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Warez Moving From BitTorrent to Conventional Hosting Services

timothy posted more than 4 years ago | from the gradual-process-gets-noticed dept.

Media 366

ericatcw writes "Driven by increased crackdowns on BitTorrent sites such as The Pirate Bay, software pirates are fast moving their warez to file-hosting Web sites like RapidShare, reports Computerworld. According to anti-piracy vendor V.I. Labs, 100% of the warez in its survey were available on RapidShare, which, according to Alexa, is already one of the 20 largest sites in the world. V.I. Labs' CEO predicts file-hosting sites such as RapidShare will supplant BitTorrent, as the former appear better protected legally."

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366 comments

captain obvious (5, Insightful)

MoFoQ (584566) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708443)

this one needs a "no sh*t sherlock" tag...

obviously, when u stamp out one source....and not the demand, a new source will come to existence to fill in that demand.

Rapidshare, Megaupload, netload, etc. have been around for a while and do have legitimate uses (some times, trying to send to a 20MB PDF or Illustrator (.ai) advertising file can wreak havoc on email, especially with some of the free email ones or if your client is a small business).

Some opensource apps also use the services to host mirrors to their downloads to lighten the load on their own servers.

Re:captain obvious (4, Insightful)

IgnoramusMaximus (692000) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708587)

Actually, moving to paid services is one of those short-sighted, brain-dead lemming moves the general public gets involved in periodically. This is simply so because most such sites need actual payment to download (unless you want to download 1 file per 24 hours at something like 10k/s in the "free", "oh how much faster it would go if you only gave us your Credit Card number", "trial" mode - and never you mind horrid java-script hells of a "web page" all of these "services" feature).

The end result is that there is a complete trail of uploaders, their IP Addresses, their emails, but what's even better, there is a complete trail of all downloaders, including their IP Addresses, emails, user ids and, the Holy Grail of RIAA, MPAA and BSA snooping campaigns: actual financial transactions of these donwloaders which immediately yield their identities and bonus preculde any possible defense of "sharing between friends" as there is actual money changing hands.

In short: stupidity squared on the part of any people who use RapidShare, MegaUpload and a bunch of similar scams, people who have no clue about the implications of their actions and were, due to their ignorance of technology driven into arms of these scams by the PR campaigns against P2P, people who got brainwashed into believing that the direct-download sites are "safer". All it will take is one of them getting sued and happily forking over all the logs and financial records. Than again, odds are that some of them are already controlled by MPAA etc as a result of some behind-the-scenes settlements.

No such thing was possible with BitTorrent as a vast majority of tracker sites are anonymous. The snobs participating in "private trackers" had more elevated levels of exposure because of their "registration" process offered additional levels of forensic evidence. In fact most P2P systems offer as the only point of identification the IP Address, which does not immediately translate into a personal identification (unlike your MasterCard with which you paid RapidShare) due to dynapmic IP assignments, possible WiFi holes, access by other people to your computer and what not.

In short, it will take only a series of mega-busts of MegaUpload users, followed by rapid (due to excellent and undeniable forensic evidence) convictions, until the lemmings will run back to more anonymous and thus more sane methods of file-sharing.

Re:captain obvious (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29708641)

In short, it will take only a series of mega-busts of MegaUpload users, followed by rapid (due to excellent and undeniable forensic evidence) convictions, until the lemmings will run back to more anonymous and thus more sane methods of file-sharing.

In various parts you're quite right. Although in countries where downloading is legal, there's less that can be done to the downloaders - especially those that don't mind waiting or slower-than-instant downloads. The uploader would likely get crucified all the same if uploading was illegal.

Re:captain obvious (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29708657)

You talk about Bit torrent use like it's in the past, however it's very much a live and kicking.

Re:captain obvious (4, Insightful)

MoFoQ (584566) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708677)

never heard of jdownloader [jdownloader.org] ?

it doesn't have to use a "paid/premium" account to access those files and it automates a lot of the tedious aspects of the free versions of the services.
plus there are services out there meant for uploading to those file hosting services, anonymously and automatically, as well as payment services from various countries that don't share the bed with the lobbyists like the US/UK/France that handle the payment services as well as proxy services...

yes...I can go on and on.
It's a cat-and-mouse game, where the mouse usually is more savy and has a head-start.

Re:captain obvious (1)

IgnoramusMaximus (692000) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708799)

never heard of jdownloader?

No, its first time I hear of the thing, although the concept is rather old and has been done in response to previous scam sites trying to obfuscate or lock contents and get people to pay for releasing it. Naturally the operators if the scam sites will do everything in their power to prevent this "jdownloader" from working (as they are "losing" their ad revenue and "premium account" money to it as it makes "free" downloading less of an getting-a-root-canal-dentistry-experience they want you to have) and this will quickly devolve into an arms race, where your "jdownloader" will work today, by screwed up tomorrow as some site takes counter-measures, work on the next Tuesday again when devs respond, then quit on Thursday etc and so on.

It's a cat-and-mouse game, where the mouse usually is more savy and has a head-start.

Not if the mouse was stupid enough to forward its Credit Card number to the cat, who then finds its billing-address-mouse-hole and sits there waiting for it...

Re:captain obvious (2, Interesting)

logjon (1411219) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708821)

Again, you're disregarding prepaid credit cards that leave no such trail. You are aware it's nearly 2010 correct?

Re:captain obvious (1)

IgnoramusMaximus (692000) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708861)

Again, you're disregarding prepaid credit cards that leave no such trail. You are aware it's nearly 2010 correct?

I addressed the gift cards in another reply to a poster below.

In short: they are not available in most countries, in many where they allow them they do not work online and in the last remaining few places the FATF is doing their best to make them unusable online. I do not expect that fight to last very long, by 2011 or so none of them will work online anymore.

Re:captain obvious (1, Informative)

logjon (1411219) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708901)

They've worked for everything I've needed them for online or offline. Also, your 'projection' is meaningless, and I could give a shit about what can be purchased in other countries.

Re:captain obvious (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29709089)

Well, y'see, the thing is that your original argument was "these d00ds are dumb for not using jdownloader and prepaid credit cards". And when it's pointed out that neither of these is a viable option for most of the people most of the time, you say "don't care, worksforme". Which is essentially a tacit admission that you were wrong in the first place.

Re:captain obvious (1)

logjon (1411219) | more than 4 years ago | (#29709101)

No. my original point was that your point was flawed as it failed to take prepaid cards into consideration. So they aren't necessarily dumb for using it if they do it right. And then you go into a spiel about other countries and the year 2011, neither of which is relevant at this point in time.

Re:captain obvious (4, Insightful)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708695)

In fact most P2P systems offer as the only point of identification the IP Address, which does not immediately translate into a personal identification

Apparently you've not been following the RIAA lawsuit mill. According to them (and the majority of courts which have bought into it) an IP address is unquestionable proof of identity. The fact that it's not doesn't matter if you've been screwed into the ground by a frivolous lawsuit.

Re:captain obvious (1)

vxvxvxvx (745287) | more than 4 years ago | (#29709105)

According to them (and the majority of courts which have bought into it) an IP address is unquestionable proof of identity.

I'm glad you clarified that it's the courts that bought into it that bought into it... It's fitting that this was posted under "captain obvious."

Re:captain obvious (2, Informative)

Shadow of Eternity (795165) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708749)

No, nobody will ever be convicted of anything. They may be found LIABLE after the RIAA proves a preponderance of the evidence is in their favor but nobody is getting convicted of anything. There's a reason the MAFIAA keeps using civil suits rather than trying to pursue things in criminal courts.

Sucks to be American sometimes (3, Insightful)

Langfat (953252) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708753)

sorry to be rude, but not all countries adhere to the crazy copyright laws that the USA does. according to my interpretation of current Canadian law (which could very well be incorrect) the levies i pay on blank media go to the riaa/mpaa/canadian equivalents and i am allowed to download as much as i want. this doesn't mean i'm allowed to distribute as much as i want, but with a centralized server which is download only, that's not the problem that it would be with bittorrent, in which you're required to both send and receive.

not too mention that rapidshare et. al have an air of legitimacy, as they take down any files which are reported to contain content they aren't legally allowed to distribute. of course, "they don't have the resources to check every single file that is uploaded to their servers," only the ones that are reported. And the only reason rapidshare does that is because they are a German-owned company (if i recall correctly). some countries, like Colombia and Egypt don't adhere to any copyright law. presumably a company owned and operated in a place like that would be virtually immune to any information requests from the MAFIAA and their ilk.

it surprises me, given the invention and popularity of the internet, how many americans still struggle to think globally, and still assume that the rest of the world on their terms. this is not intended to be a troll or flamebait or personal insult, it's merely my own stated opinion.

Re:Sucks to be American sometimes (1)

ImYourVirus (1443523) | more than 4 years ago | (#29709035)

Sure but that doesn't stop 'american' companies from forcing their will in other countries. I don't recall any foreign governments/isp's/corporations that haven't bowed (eventually) to the demands u.s. corporations like the mafiaa, correct me if I'm wrong, and even if I am it hasn't been many.

Re:captain obvious (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29708803)

You also act like you've never heard of prepaid credit cards.

Re:captain obvious (1)

IgnoramusMaximus (692000) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708839)

You also act like you've never heard of prepaid credit cards.

"Gift" (i.e. anonymous and prepaid) credit cards do not exist in many countries, and in many of those that allow them the cards do not work online .... precisely because they are anonymous. In fact the whole idea of "gift" cards is being considered a loophole that goes against the recommendations of FATF (Financial Action Task Force on Money Laundering). Anonymity is a precious commodity and is considered a weapon in the "Wars" on Terrorism, Drugs, Alcohol, Privacy and Whatever Else Can Be Made Into A Cash-cow For Security And Defence Corporations And An Excuse For Authoritarian Crusades.

Subsequently, I would not get too used to these cards being around.

Re:captain obvious (1)

logjon (1411219) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708865)

So if they're about to take away our 'gift' cards and start tracking down everybody who uses rapidshare, what makes you think BT is any safer?

Re:captain obvious (3, Interesting)

IgnoramusMaximus (692000) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708921)

BT (and any other pure P2P system) is safer simply because there are additional hoops for the MPAAs of the world to jump through (like ISPs and privacy laws) to get your identity and even so such identity is unreliable (unless your lawyer is a dolt or you have been completely unprepared and are keeping all your downloaded stuff in the open, have no WiFi routers etc).

This is of course not an impregnable defence but its orders of magnitude harder to crack then simply asking MegaUpload for all your downloads in your account, cross-correlated with your identity coming from your financial record (note that the prickly ISP problem has been circumnavigated neatly).

P2P can be made far more secure, and it has been, like for example the Japanese Winny system (which was a cross between something like FreeNet and a typical P2P system like Gnutella) and its more modern successor the Perfect Dark. If coupled with steganographic storage, good user practices and other tricks, such systems can be made near-impractical to crack, to the point that mere knowledge of the IP address is (practically) useless from the perspective of copyright witch-hunters.

Re:captain obvious (1)

logjon (1411219) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708961)

Ah, so that's how your 'projection' of prepaid credit cards not working after [insert arbitrary date here] comes into play. Well I project that on December 31, 2009, BitTorrent clients will be entirely illegal across the world, and anyone caught with one will face the death penalty. Rapidshare is looking good now, isn't it?

Re:captain obvious (2, Insightful)

IgnoramusMaximus (692000) | more than 4 years ago | (#29709033)

Dude, you do not seem to understand. Prepaid cards are a money laundering loophole, far more serious to the powers-that-be than some nerds downloading pilfered porn off of RapidShare. You are thinking: "merry mouse-and-cat chases with the RIAA", they are thinking: "Osama Bin Laden agents paying for communications and bomb components". It doesn't take a genius to figure out what is going to happen in this case.

Re:captain obvious (1)

logjon (1411219) | more than 4 years ago | (#29709071)

I never even implied that your projected outlawing of prepaid cards had anything to do with the RIAA. I have not been thinking "merry mouse-and-cat chases with the RIAA." You will find no text to indicate such. If you do, I suggest you re-read.

Re:captain obvious (1)

Dudeman_Jones (1589225) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708845)

fun fact. anyone downloading junk from these sites is probably downloading an encrypted container file like rar or 7zip, under a completely false filename.
another fun fact. the most popular, and therefore hardest to police sites are all free to use, with improved premium access being a pay-to-play option, not a mandate.

Next time get off your high horse and do a little research before flipping out on this crap.

Re:captain obvious (1)

IgnoramusMaximus (692000) | more than 4 years ago | (#29709015)

fun fact. anyone downloading junk from these sites is probably downloading an encrypted container file like rar or 7zip, under a completely false file

Really? How then do you find this file? Unless you and your buddies are into psychic connections, there is somewhere, where a lot of you turkeys congregate, a "translation" to the real contents and the password to extract it. Unless you expect MPAAs of the world to be illiterate, they can read it as well as you do. Considering yourself oh-soooo-much-smarter-then-your-dumb-by-definition-adversary is the hallmark of elementary school "cryptography". In keeping with this, I fully expect you to lecture me next on the use of ROT-13 as an "advanced" method of "hiding" stuff.

another fun fact. the most popular, and therefore hardest to police sites are all free to use, with improved premium access being a pay-to-play option, not a mandate.

The article specifically mentions the likes of RapidShare, which is decidedly not in that category. But fear not, I am sure the other sites expect to make oodles on continuing to offer terabytes of bandwidth just out of their love of sharing.... or perhaps they are just hoping that enough suckers pays before they go bust. Note that places like YouTube are millions of dollars in the red.

Re:captain obvious (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29709099)

an encrypted container file like rar or 7zip, under a completely false filename.

The AAs wouldn't be the least bit disappointed if file sharing went back to trading info on obscure bulletin boards located in the underbelly of the internet.

Re:captain obvious (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29708877)

This is simply so because most such sites need actual payment to download (unless you want to download 1 file per 24 hours at something like 10k/s in the "free", "oh how much faster it would go if you only gave us your Credit Card number", "trial" mode - and never you mind horrid java-script hells of a "web page" all of these "services" feature).

Rapidshare may be strict about the number of files you download, speed, etc (like "only one file every 10 minutes"), but most others aren't that way from what I can see. I've gotten 1200 KBps speeds on MegaUpload downloading files before and usually average between 500 and 800 KBps, and have downloaded a gig before the limits on a day have hit me. They adjust them back and forth depending on traffic, so sometimes it's 350MB max in 15 minutes. Yeah, they have a "premium" level of service of course, but the "free" version really is fine for regular file transferring -- just not for downloading feature films and other heavy pirate usage.

Re:captain obvious (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708907)

the Holy Grail of RIAA, MPAA and BSA snooping campaigns: actual financial transactions of these donwloaders which immediately yield their identities and bonus preculde any possible defense of "sharing between friends" as there is actual money changing hands.

Uh? I pay money for my ISP, so there's actual money changing hands no matter what I do online. They'll need a stronger connection than that to get anywhere.

Re:captain obvious (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29708993)

I don't pay for my connection. I don't even use a neighbors WiFi. I also live in an apartment building where the cable lines are split at entry-point. So finding my specific location is quite difficult, unless they want to get a warrant to search all 20 or so tenant's computers of my one building.

Re:captain obvious (2, Informative)

FallinWithStyle (1474217) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708735)

Agreed... But really though, rs is going to overtake torrents the day that users decide manually downloading 800 pieces of a file from a server is easier than letting an app do it for you (from a network of peers, none the less).

http://icefilms.info/ (4, Informative)

HNS-I (1119771) | more than 4 years ago | (#29709059)

http://icefilms.info/ [icefilms.info] Uses some javascript hack to start a divx player in your browser and stream the content directly on the megaupload site. No download limit.

xIAA loses (4, Insightful)

lucas teh geek (714343) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708447)

with things moving away from p2p and back to the client-server model, the number of people open to lawsuits drops dramatically. downloaders are no longer forced to upload, so they're no longer "making available", the the most they can be realistically charged with is making one copy.

Use JDownloader for file-hosting sites (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29708459)

If you download a lot of files from one-click hosting sites like RapidShare, MegaUpload, etc., you should definitely check out JDownloader ( http://jdownloader.org/download/index ). It automates the downloading of files from several dozen sites and even has features like CAPTCHA breaking. Linux, Mac, and Windows are all supported.

Agreed (2, Informative)

mister_playboy (1474163) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708571)

JDownloader has really come into its own over the last few months. Older versions were prone to errors, dropped links and excessive CPU usage, but the current version does very well. As the program has grown, it also keeps up much better with changes in hoster page layout (which can break downloads).

Free games? (5, Funny)

nycguy (892403) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708461)

You mean RapidShare has something else besides porn on it? I'm going to have to grab my other joystick!

Re:Free games? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29708983)

RapidShare has porn?!?

That's not new (3, Insightful)

jeffasselin (566598) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708463)

A lot of warez stuff has been hosted on such services for a while now, it's only more noticeable because other services are being used less.

Re:That's not new (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29708851)

I thought that was the point of this article, that more people are going to direct download services. Not that they're doing it period, but that there's more of them.

The future of piracy... (3, Insightful)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708469)

They'll continue to make more and more draconian laws. In twenty years, they'll be threatening people with fifty years in the electric chair with a gerbil up their arse, and it will have done nothing to solve the problem. And between websites, new protocols, new control methods, demands to the ISPs, and all of that, the community will survive on shifting sands, always staying one step ahead of their pursuers because it takes time to legislate and administrate a response to what is inherently a social movement without any defined leaders or organizational structure. They cannot beat the economics of the situation, no matter how much technology or social control, or legal action they take: Which is that the cost of reproduction is effectively zero.

They will do everything they can to make distribution as expensive as possible, enforcing ludicrous bandwidth caps and trying to control the internet as much as they can. Eventually, it'll reach a critical point where the cost of forming a new decentralized network will become cheaper than continuing to use the old methods of communication, and the community will give birth to the successor to the internet. It's something of an irony that the internet was created on the ideas of free information exchange and ensuring that an open line of communication would always be possible between its participants turning into a profit-orientated tool by greedy corporations. But while they may someday succeed in control of the network, they will have done nothing to attack the ideals upon which it was originally built, and so long as those ideals live, it will continue to rematerialize like the goddamned phoenix, generation after generation, even as society claims to have no use for it.

Re:The future of piracy... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29708663)

of course, although the cost of reproduction is zero, the cost of *production* is still pretty huge for most media types, by most metrics.

if that's the way things are going, then i can only really see one possible endpoint: advertising/product-placement driven production. which is gonna suck. thanks for playing.

Re:The future of piracy... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29708809)

Umm, the music and movie industry are raking in cash, even in the age of mass downloads. That isn't going to change.

Re:The future of piracy... (2, Interesting)

cdrguru (88047) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708797)

Everything adapts. Software will be something you rent on the Internet and never resides on your computer.

Music? The situation in China has "evolved" to the point where there is no more recorded music sold (or produced). In the West check your local radio stations... what is selling there is oldies. What will continue to "sell" will be music from the previous century and the Internet will be dominated by garage bands offering stuff for free in hopes of landing a gig.

Movies? Eliminate digital distribution (DVDs) and you eliminate the problem. If it is going to be on DVD, lots of people will just download it for free. You want a theatrical release? It is going to have to be in theaters only, for years. Maybe sell DVDs years later, maybe never because once released on DVD the revenue stream ends.

User generated content? Check out YouTube for that, especially ShayTards and Magibon. This is the height of user-generated content and people are starting to discover (realize?) that it is crap. All crap, all the time. No, that isn't going to be the future of entertainment.

What most people don't understand is we've grown an entire generation that believes it all should be free and will never, ever pay. This is going to require a major adaptation that most "media" and "entertainment" isn't going to survive, but the adaptation will eventually succeed.

No, only in your fantasy will it really all be free. Someone has to pay, and patronage doesn't work. So we all have to pay for what we consume.

Re:The future of piracy... (4, Informative)

amRadioHed (463061) | more than 4 years ago | (#29709091)

What do you mean recorded music isn't sold or produced in China? I've got a handful of recent CDs from China sitting in front of me right now.

This makes perfect sense (2, Insightful)

Ralph Spoilsport (673134) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708473)

RapidShare will supplant BitTorrent, as the former appear better protected legally.

RS et al is more than happy to take down anything determined to be a violation of copyright. PirateBay et al stood up and said "fuck off". This doesn't jive with the workflow IP capital demands under the DMCA. Yes, the DMCA is a parochial piece of shit that is only enforceable in the states, but given the size and power of the USA system and its networks, it only makes sense to appease the DMCA as it is the more restrictive of the nationalist bullshit rules re: IP copyright.

RS, mediafire, and others will take down stuff when someone complains. Hence, by "killing its own" it becomes much more resilient, as one gets the whack-a-mole effect, but with this major structural difference: with pirate Bay / napster etc. when the system is brought down, resurrecting or building a new network is very time consuming and difficult. with the RS/megaupload/mediafire/etc. model, they own they field on which whack-a-mole is played. So by letting the rights holders chase the pirates, RS et al get to profit on the churn.

The next thing will be blogs dedicated to software with links to DLs of the stuff in RS et al, similar to music blogs now, and then a master system to search it all, similar to chewbone.

RS

Re:This makes perfect sense (1)

buchner.johannes (1139593) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708511)

RS, mediafire, and others will take down stuff when someone complains.

Maybe, but it is still a "Bat a rat" game with an apathic player. You will never get all copies across multiple hosters.

Re:This makes perfect sense (2, Informative)

JoelRodz (873094) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708661)

Personally I've already seen Forums used to post links of RS or MU. I've even seen Twitter linking to a blogger's site which contains the URLs in text files!

This is already being done... its just not as mainstream as one would think.

Re:This makes perfect sense (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29708743)

It doesn't matter. Producers will put advertisements in their products no matter what; either they can make X from selling their product traditionally, or they can make X+Y selling their product with embedded advertising. Even if X decreases slightly because of the blatant advertising, Y usually makes up for it.

Ideas (2, Interesting)

robvangelder (472838) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708475)

I wish that TV Shows were available on Rapidshare legit. The download speeds are great, and I would definitely pay $1 per episode.

List of warez ftp sites... regularly updated (4, Funny)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708479)

List of warez ftp sites... regularly updated [bofh.net] .

General information on accessing these sites:

  • Some sites are slow, down, whatever. Try again later.
  • These sites use advanced authentication methods, such as reverse authentication look-up to local FTP daemon. Anonymous might not allways work if the address that you're coming from doesn't look 3l33+ enough, you might have to use your own userid and password. Also, disabling or enabling a proxy might help.
  • Also, simple PC's with Wind0wz are also totally off the limits. Go to your shell account and use a real operating systems. L4m3rs without multitasking can't get in.

Re:List of warez ftp sites... regularly updated (1)

gzipped_tar (1151931) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708649)

I particularly like the jokes such as "ftp://0x7f000001/" there ;)

For those who don't get it, they're the localhost address in hex, dec and oct representations.

Re:List of warez ftp sites... regularly updated (2, Insightful)

ultimad (879139) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708659)

Also, simple PC's with Wind0wz are also totally off the limits. Go to your shell account and use a real operating systems. L4m3rs without multitasking can't get in.

That gave me today's dose of laugh! Considering 90% of warez are applications and games designed for Windows, it's amusing that users with that OS are not allowed!

Re:List of warez ftp sites... regularly updated (3, Informative)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708927)

It was a joke...that web page is from 1995 or so. You couldn't do anything from a Windows 3.1 box on SLIP dialup. I didn't expect it to get +5 Informative...I was planning on +5 Funny, but go figure.

Re:List of warez ftp sites... regularly updated (3, Funny)

Kjella (173770) | more than 4 years ago | (#29709041)

Sometimes the moderators have a sense of humor too, they're modding it so others will be fooled. Plus you get free karma, so no reason to complain.

Usenet anyone? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29708491)

Usenet still has an awful lot of warez on it, and I can download TV shows through usenet much faster than I can as a torrent.

If it's a high-profile (read: watched by the media companies like a hawk), it's a no brainer.

Re:Usenet anyone? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29708553)

Usenet is long dead unless you trade recipes, participate in flamewars, or spam. Rumors to the contrary occasionally arise, but if it was so great, nobody would have used:

  • Napster
  • Gnutella
  • Limewire
  • eDonkey
  • BitTorrent
  • dc++
  • (or the other hundred or so things I forget)

q.e.d., Usenet is just a lousy message board for elitists. There is certainly nothing to see there.

Re:Usenet anyone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29708623)

Right that's why I download about a terabyte a month from usenet.

Re:Usenet anyone? (1, Insightful)

mister_playboy (1474163) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708593)

Usenet is not particularly useful unless you spend money. File hosting services are generally quite usable for free (granted, I don't have a big download pipe, so I can still max it out with the free options.) Bittorrent is 100% usable without spending money.

I understand the arguments in favor of Usenet, but the truth is the competing services are way better when your main goal is to spend no money at all.

The first rule of usenet (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29708607)

Is that YOU DO NOT TALK ABOUT USENET.

The second rule of Usenet is that YOU DO NOT TALK ABOUT USENET.

Re:The first rule of usenet (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29709103)

The third rule of Usenet is that is costs lots of money and is a major pain to download anything from if you could ever find anything that you wanted. So everyone should just forget about waiting time with Usenet.

Oh and rule four, you don't talk about Usenet.

All things old... (1)

blue l0g1c (1007517) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708513)

What? You can get warez somewhere other than newsgroups? My lawn...get off it!

Re:All things old... (1)

voodoowizard (1557839) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708747)

For me, the death of dial up with a free newsgroup service killed it. Now I have to pay...? Bah, screw that, why pay when... ah never mind.

Newsgroups (4, Insightful)

Frogbert (589961) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708515)

To preempt any discussion about newsgroups please read the following before posting:

Do not talk about fucking newsgroups, we have a good thing going here, don't fuck it up.

Re:xxxxgroups (1)

networkzombie (921324) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708581)

The first rule of xxxxxx is DON'T TALK ABOUT XXXXXX

Re:xxxxgroups (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29708603)

The first rule of xxxxxx is DON'T TALK ABOUT XXXXXX

Of course not. You just post the porn and you don't discuss it. Else it gets kinda creepy.

And six-X porn? Seriously, that just seems unnecessary.

Re:xxxxgroups (1)

FallinWithStyle (1474217) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708681)

Wait... We're talking about Usenet here, right? It's cool, I can say that, it only shows up as X's for everyone else-- try it.

Re:Newsgroups (1)

mako1138 (837520) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708687)

I've felt for a while that download sites are the new [redacted], except they're accessible over a different protocol. A "premium account" is a subscription, more or less.

Re:Newsgroups (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29708715)

You're kidding right? The FBI, BSA, RIAA, and anyone else who cares about copyright infringement has known about binaries on Usenet for at least a decade.

It's the low volume of users that prevents lawsuits.

Re:Newsgroups (1, Insightful)

RoboRay (735839) | more than 4 years ago | (#29709081)

"It's the low volume of users that prevents lawsuits."

Actually, I'm pretty sure it's the inability to monitor downloads and the ease of forging headers for the uploaders.

Re:Newsgroups (1)

0100010001010011 (652467) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708773)

Given they haven't paid attention for the last 20 years, somehow I don't think they're going to start.

Yes BT was 100% free. And I was against paying for anything. But with that of which we do not speak, TV and Movies are closer to VOD. My cable company just upgraded me to 1.4MB/s... I can get a 30 minute TV show in 3 minutes. I can get a whole movie in 10-15, enough time to pop popcorn and get settled in. It's well worth the $11 I spend on it.

Re:Newsgroups (1)

ewolfr (209134) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708867)

$11/mo? You must be using Astraweb as well. Good choice.

Re:Newsgroups (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29708989)

Astraweb is a terrible choice.
Those fuckers are polluting usenet.
Most large scale postings to astraweb gets article-id's mixed up with other unrelated posts on transfer to other usenet providers.

The effect being that everything looks great on astraweb, but any posts made to astraweb are really fucked up if downloaded from any other usenet provider.
It has become so bad that the author of newsbin has added extra code in the beta releases specifically to detect such "spoofed" article-ids and not download them (which is better than silently downloading them and assuming they are good until par2repair says otherwise).

I'm surprised that the other big usenet providers have not banned together and 'shunned' astraweb for feeding them bad data because otherwise there is nearly zero incentive for astraweb to fix their problem (so far they've blamed it on hackers and left it unfixed for about a year).

That $11/month pricing won't last if astraweb's negligence causes their competitors to lose customers and fold. It would be one thing if they were competing on quality, but they aren't, they are sabotaging the competition instead.

And he's wrong (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29708537)

"V.I. Labs' CEO predicts file-hosting sites such as RapidShare will supplant BitTorrent, as the former appear better protected legally."

As a former courier from the mid to late 90's, most of the "good" shit will be found underground, on unlisted boards. All the releases you see on IRC or where ever are 1/10th of what you see on the private servers.

how are they better protected? (1)

Punto (100573) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708615)

Rapidshare is a central source, that stores the actual illegal data, and even charges money for it. How are they better protected than "bittorrent", which is not even a real target? Apart from the "activism" side of it, nobody gives two shits about The Pirate Bay being shot down. Anyone can setup a webserver in their basement that serves a bunch of links, but who can recreate rapidshare if it goes down?

Re:how are they better protected? (2, Informative)

petronije (1650685) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708703)

Rapidshare will not go down because they remove the copyrighted files promptly - as soon as they are notified.

Re:how are they better protected? (1)

shentino (1139071) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708805)

I wonder how long the pirate bay would survive if they were in the USA...

Which would happen first? Being drained of content by DMCA takedowns or being shut down by the feds?

Re:how are they better protected? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29708777)

I'm guessing it's the downloaders who are better protected.

You can download without broadcasting it back to anyone who requests it (including the **AA).

Warez Scene (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29708621)

Actually the true scene of "pirates" is still going strong oldskool on FTP servers.
Nothing much has changed in years there.

Hacker's Manifesto (1)

JoelRodz (873094) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708631)

This reminds me of the famous Hacker's Manifesto!

People will just keep finding other means to manifest themselves.

"This is our world now... the world of the electron and the switch, we explore... We seekafter knowledge... We exist without skin color,without nationality, without religious bias... You build atomic bombs, you wage wars, you murder, cheat, and lie to usand try to make us believe it's for our own good, yet we're the criminals. You may stop this individual,but you can't stop us all... "

Re:Hacker's Manifesto (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29708723)

Sounds like the same sort of bullshit you would find on 4chan. WE ARE ANONYMOUS WE ARE LEGION XD

Warez Scene (1)

Ziekheid (1427027) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708653)

Actually, the true scene of "pirates" is still going strong oldskool on FTP servers. Nothing much has changed in years there.

Can we stop calling it "piracy" already? (1, Flamebait)

linuxhansl (764171) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708675)

"Piracy" is a clever term coined by the music and file industry to associate file copying directly with stealing.

Existing information is replicated or copied nothing more and nothing less.
That may not be legal by current law, and there might be an "opportunity loss" for the content owner, but that is not "piracy" nor is it "stealing".

"Illegal content replication" just doesn't sound as snazzy and dirty as "piracy".

Re:Can we stop calling it "piracy" already? (5, Funny)

MagusSlurpy (592575) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708719)

Frankly, I prefer hearing myself called a "pirate," versus a "copyright-infringing content replicator."

Not as cool as being called a ninja, but I'll take what I can get.

Re:Can we stop calling it "piracy" already? (1)

petronije (1650685) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708741)

How about "Forger"? Although the definition is a bit different: "Forgery: The creation of a false written document or alteration of a genuine one, with the intent to defraud."

Re:Can we stop calling it "piracy" already? (1)

Zerth (26112) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708849)

Piracy was coined by book publishers in the 17th century in response to what happened when they failed to produce cheap books instead of expensive ones.

It isn't new.

Re:Can we stop calling it "piracy" already? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29708903)

Can we be patriots?

Re:Can we stop calling it "piracy" already? (2)

DAldredge (2353) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708933)

Wrong. For electronic and audio-visual media, unauthorized reproduction and distribution is also commonly referred to as piracy (an early reference was made by Daniel Defoe in 1703 when he said of his novel True-born Englishman : "Its being Printed again and again, by Pyrates"[2]). The practice of labeling the act of infringement as "piracy" actually predates copyright itself. Even prior to the 1709 enactment of the Statute of Anne, generally recognized as the first copyright law, the Stationers' Company of London in 1557 received a Royal Charter giving the company a monopoly on publication and tasking it with enforcing the charter. Those who violated the charter were labeled pirates as early as 1603 From wikipedia

Re:Can we stop calling it "piracy" already? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29709087)

So how do you classify Robin Hood???

Think about third world countries where they earn couple bucks per month and windows still costs a couple hundred.
If only MS adjusted their prices so it was reasonable for these guys there would be no 'illegal' software and their user base would be around 4 billions.

On the same note don't see reasons for this happening in US.

Just a friendly reminder (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29708737)

Don't forget how huge my cock is. It's crazy large.

I'm sure that makes you very popular (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29708779)

with the faggot App|e fanbois who love cock up the ass. Bonus points if it's huge niggerdick.

What year is this? (1)

michaelhood (667393) | more than 4 years ago | (#29708801)

Is it 1997 again? s/rapidshare/geocities

Re:What year is this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29709025)

but this time the downloads aren't split up into 2.88 MB zip files ;-)

This is about ACTA for sure. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29708913)

You know, think of the children. Just read between the lines. It's about MAFIAA and Micro$oft closing down the free software ecosystem. Those guys just don't like competition, like wiseguys generally don't.

http://www.fsf.org/campaigns/acta/ [fsf.org]

Micro$oft tried the treacherous compting [wikipedia.org] trap and it's still slowly going onwards. Then they tried the patent FUD "we own the Linux kernel". And now they're playing this ACTA shit. What a bunch of crooks! [msversus.org]

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