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Virtual Autopsy On a Multi-Touch Table Surface

Soulskill posted more than 4 years ago | from the over-my-dead-body dept.

Medicine 72

An anonymous reader writes "Engadget points out one of the more interesting ways to use a multitouch table surface so far. Researchers at Norrkoping Visualization Centre and the Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization in Sweden have fitted such a device with stunning, volume-rendered visualizations of high-resolution MRI data. If you've ever wondered what the inside of a human being really looks like, but lacked the grit or credentials to watch an autopsy in the flesh, check it out."

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72 comments

Incredible learning tool (3, Insightful)

Da_Biz (267075) | more than 4 years ago | (#29671157)

I had the pleasure of taking Human Anatomy and Physiology a few years ago. The professor was superb, but our school didn't have the resources to afford a cadaver lab.

Pictures and plastic models are OK, but there are times when being able to visualize something like this would greatly help the learning experience.

Re:Incredible learning tool (4, Insightful)

CodingHero (1545185) | more than 4 years ago | (#29671241)

I had the pleasure of taking Human Anatomy and Physiology a few years ago. The professor was superb, but our school didn't have the resources to afford a cadaver lab.

Pictures and plastic models are OK, but there are times when being able to visualize something like this would greatly help the learning experience.

I agree that visualizing greatly helps the learning experience in science and engineering and that tools like this would be very helpful in the areas of medicine and biology. A cool next step to this would be some sort of "virtual surgery" that could pay attention to what both hands were doing at once.

Re:Incredible learning tool (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29671493)

If you've ever wondered what the inside of a human being really looks like, but lacked the grit or credentials to watch an autopsy in the flesh, check it out.

In other words, if you're a pussy.

Re:Incredible learning tool (3, Interesting)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672323)

Watching that video with the "layers of skin and bone peeling away" reminded me of some classic 1980s games. Like the Intellivision's Microsurgeon - the power of 16-bit gaming baby! ;-) LINK - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ms_yLmub6PM [youtube.com]

IBM PC variant (check out the amazing 2 color graphics and hi-fidelity "beep" sound) ;-) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5azQdQR35E [youtube.com]

Commodore Amiga variant - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UAR_c89TjEc [youtube.com]

Re:Incredible learning tool (2, Interesting)

TooMuchToDo (882796) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672653)

I agree that visualizing greatly helps the learning experience in science and engineering and that tools like this would be very helpful in the areas of medicine and biology. A cool next step to this would be some sort of "virtual surgery" that could pay attention to what both hands were doing at once.

Like Microsoft's Natal concept? Where the controls are your hands or typical items? Combined with multi-touch tables, it's a fantastic idea for learning that could lower costs.

Another cool concept would be that these tables could pull from a database/data warehouse where all sorts of MRI data from real life cases is stored.

Re:Incredible learning tool (1)

BrokenHalo (565198) | more than 4 years ago | (#29671415)

but there are times when being able to visualize something like this would greatly help the learning experience.

I'm sure the cleaners probably prefer it too. ;-)

Of course, it looks gobsmackingly awesome right now, but I guess in 5 years or so this'll all be old hat. Maybe there's something a bit sad about that. But then, when I was a kid, the humble flatbed scanner would have been well and truly in the realms of science fiction...

Re:Incredible learning tool (1)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#29671499)

>>>when I was a kid, the humble flatbed scanner would have been well and truly in the realms of science fiction...

When I was a kid, the personal computer didn't even exist yet. I was about 7 when people first started getting PCs (Apples, Ataris, Tandy-Radio Shacks).

Re:Incredible learning tool (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672327)

Fine, but not at the expense of having the students miss the exquisite aroma of formaldehyde.

Long ago, I was filming anatomy classes for a med school, making educational films. It is nigh impossible to get that smell out of your clothes, even your shoes. I dated a first-year med student for a while, and fine as she was, I just couldn't get past that smell. She'd shower, put on perfume, and you'd still get that note of formaldehyde. Unfortunately, by the time she'd passed anatomy, and the smell went away, she'd already hooked up with another med student, and I just couldn't afford the ante any more.

As a member of the Biological Photographers' Association, I was able to take an anatomy class myself, if only so I'd know the difference between proximal and distal. One of the most surprising aspects of actually doing a dissection on a cadaver is how three-dimensional we are inside.

I hope that virtual dissection never replaces the real thing. There's nothing like hands-on.

Re:Incredible learning tool (1)

CrimsonAvenger (580665) | more than 4 years ago | (#29675751)

There's nothing like hands-on.

Or, in the case of dissection, "hands-in"....

Re:Incredible learning tool (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29681977)

Hehehe, after noting how three-dimensional we are inside, you'd think he'd have thought of that one himself.

Re:Incredible learning tool (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29673655)

Examining the living, or being examined, can be much more fun.

It helps to maintain good communications.

It's especially pleasant if the examiner can be very oral throughout the exam.

Especially the multi-touch prostate exam...

If you want music during the exam, skip Bluetooth and ask for the player with the zune-squirt inspired streaming added:

iTouch BlueBalls

So, when will Virtual Surgeon for Wii be out? (4, Funny)

lena_10326 (1100441) | more than 4 years ago | (#29671213)

Waiting with anticipation.

Re:So, when will Virtual Surgeon for Wii be out? (3, Informative)

sjfoland (1565277) | more than 4 years ago | (#29671261)

Re:So, when will Virtual Surgeon for Wii be out? (4, Informative)

strateego (598207) | more than 4 years ago | (#29671325)

So, when will Virtual Surgeon for Wii be out?
Waiting with anticipation.

Will these suffice?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trauma_center_new_blood [wikipedia.org]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trauma_Center_Second_Opinion [wikipedia.org]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trauma_Team [wikipedia.org]

Or maybe the Nintendo DS versions??
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trauma_Center:_Under_the_Knife [wikipedia.org]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trauma_Center:_Under_the_Knife_2 [wikipedia.org]

Re:So, when will Virtual Surgeon for Wii be out? (2, Informative)

Prien715 (251944) | more than 4 years ago | (#29671589)

Which version doesn't devolve into a bunch of space-invader style minigames with matrix-style slow motion surgery?

Re:So, when will Virtual Surgeon for Wii be out? (1)

BiggoronSword (1135013) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672507)

Isn't there a game like this already? Isn't it called Operation [wikipedia.org]? It's the original virtual surgery multi-touch surface.

Re:So, when will Virtual Surgeon for Wii be out? (1)

cthulu_mt (1124113) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673557)

You're not supposed to touch the surface, der, that's the point of the game.

I think (3, Funny)

Dyinobal (1427207) | more than 4 years ago | (#29671297)

I think I've played this before, it's called operation! I was never very good at it. I always preferred to play doctor instead.

Re:I think (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29671491)

Trixie Teen wasn't much good at it either, but it did end up with her getting naked, so I guess I can't complain.

Re:I think (4, Insightful)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#29671567)

>>>I always preferred to play doctor instead.

Good thing your childhood was in the past and not the present. Today's kids "play doctor" using cellphones, and they are getting charged with distributing child pornography. We just had another case yesterday where a girlfriend/boyfriend wanted to see each other naked, so they sent photos, and now they are charged with a crime. Ridiculous. If you can't even take a photos of your own body, then you no longer own it. You've become a serf.

Also a distinction should be made between simple nudity and sex.
The latter is pornographic; the former is not.
The view of a human body without clothes is not something to fear.

Re:I think (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29672037)

I think this is really off topic.

Re:I think (1)

Gamer_2k4 (1030634) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672543)

Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't "playing doctor" intended to be more than simple nudity? I'm not trying to say it's explicitly sexual, but there's a difference between nudity as such and nudity with a sexual connotation. As for your cell phone example, I doubt the parties wanted each others' naked pictures simply because they had a biological curiosity. I somehow get the feeling that there was something more to it, which would be why the law is cracking down on them.

Re:I think (3, Insightful)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672809)

>>>a difference between nudity as such and nudity with a sexual connotation

Which basically means you can define ANY nudity as having a "sexual connotation". It's a slippery slope. For example I might just be taking videos of my vacation in Brazil (where the women and children wear little or nothing), but if my local District Attorney Harry Prude got a hold of it, he might label it "sexually explicit" and throw me in jail.

It is better to define nudity as just nudity, and therefore protected freedom of expression, until there's an actual sex act occurring.
.

>>>isn't "playing doctor" intended to be more than simple nudity

Really? Man my neighbor Sally duped me! She told me "look but don't touch."

Re:I think (2, Informative)

demonlapin (527802) | more than 4 years ago | (#29676379)

The southern humorist (and sports columnist) Lewis Grizzard once commented beautifully on this when describing the three ways in which a person can be said to lack clothing:
  1. Nude: what people in paintings are
  2. Naked: what you are when you are born, or in the shower.
  3. Nekkid: naked and up to something

Re:I think (1)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#29679389)

My grandmother used to watch the Thanksgiving Day parade, with the cheerleaders, and say, "That's horrible. They are practically negged! I can't believe they allow that."

(rolls eyes)

Re:I think (1)

corbettw (214229) | more than 4 years ago | (#29676033)

The view of a human body without clothes is not something to fear.

That depends entirely on which human's body we're talking about. *cough*Rosie O'Donnell*cough*

solution in search of a problem (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 4 years ago | (#29671337)

I love the way they scrape the bottom of the obscure niche barrel to prove this toy technology is actually useful.

Re:solution in search of a problem (1)

citizenr (871508) | more than 4 years ago | (#29671585)

I love the way they scrape the bottom of the obscure niche barrel to prove this toy technology is actually useful.

This is not M$ Surface. Plus gestures are visibly laggy on this one.

Re:solution in search of a problem (3, Insightful)

natehoy (1608657) | more than 4 years ago | (#29671631)

I think autopsies are a perfect first problem to solve. First, you can keep the corpse intact which makes the autopsies less distasteful to the family (assuming they want a viewing). Second, you get a lot more data about the tissues as they are intact at the time of the scan. Third, you keep a lot more detailed data than pictures and/or a videotape and a recording from the technician - you can review the data anytime you want.

And, finally, if there turn out to be some adverse tissue effects from the scanners, their patients aren't really going to mind all that much.

Re:solution in search of a problem (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29673213)

Just make sure to run the ol' metal detector on it first ;)

Re:solution in search of a problem (1)

natehoy (1608657) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673247)

Hmm, good point. Steel-jacketed bullets are a must for criminals, because it'll mess up the autopsy...

Re:solution in search of a problem (1)

BungaDunga (801391) | more than 4 years ago | (#29674983)

Costs a lot for time to run scans, though. Not sure how much a real autopsy costs, but a virtual one is probably more expensive.

Re:solution in search of a problem (1)

vegiVamp (518171) | more than 4 years ago | (#29679087)

TFA (or the video in it) mentioned something of about 15 minutes for scanning. Given that the scan data is processed automatically, I'd guess you can have your autopsy being in under an hour.

Re:solution in search of a problem (3, Informative)

demonlapin (527802) | more than 4 years ago | (#29676423)

Er, no. Autopsy has many components; MRI or CT would supplant only the most cursory examination. Organs are weighed; they are examined both grossly and microscopically. The vasculature is examined carefully - there's no way to do that with dead people without cutting them open, because they can't circulate the contrast material needed to see them on a scan. Toxicology can be collected. And so forth.

Re:solution in search of a problem (1)

vegiVamp (518171) | more than 4 years ago | (#29679095)

TFA did mention the usual inability do to scans of dead bodies, and having developed "entirely new technology" to work around that.

Re:solution in search of a problem (1)

demonlapin (527802) | more than 4 years ago | (#29687189)

That's a result of their being cold - the MRI process is apparently tuned for warm protons. It isn't that you can't scan bodies now - indeed, CT could easily do it without their tech - it's that scans, while useful, are rarely a substitute for actually looking at the body. Otherwise, we wouldn't have exploratory surgery.

Re:solution in search of a problem (1)

senorpoco (1396603) | more than 4 years ago | (#29671741)

Not at all. I am at medschool currently, my school is one of the few in the UK which can afford to have a full dissection lab, let alone source the cadavers.

Re:solution in search of a problem (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 4 years ago | (#29678499)

You're training to be a doctor but you're too thick to understand that I was referring to the multitouch, which seems to be the new panacea of UI design (just like speech recognition was).

Are you from Nigeria or something?

P.S. I don't believe for one minute that there are medical schools where they don't do dissections.

Hey honey, how's that diet? (3, Funny)

SnarfQuest (469614) | more than 4 years ago | (#29671377)

Look honey, I bought us a new dining room table. Take a look at what it can do. Why aren't you eating, aren't you hungry?

Re:Hey honey, how's that diet? (1)

TheLink (130905) | more than 4 years ago | (#29675153)

Better hope she doesn't start looking at you strangely/vacantly and say "Mmmm... brainssss...".

Obligatory Big Ass Table joke (2, Funny)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#29671399)

"Instead of actually playing with your kids, you could just look at video of them playing by themselves. And you'll smile knowing you only paid ten thousands dollars to do it." - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CZrr7AZ9nCY [youtube.com]

Re:Obligatory Big Ass Table joke (1)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#29671443)

>>> $10,000

Hey! What a coincidence. That's how much I spent keeping my Mac upgraded over the last ten years. (ducks a spitball). I kid, I kid.

Diagnosis (2, Interesting)

jpmorgan (517966) | more than 4 years ago | (#29671429)

It may be a virtual autopsy today, but how long until we see something similar but as a diagnostic tool? It'll probably take another years to bring everything together (and 3d image reconstruction is still a computationally intensive task), but I can see something like this coupled with MRI and other diagnostic data from live patients. Fantastic.

Re:Diagnosis (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29671795)

It's actually well under way, the presented table is fresh from research, but there is nothing preventing it from using it as a clinical diagnosis tool today. Volume rendering of large scale data set is possible with today's fast mulit parallel architecture GPUs, with real time interaction, and is already in use at hospitals around the world.

Re:Diagnosis (2, Insightful)

chooks (71012) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672265)

Computers have been used for quite some time in medicine but mainly for data storage/retrieval. Their use in the diagnostic process is evolving. For example, computer aided reading of mammograms is a current area of R&D, although not to a point where it is automated. One cool application of 3D reconstruction currently in use is with bronchoscopies, where the software creates a 3D reconstruction of a bronchial tree from CT slices and then sets up breadcrumbs for a pulmonologist to a target site. During the bronchoscopy, the pulmonologist marks the crumbs as he goes to keep track of his progress. Virtual colonoscopies (with CT scans) are being looked at as an alternative for colonscopies (and some people do use them this way if there aren't other options, but it is not currently an accepted general screening method, at least according to the USPSTF). In pathology, research is ongoing on visualizing expression of multiple different types of proteins in tumor cells at the same which are then "read" by a computer with an eye to use data mining to determine sets of proteins as prognostic indicators. Also in pathology, scanning technology is progressing to the point where you can get high resolution scans of slides at different magnifications (up to 40x) fairly quickly that can be read remotely via viewing software. So in short - there are lots of interesting (dare I say exciting?) applications going on right now for using computers as an aid for the diagnostic process.

That being said, as always the right study depends on time, cost, and quality. For example, sticking somebody you think has an epidural hematoma in an MRI scanner for $1600 and 45 minutes instead of a CT for $500 and 5 minutes isn't that bright of an idea. But as the technology evolves, do does the applications for it. One issue with indiscriminate scanning (and testing in general) is that it can actually harm people. This is the debate over prostate cancer/detection. Namely - if you find something in your study, what is the harm done in addressing (e.g. surgical morbidity/mortality/side effects) vs. not doing anything (mortality from the finding). This is the debate over prostate cancer screening/treatment right now. And of course there is always the issue of pre-test probability and its effect on test results (Baye's theroem [merck.com]).

Re:Diagnosis (2, Insightful)

chinodelosmuertos (805584) | more than 4 years ago | (#29674737)

Don't forget how a CT scanner works: it effectively takes thousands of xrays in a 360 degree plane around the body at different slices through the body. Start at the head, 360 degrees around the area. Move the body down a bit, do the thorax, 360 degrees, etc. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CT_scanner [wikipedia.org] Actually, most of the tech you see on the screen has been available for years - as in, a lot of ct scanners can do a 3d reconstruction anyway. The images you see on that vid have been done for years, it's just the setup which is pretty slick and neat. You can pan and scan and manipulate the images like that using any radiology imaging software. In clinical practice, most people don't bother with fancy reconstructions, not because it's memory intensive, but because there's no point. It looks nice, but most of the answers you can get without doing a silly reconstruction. You'll often see it done for fractures. And, as someone has already mentioned, scans aren't without their risk. As that wikipedia points out, you get about 3x your yearly dose of radiation in that one scan. And as for coupling it with other scans, again, kinda done anyway. But if you suspect someone has some pathology that needs a scan, you normally just pick the right scan for the job instead of taking a shotgun approach to the whole thing. It's cost and time intensive.

And as for replacing the autopsy, hmmm. For about 10 years the Swiss have been trying to come out with virtual autopsies, heralding it as the way of the future http://www.virtopsy.com/ [virtopsy.com] The guy offers courses on how to use a CT scanner instead of an autopsy. The storage and memory problems not withstanding, there's also the cost of the systems, and the fact that there are very few radiologists worldwide who would be willing to take a 300k a year paycut to report on a bunch of corpses when pathologists have been doing the job for about 1/10th the cost for years. It's shown to be useful in very limited situations, including identification of remains in mass disasters... but again as a day to day tool, it's pretty hard to justify the cost. As far as I know, there are less than 10 forensic centres performing routine CT autopsies, none of which are based in the States. Albuquerque will probably be the first. Melbourne, Victoria does it, and probably has the highest throughput of any institute I've seen, but it really doesn't affect outcomes very much (ie, the person's still dead).

What this is basically is a really nice teaching tool that can help people learn a bit about human anatomy. It would be great in museums and the odd medical library.

Re:Diagnosis (1)

chinodelosmuertos (805584) | more than 4 years ago | (#29675007)

I also should mention - They used MRI, not CT. Which doesn't change most of the arguments of the above post (3d reconstruction can be done on either modality, and can still be viewed with any imaging software, and is still pretty useless in clinical practice) and it also means that it would all be out of the question there was any question about if someone had gotten shot.

With regards to post mortems, as far as I know, there is no centre in the world doing routine MRIs for all post mortems. It's still a research tool, and there are even fewer people around able to report post mortem MRIs.

Re:Diagnosis (1)

spydabyte (1032538) | more than 4 years ago | (#29675571)

Check out the 2nd video on TFA. It takes 20 seconds for a CT Scan to process the body!

Sure you need some high end equipment, but to not disturb the body and do something extremely close to a full autopsy? A master card says, priceless.

I wonder if this counts as desecration of the body? Think Orthodox Judaism [google.com] or Islamic Funerals, which need to take place ASAP [wikipedia.org].

Cool, but is the multitouch necessary? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29671575)

This seems like it can be done just fine with a mouse (scroll to zoom, click around) like we do with 3D CAD software. The real genius is in the imaging, compiling of the MRI/CT data, and putting it in a clean 3D interactive environment.

What you miss at a real autopsy (3, Informative)

dorpus (636554) | more than 4 years ago | (#29671603)

I used to work at a hospital, and they let me sit in on one. What you miss is the yellow skin of corpses, and the fact that they still make noises from various orifices when you move the body parts.

The gall bladder really is green -- it's not an artifact of textbook coloring.

Everyone said I will get sick from watching a real autopsy, but it didn't feel any worse than watching a horror movie. I wore a mask, so didn't smell much.

Re:What you miss at a real autopsy (1)

chooks (71012) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673709)

I've assisted many autopsies. The bad ones are:

  1. The partial decomps. Those really do not smell good. Probably better than a full decomp, but I've never done one of those as the hospital I am at does not allow them.
  2. Running the bowel. It smells as wonderful as it sounds. Normally in surgical pathology you work under a hood that vents off most of the lovely odors (unless you get something like a 3 day old placenta that has been left out without formalin). In autopsy you run the bowel (go through every inch of it looking for pathology) in a sink and get every wonderful scent.
  3. Stomachs never smell that great to me.
  4. Ascitic fluid has a different odor. Nothing disgusting, but definitely noticable.

Slow Reponse Time (2, Insightful)

k0de (619918) | more than 4 years ago | (#29671687)

The concept and imaging are fantastic, but I hope the technology improves as the table didn't appear very responsive. I was annoyed just watching the users struggling to navigate it.

THIS IS ONE BIG ASS IPHONE (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29671735)

ONE BIG ASS IPHONE!

mytichal tech get real (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29671875)

On the television shows Bones and CSI: NY, they demonstrated mythical versions of this technology already :) It's awesome when fake-tech becomes the real thing.

I want one for a paperless office (1)

Overzeetop (214511) | more than 4 years ago | (#29671963)

Well, what I want is a 62", quad-HD touchscreen - stylus is fine - for reviewing architectural prints. They rarely come in larger than E size (30x42) which would fit well on a 62" widescreen monitor at 100% scale. Let me mark them up with a stylus and send them off. Make it responsive (i.e. - don't let Adobe or Autodesk code the reader) so can "flip" through a set quickly. And make it cost under $5k. That last one is mostly just quantity, since all I'm really looking for a 62" tablet computer with a decent i7 quad core and the new Radeon graphics card. The card can run the resolution and crunch the numbers in 2D or 3D (for models). The i7 can do the background work and keep things moving. That resolution isn't in vogue - yet - but it's already on drawing boards, and the pixel pitch is larger than current monitors. Touch surfaces seem less and less novel each day now that they're incorporated into practically everything.

Problem is, even if it existed today, there are likely no more than a ten thousand that would be sold at the $5k price point, and less than 1000 at the $10-15k price point needed to get production ramped up.

Re:I want one for a paperless office (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29699127)

until then you could try using a 1080p projector/big screen TV and touchscreen solution from here [johnnylee.net]

CT and MRI data (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29671995)

The slashdot post meantions MRI data, but it is actually both "Dual Energy Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance" data, according to original source. That is CT and MRI data.

Nowhere near the real thing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29672003)

What a complete misnomer.

There is a distinction between anatomy and a post-mortem examination -- the former describes structures and their relationships to each other. In a post-mortem, one renders diagnoses and talks about disease processes -- none of which is discussed in the video. This video shows virtual anatomy, not a virtual autopsy. (Which has been done before, very ho-hum.)

In a real autopsy, a pathologist not only examines the organs and their appearance, but they also take pieces of tissue for examination underneath the microscope to actually see what disease processes are going on. Which obviously can't be done in a fake autopsy.

Or, to make a car analogy: radiology ('virtual autopsy') is like looking at the warning indicators on your dashboard to see what's wrong. A real autopsy involves popping the hood of the car and actually checking the engine, radiator, hydraulics, whatever -- getting down and dirty and *finding* the problem.

With respect to "keeping corpses intact for a viewing": the autopsy cuts are made to the torso and abdomen. Most people, I am informed, are not buried in the nude (or a swimsuit), and therefore those cuts do not show at the time of a viewing. Even the cut used to remove the brain is generally hidden under hair.

Re:Nowhere near the real thing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29672199)

How about religious beliefs?

I don't think some religions and/or cultures are so keen on letting doctors cut the "souls" away of their loved lost ones, however
doing it virtually might be much more accepted?

Not MRI, but CT!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29672033)

The data is clearly CT (which is always "high res"), not MRI. MRI images soft tissue and is not good for visualization of skeletal features.

CT has come a long way in terms of soft tissue imaging as well. Radiation, yes. But much less radiation that years ago.

I'd much rather get a CT with a definitive diagnosis.

Too cool for words (1)

OrangeMonkey11 (1553753) | more than 4 years ago | (#29672629)

If I was born with a diamond spoon in my mouth I would sell that spoon and have this installed in my house. Such a great educational tool; I've seen quite a few other virtual surgery application in the past but nothing had compare to this.

Re:Too cool for words (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29672853)

I agree. this one is a must have for any serious anatomy exhibition!!

Re:Too cool for words (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29684519)

If I was born with a diamond spoon in my mouth I would sell that spoon and have this installed in my house.

They're words, yes, but what do they mean?

Define autopsy (2)

Qrypto (462155) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673135)

I think this is just savvy marketing to get exposure for the research lab. In reality this is a virtual anatomy tool that has a 3D interface and works on a fancy multi-touch table. This is a lot like the virtual human project (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/research/visible/visible_human.html) but works with any human that will fit in the scanner(s), and has cool interface.

This is an excellent tool for pre-surgery visualization, for augmenting radiological visualization, and for education purposes but could not replicate and certainly not replace a true a post-mortem examination.

The first app for the "Apple Tablet"? (1)

Spencerian (465343) | more than 4 years ago | (#29673139)

"Say you've got a victim of drowning. You need to probe inside to determine if water is present in the lungs, or if the victim died prior to immersion. And, say, you need to upload your results to your boss, the sheriff, the district attorney, and the press corps, all with one click.

"Yes, there's an app for that."

amy i love you (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29673791)

...

Re:amy i love you (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29684535)

I love you too.

Screen and a mouse (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29675303)

Why do you need a multitouch table for this?
Couldn't the same thing be done for cheaper using a large LCD screen and a mouse?

its just a computer (1)

DavoMan (759653) | more than 4 years ago | (#29678943)

Its just a flat-screen computer laid on it side to be horizontal. And software/hardware that allows multi-touch. This fails to even qualify as an invention. Its like a gigantic iphone sitting on the floor.

Msg from one of the developers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29681285)

Thanks for all of your comments. It's nice to hear input from the outside world.

There are a number of things as to why this project is done:
- Virtual autopsies don't replace real autopsies; the virtual autopsies are commonly used as a verification method to aid real autopsies or to check on clinical cases;
- The visualization use a standard visualization technique for the actual visualization. What is novel here is the way that the large data sets is reduced in size (from 6 GB to about 512MB). We then use the GPU to render the images on the fly;
- Bring knowledge the general public. We did not try to come up with a new invention. Our aim is to have people interact with the visualization in a nice way and educate them. A multi-touch interface is simply one way to make it more fun.

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