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Cosmic Ray Intensity Reaches Highest Levels In 50 years

samzenpus posted more than 4 years ago | from the start-the-mutations dept.

Space 263

An anonymous reader writes "A NASA probe found that cosmic ray intensities in 2009 had increased by almost 20 percent beyond anything seen in the past 50 years. Such cosmic rays arise from distant supernova explosions and consist mostly of protons and heavier subatomic particles — just one cosmic ray could disable unlucky satellites or even put a mission to Mars in jeopardy."

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263 comments

Cosmic Warming? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601205)

Clearly we need more energy-efficient stars.

Cosmic Niggers? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601441)

HOW TO BE A WORTHLESS, VILE, AMERICAN YARD-APE!!!!


Slink around, shuffling your feet and bobbing your neck like the lazy retard you are.

Walk down the middle of the street because you don't know what a sidewalk is for.

Hang out at carwashes and mini-marts because everybody knows these are the best places to be a dope, I mean dope.

If you're a nigger bitch, shit three nigger babies into the world before 17 years of age. This assures that welfare money will support you, so your nigger men have more time to commit crimes.

And give REAL honest black people a bad name.

Oh yes, make sure each nigger baby has a different father.

Bastardize the English language in the name of nigger culture.

Make sure that several terms have multiple meanings and others have ambiguous meanings and that only 50% of nigger words are even complete words. Real niggers will know what you're trying to say.

As a culture, make sure there are always more blacks in prison than in college at any given time.

Hang out in packs of 10 to 15 and make sure everyone acts as annoying as possible. This helps to promote nigger individuality.

Always talk loud enough so everyone in the 'hood can fucking hear you, and if they are niggers, they will know what your saying, bro.

Wear clothes that are 10 sizes too big, making sure the pants hang off your ass.

Park at least 5 junk cars in your yard while being careful not to use the driveway. It's OK to abandon them in the street as long as it's in front of someone else's crib.

Exaggerate every motion, every tonal inflection and grab your dick a lot.

Do drugs, sell drugs, make drugs. Okay, don't REALLY do this, but it IS what niggers do.

Turn your backyard into a junk yard. If you don't have a backyard, turn your mother's into a junk yard.

Travel around leaching off relatives, friends, salvation armies.

Drink cheap wine and malt liquor every day, forgetting that "malt liquor" is just fortified cheap beer.

If you're a nigger buck: fuck anything that moves, no matter how ugly she is. After two 40oz, even the ugliest, fattest nigger bitch will look good.

Be charitable and covet fat, ugly white chicks. After all, they're niggers too. They can't help being so undesirable to white men that they have to fraternize with black dudes on a 20/20 trip. And white ho's are a special trophy too, especially the not so ugly ones.

Spray paint everything in sight with scribbles that mean nothing to white people but mean things to fellow niggers (except niggers from another hood who will probably go after you for tresspassing on their turf).

Use the term "motherfucker" in every sentence. It's one of the most versatile words in the nigger language, being a noun, verb, adjective and complete mini-sentence in event you run out of thoughts.

Stop in the middle of the street, blocking all traffic to converse with fellow niggers and have complete disregard for everyone else.

Overcharge customers at Taco Bell and pocket the difference.

Drive your car while slouched so low that you can barely see over the wheel (gangsta drivin').

Get a job under affirmative action. Then sit around all day pretending that you earned the position and that the other co-workers respect you. Whenever you fuck up, scream "racism!" & hope you get enough Generation X liberals in the jury.

Never, I mean NEVER, take any responsibility for your actions. Always blame others including Asians, Latinos, Mexicans, and especially Whites for your sorry ass stupid lives.

Be sure to get a dog, tie it up in the cold and mud and neglect it until it dies. Then start all over again. Cash must be used because you long ago fucked up your credit and checking account.

Cram 5 generations into a two room government apartment and still be able to neglect your kids.


Then you too can be a true nigger, and anyone who finds any fault with anything you do is automatically a racist. They don't dislike what you do and wish you would do something better with your life, nor do they wish you would realize that other people exist and should be treated with respect. No, they're just racists who hate you because of the color of your skin, and everything bad in your life is their fault. You nigger.

Re:Cosmic Niggers? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601623)

Thanks for posting this... it made me lol.

Mods have to admit there are some kernels of truth to this troll.

Thanks, AC.

Re:Cosmic Niggers? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601691)

tl;dr

Re:Cosmic Warming? (0, Troll)

stms (1132653) | more than 4 years ago | (#29602027)

Clearly we need more energy-efficient stars.

Don't blame the stars. How is Al Gore going to make money off of that.

I've got one thing to say to that... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601221)

Hello superpowers! I hope I get flight!

Re:I've got one thing to say to that... (1)

AmigaMMC (1103025) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601825)

I want to be invisible, then you'll see me spoiling the Vatican's secrets... oops!

global warming (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601223)

Yet more proof of global warming

Re:global warming (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601379)

Counting down to Bush ghey boys modding OP Troll in 5, 4, 3, ...

BOFH (4, Funny)

xanadu-xtroot.com (450073) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601225)

BOFH Excuse #98734

"It's Cosmic Rays mutating the electrons."

Re:BOFH (4, Funny)

cjfs (1253208) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601257)

It's Cosmic Rays mutating the electrons.

My 150.00 gold-plated Monster HDMI cable protects against those. It must be something else this time.

Re:BOFH (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601923)

OH YEAH? Well, my $300 gold-plated Monster HDMI cable absorbs them and converts them to audio warmth for a more in tune with the universe sound..

Clinton's fault (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601227)

Bush did the best he could with the hand he was dealt.

Re:Clinton's fault (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601591)

Unfortunately, his best was pretty fucking miserable.

Re:Clinton's fault (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601975)

...but we weren't done plumbing the depths of horrible presidents, so we followed him up with a *real* loser. I wonder who we'll follow Obama up with, or if maybe we'll have learned our lesson about electing corrupt idiots by then.

Global warming? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601231)

Such cosmic rays arise from distant supernova explosions and consist mostly of protons and heavier subatomic particles â" just one cosmic ray could disable unlucky satellites or even put a mission to Mars in jeopardy."

And don't forget they cause global warming too! Things are about to get much, much worse.

I mean, this is even better than sunspots!

putting a mission to Mars in Jeopardy. (4, Funny)

FooAtWFU (699187) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601247)

In this Brian de Palma film, a mission to rescue astronauts stranded on the titular planet finds a hill shaped like a giant face, with alien technology inside.

Oh good grief... (5, Funny)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601253)

Will the legacy of environmental disaster that was George W. Bush's presidency never end?

Re:Oh good grief... (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601381)

Clearly, we need a longer school year and racist Supreme Court Justices.

Re:Oh good grief... (2, Insightful)

ClosedSource (238333) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601495)

I don't know about longer school years but the US has never had a shortage of racist Supreme Court Justices.

Re:Oh good grief... (0, Offtopic)

macshit (157376) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601485)

Will the legacy of environmental disaster that was George W. Bush's presidency never end?

He's not dead yet!

Mod parent down -- Politically Incorrect! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601815)

Parent is a Bush hater and obviously an environmentalist! This is incompatible with the political fashion around here--he must be modded down for being offensive! Why do you hate Bush? Why do you hate our freedoms?

global cooling (1, Informative)

cdn-programmer (468978) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601273)

The increased cosmic ray flux will undoubtably cause global cooling. The high energy rays and penetrate deep into the atmosphere where they create nucleation points which increase cloud over. The inreased cloud cover reflects more energy into space and the planet will cool.

This is likely the mechanizm behind the little ice age which occurred during the Maunder minimum between 1645 and 1715.

At this point solar cycle #24 is more than 2 years late. Solar cycle #25 was predicted to be very weak but #24 was predicted to be more or less normal. The predictions for #24 are proving to be in error.

A cooling trend can go on for decades.

Re:global cooling (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601329)

Cool! Then we have to do ABSOLUTELY NOTHING about the projected temperature increase of 4-5C around 2060 I read about on the BBC yesterday! YAY personal responsibility.

Re:global cooling (4, Funny)

brentonboy (1067468) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601331)

Yay! This is our chance to use up all the fossil fuels real quick-like and then by the time the cold spell is over we'll all be using nuclear and solar panels.

Re:global cooling (3, Interesting)

digitalunity (19107) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601451)

Terrible plan. When the next sun cycle starts and the cloud cover is gone, global warming will hit us like a train.

Better idea is to use geothermal heating to keep us all warm during an ice age. The technology exists today but there is no reason to use it while energy is cheap. A period of rapid global cooling would cause energy prices to skyrocket as electric, gas, oil and wood furnaces blaze to keep people warm. The coal plants will roar ahead like nothing is wrong, wind and solar won't be doing very well but that's ok - they dont make up much of the grid right now anyway.

If global cooling became a real problem, food shortage would actually be the most serious impediment to our survival. Extra rain would be good, but the reduced sunlight would hurt crops catastrophically and the average surface temperature really doesn't need to go down that much for crops to be impacted.

Re:global cooling (1)

Shakrai (717556) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601911)

If global cooling became a real problem, food shortage would actually be the most serious impediment to our survival.

It'd be more realistic to say that it'd be a serious impediment to the survival of those in poorer nations. Do you really see the people of the United States or Western Europe wanting for food?

Re:global cooling (1)

farrellj (563) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601487)

I wonder if this intensity of cosmic rays is what is fscking up the sun-spot cycle on our local star?

Re:global cooling (2, Informative)

Verteiron (224042) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601555)

Or vice versa: The screwy solar cycle is messing with the heliopheric current sheet and thus allowing more cosmic rays to enter the system. We know that even minor solar fluctuations can manipulate the termination shock, so the idea is not -entirely- implausible. Dress it up in some Star Trek language and it'll sound more convincing.

Re:global cooling (2, Funny)

elthicko (1399175) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601927)

Maybe it's those bastards doing warp 10 around the sun causing all the problems. If only we could reverse the polarity on the main deflector to radiate a tachyon pulse directly into the sun. That oughta solve any problem we come across.

Your Universal WX forecast (2, Funny)

SpaceLifeForm (228190) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601937)

Mostly clear with scattered cosmic rays, some heavy. Temperature near steady at 3K. Stellar winds light and variable except near stars.

Re:global cooling (5, Informative)

bughunter (10093) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601651)

The high energy rays and penetrate deep into the atmosphere where they create nucleation points which increase cloud over. The inreased cloud cover reflects more energy into space and the planet will cool.

Why didn't you provide any citations? Perhaps because it was [sciencedaily.com] disproved [discovermagazine.com] in 2007 [wired.com].

Thirty seconds with google and the keywords "cosmic rays global warming [google.com]" brought a wealth of stories describing research which found no correlation of any kind between cosmic ray flux and cloud cover. Sure, you'll find articles describing this theory, but it's called a "hypothesis," and "controversial" at best. And all those stories are older than the 2008 analysis of MODIS data.

Re:global cooling (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601709)

Hopefully GP will eventually get modded down. Grats on using citations.

Re:global cooling (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601693)

[...] The inreased cloud cover reflects more energy into space and the planet will cool. [...]

True, clouds do increase the reflection of solar radiation, but there is also a greenhouse effect which reduces outgoing radiation.
A slight increase in clouds could help cool the Earth, but too many clouds could help warm it.

Realize that there is a lot of uncertainty around clouds and their global warming/cooling effects.

Re:global cooling (1)

coldmist (154493) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601855)

Now wait. You are saying the Maunder Minimum, which corresponded with fewer solar flares (well, almost none, really) was from the same "mechanizm", ie increased cosmic rays?

Are you implying that cosmic rays influence the solar flares, or are you really that "cloud covered" (ie dim) to say same net effect from two independent sources is really the same source?

Re:global cooling (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601939)

Cloud cover is both a reflector and an insulator.

I guess the paranoids were right, sorta (1)

Captain Spam (66120) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601283)

A NASA probe found that cosmic ray intensities in 2009 had increased by almost 20 percent beyond anything seen in the past 50 years.

Well, crap, then. Maybe we actually SHOULD all get out our tinfoil hats.

Actually, lead foil might be a better bet...

Re:I guess the paranoids were right, sorta (1)

Bob_Who (926234) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601725)

Actually, lead foil might be a better bet...

No silly.... lead is why the Romans forgot to wear their helmets.

Re:I guess the paranoids were right, sorta (1)

wellingj (1030460) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601749)

No problem. I'll just use the lead foil that I was using to wrap my sandwiches in... Can't be to careful in this nuclear age ya' know?

Re:I guess the paranoids were right, sorta (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601903)

Or, you could create a full helmet out of aluminum screen, which is grounded. At least that in principal would act like a Faraday cage and block most frequencies.

What are the chances? (4, Funny)

Ironchew (1069966) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601295)

Cosmic rays damaging electronic equipment? I've been using this computer for years and my RAM is doing just fi

Re:What are the chances? (4, Funny)

siddesu (698447) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601335)

How did you manage to submit half the posting after your RAM was hit by a cosmic ra

Re:What are the chances? (5, Funny)

B4light (1144317) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601367)

I don't suppose Candlejack has anything to do wi

Re:What are the chances? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601521)

in the olden days, by crackey we would use the
NO CARRIER
joke. you younguns wouldn't even know what a carrier was.
Now get off my lawn.

Re:What are the chances? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601539)

Meh. No carrier happens when the FBI cuts your phone line. In this case, his computer was hit by a cosmic ray. Totally different joke. Obviously land-mowing don't make you smart.

Re:What are the chances? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601771)

you younguns wouldn't even know what a carrier was.

A big boat that holds airplanes?

Why it's more dangerous. (5, Informative)

Jason Pollock (45537) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601303)

I was wondering, "Why are cosmic rays so dangerous, It's just protons and electrons, just like the solar wind".

However, there's a huge energy difference between the two.

The particles in cosmic radiation have 1x10^20eV and the solar wind is 1x10^3eV

So, while it's the same "stuff", the cosmic particles are moving a lot faster relative to us.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_wind [wikipedia.org]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosmic_radiation [wikipedia.org]

Re:Why it's more dangerous. (4, Funny)

MachDelta (704883) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601425)

So it's like the difference between being hit by a car going 1mph and one going 100,000,000,000,000,000mph? Am I doing these car analogy things right?

Re:Why it's more dangerous. (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601721)

The car analogy should more properly compare the increase in non-relativistic Kinetic Energy. KE=0.5 m v^2, so it should be an increase of sqrt(10^17), which is about 3 x 10^8 (also amusingly the speed of light in S.I. units).

like the difference between being hit by a car going 1mph and one going 300'000'000mph?

Re:Why it's more dangerous. (1)

flydude18 (839328) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601729)

Almost. The kinetic energy of the car is proportional to the square of the velocity. So, if the energy goes up by a factor of 1e17, the corresponding velocity increase is only by a factor of sqrt(1e17), or about 3e8.

Re:Why it's more dangerous. (4, Funny)

ignavus (213578) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601783)

So it's like the difference between being hit by a car going 1mph and one going 100,000,000,000,000,000mph? Am I doing these car analogy things right?

But the cars are very tiny.

Re:Why it's more dangerous. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29602031)

And also your body is made of cars.

Re:Why it's more dangerous. (1)

DirePickle (796986) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601879)

It's really more like the difference between getting hit by a pebble at 1mm per hour and a baseball at 23mph. ;)

Re:Why it's more dangerous. (1)

antibryce (124264) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601979)

it's more like the difference between Moby Dick and the entire Library of Congress.

Re:Why it's more dangerous. (1)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601567)

I dunno - I thought it happened every time Nemesis came around. The Mayan calendar, and all that other nonsense. The dark star approaches (insert something sinister, like the theme from Jaws) and there's nothing we can do about it!!

Re:Why it's more dangerous. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601891)

Multipass?

Re:Why it's more dangerous. (2, Interesting)

somepunk (720296) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601885)

That's the most extreme upper limit. Only a handful of these extremem events [fourmilab.ch] have been recorded. Furthermore, cosmic rays (like particles from solar wind) almost never impact you directly, unless you're in space. They interact with the atmosphere, creating showers of particles, which spread the energy over a large area. I'm not going to do the math now, but the useful figure for effecting electronics might be per square cm per year, at ground level. Most of the cross section of your computer wouldn't notice much if some ionizing radiation passed through it. The CPU and major chips are a pretty small portion of total area. The magnetic domains on your disk platters are probably large enough to be unaffected.

Great (1)

abbynormal brain (1637419) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601305)

Prepare for a new wave of Earth destruction movies. On a serious note, anyone know a good page, paper, or interesting sites concerning the heliosphere?

Use ECC Memory (1, Insightful)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601309)

I guess now would be a good time to use ECC RAM in consumer PCs and not just servers anymore. In fact, I've always been in favor of ECC in every workstation. At least nVidia is talking it seriously.

FYI. Cosmic rays have been known to cause bit-flips in RAM. That's why using ECC is important in preventing data corruption committed back to disk.

*rimshot* (4, Funny)

Valdrax (32670) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601355)

FYI. Cosmic rays have been known to cause bit-flips in RAM.

But the odds are astronomical.

Re:*rimshot* (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601413)

But since the rays are cosmic, they cancel out the astronomical probability.

ECC FTW. Too bad Apple only has the Mac Pro with ECC support.

Re:*rimshot* (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601807)

But the odds are economical .

FTFY

Re:Use ECC Memory (2, Interesting)

Timothy Brownawell (627747) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601433)

I guess now would be a good time to use ECC RAM in consumer PCs and not just servers anymore.

Note that Intel are a bunch of $^@#! and try to segment the market by disabling this on their desktop processors. I've been trying to decide whether getting ECC might just be worth taking the 30% (or whatever it is at your favored price point) performance hit of going with AMD.

Re:Use ECC Memory (2, Informative)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601681)

According to Crucial and other sites that benchmark, going ECC is only 2% slower than non-ECC memory. That's a very good trade off for reliability IMHO.

As for Intel. Yes, ECC support is restricted to their Xeon line now. You will also need a workstation motherboard. Even though Intel's latest "high-end" desktop gaming board (X58 chipset) supports the Xeon CPU, ECC support is not available. At least, no reference was mentioned in the manual.

I think my next workstation build will be AMD based.

WTF??? (2, Insightful)

vrmlguy (120854) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601315)

Centuries ago, cosmic-ray concentrations grew to be as much as 200 percent more intense than they are now, yet humankind survived.

How do we know this? Who was measuring cosmic-ray concentrations centuries ago, and how did they measure them? How accurate were the measurements, and how certain are we of that accuracy?

According to wikipedia [wikipedia.org], "In 1910 Theodor Wulf developed an electrometer (a device to measure the rate of ion production inside a hermetically sealed container) and used it to show higher levels of radiation at the top of the Eiffel Tower than at its base." That sounds like a bit less than "centuries ago".

Re:WTF??? (2, Informative)

Vellmont (569020) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601467)


How do we know this?

We understand the theory of what influence cosmic rays numbers. It's the solar cycles and the earth's magnetic field. The magnetic field we have geologic evidence of it's strength. Sunspot numbers have sporadic data going back 400 years (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sunspot_Numbers.png).

There's plenty of phenomenon we predict using indirect observations and theory.

Re:WTF??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601471)

Measuring the isotope concentrations of different elements relative to today's values will be an indicator for the amount of external radiation that the system has received.

As a matter of fact (1)

binaryseraph (955557) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601399)

"...or even put a mission to Mars in jeopardy." If you are talking about a human mission to Mars, even the lightest of cosmic radiation would only allow for a one way trip for any human. A round trip would provide fatal doses (just a side note).

Time to change the climate? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601405)

Yes, I know it's the height of transhumanist hubris. But news like this make me wonder if now is the time to start thinking about causing rather than preventing climate change. I mean, whether we like it or not, with or without us, the climate will change. We have proof of this from Ant/arctic core samples and other sources that point to prehistoric changes in the Earth's atmosphere. It was warmer during the time of the dinosaurs and colder during the reign of the mammoths. Maybe it's time to start testing those orbital solar reflectors or beefing up our Near Earth Asteroid Tracking [nasa.gov] efforts?

Re:Time to change the climate? (1)

symbolset (646467) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601481)

If we're going to set a course of deliberate climate change, I'm going to go out on a limb and nominate Mars for the pilot project. Let's try it there and if it works, bring it home.

Re:Time to change the climate? (1)

pclminion (145572) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601563)

I don't think that makes sense. Mars, as far as we know, doesn't have a pervasive biosphere. The reaction of the Martian climate to a given input probably has no correlation at all to the reaction the Earth's climate would have to the same input. Think about the amount of CO2 which is modulated into/out of the atmosphere by life.

Re:Time to change the climate? (1)

Valdrax (32670) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601859)

I mean, whether we like it or not, with or without us, the climate will change. We have proof of this from Ant/arctic core samples and other sources that point to prehistoric changes in the Earth's atmosphere. It was warmer during the time of the dinosaurs and colder during the reign of the mammoths.

No one disputes this -- at least not on the side of people who accept the reality of anthropogenic climate change. The important difference is that the changes you list took VERY long times to happen; even so, many species couldn't adapt.

Maybe it's time to start testing those orbital solar reflectors or beefing up our Near Earth Asteroid Tracking efforts?

Maybe it would be actually much cheaper to change things on the ground rather than to attempt a MASSIVE orbital engineering project. You think it's a bitch getting modern industrial societies to pay to save energy and switch generation sources? Imagine trying to fund a project to put a structure large enough to shade the Earth in a stable position between us and the Sun (i.e. the L1 point).

So, yeah, no. But it's not like we can do a damn thing about cosmic rays, and it's not like they have much influence on global warming, [sciencedaily.com] anyway.

Re:Time to change the climate? (1)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 4 years ago | (#29602001)

attempting to engineer our climate is a massive fuck up. anyone who suggests it needs to step back and evaluate thier compertence....

That's what happens when the Sun is Quiet (3, Informative)

mbone (558574) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601435)

The Sun has been very quiet recently, so this is not surprising. Now that the Sunspots are back [westender.com.au] and the Sun is getting more active, I would expect things to go back to normal.

Bring on the mutants (2, Funny)

NotQuiteReal (608241) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601461)

Let's hear it for cosmic rays. We need something to kick evolution into gear. Things seem to have been at a standstill lately.

Re:Bring on the mutants (1)

Idiomatick (976696) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601745)

Sort of an interesting idea. We know evolution proceeds in quick leaps ever once in a while. While I'm sure much of these had more to do with temperature and oxygen levels. But I bet certain cosmic events could act as a catalyst for evolution. Even if cosmic rays aren't necessarily one of them.

New Energy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601529)

Aside from being able create a Mr. Fantasic or a Human Torch or any other character from the Fantastic 4 series is there any way that the energy from these intensified cosmic rays can be harvested. If so who knows that could be the fuel alternative that we have been looking for....

The sun shines out of my butt (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601569)

...and I farted.

Sorry.

Further proof... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601599)

...that man-made global warming is a ridiculous liberal myth.

Not a Big Problem. (5, Informative)

Suicidal Gir (939232) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601699)

I wouldn't raise alarm too much, cosmic rays affect a space craft in mainly three ways: Single Even Upset (SEU), Single Event Latchup (SEL), and Total Ionization Dose (TID) measured in kRad. The higher cosmic rays increase the TID, but all these satellites are built for it and it shouldn't raise an alarm except for very long term missions. SEUs and SELs are what the phrase "just one cosmic ray could disable unlucky satellites or even put a mission to Mars in jeopardy." is mentioning. SEUs aren't too much too worry about, usually nothing too harmful, just a few errors and at worst a reset of some subsystems. The bad one is the SELs. These can cause a temporary short and potentially cause damage. The key thing with SEUs and SELs is that they're typically temporary and the spacecraft's power systems nowadays can easily handle them. The solid state switches/fuses they started with Cassini (and are now typical for NASA missions) are very effective (accidently proven so during integration) and can cut off a shorted subsystem quite fast and prevent damage.

In a nutshell, don't get your panties in a bunch.

I Call BS (1)

rozthepimp (638319) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601703)

I went to school with Cosmic Ray and I know for a fact that he died in some ugly drowning incident involving a bong. Ray Dead = No more Cosmic Ray.

Solar Wind Decreasing (1, Informative)

jameskojiro (705701) | more than 4 years ago | (#29601821)

The solar activity is decreasing we are in a sunspot minimum temps will decrease on the earth and more cosmic rays will mean more rainfall due to the "cloud chamber effect" in the upper atmosphere.

CIA and cosmic rays (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601941)

another good reason for my tinfoil hat.

More cosmic rays caused by weak solar wind (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29601959)

weak solar wind -> more cosmic rays reaching us
any effects on climate are subject to debate/further research. We'll find out. Solar wind's been super low for the last year.

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