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Cyber-criminal Left In Charge of Prison Computer Network

samzenpus posted more than 4 years ago | from the fox-in-the-hen-house dept.

Security 389

samzenpus writes "A 27-year-old man serving six years for stealing £6.5million using forged credit cards over the internet was recruited to help write code needed for the installation of an internal prison TV station. He was left unguarded with unfettered access to the system and produced results that anyone but prison officials could have guessed. He installed a series of passwords on all the machines, shutting down the entire prison computer system. A prison source said, 'It's unbelievable that a criminal convicted of cyber-crime was allowed uncontrolled access to the hard drive. He set up such an elaborate array of passwords it took a specialist company to get it working.'"

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389 comments

Don't they... (5, Funny)

daninspokane (1198749) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672525)

...hire these people for the FBI or something? At least that's how the movies go...

Re:Don't they... (5, Funny)

eln (21727) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672995)

Nah, that's just what they tell the rubes at DEFCON to make them want to get caught. They go up and show a bunch of faked pictures of hackers in FBI t-shirts tanning themselves on the roof of the J. Edgar Hoover building with a couple of scantily-clad "analysts", and tell everyone how these hackers were so good that they ended up being hired by the FBI and are now living happily ever after. Meanwhile, the burned up corpses of these hackers are resting in an abandoned locker room in the middle of a post-apocalyptic hellscape near a satellite uplink station. You know, sort of like in The Running Man.

Re:Don't they... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29673053)

Nah, that's just what they tell the rubes at DEFCON to make them want to get caught. They go up and show a bunch of faked pictures of hackers in FBI t-shirts tanning themselves on the roof of the J. Edgar Hoover building with a couple of scantily-clad "analysts", and tell everyone how these hackers were so good that they ended up being hired by the FBI and are now living happily ever after. Meanwhile, the burned up corpses of these hackers are resting in an abandoned locker room in the middle of a post-apocalyptic hellscape near a satellite uplink station. You know, sort of like in The Running Man.

I lolled :) Thank you!

Re:Don't they... (0, Offtopic)

Jeng (926980) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673305)

The book was soooo much better.

The only things that the book shares with the movie is the title and the name of the characters. Just about every single thing is different.

Re:Don't they... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29673427)

You know what else was soooo much better? The parent post. It was at least funny. No one asked for your opinion of The Running Man movie. I bet you pull that shit in real life and then wonder why everyone just walks away from you, mouths gaping wide open in disbelief.

Re:Don't they... (4, Informative)

JeffSpudrinski (1310127) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672999)

Paragraph 4 of TFA has the hidden "gem":

"The blunder emerged a week after the Sunday Mirror revealed how an inmate at the same jail managed to get a key cut that opened every door."

I wonder if that fella was employed as a locksmith at the jail after having been arrested for breaking and entering...

From The Country That Brought You (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29673071)

the Three Aghan Wars [wikipedia.org] in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Finish the current one on your own.

Yours In Bashkortostan,
Philboyd Studge

OMG NOT THE HARD DRIVE ONE ONE 1111 (1)

Anarke_Incarnate (733529) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672527)

This guy wants to appear like he is technical but only makes himself look foolish. The operating system was compromised. The protections should have been put in place to limit his rights to access the system and should always have been done so under supervision and with logging. They were foolish, he did what was to be expected

OTOH... (1)

tfmachad (1386141) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673005)

...the hacker guy tried to be funny but only made things worse for himself. There was no way he could get away with it. He should have tried something a bit more subtle, like installing some malware to collect data on the users for 'future reference'. He was foolish, they, in turn, did to him what was to be expected.

6yrs.. turned into LIFE.. what a moron (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29672549)

6yrs.. turned into LIFE.. what a moron

Re:6yrs.. turned into LIFE.. what a moron (1)

Jeng (926980) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673267)

Agreed.

He could have done the RIGHT thing which would have not only shortened his sentence, it would have looked great on his resume.

Well, at least it would have looked better than what he did.

ehh (1, Interesting)

Dyinobal (1427207) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672565)

I stumbled this a long while ago. I'm surprised to see it is just now on slashdot.

Re:ehh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29673171)

I stumbled this a long while ago. I'm surprised to see it is just now on slashdot.

Well then, you should have submitted it as a story to slashdot a long while ago ! :)

Stupid Brits (5, Funny)

Absolut187 (816431) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672567)

Thats almost as dumb as putting a Halliburton CEO in charge of the entire military.

Luckily nothing that stupid would ever happen here in America.

Re:Stupid Brits (3, Funny)

MrSenile (759314) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672811)

Or starring Jeffrery Dahmer on an episode of Iron Chef.

Re:Stupid Brits (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29672873)

Nah, that's ok. The contestants don't get to pick the theme ingredient. Having him sub for Chairman Kaga, now, that'd be a bad idea.

Still, it would give a whole new meaning to the "Tasting and Judgement" segment.

Re:Stupid Brits (3, Insightful)

Attila Dimedici (1036002) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672827)

Thats almost as dumb as putting a Halliburton CEO in charge of the entire military.

Luckily nothing that stupid would ever happen here in America.

You're right, that never happened. While Dick Cheney was at one point the CEO of Halliburton, he was in charge of the U.S. military before he worked for Halliburton. As Vice President he had no authority over the military.

Re:Stupid Brits (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29673047)

Just because he had no "authority" didn't mean he didn't assert control. I seem to recall that it was Cheney's office that provided the falsified intelligence that was used to justify the war in Iraq. Authority is only required if you have ethics.

Re:Stupid Brits (1)

Jack9 (11421) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673083)

If the military was assigned to "protect" the interests of Haliburton (which it was), there was indirect control. Nice revisionism.

Re:Stupid Brits (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29672943)

The VP has no military powers. None. Your comment should be letting a trust fund kiddie coke-head alcoholic who has driven at least two companies into the ground run the US Military. I know middle-america is big on born-agains, but please stop voting them into office. Thanks.

Press release (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29672569)

Chicken Coop, Inc. is proud to announce the promotion of Mr. Fox to the position of chief of security...

This is who the Joker recruited. (1)

xxuserxx (1341131) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672571)

This was the same guy who helped the joker take over Arkham Asylum.

Re:This is who the Joker recruited. (1)

The Archon V2.0 (782634) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672733)

This was the same guy who helped the joker take over Arkham Asylum.

Well, the inmates are clearly running the asylum, and there's at least one joker in the prison's security or management structure, but somehow I don't think that's what you meant.

Six years? (2, Insightful)

sitarlo (792966) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672583)

6.5 million pounds vs. six years in prison. Considering 20 years in cube for about 2.5 million pounds total, this crime thing is looking like a better alternative career!

Re:Six years? (4, Insightful)

Absolut187 (816431) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672783)

Yeah, I'm sure they let him keep the money.

How the hell is parent insightful???

Re:Six years? (3, Insightful)

sitarlo (792966) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673001)

Because I'm sure he had time to either squander, launder or hide a lot of his take. It's not like criminals open a domestic bank account and deposit their loot then report it to the queen. This dude may be broke, but then again, he may have a bundle waiting for him when he gets out. Or, he may have lived large while he was operating and now he's paying the price. Still, I think it is comparable to cubical life. People who work for corporations that knowingly screw consumers aren't really on a higher moral ground in my opinion.

Re:Six years? (4, Insightful)

Clandestine_Blaze (1019274) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673117)

I think the poster that you're replying to was implying that the six year sentence is hardly a deterrent for the amount that the criminal was convicted for stealing. If stealing 6.5 million pounds gets you six years in the slammer, and the alternative is working 20 years for only 2.5 million pounds, then suddenly the risk of getting caught doesn't seem so bad.

(Well, I wouldn't want to even spend one minute in prison, let alone six years, but that's just me :-D )

I think their whole point was that six years is way too small of a sentence for someone who stole that much money, not that he got to keep it after he was released. Keep in mind, there are cyber-criminals that are still at large, so there are some that get away with it. They usually get caught only when they don't know their boundaries and try to go for TOO much.

Re:Six years? (1)

cs668 (89484) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673329)

Burn through 1 Mil, hide the rest and tell the cops you spent it all on drugs and hookers!

Re:Six years? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29673359)

They don't always find all the money.

Hey Warden, isn't Catch me if you Can. (1)

Uchiha (811374) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672587)

Failbus. What did they offer him to do this? He might've helped them out if they actually offered him something instead of doing it out of the godness of his heart.

Hmmm. (2, Insightful)

CannonballHead (842625) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672607)

Interesting that inmates have access to computers and TV. I'm glad we pay for that for them while normal citizens are having a hard time finding a job...

Re:Hmmm. (1, Interesting)

TheCarp (96830) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672679)

It makes me feel better actually. I hate to think that we have ridiculous laws that can wind a person up in prison for something as silly as growing a plant for his own use.... so its good to know that its not a total hell hole. Given that simple drug possession is one of the most common reasons for being behind bars.... this seems wholly appropriate.

Until they fix the reasons that people go there, I can't support anything that makes being in there unpleasant.

-Steve

Re:Hmmm. (1, Troll)

Kokuyo (549451) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672843)

Is it just me or is there a lot of Troll/Flamebait moderating going on lately about things that are not quite a majority opinion? I suspect someone doesn't like me much, too, as I'm getting modded Troll days after having been modded Insightful or some such. And I'm not the only one.

Anyone else get the same vibes?

Re:Hmmm. (1)

Chickan (1070300) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673003)

No, its just TheCarp's suggestion that we should make prison pleasant because we have bad laws that put "good" people behind bars is retarded. Prison is meant to be punishment, if you don't agree with some of the laws write your congressman.

Re:Hmmm. (0, Flamebait)

olsmeister (1488789) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673077)

I currently have mod points, and nearly modded you flamebait just to piss you off, but decided not to. Hey, they're too precious to waste! ;)

Re:Hmmm. (2, Insightful)

lorenlal (164133) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673097)

Answer:
Sort of. It seems that there's a group of mods who've decided that anything that's subjective, or opinionated will be marked Flamebait. Any joke that they whoosh on gets marked Troll.

Solution(?):
Metamoderate. Hopefully that lowers the chances of them getting to mod again.

Re:Hmmm. (2, Interesting)

CannonballHead (842625) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672879)

So, in other words - until you agree with all the laws that land you in jail, you don't think jail should be punitive in any way? Just a pleasant vacation?

Not that it's a "pleasant vacation" now, but just curious about that. It seems to me that laws are always going to be disagreed on by people, including drug possession ... but what's the use of laws if they are not enforced at all unless 100% of the population agrees with them? I bet I could find a lot of people that disagree with a lot more laws than you do. In fact, I probably just have to walk to the nearest penitentiary.

Re:Hmmm. (2, Interesting)

mayko (1630637) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672975)

No. I think the point is prison shouldn't be used as punishment. It's only function should be removing dangerous people from society and rehabilitating those that are able.

The idea that we are spending our money to put people in "time-out" for using drugs, or any other victimless crime is fucking stupid and any logical person knows that.

Studies have shown that interactive constructive environments in jails/prisons improve behavior and rehabilitation rates. So maybe they don't need mindless entertainment like TV, but I hardly think 23 hours of bare concrete is a better choice.

Re:Hmmm. (0)

CannonballHead (842625) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673373)

23 hours? *blink* What happened to the other one?

I agree, "23" hours of bare concrete isn't necessarily a better choice. IMO, they should "work for their living," like the rest of society presumably does.

I think prison should be used as punishment. I guess that's just a difference between our thoughts. Which is cool. The problem I have with rehabilitation isn't rehabilitation itself - it's that it's pretty difficult to measure. How do we KNOW this person was rehabilitated, whatever that means?

That and I think some offesnes should not have that option. If someone killed someone, I see no reason I should let that person freely wander around amongst people again. It seems only just; the person took someone's life and caused them never to walk this earth again. It seems the proper justice would be to, at least, not let the person that took that life be allowed to enjoy walking the earth again, either. "Justice" is not something that necessarily cares about "rehabilitation." I guess that's my main beef with the typical rehabilitation-promoters: there's no more justice.

Justice for stealing? You have to pay it back. Justice for graffiti? Clean it up. Justice for illegal drugs? I don't know, that's a hard one. One thing I do know; if I steal something and later am "rehabilitated," that doesn't mean that I don't owe anyone anything anymore because I'm a "better" person. It just means I am hopefully less likely to re-offend... but I should still be made to pay back what I took.

Re:Hmmm. (1, Insightful)

rev_g33k_101 (886348) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673059)

I got to say that you need to be modded up out of flamebait. not because you are right, but because you are not flamebait. you may be dumb IMO but not flamebait.

please remember people, there is no mod for "you don't agree with me", and not everybody who disagrees with you is a troll or flamebait.

Re:Hmmm. (1)

OrangeMonkey11 (1553753) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672697)

come on where is your humanity; rapist, murder, child molesters are people too they have the rights to be comfortable at Club Fed

Re:Hmmm. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29672967)

And horses, Lois, they're terrible people.

Re:Hmmm. (3, Insightful)

vertinox (846076) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672757)

Interesting that inmates have access to computers and TV. I'm glad we pay for that for them while normal citizens are having a hard time finding a job...

Considering most of them are in their for minor drug charges and are no more evil than you or me...

And that most of the tax money goes into the hands of the private corporations running the prisons and use the inmates for sub minimum wage labor at a profit which none goes back to the tax payers.

So simple solution... Reform the laws and decriminalize these minor offenses and revoke the contracts with the private corporations running these prisions.

Re:Hmmm. (5, Informative)

CrimsonAvenger (580665) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672933)

Considering most of them are in their for minor drug charges and are no more evil than you or me...

Oddly enough, when I start googling for statistics to support your statement, I find things that say that there are fewer Drug offenders in prison that people convicted of Property crimes, and fewer of both those groups combined than people convicted of Violent crimes.

In other words, drug charges, major or minor, account for about 22% of the prison population in the USA.

Oh, and 55% of the prison population are in for violent crimes, and the remainder for property crimes.

Re:Hmmm. (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29673085)

Neither GP nor GPP specifically mentioned "prison" inmates, many drug offenders go to jail and are not included in your statistics. As someone who is about to go to jail for growing funny plants in my attic, I have to say.. what a way to waste your money.

Re:Hmmm. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29673339)

[citation needed]

Re:Hmmm. (1)

CannonballHead (842625) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672983)

Considering most of them are in their for minor drug charges and are no more evil than you or me...

That depends on what you mean by "evil."

My ideology/religion/worldview/whatever says everyone is evil. Some people are more "moral" and some are more "law-abiding" however. A minor drug charge is a shift in moral/law-abiding. Read on, though, I'll probably end up agreeing with you...

And that most of the tax money goes into the hands of the private corporations running the prisons and use the inmates for sub minimum wage labor at a profit which none goes back to the tax payers.

Using inmates for labor seems like a good idea to me, frankly. Why simply let them live at the taxpayers' expense? Why not have them work for it? And frankly, not sure why they should even necessarily be paid much, if at all... they aren't there to make money, they are there to be punished, yes? Although, the view seems to be circulating more widely that prison is for "reformation" of the person or whatever, not to pay the penalty of his crime. I'm all for reforming people, but the whole point of having laws and penalties is... well ... so that people are punished for those law-breakings...

So simple solution... Reform the laws and decriminalize these minor offenses and revoke the contracts with the private corporations running these prisions.

Agree with reformation of laws, at any rate. Decriminalize minor offenses - not sure about that. However, I certainly agree that some offenses get too much time, and some offenses get way too little time. The idea that you can kill someone and get out of jail after 10 or 20 years is ridiculous... not even from a "penalty" standpoint but from a protection-of-society standpoint. And I am not sure if I care - with respect to time-locked-up - if the person was "temporarily insane," that just makes him more dangerous, doesn't it? Or, since the Duggard case is in the news... he got out in something like 7 years after kidnapping and raping? And look what happened, he went on to continue exactly what he was doing before. Surprise! ...

I'm not sure really how to fix those issues. But I really don't think that people that rape, murder, steal, etc., should just go on vacation [slightly sarcastic there, I realize its' not vacation...]. There's something wrong when "jail" means TV, internet, etc.

And there is something to be said about multiple small offenses increasing the penalty each time... depending on the offense, of course. Jaywalking multiple times may not be in the same category as stealing women's purses multiple times.

Re:Hmmm. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29673029)

I agree. Putting for profit companies in charge of prisons - how do they increase profits? More prisoners for longer terms. No reform, high recidivism, making non-criminals into prison-hardened violent criminals. The Land of the Free - America - has more people in prison than anyone. It's time to turn the prisons back over to non-profit government and stop persecuting drug users etc. Let 'em go.

Re:Hmmm. (5, Insightful)

arth1 (260657) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672765)

Civilized countries rehabilitate prisoners, and yes, that includes schooling them on what they will find in society once they've served their sentence.
The alternative, a punishment based system like in the US, causes those coming out of prison to be unemployable, and their only recourse is crime. Which is one of the main reasons why the recidivism rate and percent of the population in prison is much higher in the US than in other western countries.

Re:Hmmm. (1, Insightful)

Absolut187 (816431) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672815)

This guy's "rehabilitation" seems to be going well..

Seriously, I agree that we should give SOME criminals a chance at rehabilitation.
But when somebody (like this guy) shows that he is clearly NOT INTERESTED in rehabilitation whatsoever - execution.

The hard-core criminals only interfere with the rehabilitation of those who might actually benefit from it.

Re:Hmmm. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29673037)

You're suggesting execution for white collar crimes where a corporation was the main victim?

Re:Hmmm. (4, Funny)

Korin43 (881732) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673087)

I think executing someone for changing the password on a computer may be a little harsh. I mean, it's not like he installed Windows ME on it.

Their only recourse is crime (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29672969)

Or politics.

Re:Hmmm. (1)

CannonballHead (842625) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673031)

Rehabilitation... well, I think that depends. I'm all for letting them work or letting them learn a skill. I'm not for forcing them or paying to try to force them. If they don't want to learn, they're not going to.

And if you murder someone, I don't know what rehabilitation there is for you. Or rape. Or any other violent crime like that.

The stats for repeat offenders is pretty high, as I recall. Rehabilitation isn't working so well. Maybe because you're not changing anything but their external observances, temporarily, so they can just get out of jail? Rehabilitation tends to miss one rather important aspect of life - that people are not naturally good and just have bad circumstances. You can be the richest person on earth and able to do whatever you want to do, and still commit some of the worst crimes. Rehabilitation seems to take the same aspect as communism ... in a perfect world, it'd probably work great. So far, it hasn't. Maybe this isn't a perfect world, and maybe people don't naturally want to be good, happy citizens looking out for their neighbor... maybe they actually do crime and violent things because *gasp* they like doing crime and violent things? And teaching them job skills won't change them liking crime/violence...

Re:Hmmm. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29673273)

If they actually rehabilitated them, who would they lock up next year?

They are protecting their livelihoods guys!

Re:Hmmm. (2, Insightful)

RiotingPacifist (1228016) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672799)

Yeah its not like giving them opportunity works and as a result we have a lower re-offending rate than America (harsher prisons) but higher than Sweden (nicer prisons), but fuck it, I'm having a hard time finding a job so all spending should be cut even if it makes everybody less safe and effect wastes more money (1 "expensive" stay vs 10+ cheap stays).

Re:Hmmm. (1)

gestalt_n_pepper (991155) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672905)

As stated by others, most are in for drug charges.

Nor will this change. Drugs were made illegal as an easy pretext for jailing minorities in the early 20th century when African Americans and Mexicans were the primary users of marijuana. When almost everyone is doing something and you make it illegal, it becomes much easier to control them. Remember prohibition?

So for these guys, I have a lot of sympathy. For violent criminals I have none and would prefer that they all be locked in solitary and dosed heavily with Prozac for the duration of their stay. Allowing them to form ANY sort of social group or interact with their buddies outside is the reason we have gangs, gang culture and all the crap that goes with it. If we can't decide to kill them, we should at least neutralize them.

Re:Hmmm. (1)

mjihad (686196) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673303)

For violent criminals I have none and would prefer that they all be locked in solitary and dosed heavily with Prozac for the duration of their stay. Allowing them to form ANY sort of social group or interact with their buddies outside is the reason we have gangs, gang culture and all the crap that goes with it. If we can't decide to kill them, we should at least neutralize them.

I'm sure they'll be very well adjusted to interact normally with society when they come out of prison too! Or perhaps we should treat them as human beings and try to help them become more productive members of society.

Re:Hmmm. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29673365)

Drug related charges maybe - same effect as prohibition - if distribution is illegal, criminals run the distribution.

Re:Hmmm. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29673439)

Except, y'know, that's false. Another poster gave a link above to ACTUAL stats, not just a slashdotter saying things.

About 20% are for drug charges. 55% are violent crimes. The rest is property crimes.

Re:Hmmm. (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672971)

Interesting that inmates have access to computers and TV. I'm glad we pay for that for them while normal citizens are having a hard time finding a job...

You'd rather the inmates reach their breaking points and tear each other up?

Re:Hmmm. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29673287)

1. Reduce costs by removing computers, TVs, etc.
2. Reduce costs further by removing inmates due to aforementioned "tearing up"
3. ...
4. Profit!

Re:Hmmm. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29673015)

We pay a lot more to keep the millions of non-violent drug offenders locked up next to the thieves, rapists, and murderers. Of course, in the business of government, this represents profit and not loss. You're not at the top of the power pyramid, are you? ;)

Re:Hmmm. (4, Insightful)

ThrowAwaySociety (1351793) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673039)

Interesting that inmates have access to computers and TV.

Imagine a group of people with little respect for authority, and, in many cases, a history of violence.

Now take away their TV.

Do you really think that putting down prison riots is cheaper than just letting them vegetate in front of the idiot box? Are you, a normal citizen, volunteering for that job? I'm sure there's an opening there.

Re:Hmmm. (1)

couchslug (175151) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673423)

"Interesting that inmates have access to computers and TV. I'm glad we pay for that for them while normal citizens are having a hard time finding a job..."

That's because the purpose of prison is to make the most effeminate portions of the public feel good about themselves instead of deter crime by crushing criminals. That an inmate would dare do anything at all against orders means the system is too weak. We should admit we are facing bad people who are willfully beyond redemption and act accordingly. The inmates rightly see mercy = weakness.

This is surprising (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29672625)

Given that our best and brightest are running the prison system.

Up next:

Sexual offenders run the prison rape-prevention program.

Re:This is surprising (4, Funny)

palegray.net (1195047) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672737)

Sexual offenders run the prison rape-prevention program.

No, that's already run by designated "I'll be your daddy and protect you from the others" representatives, fairly elected by the general population.

Now contrast that with... (4, Interesting)

lbalbalba (526209) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672661)

The case of Kevin Mitnick, who was initially restricted from using any sort of communications technology whatsoever (no computer access at all, no mobile phone, etc.), other than a landline telephone...

Of course. He was the resident computer guy. (4, Funny)

wazzzup (172351) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672707)

You're a computer guy, right? My cousin's kid been trying to help us with this TV station thing we're doing but I don't think he knows what he's doing. Plus he's starting soccer now and he doesn't have much time anymore. It's not like you don't, eh? Heh heh.

Anyway, can you help? We use The Windows and all that so it's pretty standard.

You will? Thanks buddy - I'll see that you get some extra "unmonitored" visits from the little lady this month.

Re:Of course. He was the resident computer guy. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29673411)

Little lady? I think you mean "little" laddie. And I think that's more of a threat than a bribe.

Why does it not surprise me... (1)

TrebleJunkie (208060) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672721)

... that this happened when the "prison source" still refers to a computer as "the hard drive"?

Anonymous Coward (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29672723)

Why did this story get a lock instead of a foot?

. . . and a chainsaw massacre murderer . . . (4, Funny)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672785)

. . . is assigned in prison to garden detail . . . and is given . . . a chainsaw!

The prison now has a few open bunks.

The prison psychologist stated, "I hoped that we could discover how to do pleasant things with a chainsaw, instead of nasty things."

Re: . . . and a chainsaw massacre murderer . . . (1)

geekmux (1040042) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673275)

. . . is assigned in prison to garden detail . . . and is given . . . a chainsaw!

The prison now has a few open bunks.

The prison psychologist stated, "I hoped that we could discover how to do pleasant things with a chainsaw, instead of nasty things."

This may sound strange, but somewhere deep inside, I almost yearn for a "tax cut" type solution ala Running Man.

Just because some screw up (1, Insightful)

iamacat (583406) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672833)

does it mean nobody should be ever given a chance? This guy acted pretty dumb, knowing that he be caught for sure. It's too bad someone else is now less likely to be given a chance to put their skills for good purpose after screwing up.

In Prison for a reason! (1)

Stan92057 (737634) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672855)

Stupid lol, they do know that they put the guy in a prison for a REASON?? And the criminal was stupid too,he could have gotten out of prison faster for his work,but the prisons are full of really smart criminals huh?? LOL

too bad no one died (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29672895)

If the individual who allowed this prisoner access to the system somehow died as a result, it would be a great candidate for the Darwin Award.

A faster way to get it working... (1)

davidwr (791652) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672927)

Restore from your last good backup.

Re:A faster way to get it working... (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672987)

Restore from your last good backup.

Let me guess the warden's response:

"Backup? Whats that?"

Re:A faster way to get it working... (1)

schon (31600) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673119)

"Backup? Whats that?"

Duh - that's the thing on the site that you put tapes in to keep the computer on when the power goes out!

Don't you know anything?

Re:A faster way to get it working... (1)

Chickan (1070300) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673051)

If they are using a convicted felon to help setup an internal TV station I somehow doubt they have a backup of anything but the warden's porno collection.

Re:A faster way to get it working... (2, Funny)

coolsnowmen (695297) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673089)

Their last good backup? heh

Welcome to MS-DOS
Copyright 1981,82 Microsoft, Inc.

c:\

Makes no sense. (1)

jcr (53032) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673019)

Why didn't he just alter his own records and get himself released?

-jcr

Why did he do it? (4, Insightful)

captaindomon (870655) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673123)

My question is, why? I can understand stealing credit card information due to the financial side of things. Why would he pull a stunt like this? So he can get an extended prison sentence, and have no hope of being let out on parole? When you're in prison, do you want to piss off the prison staff? Do you know what happens when you do that? Idiot.

Re:Why did he do it? (1)

iron-kurton (891451) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673197)

When i read TFS, it sounded like he installed passwords on computers. As in, they didn't have passwords before. Maybe he tried to get some time off In exchange for these passwords, though which certainly would be bad...

The lesson to take home: (1)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673193)

"Pen-testing" and "set a thief to catch a thief" does not mean letting a thief build your security infrastructure without supervision.

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