degree in computer science, and it's a real eye-opener to see how many people local to me have the same opinions about copyright and freedom...while still managing to be reasonable and logical about it.

Even in university, I didn't come across any groups that gelled so well with my opinions and feelings. They have my support so far, and I hope they'll continue the same way in the future.

Piratenpartei got 2.0% in german elections (5, Interesting)

bostei2008 (1441027) | more than 4 years ago | (#29577847)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_Pirate_Party [wikipedia.org]

This may not sound much, but it is actually pretty good for a new and totally unknown party with a scary name. Hopefully the aims of the party (internet Censorship, civil rights etc) will now get some public attention.

Re:Piratenpartei got 2.0% in german elections (3, Informative)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 4 years ago | (#29577981)

Exactly - the PP pulled past the rightwing extremists with flying colors and taken on the title of the "biggest of the small parties". The news agencies moved them out of "Others" into their own column. To compare, the Greens got 1.5% when they first ran, and "save the Earth" sounds easier to convince people of than "copyright needs to be revised". This was a grand success! :D

Yes, they are expending fast (3, Informative)

saibot834 (1061528) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578013)

German Pirate Party gets some attention, though it could be more. They have been successful this far, because they address topics that major parties ignore (internet cencorship, civil rights, privacy, government transparency, open access, copyright, patents, ...). They got 0.9% at European Parliament election in June and now they got 2% in federal elections. Their membership number is exploding (currently almost 10,000 [piratenpartei.de], graph [piratenpartei.de]).
Even though some pirates hoped for a better result, 2% is absolutely astonishing. If their success continues (and polls show that PP has 13% of all first-time voters, some time is working for us), they may very well be in the Bundestag (parliament) in four years. By comparison, Green party had 1.5% in its first federal election in 1980 and since the following election, they are represented in the Bundestag with constantly over 5%.

Re:Yes, they are expending fast (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29578071)

13% of all first-time voters, some time is working for us

I heard that it was 13% of the male first time voters.

Re:Piratenpartei got 2.0% in german elections (1)

Ihlosi (895663) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578145)

This may not sound much, but it is actually pretty good for a new and totally unknown party with a scary name.

1. Re-Brand using a backronym in order to appeal to a more general audience.
2. Expand the party platform somewhat to be less of a single-issue party.
3. Wait four years.
4. Seats in the parliament!

Note the absence of question marks.

Re:Piratenpartei got 2.0% in german elections (1)

bluesatin (1350681) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578183)

You mean there won't be any profit?

Re:Piratenpartei got 2.0% in german elections (1)

Ihlosi (895663) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578389)

You mean there won't be any profit?

There already _is_ profit. Somewhat above €500k in campaign cost reimbursements for getting more than 0.5% of the votes. Getting seats in the parliament is the next step.

Re:Piratenpartei got 2.0% in german elections (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29578383)

1. Re-Brand using a backronym in order to appeal to a more general audience.

While I agree with your other points, the first one doesn't work. Making "PIRATEN" a backronym would only serve to liken it to the party PARTEI [wikipedia.org], the latter being a group that ridicules our much-show-little-contents politics through satire.

Re:Piratenpartei got 2.0% in german elections (1)

Ihlosi (895663) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578443)

While I agree with your other points, the first one doesn't work. Making "PIRATEN" a backronym

Make it into a three- or four-letter backronym that's still recognizable. Heck, isn't that what texting is all about? ;)

PRTN, "Partei fuer Rechte der Buerger, Technologie und Neue Medien". I'm sure that with a bit of brainstorming, they can come up with something that makes more sense. Creativity isn't one of their weak points.

Re:Piratenpartei got 2.0% in german elections (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29578483)

I would have no problem if they produced a manifesto using a backronym like that as a tongue-in-cheek, but the idea of renaming the entire party doesn't make sense to me.

Re:Piratenpartei got 2.0% in german elections (1)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578387)

Expand the party platform somewhat to be less of a single-issue party.

If they do that, they risk loosing support. One of the major reasons for this growth is that they defend a cause (against censorship and freedom of speech) which is supported by people from left and right-wings. It doesn't matter if you are more or less liberal in economic terms, if you defend Democracy, you defend freedom of speech.

Re:Piratenpartei got 2.0% in german elections (1)

Ihlosi (895663) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578409)

If they do that, they risk loosing support.

It worked for the Greens. They started out worse 30 years ago, and now they're regulars in parliament. A party that stays single-issue isn't going to _gain_ much support.

One of the major reasons for this growth is that they defend a cause (against censorship and freedom of speech) which is supported by people from left and right-wings.

And that precludes forming an opinion on other topics?

Re:Piratenpartei got 2.0% in german elections (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29578923)

There are three other parties in Germany that share those aims you listed (free democrats, green party and left party). I am glad that the PP did so well but It's not as if the PP invented those topics over here.

Failz0vrs! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29577877)

and reports and Play area try not Turned over to yet Anybody's guess 486/66 with 8

Not 2 percent in Germany (2, Interesting)

Denial93 (773403) | more than 4 years ago | (#29577883)

2 percent in Germany might not be correct. Pirate party votes have been lost in at least one voting district [wa-online.de] and it only came out because the result said no votes were cast for them, while at least three voters report voting for them. The official preliminary results for Berlin [wahlen-berlin.de] do not show pirate party votes either, although this is probably just a glitch as 3,5% were reported for Berlin before.

Investigations are ongoing.

Re:Not 2 percent in Germany (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29577999)

Yeah...3 votes were lost. I'm sure that will give them a few additional %...

Re:Not 2 percent in Germany (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29578025)

There are two tables for the results of Berlin. The first one shows the results for the 'Erststimme' (first vote) which is used to elect a direct candidate for your district. Since there were no direct candidates from the pirate party for Berlin, the number of votes is 0. The second table shows the results for the 'Zweitstimme' (second vote), which is used to assign the seats in the 'Bundestag' proportionally to all parties that gained more than 5%. As you can see, the votes for the pirate party do appear in this table.
I hope this helps. But mind you, the German election system is extremely complicated.

Greetings from the Germany.

What we actually manages to do (2, Interesting)

redhog (15207) | more than 4 years ago | (#29577895)

This is only the beginning. PP has shown that change is possible, that it is possible to reach positions where you can affect actual policies:

The swedish Pirate Party has one member in the European Parliament since this summers' election. This MEP is now one of the 14 MEPs in the group working with the european commission to work out a final solution for the Telecom package.

Keen As (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29577905)

I signed up.
Very excited that this is happening!

Could there be a more supid name (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29577907)

For a political party?

"What's the name of your organization?"
"The Pirate Party."
"Oh, aren't those the ones that believe in pirating other people's hard work?"
"No uhh... the name is a uhh... shut up, Arrr!!!!"

At last... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29577951)

a political party actually worth joining.

That Conroy luddite will cop an earful.

Pirate Party is too narrow a term (2, Insightful)

Ritontor (244585) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578033)

I think the Pirate Party should rebrand itself as the Internet Party, Digital Party or Future Party, some such thing, and just fight for the rights of all things that service the good of the Internet, which is kinda what they're doing anyway, except to the layman, who asks "what the hell has pirates got to do with the Internet"?

Re:Pirate Party is too narrow a term (1)

Ihlosi (895663) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578117)

I think the Pirate Party should rebrand itself as the Internet Party, Digital Party or Future Party, some such thing,

Duh, if they rebrand themselves, they should use a backronym, of course. Conveniently enough, Pirate starts with a P, as does Party. Just knock a few letters from "Pirate(s)" to end up with a three- to four-letter backronym palatable to the general public.

Re:Pirate Party is too narrow a term (1)

deniable (76198) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578203)

How about Digital Rights Management? DRM is good, no DRM is bad, no the other DRM.

Re:Pirate Party is too narrow a term (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29578623)

I think the Pirate Party should rebrand itself as the Internet Party, Digital Party or Future Party

I believe that would be a big mistake. "Pirate Party" may sound ridiculous at first, but "Green Party" did just the same. In contrast, renaming it would only make it lose its edge.

and just fight for the rights of all things that service the good of the Internet, which is kinda what they're doing anyway, except to the layman, who asks "what the hell has pirates got to do with the Internet"?

All the more reason to stick to the name "Pirate Party". It has a much stronger presence than "Digital Party", "Future Party" or "Internet Party" - and it can easily be associated with all of those values by informing the voters.

Re:Pirate Party is too narrow a term (1)

Xest (935314) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578917)

The Pirate Party name gets average joes asking what they actually stand for.

Calling it something mundane just leaves them thinking "Oh, just another run of the mill minority party".

Re:Pirate Party is too narrow a term (1)

MrKaos (858439) | more than 4 years ago | (#29579573)

I think the Pirate Party should rebrand itself

what about the Irate Party?

2% may not sound like much, but consider this: (1)

Ihlosi (895663) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578127)

In their first federal election in 1980, the Green party got 1.5% in Germany. And they received much, much more media attention.

Re:2% may not sound like much, but consider this: (1)

dkleinsc (563838) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578393)

Perhaps the media companies who stand to lose quite a bit if the Pirate Party gains real traction are not exactly keen on giving it a lot of attention?

Re:2% may not sound like much, but consider this: (1)

ArsenneLupin (766289) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578879)

The point is, the pirate party got more votes than the Green party back then, despite lack of media attention. How much traction do you think they'll get at the next election, when the media will have to talk about them?

Re:2% may not sound like much, but consider this: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29579713)

Sorry, try again.

There was coverage about the PP in the larger german newspapers and magazines (Zeit, Sueddeutsche, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, taz, Spiegel, ...). Don't know about TV though, don't watch it that much.

good luck (1)

Tom (822) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578215)

All the best to our australian friends. For those who didn't follow the news: The Pirate Party has reached a newsworthy 2.1% here in Germany in our general election last sunday.

It's great to see that we're becoming an international movement, and the support we're gathering is considerable.

if only (1)

hydrolyzer (1637811) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578221)

the one thing the two main political parties in australia can agree on is that having a three party system would not be beneficial to either of them, and so will pour every single resource they have into ensuring that no threat is posed to their shared domination. Maybe one or two seats will go to the pirate party, any more then that and the party that is in power will find a way to put the leaders in gaol.

ayıÅYıgı (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29578351)

http://www.ay-isigi.net/ thank you admin.

im not sure a pirate party (2, Funny)

nimbius (983462) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578355)

would gain any ground in the states, and for two reasons.

1. the average american has been boiled like a frog into accepting the illegality of downloading content that majority shareholders and major corporations deem "unsuitable." id hate to even think it, but it almost seems as though we just dont care about or rights and freedoms as long as we're marketed a product that appears to cater to our wants reglardless of our rights (ipod and zune for example)

2. most americans and lawmakers especially would have a terrible time not associating the pirate party with somali pirates, if not at least subconsciously. This would need to be retooled to have a prettier name at very least.

finally for extra credit, americans have trouble with things like sex and sexuality, so if there were an initiative as pervasive as AU to censor our tubes, its hard to think there would be much if any resistance to it simply based on our culture. Just my theory.

Re:im not sure a pirate party (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29578809)

2. most americans and lawmakers especially would have a terrible time not associating the pirate party with somali pirates, if not at least subconsciously. This would need to be retooled to have a prettier name at very least.

I see the problem here, since my sister also thinks that a download manager is some kind of boss at the docks.
Probably something like "Privateering Party" would appeal more to the American voters? Or something fluffier, like "Corsairs'R'Us"?

americans have trouble with things like sex and sexuality

I.... can't....Too many jokes.....

Re:im not sure a pirate party (1)

ZOmegaZ (687142) | more than 4 years ago | (#29579399)

Well, I'm running for US Congress with their endorsement, so we'll just see about that next November. :-)

They may just get a seat. (2, Informative)

shitdrummer (523404) | more than 4 years ago | (#29578509)

They may just get a seat.

One of our current federal senators is Seven Fielding, of the christian political party called Family First. http://www.stevefielding.com.au/ [stevefielding.com.au]

That fool got his seat with only 1.8% of the primary vote. The remainder were on preferences.

Mr 2% (1)

TapeCutter (624760) | more than 4 years ago | (#29579695)

Seven Fielding AKA "Mr two percent" can under certain circumstances hold the balance of power and is the reason the government is having yet another "Yes Minister" inquiry into net censorship. This is why Aussies don't take the "threat" of a mandatory filter seriously, we all know it will never fly. Both sides play this game, it's just political theater to keep independent nuts busy chasing their tails. I believe Fielding has gone off the idea a bit now that his own anti-abortion supporters have appeared on the convienently leaked test blacklist.

Personally I don't want the PP or anyone else with a measley 2% winning a seat via a preference quirk but as you demonstrated, it happens.

The GPL (1)

DAldredge (2353) | more than 4 years ago | (#29579659)

How quickly people forget that the GPL relies on copyright to function.

Re:The GPL (1)

PeterBrett (780946) | more than 4 years ago | (#29579899)

How quickly people forget that the GPL relies on copyright to function.

No, it's not forgotten at all. Stallman raised this issue a few weeks ago [gnu.org], and since then the Pirate Party UK [pirateparty.org.uk], at least, has decided to adopt the solution he proposed:

...a special rule for free software: to make copyright last longer for free software, so that it can continue to be copylefted. This explicit exception for free software would counterbalance the effective exception for proprietary software. Even ten years ought to be enough, I think.

(Okay, not exactly, because the exception would be for software released with source code, rather than for Free software explicitly).

ma8e (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29579979)

take a look at thhe I type this. at this point ofone single puny

They shoudln't have advertised for a President (2, Insightful)

fast turtle (1118037) | more than 4 years ago | (#29580019)

That's not the Pirate Way. What they needed was a Captain, A second Officer, Master at Arms, Helmsman, Navigator and you certainly can't forget cook. That's what it takes to run each and every pirate ship we have, not some new fangled rank like President.

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