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NASA's LCROSS Moon Impact Mission Provides Great Data

ScuttleMonkey posted about 5 years ago | from the yes-but-is-it-wet? dept.

NASA 91

Several sources are sending us reports of NASA's recent LCROSS Moon impact mission. While the visual results seem to be less than stunning, LCROSS Principal Investigator Anthony Colaprete said the initial results produced "the data we need," but refused to say anything about "water or no water." "The goal of this dual impact was to have the Centaur upper stage impact first, allowing the LCROSS spacecraft to observe close-up the results of the impact. In fairness, the view from LCROSS as it approached the moon was amazing — even though there was no obvious visual evidence of impact, which early data from the infrared camera on the craft indicates did occur. What happens next is a whole lot of math and science. The LCROSS spacecraft included nine individual science instruments. This suite of instruments consisted of one visible camera, two near-infrared cameras, two mid-infrared cameras, a visible light spectrometer, two near-infrared spectrometers, and a photometer. All nine of those instruments were gathering data simultaneously and streaming that data back to Earth."

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Why we should blow up the moon... (0, Offtopic)

BuddyFriend (1653333) | about 5 years ago | (#29699021)

"The International Space Station is still going strong, but you can only budget so many taxpayer dollars for the study of toilet-flushing, spiderweb-weaving and astronaut-humping in zero gravity. Eventually people are going to get wise. You gotta do something, so messing up the moon is an awesome idea. And don’t bring up Mars, because that’s still a sore subject. Not gonna happen. They did the math, and it turns out that it was all just made up by Bush after he accidentally mixed his Zoloft with three Tom Collinses."

http://digg.com/d316nFP [digg.com]

Re:Why we should blow up the moon... (3, Funny)

peragrin (659227) | about 5 years ago | (#29699259)

If you listened to the conspiracy idiots recently you would think we did blow up the moon.

Re:Why we should blow up the moon... (1)

PitaBred (632671) | about 5 years ago | (#29699725)

Those mooninites had it coming, what with their quad-lasers and petty theft and everything

Re:Why we should blow up the moon... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29704161)

USA can't destroy the moon... Only Jackie Chun can!
Proof: http://www.onemanga.com/Dragon_Ball/52/02/ [onemanga.com]

Re:Why we should blow up the moon... (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | about 5 years ago | (#29704495)

No, you'd think we faked blowing up the moon.

Re:Why we should blow up the moon... (0, Troll)

symbolset (646467) | about 5 years ago | (#29701137)

Somebody's going to Mars. I hope it's us. It's not just that there's all that stuff to claim ownership of. You see... in orbit around the sun, right by Mars, there's this huge pile of rocks...

It turns out that if you live uphill from some really obnoxious people, you can just roll some big rocks down the hill to make them shut up. In order to make you stop they have to climb up that really steep hill, so it's likely they'll just see reason. Some of those rocks are really big. Killing the dinosaurs type big.

Provides great data? (4, Funny)

Kemanorel (127835) | about 5 years ago | (#29699023)

For great justice!

Re:Provides great data? (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | about 5 years ago | (#29699389)

Launch every visible camera!( And every invisible camera too!)

Re:Provides great data? (0, Offtopic)

countertrolling (1585477) | about 5 years ago | (#29699545)

I say let's give them their Nobel now.

Where was the kaboom? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29699053)

There was supposed to be an ice-shattering kaboom!

Maybe the LRO will show something, because I sure as hell didn't see anything at 4:30 this morning.

Re:Where was the kaboom? (1)

symbolset (646467) | about 5 years ago | (#29701145)

It turns out that the absence of water at the impact site is also data. And that's "great!" Because we learned something.

Next stop... Mars.

We will never colonize the moon (5, Funny)

sakdoctor (1087155) | about 5 years ago | (#29699085)

The moon has a completely insurmountable 1.2 second ping.
Even if a first generation move to the moon, their kids won't put up with a 1.2+ second ping in halo, and will move back to earth when they are 16.
So you see, it won't be sustainable.

Re:We will never colonize the moon (3, Funny)

Sets_Chaos (1622925) | about 5 years ago | (#29699231)

What do you think the carbon nanotubes are for? We are going to run those to the moon to drop ping times down to more acceptable level. Everyone know wired is way faster than wireless...

Re:We will never colonize the moon (1)

dgatwood (11270) | about 5 years ago | (#29699375)

<sarcasm>Ooh! I've got it! We'll use wormhole routing!</sarcasm>

Re:We will never colonize the moon (3, Informative)

idontgno (624372) | about 5 years ago | (#29699617)

Signal propagation in conductors is only a fraction of lightspeed.

This site [siemon.com] , a cabling vendor, has a nice graph [siemon.com] towards the middle of the page. Reading that graph tells me that the propagation delay of their twisted pair is 470 ns over a 100 m run.

Google calc tells me [google.com] that that works out to 212,765,957 meters per second. Scorching, eh? But compared to lightspeed?

Again, let's ask Google calc [google.com]

Oh, that's only 71% of the speed of light. OK, so, that's a bit slower. Based on simple RTT and the signal propagation speed difference, your 2.4 sec ping just went up to just over 4 seconds.

Yeah, ok, you were joking. And carbon nanotubule conductors may have a signal propagation speed higher than even virgin-copper oxygen-free 2-gauge Monster(tm) brand network cable. Or not. But even a superconductor, insulated with either vacuum or a dielectric insulator, has a signal propagation speed measured as a fraction of the speed of light. (I've heard .95c cited.)

Superconductors are used, in fact, as delay lines [google.com] .

Re:We will never colonize the moon (1)

bmgoau (801508) | about 5 years ago | (#29700887)

Your post is very well researched and written but, after reading it a few times just to make sure, i think you were basing those calculations on the idea that we would communicate with the moon using a carbon nanotube/super conductor cable.

I have never heard that suggested before, i mean, we have stories about space elevators on slashdot all the time, but why would you think we would communicate with the moon using a cable?

Its movement relative to the earth would make this pretty much impossible. It also seems like an unnecessary waste of resources considered light is much faster.

Can you explain further? Why did you choose to communicate with the moon using a cable instead of microwave/radio?

Re:We will never colonize the moon (1)

treeves (963993) | about 5 years ago | (#29701923)

This thread will now terminate due to excessive whoosh/pedantry density.

Here is why (1)

Gorimek (61128) | about 5 years ago | (#29701913)

This is all true.

But I find it better to think about this speed of 213 Mm/s as the speed of light (electromagnetic radiation) in that material.

mod that up (1)

mx_mx_mx (1625481) | about 5 years ago | (#29699777)

Funniest comment I have ever seen

Re:We will never colonize the moon (1)

The Grim Reefer2 (1195989) | about 5 years ago | (#29705729)

What do you think the carbon nanotubes are for? We are going to run those to the moon to drop ping times down to more acceptable level. Everyone know wired is way faster than wireless...

No, no, no. Everyone knows wireless is faster. You just have to re-route a tachyon pulse through the Heisenberg compensator and then into the main deflector dish.

Re:We will never colonize the moon (1)

xanadu113 (657977) | about 5 years ago | (#29699441)

Couldn't this delay be solved by quantum entanglement and use that to transmit data?

Re:We will never colonize the moon (1)

sakdoctor (1087155) | about 5 years ago | (#29699525)

I'm afraid not.

Without a classical information channel (speed of light) to confirm whether or not you pwned that noob, you would be faced with a Schrödinger's teabagging paradox.

Re:We will never colonize the moon (-1, Flamebait)

geekgirlandrea (1148779) | about 5 years ago | (#29700075)

No. You can't send any information that way without a classical channel. In the future, try to avoid talking about physics without having actually studied it.

Re:We will never colonize the moon (1)

node 3 (115640) | about 5 years ago | (#29701919)

In the future, try to avoid talking about physics without having actually studied it.

*That'll* teach him to ask a physics question! The nerve of some people...

Re:We will never colonize the moon (1)

PhxBlue (562201) | about 5 years ago | (#29699699)

Even if a first generation move to the moon, their kids won't put up with a 1.2+ second ping in halo, and will move back to earth when they are 16.

They'll finally be off my damn "lawn"!

Re:We will never colonize the moon (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29699709)

No, you got it completely and utterly wrong. The truth is they'll never leave.

On earth, maximal lag can be up to 200 ms just because of great circle distance and light is traveling (correct if I'm wrong) at only 2/3 of speed of light in a fiber optic network. And that's assuming a straight cable.

The moon, however, is way more gamer friendly. It has no atmosphere, and thus no weather, so you can use shar... I mean lasers for communications. Maximal distance ping at the speed of light is just 36.4 ms. This means, if you have only two server locations and a network of laser linked towers, your worst round trip delay is below 19ms! Now tell me which gamer can resist a world as ideal as moon? Always perfect network and no one bothering you!

Re:We will never colonize the moon (2, Funny)

khallow (566160) | about 5 years ago | (#29700855)

Besides the Moon is high ground. Bomb the Earth till they move all the servers up there.

Halo??? LOL What A Retard (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29700001)

The laughingstock of the fps games you picked as your example of something gamers would be playing???

A gay green powerranger covered in retarded shiny green armor? No wonder the Xbox and Xbox 360 failed so badly in the market.

 

Re:Halo??? LOL What A Retard (1)

ResidntGeek (772730) | about 5 years ago | (#29702285)

Your post makes my brain hurt.

Halo??? LOL What A Troll (1)

Josh04 (1596071) | about 5 years ago | (#29703707)

The laughingstock of the poor trolls you picked as your attempt at something people would argue over??? A gay green powerranger covered in retarded shiny green armor? No wonder you posted as Anonymous Coward.

Re:We will never colonize the moon (1)

sillybilly (668960) | about 5 years ago | (#29700881)

Eventually there will be space reality shows, and docking meet ups and game contests between various space stations, such as space boxing, or even undocked who can grow food better, and everyone down on Terra will be watching. A 1.2 second ping will be tolerable for things that really matter.

Re:We will never colonize the moon (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29710895)

yeah space boxing, like in our friendly Zenith of Things Tournament aka (Z.O.T.T.)

Huh? (1)

symbolset (646467) | about 5 years ago | (#29701163)

People who play Halo reproduce? How?

Re:We will never colonize the moon (1)

zapakh (1256518) | about 5 years ago | (#29709195)

The moon has a completely insurmountable 1.2 second ping. Even if a first generation move to the moon, their kids won't put up with a 1.2+ second ping in halo, and will move back to earth when they are 16. So you see, it won't be sustainable.

Nah, Moon kids set up our own FPS servers. Do you think we want to play with the Earth kids? Those guys crank the in-game gravity way up, about six times the realistic level. I mean, come on!

Oblig (2, Funny)

russlar (1122455) | about 5 years ago | (#29699095)

"I have just signed legislation outlawing the Moon. We begin bombing in 5 minutes."

Re:Oblig (1)

PPH (736903) | about 5 years ago | (#29700521)

I'm sure the lunarites (or whatever the moon's resident race is called) are protesting Obama's Nobel Peace Prize at this very moment.

A comedy piece about the LCROSS mission (0, Offtopic)

BuddyFriend (1653333) | about 5 years ago | (#29699103)

Hey, this is not a troll: I wrote this article on Heavy.com to try to express some frustration I had with how the LCROSS mission was being spun by the White House. I wanted to share it with anyone looking for a laugh today who has been following this mission as closely as I have. "Mars, Bitches!"

http://www.heavy.com/post/why-we-should-blow-up-the-moon-840 [heavy.com]

while we're linking websites about it (5, Informative)

Trepidity (597) | about 5 years ago | (#29699151)

It might be worth pointing to the mission site [nasa.gov] or project site [nasa.gov] at NASA.

Re:while we're linking websites about it (4, Informative)

Informative (1347701) | about 5 years ago | (#29699205)

The PDFs for the press conference have pictures containing a white dot which are alledged to be the crater and the explosion.

http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/392841main_SSC-data.pdf

http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/360020main_LRO_LCROSS_presskit2.pdf

Is it just me (5, Insightful)

clong83 (1468431) | about 5 years ago | (#29699179)

... or does this posting say almost nothing? "We blew up a crater on the moon, and boy our data is great. Check back with you guys later."

Is this just NASA-speak for "We haven't analyzed the data yet but we wanted to make some sort of comment anyways"?

Re:Is it just me (1)

Chris Burke (6130) | about 5 years ago | (#29699265)

Yeah, that's exactly what they're saying. They recorded a lot of data, and it was the kind of data they wanted -- just in case you were worried the lack of the predicted totally awesome dust plume meant the whole mission was a failure -- but it's going to take a while to analyze so sorry no conclusions yet.

Personally, I could give a crap about their data analysis and finding water blah blah. To me, the next step is clear: Repeat the mission, but without all that stupid science equipment garbage and instead just a much heavier impactor aimed at a much more visible part of the moon. We need to kick the moon's ass! It's laughing at us right now! "Oh that the best you got?"

Re:Is it just me (1)

siddesu (698447) | about 5 years ago | (#29699729)

George?

Re:Is it just me (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29700347)

Yeah, WTF else are we s'posed to do with all those nukes?

Re:Is it just me (4, Funny)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | about 5 years ago | (#29699277)

It's NASA speak for "*sigh*, what the fuck are we even doing?"

Re:Is it just me (2)

Interoperable (1651953) | about 5 years ago | (#29699291)

Well it's not like the general public actually wants to see the data. They need to keep the public interested so that they can garner funding and you do that by making vague, general statements about "cool" stuff. It saddens me that more people aren't very interested in learning what is actually being done but the rest of us can just wait a few years for the papers to make their wait unto arXiv.

Re:Is it just me (1)

mrsquid0 (1335303) | about 5 years ago | (#29699303)

It is more like NASA-speak for we do not have any cool publicity pictures yet, but we need to say something so that the twits of the world don't accuse us of sitting on the data.

No translation needed. But in other words... (4, Insightful)

Ungrounded Lightning (62228) | about 5 years ago | (#29699915)

- We didn't miss the aim point.
  - None of the instruments malfunctioned.
  - We didn't lose the data on the way back.
  - We'll tell you what it means once we're done analyzing and checking it.

In still other words "The project passed THE major milestone and is on track with nothing broken."

Re:No translation needed. But in other words... (1)

Convector (897502) | about 5 years ago | (#29704515)

Well, I'm pretty sure the spacecraft and all its instruments are broken now. That WAS the milestone.

Re:Is it just me (1)

Tibor the Hun (143056) | about 5 years ago | (#29700781)

Yeah, but they're keeping a lot of artist employed, creating those pretty images and their impressions everyone keeps posting instead of actual images.

Re:Is it just me (1)

Shag (3737) | about 5 years ago | (#29701341)

Is this just NASA-speak for "We haven't analyzed the data yet but we wanted to make some sort of comment anyways"?

Yeah, it's standard boilerplate, probably defined verbatim in some policy manual somewhere. :)

I was on Mauna Kea for the impact. Didn't detect anything visible from the parking lot of the Visitor Station (though I confess I haven't zoomed in on all 2,000+ images and however many video frames I got...) but they had a communications center set up at the mid-level facility, with one of the science PI's for the mission there, and all indications are that the spectroscopic data is really where it's at.

And yes, of course, spectroscopic data actually has to be analyzed.

Re:Is it just me (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29702469)

Yes, and further it means that it is *their* project, they justified it, spent years of their life on it, actually designed and sent the probe, and now the data is their baby, at since the experiment was demonstrated in real-time they now need to sequester it to buy time for the first crack at decoding and any announcing broad implications it may have.

NASA TV showed the ride in (4, Informative)

ronsr (1653189) | about 5 years ago | (#29699199)

There's a nice sequence of screen-grabs showing the journey into lunar oblivion plus summary of the post-impact press conference here. [ninkinews.com]

It was strange not seeing any massive impact plume like expected, but seems they got spectroscopic data which is what really matters. You got the sense that all the journos were disappointed there wasn't a big KABOOM with all those questions asked about it in the press conference.

Re:NASA TV showed the ride in (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29699533)

You got the sense that all the journos were disappointed there wasn't a big KABOOM with all those questions asked about it in the press conference.

We watched the live stream in our physics class today. To quote our PhysDoc: 'oh, well, that wasn't very exciting!'

Watching the second satellite fall to its doom was rather good, though :)

Re:NASA TV showed the ride in (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29699665)

Next time they could have a third media stage, since this already split in two - three's not too far a stretch. A little cam-bot that splits off of the back and remains close behind the spacecraft as it swoops in and smashes into the crater would be great for the public in my view.

I guess that was sort of intended with the centaur impact. Closer, like video game 3rd person perspective would have been neat though, even if it ads a few million to the budget. It'd be great NASA PR to convey to norms the actual excitement of the science.

Re:NASA TV showed the ride in (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29701359)

There was supposed to be a moon-shattering KABOOM?!

Re:NASA TV showed the ride in (1)

argStyopa (232550) | about 5 years ago | (#29702389)

I see this a lot of places "there wasn't a big explosion or anything"...were there even EXPLOSIVES on the impactor? Fuel? I'd guess there wasn't, as any sort of oxydizer probably would run the risk of confusing the data grabbed.

So no, if you slam a chunk of essentially inert metal at a fairly high speed into a pile of gravel, you're not going to get a big Hollywood(tm) explosion.

Re:NASA TV showed the ride in (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 5 years ago | (#29703013)

So no, if you slam a chunk of essentially inert metal at a fairly high speed into a pile of gravel, you're not going to get a big Hollywood(tm) explosion.

A lump of metal going really fast can have more energy than a small explosive. F=MA, remember?

The lack of a dust plume is interesting because it suggests that the craft didn't land in a deep pocket of dust, because dust tends to act like water when you put enough impact force in it, and the moon has no atmosphere to speak of so loosened debris tends to trace a neat parabola as it attempts to escape the moon's gravity well. Likewise, once a particle has been accelerated to escape velocity, it tends to remain at that velocity due to the lack of atmosphere to slow it down. Then again, when you splash liquid into liquid, if their properties are sufficiently similar most of the splashback is from the liquid you dropped... and the impactor wasn't liquid.

The short form is that there should have been a microsatellite with a camera in it dropped to take pictures of what happened as the thing hit the moon, so that we could have answers to these questions.

Re:NASA TV showed the ride in (1)

germansausage (682057) | about 5 years ago | (#29704523)

You say "energy" and then give the formula for force??? F=ma is for force. You want kinetic energy. Ek=(1/2)mv^2.

Re:NASA TV showed the ride in (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 5 years ago | (#29704857)

AFAIK PE = F * D. If F increases... I am not a math nerd, but I'm pretty sure force is involved when you're talking about an impactor.

Re:NASA TV showed the ride in (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | about 5 years ago | (#29704525)

A lump of metal going really fast can have more energy than a small explosive. F=MA, remember?

No I don't. In particular, I appear to have forgotten which of those three variables stands for kinetic energy.

Re:NASA TV showed the ride in (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29702981)

Where's the KABOOM? There was supposed to be a Moon shattering KABOOM!

A high energy impact with the moon's surface.. (2, Funny)

blind biker (1066130) | about 5 years ago | (#29699289)

followed by "a whole lot of math and science".

Pure orgasm.

Re:A high energy impact with the moon's surface.. (5, Funny)

skine (1524819) | about 5 years ago | (#29699843)

I think when you mix math and science it's an applied orgasm.

Re:A high energy impact with the moon's surface.. (1)

Extremus (1043274) | about 5 years ago | (#29700681)

The "usual" orgasm is theoretical then?

Re:A high energy impact with the moon's surface.. (1)

mkarcher (136108) | about 5 years ago | (#29836219)

Around here it is.

News at 10:00 (2, Funny)

Titanarm (1640169) | about 5 years ago | (#29699317)

Jim: This just in, we have confirmed reports that the two NASA probes that slammed into the moon earlier today have irrevocably changed the moons trajectory in such a way that it will intersect with Earth's. Scientist's calculated that impact will oc

Participating in Science (0, Flamebait)

k6mfw (1182893) | about 5 years ago | (#29699337)

Yes it is boring but that's science, not science fiction (ya ever noticed that all space sci-fi shows are either alien space monsters or laser beam battles? Like there's only seven plots to a western.) They probably shouldn't have hyped the huge explosive plume in animations for weeks before impact. However, public was given direct observation of this program in action. OK maybe they didn't feed all the console data direct but they gave realtime visuals. However, realtime astronomy is really boring to those that don't understand it. Gathering at Ames Research Center grass area of Shenandoah Plaza was interesting. How often can someone camp out at a federal facility?

Re:Participating in Science (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29699637)

(ya ever noticed that all space sci-fi shows are either alien space monsters or laser beam battles? Like there's only seven plots to a western.)

Science fiction != sci-fi action. It's a setting, you can put whatever you want in there. Kubrick made a drama, one act being a thriller without lasers or monsters.

And the same goes for the western setting.

Incomplete Data . . . (2, Funny)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | about 5 years ago | (#29699405)

All nine of those instruments were gathering data simultaneously and streaming that data back to Earth.

Unfortunately, this high volume of data alerted the MPAA/RIAA that copyright theft was in progress, and their lawyers ordered a DMCA take down order to cut off data transmission from the moon. So not all the data was received.

The Moon must appear in court in order for its data service to be restored.

unfortunate overhyping (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29699459)

It's unfortunate that NASA hyped this up as much as they did, asking the nation to host "backyard impact parties" and saying you'll see it in your mid sized backyard telescope and whatever.

This may have been a smashing success for the scientists, but each time they play up something that turns out to be a dud in the eyes of Joe Sixpack, they'll lose that much more public support. They're teetering on the brink as it is; people don't understand why they should be funding smashing things into the moon when their local roads are filled with potholes and they can't afford health care.

Re:unfortunate overhyping (2, Informative)

confused one (671304) | about 5 years ago | (#29700527)

I think they honestly expected a bigger flash. Something that could be seen by a 10" or 12" telescope. Instead, the smallest telescope I heard say "we saw the impact" was MMT, which has a 256" aperature.

Today's Zen homework question (1)

sweet_petunias_full_ (1091547) | about 5 years ago | (#29701799)

If a NASA dud craft falls in a crater and nobody sees it in their telescope, did it really fall?

After 40 years (1)

Nonillion (266505) | about 5 years ago | (#29699555)

While the science geek in me says cool!, the other side says, After 40 years, is this the BEST we can do?

Re:After 40 years (2, Funny)

PhxBlue (562201) | about 5 years ago | (#29699757)

At least they didn't miss!

We pi**ed all the money away (1, Insightful)

Ungrounded Lightning (62228) | about 5 years ago | (#29700009)

While the science geek in me says cool!, the other side says, After 40 years, is this the BEST we can do?

After the Apollo program we pi**ed all the money away on Vietnam, a string of other wars, and "The Great Society" welfare programs. These were all run on the national credit card until the interest on the account is now sucking down more than the income tax provides.

The value was sucked out of the economy and disposed of by government until, despite what advancements WERE made since with what resources were left, we still can't afford the size of program we could in the 1960s.

Moon shots are expensive and we're broke.

Re:After 40 years (1)

symbolset (646467) | about 5 years ago | (#29701195)

If you're over 50, it's your fault. If you're under 40, blame your parents. If you're under 25, do something about it: remind yourself that new lands belong to them what claim them.

Almost 50 years, actually. (1)

Shag (3737) | about 5 years ago | (#29701313)

First NASA spacecraft to slam into the moon was Ranger 4 in 1962.

Of course, back then they didn't crash-land on purpose... ;)

The Only Data I'm Interested in... (1)

AndyMan1 (769797) | about 5 years ago | (#29700141)

Did that guy ever get his high-five?

Why does NASA have the rights to blow up the Moon? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29700235)

I would've thought that the Moon is owned by no one... or everyone on Earth. So why does NASA have the rights to blow up the Moon?!

Mont Bland Coach Sunglass,ED Sunglass So Cool. (-1, Troll)

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great news everyone! (1)

iggymanz (596061) | about 5 years ago | (#29700417)

The real reason that there was no plume is that the moon is so frickin' wet with water at the poles the probes each stuck in the mud with a mighty *splat*. We're talking the kind of mud that sucks the boots right off your feet, so muddy they'll have to jack up the cows to milk them.

Re:great news everyone! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29713587)

That's what I thought. Or else there is a hole at the pole because planets are hollow.

Why double efforts? (1)

Excelcior (1390167) | about 5 years ago | (#29701153)

Seriously, didn't the ISRO just do this? And wasn't NASA was given free passage for any equipment they wanted to include? As I recall [wikipedia.org] , the mission was a success. [wikipedia.org]

Re:Why double efforts? (1)

t_little (91171) | about 5 years ago | (#29701357)

The LCROSS mission selected a polar crash site that was in permanent shadow in order to find out whether a lot more water was trapped there than the small amounts found by Chandrayaan.

Re:Why double efforts? (1)

Cochonou (576531) | about 5 years ago | (#29702055)

This is a satellite that reported in a lot of good scientific data, but that still had critical design flaws - it failed after less than a year in orbit, when it was supposed to live on a two-year mission.

RT (1)

lastgoodnickname (1438821) | about 5 years ago | (#29701703)

LCROSS_NASA “And what's this thing coming toward me very fast? So big and flat and round, about 18 hours ago from web
LCROSS_NASA it needs a big wide sounding name like 'Ow', 'Ownge', 'Round', 'Ground'!” about 18 hours ago from web
LCROSS_NASA “That's it! Ground! Ha! I wonder if it'll be friends with me?” about 18 hours ago from web

Re:RT (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 years ago | (#29701781)

This is HHGG reference, you ignorant sluts. Mod this douchebag back up.

Re:RT (1)

lastgoodnickname (1438821) | about 5 years ago | (#29701809)

Oh no!, Not again!

Obama attacks moon while receiving Peace Prize (1)

David Gerard (12369) | about 5 years ago | (#29702525)

Barack Obama, the President of Earth, has controversially launched an attack on the Lunar Imperium [today.com] the same day he received the Nobel Peace Prize for not being George W. Bush.

"We closely examined Mr Obama's record over the past nine months," said Nobel Prize committee chair Thorbjørn Jagland, "and have established to our satisfaction that he has succeeded in not been George W. Bush in any manner whatsoever. Also, the flying cars, moving sidewalks and robot servants he brought in are pretty cool."

The committee had initially been concerned that Mr Obama may have been, per investigations by "birther" researchers, a replicant created by the team responsible for the cyborgization of Dick Cheney, to take his place as humanity's next robot overlord after Mr Cheney's term had finished. "However, we are now confident that his documentation of Autobot manufacture is entirely in order."

The surprise attack on the moon came after a CIA report indicated the Taliban had set up shop in the old Nazi moon base, based on intelligence gathered from secret mass phone tapping. The Obama administration denied it was merely an excuse to invade the Lunar Imperium and steal its water.

"It grieves us terribly that our lunar brothers have let us down so," said Mr Obama today. "But with mutual respect and communication, I am confident we can work through our differences. We'll teach them to love again DESTROY ALL HUMANS DESTROY ALL HUMANS SOCIALIZE HEALTH CARE I'm sorry, I'm having a minor glitch. I'll get back to you."

Is the Moon gone? (1)

Haxzaw (1502841) | about 5 years ago | (#29704319)

I live in Colorado, and I haven't seen the Moon since they blew it up, and our weather turned cold, snowy, and icy right afterwards. I can't help but think the Moon is gone, so has anyone else seen it lately?

The moon IS made of cheese! (1)

SixDimensionalArray (604334) | about 5 years ago | (#29709219)

I can't believe nobody has figured it out yet! The moon IS made of CHEESE! I think the Centaur and LCROSS just went straight through, and came out the opposite side in a stream of molten mozzarella!

I scoff at the "good data" NASA received - seriously, what do you expect lobbing a satellite into a hunk of gouda?

Golly, IANARS (not a rocket scientist) and even I figured that one out!

-SixD

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