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First Black Hole For Light Created On Earth

CmdrTaco posted more than 4 years ago | from the better-wear-a-hard-hat dept.

Science 244

An anonymous reader writes "An electromagnetic 'black hole' that sucks in surrounding light has been built for the first time. The device, which works at microwave frequencies, may soon be extended to trap visible light, leading to an entirely new way of harvesting solar energy to generate electricity. A theoretical design for a table-top black hole to trap light was proposed in a paper published earlier this year by Evgenii Narimanov and Alexander Kildishev of Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. Their idea was to mimic the properties of a cosmological black hole, whose intense gravity bends the surrounding space-time, causing any nearby matter or radiation to follow the warped space-time and spiral inwards."

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244 comments

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Black hole? On Earth? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29755717)

Already been done [goatse.fr]

Re:Black hole? On Earth? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29755935)

This is one story for which the OP is not inappropriate.

and i thought mooning (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29755723)

had been around for ages...

Hello (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29755733)

darkness...

Re:Hello darkness (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29755771)

my old friend
I've come to talk to you again

Re:Hello darkness (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29755855)

Because a vision softly creeping Left its seeds while I was sleeping

Re:Hello darkness (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29756223)

and the vision that was planted in my brain still remains within the sound of silence in restless dreams i walked alone ...

Re:Hello darkness (0, Offtopic)

evan_arrrr! (1406417) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756291)

Narrow streets of cobblestone
'Neath the halo of a street lamp
I turn my collar to the cold and damp

Re:Hello darkness (3, Funny)

oldspewey (1303305) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756435)

and she's buying the stairway to heaven ...

asshole? (1)

lapinmalin (1400199) | more than 4 years ago | (#29755741)

i know one black hole that doesnt attrack light

Re:asshole? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29755839)

I know one user that doesn't attrack spell-check.

Gotta say ... (5, Funny)

ScaledLizard (1430209) | more than 4 years ago | (#29755743)

That sucks ...

Wow (0, Redundant)

RichardJenkins (1362463) | more than 4 years ago | (#29755745)

This really sucks.

Re:Wow (1)

Necroloth (1512791) | more than 4 years ago | (#29755881)

they can just stick it where the sun don't shine ;)

Re:Wow (3, Funny)

HeLLFiRe1151 (743468) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756257)

Where can I see it?

Re:Wow (1)

craagz (965952) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756363)

drown - water
bury - soil
suck - air
sip - liquid
??? - light

or does suck work for everything?

Re:Wow (3, Funny)

Rip Dick (1207150) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756399)

It certainly works where your mom is concerned.

First priority. (5, Informative)

HungryHobo (1314109) | more than 4 years ago | (#29755751)

They need to stop calling it a black hole or the ignorant masses will decide it's going to end the world.

Re:First priority. (5, Insightful)

SpeedyDX (1014595) | more than 4 years ago | (#29755793)

But then how would they get their free publicity and 15 minutes?!

Re:First priority. (1, Funny)

TheOriginalLimey (1657333) | more than 4 years ago | (#29755985)

Now is only the could work in Cold Fusion and Death Panels.

Re:First priority. (5, Funny)

hitnrunrambler (1401521) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756315)

Now is only the could work in Cold Fusion and Death Panels!

Now is only the could work in sentence structure!

Apologies if you made this post without the aid of caffeine... or if you're quoting verbatim from Palin's blog (which I kinda doubted at first since it uses the words "cold fusion" but that COULD be some obscure Alaskan sexual practise)

Re:First priority. (3, Funny)

ms1234 (211056) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756035)

They could call it a brown hole?

Re:First priority. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29756637)

No way, bunghole.

Re:First priority. (3, Funny)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756353)

Call it cold fusion.
Say it harnesses zero-point energy.
Put porn in their research.

Re:First priority. (4, Insightful)

Thanshin (1188877) | more than 4 years ago | (#29755845)

"Welcome to the presentation of our next project, The Nightbringer."

How about a Kugelblitz? (1)

Duodecimal (938540) | more than 4 years ago | (#29755923)

I don't think HeeChee references are that obscure.

Re:First priority. (5, Informative)

Zebra_X (13249) | more than 4 years ago | (#29755971)

For sure... and it's not a black hole. It's a very well designed waveguide that is able to channel microwaves to an absorbant material without re-radiating any of the incoming energy.

Re:First priority. (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29756581)

Simply call it "Electromagnetic Sponge"

Re:First priority. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29756057)

As long as they don't build it as a chair-top black hole... i think we'll be safe from some Balmer chairmaggedon.

Re:First priority. (5, Funny)

RobotRunAmok (595286) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756131)

They need to stop calling it a black hole or the ignorant masses will decide it's going to end the world.

In the current uber-politically correct climate, they're more likely to lose their funding after being accused of racism.

Re:First priority. (4, Funny)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756139)

As long as the dolphins are still here, we're safe.

Re:First priority. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29756227)

Hell no, it is our words and our science.
Learn the idiots that it isn't an Earth-eating monster from outer space instead.

Re:First priority. (1)

ROMRIX (912502) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756279)

It's a black hole in the same way my bedroom is when I shut the door.

Re:First priority. (1)

Thanshin (1188877) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756423)

"It's a black hole in the same way my bedroom is when I shut the door." - Azathoth. 0-2009

Re:First priority. (3, Funny)

sleeponthemic (1253494) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756385)

If they stop it's still an elephant in the room. Since this is never going to go away, I think I side with the idea of continual misuse of this term, thus encouraging a public view more akin to the boy who cried wolf. Once we get there, we can actually make the black hole that destroys earth, in peace.

Re:First priority. (2, Funny)

omnichad (1198475) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756577)

The LHC was just waiting for the right time... ;-)

Re:First priority. (1)

relguj9 (1313593) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756497)

Yes please, my first gut reaction was to say "holy crap, what could possibly go wrong?" Then I read the article and my reaction was, "holy crap, this is a revolutionary way of capturing electromagnetic waves that." Seriously, this seems from the super short non-descriptive article, like it could actually be on every solar panel in 10 years.

I completely agree, they need to fix the name lol. Although it is catchy, something like "light sucker" or something would make more sense.

Re:First priority. (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29756651)

First priority: Install one above every street light so we can get our lovely speckled black skies back. :)

Plagiarism? (1, Insightful)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 4 years ago | (#29755765)

The summary is word for word the first three paragraphs in the article. The titles are also the same. Dangerous ground to tread on, CmdrTaco.

Re:Plagiarism? (1)

AltGrendel (175092) | more than 4 years ago | (#29755857)

Nah, he just needs to put double quotes around it and he's good.

I THINK ITS QUITE OVIOUS (1)

mdwh2 (535323) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756005)

I THINK ITS QUITE OVIOUS that he wasn't trying to pass off those words as his own. Apologies to TFA.

Re:Plagiarism? (1)

lxs (131946) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756153)

What's even worse is that they start out calling it the first black hole for light and immediately admit that is isn't actually a black hole for light yet.

In similar news, I just broke the 100m dash world record. Well I walked 100 meters to work, which is almost the same.

Re:Plagiarism? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29756455)

The summary is word for word the first three paragraphs in the article. The titles are also the same. Dangerous ground to tread on, CmdrTaco.

The "summary" is entirely in quotation marks - moron! Besides the fact it can't be plagiarism if he links to the original article. Get a life.

Re:Plagiarism? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29756531)

It's a quote that starts with "An anonymous reader writes", you dimwit troll

Why are science reporters such ignoramuses? (-1, Troll)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 4 years ago | (#29755809)

> Their idea was to mimic the properties of a cosmological black hole, whose
> intense gravity bends the surrounding space-time, causing any nearby matter
> or radiation to follow the warped space-time and spiral inwards.

The device sounds interesting but the reporter's notion of gravity is utter nonsense.

Re:Why are science reporters such ignoramuses? (1)

PvtVoid (1252388) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756311)

The device sounds interesting but the reporter's notion of gravity is utter nonsense.

Huh? The description you quote seems like a pretty reasonable qualitative description of an astrophysical black hole to me. Black holes have a region of capture orbits [fourmilab.ch] outside the horizon, where nearby matter spirals inwards.

Not that astrophysical black holes have anything whatsoever to do with the electromagnetic devices referred to in the article, of course.

uhhh... how much energy does it take? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29755811)

I do realize this is not a "real" black hole and is just a marketing term, but it would seem to me that the device very likely takes much ore energy to power than it can collect. After all this is not some ACME super vacuum... it can only redirect the light that is actually passing through it's field range. The only way to extend the field would be to increase power consumption, and that's not linear.
So... really that's cute... a virtual parabolic mirror, that requires energy. nifty.

I'm sure there will be a better use for this somewhere, but it won't be for solar energy collection.

Re:uhhh... how much energy does it take? (4, Funny)

FTWinston (1332785) | more than 4 years ago | (#29755891)

How much energy does it "take?" Its a metamaterial structure, and the refractive properties are caused by its shape alone.

That said, all that incident EM radiation is gonna really heat it up ... so if you were going to put a solar panel in the middle, as the article describes, then it will likely require cooling if its placed in bright conditions.

Unless they're very clever with creating it, such that only wavelengths usable by the solar panel are refracted into the centre. Anyway, if they think they can do that by the end of 2009, can they make me a man-sized invisible hamsterball? Invisible zorbing would be an interesting experience.

Re:uhhh... how much energy does it take? (3, Funny)

Thanshin (1188877) | more than 4 years ago | (#29755941)

can they make me a man-sized invisible hamsterball? Invisible zorbing would be an interesting experience.

Actually it would be a black hamsterball.

And if that's the objective for 2009, it's quite easier to achieve by simply painting it black. Anyway, you'll just end up with a pretty pissed off hamster.

Re:uhhh... how much energy does it take? (1)

PeterM from Berkeley (15510) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756039)

If it DOES get really hot, sounds like a co-generation opportunity. Hot water and electricity from the same roof unit.
How much energy would THAT save an average household??

--PM

Re:uhhh... how much energy does it take? (1)

EdZ (755139) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756115)

Unless they're very clever with creating it, such that only wavelengths usable by the solar panel are refracted into the centre.

That happens by default. Metamaterials only operate correctly on a very narrow band of frequencies.

Re:uhhh... how much energy does it take? (5, Insightful)

Interoperable (1651953) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756117)

I don't know why a huge amount of a nano-structured meta-material would be cheaper to make than a large mirror. The device is interesting in it's own right but the application to solar power is a real stretch. It seems like every advance has to claim to be a step on the way to curing cancer or solving the energy crisis to get any attention. Even the article about magnetic monopole quasi-particles tied it back to applications to computing...possible but that certainly isn't why the discovery is interesting.

This is exactly right (1)

sean.peters (568334) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756405)

It seems tremendously unlikely that this thing would be cheaper than what it aims to replace. There could possibly be a use for it in certain unusual situations - say, providing solar power to a spacecraft in the outer solar system. You might be able to get sufficient power without having to loft a giant mirror into space. But even in this case, it seems like the standard radiothermal generators would be a better choice.

Re:uhhh... how much energy does it take? (2, Interesting)

Captain Hook (923766) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756421)

I doubt it would be cheaper to make, but a mirror reflects light from one direction and if you have concave shape focuses that light at a certain point, but for that to work the light has to be entering from the right direction relative to the focus point (normal straight in the front but doesn't necessarily have to be

This system would work regardless of which direction the light enters from, which means it works under very difuse light source. It also means you don't need a tracking system to keep the mirror at the right angle relative to the sun which would make installation and maintenance costs lower than a tracking mirror system.

Re:uhhh... how much energy does it take? (1)

MobyDisk (75490) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756525)

Agreed. I came back to read the comments because I had this same though. The article says they could replace the huge parabolic mirrors used in solar collection. So they want to replace a large mirror, with a large fuunnel made of obscure expensive materials? How does that help?

Re:uhhh... how much energy does it take? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29756393)

That said, all that incident EM radiation is gonna really heat it up ... so if you were going to put a solar panel in the middle, as the article describes, then it will likely require cooling if its placed in bright conditions.

... you do realize that is the point of the device.. right?
Remember, Solar Panel != a direct EM conversion panel
Solar Panel is a parent category for a whole bunch of capture methods, such as direct EM->electrical, heat-transfer and dynamos, etc.
In this case, this solar harvester would capture all radiant energy around it and heat up the device, that heat being transferred over to a tube of liquid which will then turn a dynamo at some stage.

Re:uhhh... how much energy does it take? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29755893)

Ehhhhm no... It's a passive device. It doesn't use any energy (electric or otherwise) at all. It just sits there and captures photons and redirects them to its center. It is made from the same materials that the "invisibility cloak" that generated a lot of PR a few months ago was made of, and once made doesn't need any energy to run.

Even though I know this is /. ... RTFA

Re:uhhh... how much energy does it take? (1)

techiemikey (1126169) | more than 4 years ago | (#29755917)

It uses no energy once it's built as far as I can tell. It takes a series of materials that guides light (or electromagnetic radiation not in visible spectrum yet) and directs it into the center of the device which turns it into...well, currently heat. In a while when they get the visible light spectrum version working they will probably have the core be a solar panel so they can turn light into electricity.

Re:uhhh... how much energy does it take? (1)

chunkyasparagus (890907) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756169)

Finally! The quest to find an engine for my perpetual motion machine is over...OVER! Bwahahahahaha.

This is the proof... (1)

ctrl-alt-canc (977108) | more than 4 years ago | (#29755827)

tha the theory about the existence of dark suckers [ethereal.net] is true!

It's a black hole... (1)

Nux'd (1002189) | more than 4 years ago | (#29755837)

...only this one sucks in light!!!

Re:It's a black hole... (1)

protodevilin (1304731) | more than 4 years ago | (#29755913)

Um. ALL black holes suck in light. Light that cannot escape a black hole's intense gravitational forces will not be visible, making the black hole's area of effect appear, well, black. Hence the name.

Not really light, is it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29755853)

If it now works at microwave frequencies, technically it just sucks in microwaves and not light?

If you want to call it something else than a microwave, call it electromagnetic radiation.

Re:Not really light, is it? (1)

Beezlebub33 (1220368) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756639)

Electromagnetic radiation at all frequencies is 'light'. It's just not visible light, which is a narrow band of frequencies.

Ouch (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29755869)

This will be the final slashdotting.

Non Singularity Black Hole... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29755871)

Does this mean perhaps actual black holes are not all singularities after all?

Just food for thought...

(captya agitator, appropriate)

What will the support calls sound like? (0, Offtopic)

TheOriginalLimey (1657333) | more than 4 years ago | (#29755889)

"Hello, my black hole is red this morning?" "Hello, I've lost my black hole and the the room it was in is missing too?" ....and the responses... "Sir, could you please stick your head in the black hold to see if it's working? Yup, just go ahead....little further..."

Shouldn't we give the Cui and Cheng more credit (1)

Tom Boz (1570397) | more than 4 years ago | (#29755903)

Maybe it's because I happen to be an experimentalist (and we're always at odds with the theorists/ computer simulation/ computational analysis groups) but shouldn't Cui and Cheng's names be attached with the summary? I mean, having the idea for a box that won't let light escape is great, but actually building it is far more impressive to me.

Re:Shouldn't we give the Cui and Cheng more credit (4, Funny)

PeterM from Berkeley (15510) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756087)

Interesting culture you've got there. Where I work the theorists/computational groups find the experimentalists indispensible and vice versa. The experimentalists provide the grounding in reality and provide the final fruition of all the theory/computer work. The theory+computation guides the experiments and increases the odds that the experiments'll work the first time out. Everyone's better off, and everyone knows it, with the exception of just one guy who's generally hard to deal with anyway (even the other experimentalists don't get on with him.)

--PM

Re:Shouldn't we give the Cui and Cheng more credit (1)

Tom Boz (1570397) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756205)

I'm truly jealous. The CFD team is off-site, and most of the time they take 2 weeks to tell us they couldn't get a solution to converge, and request we try to simplify our setup to match their virtual one. Of course, there's always the possibility that we're just the group that's hard to deal with, and not them!

News Update! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29755955)

Congress has dismissed the "first" claims of the University by stating that they have been creating giant sucking black holes, such at the recent "Stimulus Bill", for over 200 years now. They hope to create an economy-crushing Black Hole by the end of the year that should eclipse anything the Universities have created.

--
Obama, Obama, Pants On Fire!

WTFO, Man. (1)

snspdaarf (1314399) | more than 4 years ago | (#29755975)

Didn't these guys pay attention to the media? It's the Large Hadron Accelerator that is supposed to create the Earth-destroying black hole...

It was nice to have known you guys (1)

Lord Lode (1290856) | more than 4 years ago | (#29755991)

This might very well be the Last Post...

Re:It was nice to have known you guys (2, Funny)

CODiNE (27417) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756093)

Don't worry, the universe itself will travel back and time and prevent it. Think about it... Mr. Universe... time travel. It's Arnold. He's the one stopping the LHC.

Re:It was nice to have known you guys (0, Flamebait)

d3m0nCr4t (869332) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756181)

He already created his own black hole, but it seems it only sucks in money... :p

Rise and shine.... (1)

Sojourner1337 (960656) | more than 4 years ago | (#29755993)

Prepare for unforeseen consequences....

It's an interesting development.... (4, Interesting)

jcochran (309950) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756029)

But I have definite issues with the last paragraph of the article

Such a device could be used to harvest solar energy in places where the light is too diffuse for mirrors to concentrate it onto a solar cell. An optical black hole would suck it all in and direct it at a solar cell sitting at the core. "If that works, you will no longer require these huge parabolic mirrors to collect light," says Narimanov.

The article gives no indication that light passing near the device will get sucked into it, but only that all light hitting the device gets sucked into the center. So instead of requiring those huge parabolic mirrors, you'll instead require these huge cylindrical structures. Would still have a nice advantage in that no tracking or steering devices would be required since light hitting it from any side gets "sucked in", but it would still require a considerable amount of real estate to deploy assuming that they can both scale it down (to handle visible light) and scale it up (to make the amount of light absorbed represent a non-trivial amount of power).

Re:It's an interesting development.... (1)

Tempest451 (791438) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756371)

But I have definite issues with the last paragraph of the article

Such a device could be used to harvest solar energy in places where the light is too diffuse for mirrors to concentrate it onto a solar cell. An optical black hole would suck it all in and direct it at a solar cell sitting at the core. "If that works, you will no longer require these huge parabolic mirrors to collect light," says Narimanov.

The article gives no indication that light passing near the device will get sucked into it, but only that all light hitting the device gets sucked into the center. So instead of requiring those huge parabolic mirrors, you'll instead require these huge cylindrical structures. Would still have a nice advantage in that no tracking or steering devices would be required since light hitting it from any side gets "sucked in", but it would still require a considerable amount of real estate to deploy assuming that they can both scale it down (to handle visible light) and scale it up (to make the amount of light absorbed represent a non-trivial amount of power).

Imagine all the ambient light in our environment? I don't think they will need too much up-scaling to see huge amounts of energy. On a decent sunny day, you can create a point of light powerful enough to incinerate an insect, and that with a crappy magnifying glass, what if that same magnifying glass had zero loss? What I want to see is if they can get this thing to trap more energetic frequencies (Gamma anyone?)

plants (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29756103)

The interesting thing to me is that the molecule plants use for photosynthesis has some spiral-like structures. Those could be guiding visible light in the same way.

Not that that helps solar power's number one problem, which is energy storage.

precedence? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29756133)

Call me paranoid but in the current increasingly litigious zeitgeist, could the Purdue team just be trying to claim originality when faced with the achievements of a competing team? (or not? just curious, given the fairly similar timelines).

Gamma Ray Bursts (1)

destroyer661 (847607) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756137)

Maybe we could use this to absorb any Gamma Ray Bursts [wikipedia.org] that happen to come our way.

Disclaimer: didn't read TFA

I am curious (2, Interesting)

badass fish (1254730) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756163)

i wonder if they checked for gravity/mass/time disturbances?

Black Hole for Light (2, Funny)

Neutral_Observer (1409941) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756173)

The first Black Hole invented by man is called Government.

oh God! (1)

BigBadBus (653823) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756217)

The nincompoops who campaigned against the LHC because of its mythical ability to create black holes will be out in force!

Inexpensive Selling,Calvin Klein sweater man (-1, Troll)

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Military application. (1)

neo (4625) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756231)

This could easily be the next smoke rounds. Imagine being able to block light past specific points on a battlefield. You could effectively blind the enemy in darkness, or create soft cover for your movements. It would also absorb laser tracking and targeting devices, leaving many modern weapons systems moot.

Make no mistake about it, this is a very important technology for the battle field.

Re:Military application. (1)

Follier (901079) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756409)

I agree! Furthermore, they can take a slab of the stuff and strap it onto a soldiers arm, thus providing him a laser shield that will defend him if he's being attacked by Cobra.

...

**nerdgasm**

Re:Military application. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29756445)

This could easily be the next smoke rounds. Imagine being able to block light past specific points on a battlefield. You could effectively blind the enemy in darkness, or create soft cover for your movements. It would also absorb laser tracking and targeting devices, leaving many modern weapons systems moot.

Make no mistake about it, this is a very important technology for the battle field.

I wish I could mod you into a black hole of ignorance, so you could never escape.

Interesting idea, but... (1)

sean.peters (568334) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756447)

... it founders on the usual issue - cost effectiveness. Smoke rounds already do this job very well, and they're bound to be a lot cheaper. They're also a lot easier to emplace (can you imagine firing one of these "black hole" deals out of an artillery piece, and having it get to its destination intact?). I wouldn't hold my breath waiting for this to show up on the battlefield.

Re:Military application. (1)

Jesus_666 (702802) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756557)

Except for the fact that these are cylindrical solid structures and are definitely not going to be shrunk down to aerosol particle size. You're not going to get these deployed less conspicuously than a portable wall that has been painted black.

The materials they use for this are useful for the military, which everyone agreed on when they were first discovered.

Oh whatever... (2)

KermitJunior (674269) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756265)

Tell me it has Ten Chevrons around it and THEN I'll be impressed.

Fresnel Lens (4, Insightful)

olsmeister (1488789) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756301)

Narimanov and Kildishev reasoned that it should be possible to build a device that makes light curve inwards towards its centre in a similar way. They calculated that this could be done by a cylindrical structure consisting of a central core surrounded by a shell of concentric rings.

Superficially, sounds kind of like a Fresnel lens [wikipedia.org] .

Don't bother RTFA... (3, Funny)

PinkyDead (862370) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756331)

There's nothing to see.

Ha! I crack myself up.

Sleath - cloaking devices (1)

pease1 (134187) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756355)

Article in the current issue of Air and Space magazine [airspacemag.com] about this sort of technology and how might be used to create cloaking devices one day.

Scientists and engineers are trying to emulate that trick by designing materials that could constitute the next-next (or next-next-next) generation of stealth. Some of their ideas sound like they sprang from the imaginations of Gene Roddenberry or J.K. Rowling, with phrases like “cloaking device” and “invisibility carpet” popping up as frequently in academic papers as in television scripts and books for kids. Other ideas are more realistic, as researchers devise ways to change an aircraft’s color and blur its outline, confusing the bad guys enough to make them shoot in the wrong direction.

Science doesn't suck (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29756401)

Wasn't everyone taught by a science teacher at some point that science doesn't suck?

Picture posted below (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29756481)

  .

Emperor's new... (1)

whereiswaldo (459052) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756491)

This black hole that sucks up invisible light would go _great_ with the emperor's new clothes. ;)

G-Man (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29756501)

Rise and shine Mr.Freeman. Rise, and shine.

Time to get some funding... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29756523)

Hey, Military, guess what, this device could be turned in to a light grenade.
Yeah, like that thing out of Starga.. okay seriously, i'm beginning to think aliens are involved somehow.

All we need to do now is make it bigger. (1)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 4 years ago | (#29756583)

Make tiny black holes with an event horizon of say 1 foot. Then we have the ultimate trashcan. We can dump nuclear wast in it and nothing will come out except for perhaps according to some theories radiation. Which we cannot see or feel so there forth it must be harmless.

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