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The Changing Face of the Console Wars

Soulskill posted more than 4 years ago | from the keeping-up-with-the-wiises dept.

PlayStation (Games) 223

An article at Gamasutra explores the decisions by Microsoft and Sony to launch significant hardware additions — their respective, upcoming motion-control schemes — in the middle of a console cycle, rather than waiting until the next generations of their systems are ready. It's indicative of a change to the established pattern of console wars; nowadays, it's more about adding features and gadgets to improve existing products than developing entirely new ones. Quoting: "... for Sony and Microsoft, motion controllers are their next-gen consoles. And it's a damn sight easier than launching Xbox 720 or PS4. They can debut these peripherals without needing to engineer completely new boxes for consumers, potentially bundle them over time, and they have a much better chance at getting exclusive games, thanks to the specificity of the hardware (something that's happened a lot for the Wii). Thus, both hardware manufacturers and publishers like EA see these controllers sparking new interest in Xbox 360 and PS3, which will delay the next dreaded console transition for another few years."

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223 comments

Old school. (3, Funny)

Luke727 (547923) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778147)

Sometimes I let the neighborhood kids play with my joystick.

You're geniouses among men Sony, MS (4, Funny)

binarylarry (1338699) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778149)

I know the solution! We'll copy Nintendo!

We'll be rich! Muahahaha

- Sony and MS boardrooms

Re:You're geniouses among men Sony, MS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29778231)

You're so right.

There's no innovative forethought.

They're just copying the guys that kicked their asses.

Re:You're geniouses among men Sony, MS (4, Interesting)

Zero_DgZ (1047348) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778629)

It's certainly been done before.

Remember that after the '84 video game crash, Nintendo came along and pretty much defined modern video gaming as we know it with the NES. Controllers with D-pads, managed third party licensing, holiday timed releases, literature, and mascots: Nintendo pretty much just made it all up and the rest of the fledgling industry followed suit.

Here's some food for thought: It's becoming pretty clear that gaming as a whole is moving towards a bit of a different demographic. This is partly because those of us who were the kids buying the first Nintendos and Segas have grown up into (presumably) responsible adultlike beings who are now buying Wiis and Xboxes. Coupled with this is the move to 'casual gaming' led mostly by the Wii (and also the DS) which is bringing in people from older generations who up until now have been unfamiliar with video gaming entirely.

One caveat about this: The "bug your parents" business model doesn't apply as well anymore. Older and wiser people who are making frankly massive investments into consoles and games for them are expecting to get a decent run time out of their investments. The huge new market of first-time gamers, grandmothers, and all the other people we like to pick on (who are all buying the Wii) are a tenuous market at best, and it's likely that the console makers are concluding that forcing everyone to jump ship and move to a new platform will probably alienate this whole market. Lots of grandmothers will say, "screw you, I'm not buying a new games machine" and suddenly not only are they not making money on new console sales but they're not making money on their legacy machine anymore, either.

The cash cow then becomes not selling new machines, but selling new upgrades for the existing machines. Grandma (or whoever) will swallow "buy this thing that plugs into your Wii (or Xbox, or PS3)" easier than she'll swallow "spend $500 on this new console that's different from your old one."

The Wii already has this curious casual gamer market. Sony and Microsoft sure want to capitalize on that success, and it's clear that the best (read: cheapest) way to do this is by upgrading rather than replacing. And while all the rest of us are cracking wise about people ripping off Nintendo, at least this method of Nintendo-rippage will be cheaper (and hopefully better) than replacing existing consoles outright. Which will piss off a lot fewer people.

Re:You're geniouses among men Sony, MS (0)

gbarules2999 (1440265) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779271)

I agree with that (not the Nintendo stuff, however), but also in the whole idea that there's really no big reason to upgrade and push games forward. Today's beautiful games already cost so much to make and are just barely finding the limits of their systems (Uncharted 2, for example) that it's simply not worth the significant burden of new consoles. And will the consumer care for a console that's not that noticeably nicer looking or doesn't contain any new features? Is there any technology barrier that games can break in the next few years?

Considering the consoles are now at the prices that their predecessors launched at eight to nine years ago, I simply can't see why anyone would care about a new console. This sounds like Captain Obvious stuff when you think about it for a moment, but the market is just fine with what's already there.

The problem with the Wii is that it's a fad. It's doomed to fail pretty quickly - the console sales are dropping, slowly but surely. The major reason why they made so many sales was the price factor, and even that's not a determining point any longer. Nintendo will find themselves treading water while Sony and Microsoft are out chugging their machines along and making a more and more stable platform that they can slap more doodads and whizdoos on for extra profit.

Re:You're geniouses among men Sony, MS (4, Funny)

Jaktar (975138) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779379)

If by fad you mean the Wii is a longstanding dominant force in the market then I agree. But that's pretty much the opposite of the standard use of the word fad.

Re:You're geniouses among men Sony, MS (2, Insightful)

Toonol (1057698) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779617)

The problem with the Wii is that it's a fad. It's doomed to fail pretty quickly - the console sales are dropping, slowly but surely.

A fad that dominates this console generation. It's been out for two and a half years, and still sells far more per week than either of it's competitors. Sony's price cut and new slim model gave it a few weeks of increased sales, but it's already dropped back down. Even assuming the best case scenario for either MS or Sony, it will be at least 18-24 months before they could catch up with the Wii's market. Realistically, they're only fighting for second.

There's no reason to consider the Wii a fad; it doesn't fit the definition. That's like considering the iPod a fad.

Re:You're geniouses among men Sony, MS (2, Funny)

aliquis (678370) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779327)

Good post but you lost me at grandma swallows.

Re:You're geniouses among men Sony, MS (2, Funny)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779371)

What do you mean? An african or european grandma?

Re:You're geniouses among men Sony, MS (2, Insightful)

Lord Bitman (95493) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778697)

"Nintendo has completely dominated a market we didn't even no existed by adding basically nothing more than instructions telling people to move while playing video-games. If we make something which not only does that, but which also actually captures motion, perhaps we can claim the market they found for ourselves!"

Haven't tried WiiMotion+ because, for fuck's sake, should I need to spend £80 to try out something which the system claimed to already come with? I've got no evidence that it's actually any better, and I haven't heard if using WiiMotion+ improves the recognition on older titles, but my instinct is "of course it doesn't"

Re:You're ingeniuos among men, Nintendo (1)

scorpivs (1408651) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778717)

Microsoft haters forget that there are two sides to Microsoft: The one that sucks and

If I understand correctly, Nintendo plans for Sony and Microft to mass-produce sets of both right-and-left Powergloves, but at the same time, like in a package deal? Why didn't they think of that the first time?

Re:You're geniouses among men Sony, MS (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778751)

Well, it worked for MS. Or what do you think Windows (all versions) or Office (all versions) is?

Re:You're geniouses among men Sony, MS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29778909)

The more motion controllers get invested in by hardware manufacturers the more developers will use them the more integrated they get the better they'll be the more fun we'll have!

They copied Nintendo, so what? If they can put out a better product are you saying you won't use it simply because they didn't come up with the idea first? Copying and improving is pretty much how competition works. MS and Sony shouldn't declare themselves the greatest innovators ever, which they probably will, but as a gamer I don't care. Just give me a better gaming experience. I don't care who came up with it first just who does it best.

Re:You're geniouses among men Sony, MS (0, Offtopic)

aliquis (678370) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778913)

Guess that's why we never see the year of Linux on the desktop.

I know the solution! Let's make it function like Windows!

- Gnome and KDE teams.

(Yeah, lack of games, a reason, the extent Windows is used at schools, friends, works and such affects things to, and I know that. But the point isn't really "this is what they are doing wrong", the point is about copying an old concept.)

And no, I'm not trolling. Back in the days of KDE 2 and such I hated how it tried so hard to be Windows. I didn't wanted Windows. I came from the world of Amiga and would so much prefer something new and innovative there someone thinks up something better rather than try to copy whatever crap is the most succesful at the time. Never understood that concept, never will.

Same goes for AROS and to less extent Haiku. Sure AmigaOS and BeOS was nice, but what good do you get from copying the same (more so in the case of AmigaOS.)
AmigaOS _WAS_ good, it don't cut it today. It's useless to copy it _NOW_. What I would see a purpose in and actually like would be something revolutionary new. Sure it may be harder to get users and apps to something such but it's what would be needed to actually get on top of everything else.

What if Apple iPods had been copies of 80ies walkmans? Would they had beaten Sony at their own game? No.

Re:You're geniouses among men Sony, MS (0, Troll)

Blakey Rat (99501) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779407)

Considering all the Xbox Live copying that's been going on at Sony and Nintendo, you can't blame Microsoft. In fact, Sony's entire PS3 business plan seems to be to copy successful ideas from other companies, then add Blu-Ray... have they done a single innovative thing yet with it?

New? (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29778189)

Nonsense, consoles have been doing this for years.

The various attempts of light guns such as the super scope, sega mega 32x cd add on, eyetoy for the ps2, added memory pack for the N64 etc.

Re:New? (3, Insightful)

QuantumLeaper (607189) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778299)

Very true, they always launch some sort of add-on, and no really buys them and very few games will use it. When they do use the new controller, they still support the old one because that where all the sales will be. I can't even think of one new controller/add-on in mid-cycle that even sold had more than 50% of the players adopting.

Re:New? (4, Interesting)

Ceiynt (993620) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778341)

The original PS1 controller didn't have analog control sticks. Sony copied it from the N64, and has used the DualShock controller since.

Re:New? (1)

QuantumLeaper (607189) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778397)

Most games on the PSX didn't require analog controls, they could use analog controls if you wanted too. I do have a PSX and in fact its sitting within reach right now. My point is its never adopted with the current generation, it maybe used in following generations.

Re:New? (1)

sabernet (751826) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778553)

Ahh, Sony took it from both Nintendo and SEGA. Both competing companies had analogue sticks going for them with a release only 1 month apart(N64 controller in June, Saturn analogue stick in July of the same year). Sony was the odd one out with no analogue input for the PS1 on the regular gamepad. However, they did have a dual analogue joystick system out(the Hackers movie had people playing Wipeout on a set of those). Seeing themselves as falling behind techwise, they took the thumbstick idea their competitors had and combined it with the dual-stick system the PS1 was already compatible with and had accessories for by simply doubling up the sticks on the gamepad.

Re:New? (1)

westlake (615356) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778965)

Very true, they always launch some sort of add-on, and no really buys them and very few games will use it.

But this strategy seems to have worked out very well for Wii Fit, Rock Band and Guitar Hero.

Re:New? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29779241)

That's because those hardware add-ons are exclusively used by that game/series and often come bundled with the game. How many Wii games in general use the Wii Fit board of the guitar? Outside of Wii Fit/Guitar hero iterations, how many future Wii games do you think will use them?

Re:New? (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779405)

If they plan on requiring the Wii Fit Board for "Metroid: Other M", then count me out. I wouldn't even be able to reach the morph ball area.

Re:New? (1)

timeOday (582209) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778599)

What's new is pushing the add-ons as the "next gen", as a fig leaf for the lack of new consoles / longer product cycle. The "new thing" is less new stuff.

Re:New? (2, Interesting)

ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778649)

An universally, every single one of these attempts failed; miserably.

If a console does not have functionality on day one, or by default, then you cannot tack on additional requirements, especially when it comes to games. Developers already worried about how small your console demographic really is cannot risk further decimating their audience by requiring people to buy some new fangled, overpriced gadget in order to play your game. People are not going to be willing to fork out double the cost on an accessory and a game, when they could just buy two regular game, usually of higher wuality, for the same price. Light gun game makers have known this for years, and often package the game with the accessory to try and make the package more digestable.

The Wii broke through the gadget impasse by making the gadget an integral part of the console from day one. Sony and Microsoft have done this to a lesser degree by making wireless controllers and in Sony's case "motion sensors" available from launch. But they cannot catch up to Nintendo on the gadget front until the next cycle. It's not possible to get all owners to upgrade their consoles at once so that developers aren't looking at a decimated pool of players. Baring an exceptional few, developers will make games for the console they know everyone definitely has, and they are right to do so.

We are not witnessing a change in the old regime of video games, at least, not from Sony and Microsoft. What we are seeing is envy from these two companies. They want the player numbers and console sales that Nintendo has. What they don't realise, or want to admit, is such numbers will neccessary mean a precipitous drop in the overall quality of game titles and consistent marketing of gadgets, widgets and dongles which may catch casual buyers but which will not attract and hold the longer term game players that the console needs to truly survive. The Wii has become a tired, cliched dead end, or real interest to no-one who actually choose video games over other pastimes. It can and will be replaced by an even blander and cheaper new console or console-like platform at the first opportunity. Nintendo has lost its loyal fan base and is now reliant on an extremely fickle and detached user base with no attachment to the brand.

Gimicks are gimicks. They are not the future of video games. In modern games, I need to control movement of a character in 3D environment, while maintaining camera control and awareness, and while maintaining quick acess to broad array of functionality and abilities, all while making room for meta and system controls. How do I do this by waving my arms or shaking the controller? How would you perform all the functions needed in say, Super Mario World with a motion control system, while retaining the same level of responsiveness and control. You can't. The standard controller is a proven method of such control and this has not happened by accident but rather by design, and it would be the height of folly to disregard that.

Sony and Microsoft complain that modern games are "too hard" for potential new players to understand or control, so we need new control methods. This is like arguments that maths is too difficult, so we shouldn't bother having people learn it. Yes, it's hard to learn how to control video games. But for decades now people have done just that, despite the difficulty. Why? Because they truly love to play video games and have put in the effort to become good at doing so. Just like people who actually like so called "difficult" things like maths will put in the effort to become better. People who cannot control video games are people who were never interested enough to bother learning how, yet now you want to disregard the former group for this latter, albeit larger one?

For the long term sake of your business, which of these groups should you be trying to hold onto? By focusing on these peripherals instead of on core games, what kind of foundation are building for your business over the next ten years?

$2 billion says you're very wrong (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29778783)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guitar_Hero [wikipedia.org] has proved, to the tune of $2 billion in sales, that you *CAN* "requir[e] people to buy some new fangled, overpriced gadget in order to play your game".

Clearly people *ARE* willing to fork out double the cost on an accessory and a game, instead of just buying two regular games, for the same price *IF* you create a game that makes it sufficiently more enjoyable to play with the accessory. The announcement of Guitar Hero for the PSP demonstrates that the game does not require the accessory controller, but who honestly believes it would have been as successful on the major consoles if it had used just the standard controllers?

Re:New? (1)

stuboogie (900470) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778871)

"If a console does not have functionality on day one, or by default, then you cannot tack on additional requirements, especially when it comes to games. Developers already worried about how small your console demographic really is cannot risk further decimating their audience by requiring people to buy some new fangled, overpriced gadget in order to play your game. People are not going to be willing to fork out double the cost on an accessory and a game, when they could just buy two regular game, usually of higher wuality, for the same price."

"It's not possible to get all owners to upgrade their consoles at once so that developers aren't looking at a decimated pool of players."

I would have to disagree with this assessment. Look at Guitar Hero and Rock Band. Both required spending a considerable amount of money on "new fangled, overpriced gadget(s)" to play the games and that is exactly what people did. I think the underlying issue is that MS and Sony need a flagship game (i.e. Halo) to launch these new accessories and therefore create the market for future development that uses the accessories.

Personally, I was hoping for a next gen console from MS or at least for them to roll out a hardware revision that would resolve the issues that have plagued the 360.

Re:New? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29778739)

It might be seen as "new" since it seems aimed at casual gamers. However, the new controllers are going to fail miserably. I don't see any gains for game developers.

Having a "much better chance at getting exclusive games" is only good from the console manufacturers view. I understand Sony making exlusives, Microsoft making exclusives and Nintendo making exclusives. Everyone else doing it are plain retarded. And as a consumer, i hate exclusives.

Seeing the amount of work which is NOT platform specific (content creation such as models, animation, cutscenes, music, level design) it astounds me that there's actually still anyone making games specific for a single platform. The cost of developing for multi platform is a lot lower than creating the content. Sure, you might not be able to squeeze those extra 25% out of the console, but you can still make damned good games none the less.

Also looking at Swedish figures, (from dataspelsbranschen.se, a swedish games market organization), the turnover for game sales is as follows:

PC - 210381938 sek
PS3 - 187357453 sek
XB360 - 178960880 sek
Wii - 155687047

The fabulous Wii (the biggest of the bunch and which everyone is trying to copy) has the lowest turnover by far. Also nice seeing the PC doing relatively well in spite of rampant piracy.

On a sidenote, as a PS3 owner, I personally HATE the motion controller. And I don't mean the technology (even though flawed), I mean how it is used. The ONLY game using the sixaxis feature where it didn't completely detract from the gameplay I've encountered so far is 'Flower'. In all other games, it's just been a crappy substitute for using the stick. (And 'Flower' would proably have been better if you could control it with the stick).

Seriously, game developers, stop bloody forcing me to shake the controller.

What? No. (4, Insightful)

stonecypher (118140) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778217)

The extension of consoles is the defacto behavior for consoles, and always has been. In modern times it's been things like Wii Fit, the Eye Toy and so on, but nobody here has forgotten the Power Glove or the Power Mat, the Sega CD and the Sega 32x, and indeed that pattern goes back into the 70s, with the Intellivision overlay system and the Commodore 64 Extender.

Indeed, it's only the last generation or two which have skipped it. Anyone who believes this is new has only been gaming through one generation of consoles, and that should be their first red flag that they're not ready to talk about the history of gaming.

Could not be less correct.

Re:What? No. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29778411)

Not even the last generation skipped it - the PS2 had the hard disk & broadband extension, and the GCN had the broadband adapter. Although they were highly underused, extensions were there last gen (save for the original X-Box)

Re:What? No. (1)

QuantumLeaper (607189) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778447)

The Dreamcast came with a modem as standard and look at how many games even used it. I think I can count the number on one hand.

Re:What? No. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29778465)

You must have FREAK hands

Re:What? No. (1)

QuantumLeaper (607189) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778509)

How many games used the modem? PSO and what?

Re:What? No. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29778533)

Chu chu rocket
Quake 3
The japanese version of DOA2

Just off the top of my head

Re:What? No. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29778537)

If you can not count up to three games on one hand, then perhaps you shouldn't be saying other people have freak hands ;)

Re:What? No. (1)

pudro (983817) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778583)

Really? [lmgtfy.com]

Re:What? No. (1)

QuantumLeaper (607189) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778535)

You are right there are more modem games for the Dreamcast than I thought at first.

Re:What? No. (1)

noidentity (188756) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778567)

Successful mid-cycle add-ons I can remember (and have purchased and used) in recent history:

N64: memory expansion
Playstation: analog controller, dual shock
Playstation 2: network/hard drive

And of course the earlier cartridge-based systems had lots of successful add-ons, only they were in each cartridge, so you weren't as aware of them. Examples include battery backup, memory mappers to allow larger games, and custom processors (e.g. SuperFX on SNES).

Re:What? No. (1)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778611)

The Rumble Pack was pretty popular among the N64 owners I knew. It also came with some games (I got mine with Starfox 64).

Re:What? No. (1)

Trixter (9555) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778585)

with the Intellivision overlay system and the Commodore 64 Extender.

Don't you mean the System Changer [intellivisiongames.com] ? That played Atari VCS games, not C64.

Re:What? No. (3, Interesting)

Jerf (17166) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778705)

The Intellivoice [wikipedia.org] sounds like a closer fit to what we're talking about, as it enabled a new form of game, rather than functioning as backwards compatibility.

No idea if that's what the original poster meant. But it definitely does show that augmenting consoles is a very old idea... older than many people reading about it. :)

Somewhere around here I still have an Intellivoice, and all four released games for it (I don't count the baseball one). You have not lived until you've heard a little 4KB cartridge (not a typo! in fact, 4KB was twice the usual size; and yes, I'm using bytes because I think measuring games in kilobits is a crock) babbling away at you. An amazing amount of voice was shoehorned into those things. Online MP3s that have samples of even a single thing it could say are themselves larger than all released games combined.

Re:What? No. (1)

Cl1mh4224rd (265427) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778633)

Could not be less correct.

It looks like it's just the summary (surprise, surprise) that is wildly incorrect. The article itself seems to only talk about the current generation of consoles.

Re:What? No. (1)

Zero_DgZ (1047348) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778735)

I would question your notion of "skipped it." There was, of course, the network adapter and hard drive combo for the PS2 as well as the Eye Toy. The Gamecube had its broadband adapter... thingy, as well as the Gameboy player and the phenominally useless GBA linkup (except for Crystal Chronicles). And no console escaped the ubiquitous presence of the DDR dance mat.

And who can forget the E-Reader and the wireless link dongle for the Gameboy Advance? Oh, that's right. A lot of people can, and did. Both were supposed to revolutionize portable gaming, and both... didn't.

Re:What? No. (1)

Dahamma (304068) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779619)

Exactly! This is what happens when a "20-something" tries to write about the history of console gaming.

I remember getting the Intellivision voice synthesizer add-on in about 1982. "Watch for flak!"

How is this new? (3, Interesting)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778219)

How is this a new tactic? Nintendo released a successful Famicom Disk System for the Famicom (NES in Japan) that expanded the Famicom by using cheaper media and cheaper games that could easily save without extra expense of a battery backup. Sega released like a million things to expand the Genesis (Mega Drive) including a CD add on, and the 32x. Nintendo used games with new CPUs and other chips to extend the life of the SNES beyond the 16 bit generation.

Re:How is this new? (1)

Orion Blastar (457579) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778829)

Before all of that the Atari 2600 had different controllers for different games. First the joystick and paddle controllers, then the driving controllers, then the keypads for the BASIC cartridge, and then the Star Raiders keypad, etc. The better joystick was invented by WICO as it styled the arcade joystick used in many arcade video games and the Mattel did the Tron joystick from the Tron arcade game. I am sure I am missing other Atari 2600 add ons. But the Atari 2600 was the original add on console. There was a super charger that plugged into the cartridge port and loaded games via cassette tape like Fireball and gave the Atari 2600 better graphics as well. But that Atari Graduator Keyboard that turned the Atari 2600 into an 8 bit computer never came out except in beta tests, IIRC.

Modern Game Consoles better have a computer mode and maybe a virtual machine that can run Windows inside of it to play Windows video games or Linux for FOSS video games. :)

Naturally (2, Interesting)

Dan East (318230) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778257)

We are reaching an era in computing where devices can push audio and video beyond human perception levels. For example, if display resolution were increased, a person would not be able to tell the difference visually from typical viewing distance. Or if color depth were increased to 64 bit over 32 bit could that even be perceived? I'm not saying we're there yet, but we are quickly approaching that point.

Once that happens then what will be the next generation anything? It will be a matter of small refinements, novelties and exclusiveness of titles.

Re:Naturally (1)

Pharmboy (216950) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778451)

Once that happens then what will be the next generation anything? It will be a matter of small refinements, novelties and exclusiveness of titles.

Nope, interactive pr0n. Get super high resolution, let people scan/upload face pictures for the head and choose from a menu for the body, and you wouldn't build enough of them at $2000 each. Obviously, you would need some kinda of wireless control system that doesn't require two hands.

Re:Naturally (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779475)

Obviously, you would need some kinda of wireless control system that doesn't require two hands.

So, we're back to a joystick interface for 50% of the units?

Re:Naturally (1)

wamerocity (1106155) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778467)

Thank you! I was coming here to say pretty much the same thing. Why bother pushing for a new system at this point? So a next system has more processing power and ram, so what? Are games today more fun than they were 4 years ago because the graphics are better? Would the next call of duty REALLY be that much better if it was rendered in 1080p instead of 720p? Innovation and quality design makes good games.

Re:Naturally (1)

Blakey Rat (99501) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779429)

Well, considering this exact same post appears in Every. Goddamned. Gaming. Thread. you really needn't have bothered-- believe me, we've all read it before.

Slashdot needs a -1 Tired Cliche moderation.

Re:Naturally (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29779221)

Finally, the fanboi will be driven out of existence. The future is, indeed, going to be great.

I'd even bet producers could see the benefits of releasing a decent (vs. shiny) game, someday.

Re:Naturally (1)

Nf1nk (443791) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779303)

There are still memory considerations. Consider GTA IV (now pretend that it isn't boring) at any given time there may be a couple of dozen cars on the road that you can see. It would be a major improvement if they could have a traffic jam with hundreds of cars and dense crowds on the sidewalks (it is unclear whether this would make it more fun, but it would be more real). This doesn't change the resolution of the screen, but it takes much more computing power than we have in the current generation of consoles.

Maybe I picked a poor game for an example, but imagine bustling market places and tropical reefs with thousands of fish.

Re:Naturally (1)

4D6963 (933028) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779527)

Well you're correct in that we're reaching the limits for certain things such as resolution (where the apparent angle of a pixel on the screen is smaller than your best eye resolving power (28 seconds of arc) at a typical viewing distance, or where bit depth is about as good as needed (although I think we may be able to see RGB 888 from anything superior in low contrast gradients without any dithering. Which IMHO is why Photoshop always dithers its gradients (or just about anything it does), but then there are always other limits to push.

For example, screens with a higher contrast (i.e. darker darks) can make a big difference, or if we're gonna talk about colour, the gamut can be increased, or yet we could have more range than 0-255 (i.e. extra range for brighter lights for higher dynamic ranges, for example, a screen that would almost blind you when you look at the in-game sun to represent light intensities correctly. Although I'm not sure this is in any way desirable... Well time will tell). And of course, it's not like we see video games stereoscopically (except for a few ones but it's marginal), or we also have a very limited FOV (our screens probably occupy less than 30 of or FOV while representing sometimes over 90), and so on...

And on top of that of course we can still see individual polygons, individual pixels in textures, lackluster real-time shadowing, unnatural motion and transitions, etc... We push old limits and are left with new (or not so new) ones.

Thank You Apple (0)

Gothmolly (148874) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778261)

Thanks for creating a fun, engaging product that plays games with "good enough" quality. The next console doesn't have to be faster and have sexier graphics, it needs to be more fun, or more real.

Re:Thank You Nintendo (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29778409)

There, fixed that for ya.

I don't think so (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29778263)

Although it is not unheard of for manufacturers to release gadgets, this specific instance is purely because of Nintendo. Nintendo have created a whole generation of devices that have non-traditional controls (Wii motion stuff, NDS touchscreen, etc) and it has proven to be a very popular.

This is just an attempt to incorporate those good ideas into products that previously didn't have them.

Merely a response to Wii (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29778265)

They see an inferior tech selling nicely and figure motion control will make new customers consider their superior tech.

The Wii proved that it isn't all about the graphics, but I don't think there is anything earth shattering about the input tech that others can't copy.

I'd like to have to fun of motion control without having to limit myself in the graphics dept like Wii.

Patents (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778481)

I don't think there is anything earth shattering about the input tech that others can't copy.

It depends on which patents Nintendo owns or exclusively licenses from another party vs. which patents Nintendo non-exclusively licenses from another party.

Re:Merely a response to Wii (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29779211)

Yes the Wii proved that but it isn't selling games aside from Wii Sports and it is an overpriced piece of shit for the price they sell it. Most people who bought the Wii made the purchase because they were sold by the marketing of the product. I know,I was one of them. I bought one for my kid but he lost interest a couple of weeks after he received his gift. Now he asks me again to go outside to play.I do not think that the motion controller à la Wii is the future of gaming. For young kids maybe but I just can't picture a fat fuck jumping around, mimicking sword fights for hours on end. I find Project Natal more interesting than the Wii or PS3 motion wand.

Personnaly, I want gaming to be relaxing when I decide to play for an hour or two, sitting in my sofa. If I want physical interaction, I do some real sports, tennis, biking, soccer, swimming.

Long lived generation (3, Interesting)

spire3661 (1038968) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778267)

THe reason the last generation of consoles went by so quickly is because the level of online interactivity on the previous consoles left alot to be desired and were jsut out of reach. Now that all the consoles have successful online digital money presses, the motivation for new hardware is less and less. I figure we wont see next gen prototypes for at LEAST 2 more years, maybe more.

Re:Long lived generation (1)

QuantumLeaper (607189) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778489)

When by quickly? The Sixth generation games consoles where sold from September 9, 1999, Dreamcast to November 22, 2005 when the XBox 360 was released. Microsoft the the last one in the Sixth Generation consoles and the first one out of that generation.

Re:Long lived generation (1)

spire3661 (1038968) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779399)

And we started seeing spec rumors/announcements and prototype hardware right about now in the cycle. We arent going to see specs or prototypes for at least another 1.5 to 2 years in this gen. So while I may have mis-stated above, the sentiment remains that there are several reason that this hardware cycle is going to last longer then initially expected.

Re:Long lived generation (1)

Spatial (1235392) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778969)

What was quick about it? It was seven years, 1998 to 2005.

Re:Long lived generation (2, Interesting)

4D6963 (933028) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779569)

No that's a biased way of looking at it because the Dreamcast didn't have any successor (and it came out in 1999, not 1998). Look at it this way, PS2 (2000) to PS3 (2006), 6 years, GameCube (2001) to Wii (2006), 5 years, Xbox (2001) to Xbox 360 (2005), 4 years. So the average periodicity for this previous generation was 5 years. It's not THAT short but on the other hand I don't think it's ever been shorter.

Could it be a sign of delay in the "next gen?" (2, Insightful)

erroneus (253617) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778275)

Perhaps it's merely my own lack of vision and creativity, but I can't imagine much further growth in the capabilities of consoles. Display technologies have been maxed out. Memory and processing systems are well balanced between power and cost even if the consoles are still a bit too costly in my opinion. Until the next great other technology comes out, I can't imagine getting much better than it already is... a little better perhaps, as the costs of more impressive technologies decrease, but nothing significant. In fact, I would go so far as to say the advancement between XBox and XBox360 is barely noticeable. PS2 and PS3 is largely the same thing.

What they will do, in the next gen, however, is figure out new ways to kill the second hand and other post-first-sale business activities. If the PSP Go is any indication of what is to come, we are going to see a decrease in the popularity of new consoles.

Re:Could it be a sign of delay in the "next gen?" (3, Insightful)

TheKidWho (705796) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778323)

The current generation of consoles are TERRIBLE compared to PCs. A new PC with a Radeon 5870 has nearly 6-8 times the graphical processing power.

Most consoles games run at sup 720P resolutions and are upscaled to fit a 1080p screen, view distance in console games is terrible, textures are blurry messes, and frame rates suck.

The fact that you can't see a difference between the xbox to xbox360 is laughable.

Just because you have low standards doesn't mean the tech can not advance much further than it already is.

Either way, eventually the hardware will get powerful enough to run real time ray tracing in HD, or at least a mix or real time ray tracing and rasterization, this is when consoles will most likely achieve very long life cycles.

Multiplayer drawback (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778545)

The current generation of consoles are TERRIBLE compared to PCs. A new PC with a Radeon 5870 has nearly 6-8 times the graphical processing power.

Even if one PC in your network has a powerful GPU, you usually need four PCs for four players, and you need to buy powerful GPUs for all of them. Even if you did buy extra PCs to run things like OpenOffice, Firefox, and Boxee, the Intel GMA that probably came in them won't cut it. Consoles, on the other hand, have a wide selection of major label titles that can use one console, one monitor, and four gamepads. Some of these games are in genres that don't even need to split the screen, like fighting games.

Re:Multiplayer drawback (1)

TheKidWho (705796) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778593)

Yeah and most of those fighting games can be played on a PC, with 2-4 controllers too.

Besides, there are plenty of games that are local multiplayer on the PC side too. Left 4 Dead for example includes split screen functionality on the PC.

A lot of console games are also moving towards providing online only mulitplayer like some recent racing games.

Re:Multiplayer drawback (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778653)

most of those fighting games can be played on a PC, with 2-4 controllers too.

Can you recommend a good 4-player PC fighting game for fans of the Super Smash Bros. series? Or something like Mario Party or WarioWare or Rabbids? Or anything like Rock Band or Guitar Hero that hasn't been either discontinued or sued into oblivion?

Re:Multiplayer drawback (1)

TheKidWho (705796) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778745)

I don't know, I don't really play any of those games. I'm sure there are a ton of Indie games similar to Smash Brothers However. Personally I like Street Fighter IV and that is available for PC too.

Besides that, the Guitar Hero series is available for PC too, so what is your point?

Re:Multiplayer drawback (2, Insightful)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778699)

You now, he was responding to the GGP post, who said

"Display technologies have been maxed out. "

And clearly they haven't. That doesn't mean the PC is a better gaming machine, it's just technologically more advanced. The reason for the lack of single-system multiplayer games is not technical, it has to do with different target markets.

Your claims are pointless BS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29778873)

You know everyone laughs at people like you, right? I mean, hysterically. Oh noes! We haz "low standards" because we like to game and not put together "rigs" and fiddle about, and then wave them about as geeky penis surrogates.

Stop clutching at class distinctions in people's gaming habits.

Re:Could it be a sign of delay in the "next gen?" (3, Interesting)

PostPhil (739179) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778971)

No, it's the other way around. PC's are currently TERRIBLE compared to consoles. How can I say that? It's easy. There is no objective meaning of "terrible": it depends on what your goals are. Apparently you're one of the gamers who prioritizes eye-candy and/or processing power. I don't, and many others don't either.

Here's what I think is important:

1. I can actually play the f***ing game at all. The PC market has intentionally alienated used-games with copy-protection and "activation". If you already activated your old game and try to resell it, good luck if you're the new owner who can't install it on their computer. But let's say this is *my* old game, not a used one. Five years down the road, if I want to use it on my new PC with my new version of Windows (because it's going to *have* to be Windows), can I activate it to play? Is the company's servers even around? How do we deal with all the breakage due to OS updates, malware, driver bugs, etc...

2. I can actually play the f***ing game at all, without having to take out a bank loan. For under $300, I can buy a console off the shelf, pop in the disk for any game I own, and I can play it immediately. As long as I have this hardware, I can continue to have the *freedom* to play these games 10 years from now if I wish to. Let me see you play Crysis with a computer off the shelf for under $300. "Technically feasible" doesn't count. I'm referring to the ability to have a genuinely enjoyable gaming experience.

3. Consoles are dedicated to their jobs, with standardized hardware and software. PC's are for general purposes, but do not excel for special purposes like gaming (or high-end audio or video) unless you spend a lot of money to get *non-standardized* hardware and software. As a result of the predictability of the console platform, quality control is easier when you only have to worry about one hardware platform coupled with one software platform. (Note that I wouldn't condone this for PC's. They really are for general purposes and not specifically just gaming.)

Re:Could it be a sign of delay in the "next gen?" (1)

gbarules2999 (1440265) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779309)

\Most consoles games run at sup 720P resolutions and are upscaled to fit a 1080p screen, view distance in console games is terrible, textures are blurry messes, and frame rates suck

Citation needed.

I shouldn't feed the trolls, but sometimes...

Re:Could it be a sign of delay in the "next gen?" (1)

TheKidWho (705796) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778363)

P.S. If you want to see where the next generation of consoles are headed, simply look at Crysis on a maxed out Rig.

Current Generation PCs can still barely run the game at 1600p with 30fps, personally I predict the next generation consoles to have equivalent power to this.

Here is a screenshot.

http://img185.imageshack.us/img185/4228/crysis64200806291401238to6.jpg [imageshack.us]
http://media.photobucket.com/image/Crysis%20max/LiquidReactor/Crysis/Crysis2009-05-2608-40-24-45.jpg [photobucket.com]

Re:Could it be a sign of delay in the "next gen?" (1)

binarylarry (1338699) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778383)

I play games at 2560x1600, you insensitive clod!

Re:Could it be a sign of delay in the "next gen?" (1)

QuantumLeaper (607189) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778407)

What at 5 frames a second?

Re:Could it be a sign of delay in the "next gen?" (1)

TheKidWho (705796) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778439)

Modern graphics cards such as the Nvidia GTX series or Radeon 4xxx to 5xxx series can easily play games at 2560x1600 with 30-60fps, especially games that are console ports.

Re:Could it be a sign of delay in the "next gen?" (1)

aliquis (678370) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779563)

While Crysis is a special case I guess you could google 5870 review.

Re:Could it be a sign of delay in the "next gen?" (1)

WarlockD (623872) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778513)

Its doubtfull the next gen systesm are going to go non-media based. The go is nice but it still takes hours to download anything just think how much data will be needed for even blue-ray type games? 10 million people downloading 30 gigs at a time is going to hurt any server:P

I agree though, I think they are not going to be upgrading the hardware significantly. They are going to play this like the PS1 did with the introduction of the duel shock controller. Even then, there was a clear need for an analog controller. I don't know, however, if a motion controller will change attitudes in either system.

I do believe that both Sony and Microsoft are not going to enjoy the next console upgrades. There is always a big lul, lots of money lost on reintroduction, people WANT backward compatibility, etc. Lets also be fair too, most of the games right now are fairly mature so it be a hard sell to another $600 dollar console with 10 crappy games at launch. Also look at their architecture. Sony has a full cell chip (minus one SPE for cost) and Microsoft uses 3 cores with two SPE's each. There is no way you could emulate that kind of power without also including that chip and thats going to add to the cost. Also what are you going to upgrade it too? The cell chips are supercomputer class, what, PS3 is going to go duel/quad core and Microsoft is going to add a second processor? I doubt they are going to even change the chips out at this point. Even going to an Intel chip can't be done. Not with the significant differences between the two. Besides, it looks like ALL the consoles use PowerPC style processors so there must be a reason for it.

I think I saw the future with the N64 and didn't know it. That little memory expansion bay? I think the next box is going to have the same basic architecture but with upgradeable video graphics hardware. Most games I play now a days doesn't require more than my older PentiumD, but god damn it requires a GTX280.

Re:Could it be a sign of delay in the "next gen?" (1)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778785)

Its doubtfull the next gen systesm are going to go non-media based. The go is nice but it still takes hours to download anything just think how much data will be needed for even blue-ray type games? 10 million people downloading 30 gigs at a time is going to hurt any server:P

I disagree: getting rid of physical distribution and killing second-hand sales with one move will compensate any bandwidth they'll have to pay.

Sucks for PC users (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29778295)

Game graphics advances will be stunted due to these dinosaur consoles being the dominant force in the industry. I guess the bright side is I won't be blowing $300 every 2 years on graphics cards.

Re:Sucks for PC users (1)

binarylarry (1338699) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778339)

You actually think Nvidia and ATI (and Intel..hahaha) aren't going to compete anymore because some morons in tangentially related industries got into the game business?

Re:Sucks for PC users (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29778441)

I don't know; I think graphics have advanced far enough that we are starting to see diminishing returns. Aside from bumping up the resolution to something PC gamers are used to, I don't really think there is much room for improvement. People like to point to Crysis, but I honestly was not particularly impressed with it. I used to be a console hater, but I just got tired of all the bullshit involved with PC gaming. Consoles have their own bullshit to deal with, but PC gaming is worse. I think it's analogous to the whole Linux on the desktop thing. Maybe Linux offers all this shit, but at the end of the day many people just don't feel it's worth the effort and go with Windows. That's exactly how I feel about console gaming.

Re:Sucks for PC users (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29778499)

Crysis was basically just a tech demo for what the most powerful lines of x86 processors and gpu could handle, the game was at best an afterthought, at worst an excuse to cash on a shit tech demo nobody would have cared about otherwise, it's one of the least relevant benchmarks ever and still the meme took hold because of a few moronic gamers who think "it kills my gpu therefore it's the best game ever".

Re:Sucks for PC users (4, Insightful)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778923)

Game graphics advances will be stunted

And some of us gamers cry "Thank effing baby Jebus" for that. Have you missed all the complaints about how gaming is too dominated by graphic card wank fests over who has the best lighting effects or water reflections? Or how the hardware has advanced too much along the polygon count side, actually making it difficult to do anything else other than service shiny graphics, enemy AI or any other intellectual concerns be damned?

I guess the bright side is I won't be blowing $300 every 2 years on graphics cards.

Yeah, bingo. People are getting tired of that. A friend showed me a newer PC FPS a couple weeks ago. Pretty as all hell, but just another goddamned shooter with dumbass enemies and puzzles for the short bus crowd. Whee!

All about the money... (2, Interesting)

biscuitlover (1306893) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778377)

Could this be because of the losses that Sony and MS are making on each unit sold? I couldn't say whether past consoles always turned a profit, but I suspect that after investing so much money in their respective hardware, neither company wants to move on to the next gen before they can claw back as much cash as possible on games and add-ons...

What does this mean for game design? (2, Interesting)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778515)

Currently, button-mashing is pretty similar between the Sony and MS consoles. This makes it pretty easy to conceptually port a game from one of the two consoles to the other (which is probably part of why we so so many simultaneous releases for the two), even if the programming APIs are distinct. On the other hand, the Wii controller has very few buttons and is controlled more so by gestures and movements.

If Sony and MS start pushing for motion-driven controllers, instead of button-mashing, and they each design their own new controllers for that, what is the likelihood that the inputs will actually be similar? If a useful motion - say a forward stabbing motion - is interpreted dramatically different between the Sony and MS systems, this could potentially make cross-platform release more time and resource intensive for the game companies.

Which, one could conjecture, could potentially drive the game companies to release more games on just one platform, instead of both Sony and MS.

Re:What does this mean for game design? (2, Interesting)

grumbel (592662) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779159)

For this generation the most likely thing is that most games will completely ignore the motion sensing stuff, as it doesn't make much sense to invest large amount of money into an add-on that only a fraction of people will own.

On top of that its questionable if motion sensing would even work for regular hardcore games. Especially Microsofts Natal just seems unfit, with no buttons at all you are extremely limited in how you could use the controller in a game (how do you fire a gun?).

Sonys solution looks more promising as it actually has buttons, so it might be useful as a lightgun like tool that could enhance aiming in some games. But how to apply it to gaming in general is still pretty much an unsolved problem and it remains to be seen how many buttons it really has (Is it a full PS3 controller replacement?).

Even on the Wii after all those years people are still struggling to do anything useful with the motion controller in regular games. And more often then not the results are rather uneven.

I think in the end we will end up with a bunch of party & mini-games, some experimental use in regular games and then only see actual real use of motion sensing in the next generation after all that experimentation is over and some new gameplay mechanics have been established.

Accessories and gimmicks (2, Informative)

wampus (1932) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778549)

You can sell more $99 gizmos and gimmick games than you can new consoles, pure and simple.

What? Game consoles? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29778577)

OMG I'm a computer nerd. I thought this article was about terminal emulators!

Re:What? Game consoles? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29779587)

I play BSD-games [linuxquestions.org] , insensitive clod.

Bleh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29778719)

Just another way to wrench money out of the consumer imo. Glad I'm not a console gamer, and if I was, I'd buy a Wii.

I'd rather just have next gen (2, Insightful)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778811)

For me the way to ease the purchase of a new gen console is with strong backward compatibility. When I bought an XBox 360, it was partially because I never had the original XBox, and the XBox games (Halo 1/2, Fable 1, Jade Empire, etc.) I wanted to play were on the compatibility list. I really feel Sony dropped the ball when they dropped PS2 compatibility.

I've gone back and rented a number of Gamecube games (Tales Of Symphonia, Eternal Darkness, etc.) for my Wii. If Nintendo wanted to have achieved true awesomeness in my eyes, they would have put a slot for Gameboy Advance games in the thing. I played some GBA games on the attachment for the Gamecube, and playing them on a big TV is great. Advance Wars with big, glorious maps made the game much more epic.

I also recall the Sega 32X and the CD for the N64. both of which I have. Nifty idea, but the developers just don't develop in droves for something not in the core system specs.

Guitar hero sucks (1)

Sam36 (1065410) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778987)

I freaking hate guitar hero. And I hate how all of my little punk cousins all want guitars for christmas now. Freaking brats

Graphics no longer; gameplay it is. (3, Interesting)

beatsme (1472991) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779093)

Thank the heavens. The gimmick will no longer be about graphics, but gameplay. Now, how long before the emphasis is on storytelling?

Re:Graphics no longer; gameplay it is. (2, Interesting)

alen (225700) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779347)

mod this up

last 20 or so years the only thing that improved in consoles was graphics. the controllers have stayed the same and a few gimmicks like the power glove never caught on. now the graphics are good enough even if they get better that people want a different game play experience and not just better graphics

Not Sure I Buy It (1)

EpsCylonB (307640) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779239)

Not sure if I buy it, yeah this generation may last longer than the standard five years, it basically already has for Microsoft.

It says more about the power of the consoles and the way games use them than it does about anything else. I have kind of noticed the same thing with PC gaming. My 8800GT still lets me play the latest games reasonably well. But how long will this last ?, I give it a couple of years max before either Sony or Microsoft start gearing up to release the first next gen console.

The sooner the better (2, Insightful)

nlawalker (804108) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779315)

The sooner that everyone has implemented and is using motion controls, the better. We need developers to get shitty, gimmicky uses of it out of their systems, and we need better hardware and software for reduced lag and more precise control.

Am I really personally that interested in games that are 100% built around motion control? As the Wii taught me, no, I'm not. I think a lot of game enthusiasts feel the same way. What I *am* excited about, and what I think game enthusiasts should be excited about, is when developers come up with more subtle uses that really add control and flexibility. One thing I really want is the ability to change the direction of the first-person camera in racing games by tilting my head, so I don't need to take my hands off of the controls (note - I'm not talking about "head tracking" where position data is used to provide a realistic viewport, I'm just talking about mapping head tilt to an analog camera control). My understanding is that GT5 + PS Eye will provide this feature. Leaning in first person shooters is another good example. Is it a "realistic" 1 to 1 mapping of a real world motion to a game action? No, but it adds to a player's ability to control the game seamlessly. It only adds to the experience - it doesn't take anything away and you don't have to use it, and the game is still perfectly playable even if you don't have the right hardware.

We need to get to the point where developers are no longer asking "how can we establish a good player experience by using motion control" and instead focus on gameplay and implementation with standard controllers, later asking "where could motion control help this experience we've established?"

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