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Arrested IBM Exec Goes MIA On the Web

kdawson posted more than 4 years ago | from the never-heard-of-him dept.

IBM 185

theodp writes "Among those charged in the largest hedge-fund insider trading case in US history was IBM Sr. VP Robert W. Moffat, the heir apparent to IBM CEO Sam Palmisano and the guy behind Big Blue's 'workforce rebalancing' and the sale of IBM's PC unit to Lenovo. IBM's not talking about the incident, but it's interesting that Moffat's bio is MIA at IBM.com ('Biography you tried to access does not exist.'), and his Smarter Planet video can no longer be found ('This video has been removed by the user.') at IBM's YouTube Channel. Do you need approval from the Feds before tidying up after someone who's under investigation? BTW, if stories and comments appearing in the Times Herald-Record and Poughkeepsie Journal are any indication, Moffat may want to avoid a local jury trial. 'I have talked to a few IBMers today, and there seems to be a lot of cheering in the halls of IBM over his arrest,' said Lee Conrad of Alliance@IBM."

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First post??? (0, Redundant)

linuxgurugamer (917289) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778963)

Sounds like he wasn't liked at the company.

Re:First post??? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29778989)

If he was black, that would make the company automatically racist. Sort of like anyone who disagrees with President Obama's policies for any reason.

Re:First post??? (3, Funny)

ClosedSource (238333) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779253)

You mean anyone who disagrees with Obama's policies makes IBM racist?

Re:First post??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29779903)

Actually, I've never seen anybody call anybody else a racist just for disagreeing with Obama.

However, I've seen plenty people pretend they are only "disagreeing with policies" to cover their obvious racism.

Re:First post??? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29780659)

Actually, I've never seen anybody call anybody else a racist just for disagreeing with Obama.

Obviously you haven't bothered to look. Racism is frequently invoked as a motive for anyone critical of Obama and his policies

Re:First post??? (1)

linuxgurugamer (917289) | more than 4 years ago | (#29778993)

Forgot to mentiion, that if you have the URL you can get the "missing" pages at archive.org

Re:First post??? (1)

mrmeval (662166) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779011)

Yes you got FP. It looks like the crook will get downsized by the Feds and unsized by his new boyfriend.

Re:First post??? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29779049)

Prison rape isn't funny.

Re:First post??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29779269)

It's not funny, it's hilarious.

Re:First post??? (5, Insightful)

rtfa-troll (1340807) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779373)

No what's funny is that a nation which is already joking about his prison rape before he's even been found guilty runs around the world trying to impose their view of human rights on everyone else.

Re:First post??? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29779513)

Compare our view of human rights, however poorly adhered to it has been, to those of other past great powers and those of emerging powers, and we come out pretty favorably! Sit back, enjoy the circus, and keep the annoying, barely tangentially relevant anti-Americanism to a minimum, please!

He's not a fucking troll (5, Interesting)

QuoteMstr (55051) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779567)

I say this as an American: we've become barbarians. We torture [wikipedia.org] people. We incarcerate more people, both in absolute terms and on a per capita basis, than any other nation in the world, and think it's okay to gang-rape 1% of our population [wikipedia.org] . Our wealth is distributed like that of a banana republic [baselinescenario.com] . We're stupid [4brevard.com] , vapid [mtv.com] , and like a feral child, we snarl [blogspot.com] and bite [wordpress.com] when someone tries to help us [scienceblogs.com] . America really is the sick man of the world, and personally, I'm about ready to give up and pronounce the disease incurable. We can argue about causes and solutions, but you can't deny that we're in a steep decline. As George Orwell write,

We are all capable of believing things which we know to be untrue, and then, when we are finally proved wrong, impudently twisting the facts so as to show that we were right. Intellectually, it is possible to carry on this process for an indefinite time: the only check on it is that sooner or later a false belief bumps up against solid reality, usually on a battlefield.

Re:He's not a fucking troll (0, Troll)

Toonol (1057698) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779647)

And there's nothing wrong with joking about any of that.

Re:He's not a fucking troll (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29780105)

Good, I'm glad you've figured out who you are. Now please pack your sh*t and f@#&!ng leave.

Re:He's not a fucking troll (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29780561)

Now listen to me, you dumb fucking redneck. You know how you and your ilk pretend to glorify that constitution of ours? And those freedoms? As a child, you and I were both brainwashed to believe that America is the greatest place on earth, where nothing can go wrong. Because you can say and believe what you want.

And people like you, who pretend to be defending those concepts, haven't the faintest idea what any of it was supposed to be about. If your reaction to someone who disagrees with what you've mis-termed a "value system" is to bully that person and tell them to "get the fuck out", it just goes to show how little you understand about things like "freedom".

Now, it turns out those freedoms were all a lie. Ask the patriotic American communists that used to exist. Patriotic, I say, because they loved their country and did not want its workers to be oppressed by social injustice. If we live in a country where we can believe whatever we want... Why then were American communists so ostracized and blacklisted during the Cold War? To this day, when someone becomes a citizen or joins the military, why do they have to swear that they aren't commies? You know why? Because all that stuff you and I were brainwashed to believe about free speech, free press, freedom of political thought and association, it's all fucking bullshit. To paraphrase the late Bill Hicks, you have freedom. Freedom to do what we tell you to do, think what we want you to think. And if you have a problem with that, you can get the fuck out of here. Because that makes perfect sense.

Re:He's not a fucking troll (3, Interesting)

jtheisen (893138) | more than 4 years ago | (#29780171)

You also do almost 100% of the world's innovation and produce the vast majority of art and culture. Within the last 100 years, you saved us from the Nazis, fascist Japan and International Communism and you're the only power who could save the world again if another threat comes up. Yes, the US appears to be mean and cold - but I shudder to think where the world would be without you. I believe that these things are unfortunately two sides of the same coin.

Re:He's not a fucking troll (5, Insightful)

QuoteMstr (55051) | more than 4 years ago | (#29780253)

We're coasting on the accomplishments of our ancestors. Unfortunately, their America is not our America.

Re:He's not a fucking troll (1)

gbjbaanb (229885) | more than 4 years ago | (#29780489)

You also do almost 100% of the world's innovation and produce the vast majority of art and cultu

you are kidding, right? Perhaps you also think you have the best educated citizens on the planet too.

Re:He's not a fucking troll (2, Interesting)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 4 years ago | (#29780713)

You have a pretty skewed view of the whole situation. For example, Prescott Bush founded the family fortune on working for a company which funneled funds to the S.S. to do Hitler's bidding. And since we're talking about IBM, this is an excellent time to mention that IBM of Germany built and delivered the machines to manage the concentration camps, and actually printed the punch cards as well [villagevoice.com] , but does their level best to deny their part in history [scrapbookpages.com] . Nonetheless, many [jewishvirtuallibrary.org] racial groups have reason to recall. No, I don't have any Obama hating to do today, don't worry... But to have the head of a dynasty founded by a known Nazi collaborator [guardian.co.uk] head the CIA, then become president, then get his son into the office... Well, it should put this whole conversation into perspective.

Hot diggity DAMN I love the internet. It makes it so easy to cite your sources. If articles like these start dropping off these here internets, you'll know to run and not look back.

Re:He's not a fucking troll (1)

Draek (916851) | more than 4 years ago | (#29780825)

You also do almost 100% of the world's innovation

Citation needed.

and produce the vast majority of art and culture.

Again, citation needed. Remember that most RIAA and MPAA members are based in Europe and Asia so if you were gonna count *THEM* in, try again.

Within the last 100 years, you saved us from the Nazis, fascist Japan and International Communism

No, the Russians saved us from the Nazis, and they would've gotten around to demolishing Japan as well given time. In fact, that's *why* the US threw the nukes at them, they didn't want Japan to lose against Russia as that would've tipped the post-war's world balance in their favor. Communism you did, but I'm not sure that Imperialism is much better.

and you're the only power who could save the world again if another threat comes up.

Besides, again, Russia, China or the EU.

Yes, the US appears to be mean and cold - but I shudder to think where the world would be without you. I believe that these things are unfortunately two sides of the same coin.

So, the US appears to be mean and cold because the world would be worse off without them. Why? are you sure, then, if being "mean and cold" is a side-effect of becoming a huge superpower, that the Russians would *really* have been worse rather than it being merely the apperance of it as result of being *another* huge superpower, albeit one farther from (your) home?

Besides, my own little problem with the US isn't that they appear mean and cold, most governments do. Its that they appear to be bloody *STUPID* on top of it. I mean, they recognized the terrorists' goals after 9/11 were to destroy their freedoms and make their citizens afraid and feeling they were in a state of war, and then what did they do? EXACTLY! destroy their freedoms and make a whole show out of pretending they were in a war where they could be killed any minute. I mean, you couldn't have done worse if you tried.

Re:He's not a fucking troll (0, Offtopic)

HanzoSpam (713251) | more than 4 years ago | (#29780459)

And that's [youtube.com] not even [moonbattery.com] the half of it. [youtube.com]

Re:He's not a fucking troll (1)

QuoteMstr (55051) | more than 4 years ago | (#29780571)

HanzoSpam:

no practical, useful scientific knowledge has emerged from the ISS

Have you ever met a liberal that wasn't proud to be sorry?

the assertion that the New Deal propelled America into a period of rapid economic growth is ridiculous

the amount of noise an individual makes about "the good of society" will be inverse to the value that individual contributes to society

explain why the average IQ of American blacks is a standard deviation lower than the average IQ of American whites

Social Justice: When a liberal gets slugged in the teeth.

Seek help.

Re:He's not a fucking troll (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29780857)

Blah, blah, blah. More observational bullshit on how America is becoming more "savage" each day. You enjoy quotes so much? Here's a quote for you:

“Because think of how we started – think of that. This country was founded by a group of slave-owners who told us all men are created equal. Oh, yeah. All men, except for Indians and niggers and women, right? (Always like to use that authentic American language.)" -- George Carlin

More savage? You were _born_ savages. Your entire nation is founded on savagery, death, torture and rape. It always has been. The fact that you're only just now realizing it and internalizing that fact is just another shining example of the ignorance of Americans of their own cultural demise.

Re:First post??? (0)

Jerry Smith (806480) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779385)

Prison rape isn't funny.

But some people in prison aren't there because they're very nice guys. No they still don't deserve it, but in some cases the rest of the world doesn't care about not so very nice guys.

Re:First post??? (1, Insightful)

Eudial (590661) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779625)

Rape is such a harsh word. Free surprise buttsecks is a much better way of putting it.

Re:First post??? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29780007)

Neither is war, but do you see the soldiers holding back? Black humor is as good as any other.

Re:First post??? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29780063)

unless your prison raping a clown.

Re:First post??? (1)

jollyreaper (513215) | more than 4 years ago | (#29780663)

Prison rape isn't funny.

Normally I'd agree but in this guy's case, I think I might snicker a little.

Re:First post??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29780805)

Unless you're prison raping a clown.

Re:First post??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29780819)

Yes it is. Not being a prisoner myself, I think the concept of people that deserve to be in jail having their anuses violently ripped to shreds by a bunch of drugged up convicts is fucking hilarious. Who are you to say what's funny? That's right, _NO ONE_.

Re:First post??? (4, Informative)

dhall (1252) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779111)

He was the man considered responsible for some of the largest cuts within IBM's STG (Systems & Technology Group). A lot of programs were cut locally in order to add to the globalization effort, which is just the politically correct way of saying off-shoring. He was considered the standard bearer to what a lot of workers felt was the increased feeling of greed among the current IBM executives. A lot of good programs and people were axed during his tenure which added to the short term bottom line but have shown in the last 4 years to hurt their long term objectives. It's difficult when you ask your top performers to do more for less, until they either leave or you cast them off.

Re:First post??? (4, Insightful)

blind biker (1066130) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779191)

A lot of good programs and people were axed during his tenure which added to the short term bottom line but have shown in the last 4 years to hurt their long term objectives.

That's so textbook corporate psychopaty. When will people learn?

Re:First post??? (5, Insightful)

tunapez (1161697) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779605)

That's so textbook corporate psychopathy. When will people learn?

After they're caught.
At which time they will wax sympathetic, not admit any guilt and promise not to do it again.
All the while crossing their toes.

When a culture celebrates and rewards parasitic behavior, it's no wonder the psycho's are winning.
***How much time will the billionaire serve do you suppose? I predict he "affords" his justice and walks. Worst case, no admission of wrongdoing and 18 months of "hard" club-fed time for perjury or jaywalking.

"corporate psychopathy" is so harsh (2, Interesting)

commodoresloat (172735) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779849)

Let's just call it an extreme form of capitalism...

No, it's definitely NOT capitalism. (5, Insightful)

boorack (1345877) | more than 4 years ago | (#29780809)

As a person who still remembers (late stages of) communism, those fat & lazy corporations resemble old (long dead) industry in communist states. So many things look exactly the same. High rank executives chasing phantom "results" just to get their bonuses, causing so much mayhem in the process. Middle rank managers who are interested in just blindly executing orders from their bosses and have to be clueless crooks to succeed, low level worker drones interested in setting up another "Q&A cell" to do some paperwork or being a salesman without any responsibility instead of doing something real.

For me, the main distinction between capitalism and communism (corporatism) is ownership. In capitalism the owner runs the business and risks its own property in the process - thus the owner is interested in well-being in the long run. In communism (or corporatism) the communist comisar (corporate executive) runs business that does not belong to him, does not risk anything and is interested in skimming some of it via bonus (for posting cooked results) or some form of fraud.

Using ownership distinction it is easy to explain why some corporations (Google, even Microsoft) are doing well (and have clean vision) while others (pre-Gerstner IBM, HP after Compaq merge) have no vision except next quarter results. Apple is a blatant example - founded by Jobs & co, then taken over by some classic corporate drones (and nearly killed in the process), then taken back by Jobs and regained all its shine (and some more). This also explains why large corporations like to merge creating larger (more poorly managed) ones - the larger (and less transparent), the more occasions for upper management to steal something.

Re:First post??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29780319)

I once dated a psycho patty :)

Open source can be outsourcing too (3, Funny)

ClosedSource (238333) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779325)

Surely some jobs were lost when IBM put more emphasis on Linux and thus didn't require as many workers to support it.

Re:Open source can be outsourcing too (1)

NoYob (1630681) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779447)

No. IBM's plan has been to move as much tech as they possibly can to India or any other low cost country.

Re:Open source can be outsourcing too (1, Troll)

nacturation (646836) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779949)

It's all part of the free software model. According to Stallman, those laid off highly skilled engineers should now be selling support services helping others install Linux, configure Linux config files, and so on.

Re:Open source can be outsourcing too (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29780473)

But if the software is well designed and documented, it shouldn't require an expert to install and configure (cf OS X). These tasks would be intuitive and "user friendly".

Of course, that means we wouldn't need those expensive consultants. Maybe this helps to explain why it will never be "the year of Linux on the desktop".

Funny enough (1)

war4peace (1628283) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779019)

What's funny is that I am able to access Moffat's biography just fine on the IBM Website. It's from July 2008 though. I dunno if there was a newer version, but it's there nevertheless.

Re:Funny enough (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29779089)

Biography? Is that some kind of "cult of personality" thing that these execs like to engage in? Because generally the life story is not important to me in the slightest, only whether the particular employee has the skills for the job. Reminds me of the times I met high-level execs (CEO, VP, and others) of a major Fortune 500 company I used to work for. They were all very smooth talkers who knew how to look good for a camera and knew how to tell a crowd whatever BS it wanted to hear, and they generally reminded me of politicians more than anything else.

I think they are cut from the same cloth, as both the execs I've met and politicians I've met were fevered egos who derive their self-worth from how many subordinates they can collect. They didn't seem overly concerned with objective criteria that indicated success or failure of their ventures, only that everyone was "on board". So doing the job and doing it well often wasn't enough for them; what they really wanted was for you to buy into it heart and soul, a status that many people learned to fake around them. I guess the difference between the execs and the politicians is that the execs are after money, while the politicians are after power (often because they already have money). Otherwise there's a great deal of overlap in both the personality types and the skillsets.

Re:Funny enough (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29779461)

Biography? Is that some kind of "cult of personality" thing that these execs like to engage in?

Nope. At least, that's not the only purpose. These things appear in "investor relations" materials. They want to convince people they've got a good executive team in place so that they put their money in the stock.

Now, you're right to point out that it's all bullshit. But this particular bullshit has a pretty clear purpose.

Re:Funny enough (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29779175)

You're right, I was able to find it: here [ibm.com] . The link was removed, but the page is there.

Re:Funny enough (1)

EvilIdler (21087) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779479)

Yep, the bio has been there every time I've tried. I'm refreshing the page, but it just won't go away! Was this just a glitch in whatever system IBM runs?

*refreshes page again*

Nope, still not gone. Tried it on .nyud.net:8080 to be sure :)

Re:Funny enough (1)

slashchuck (617840) | more than 4 years ago | (#29780497)

Here it is. [ibm.com]

IANAL, let alone a Fed... (4, Informative)

Shadow Wrought (586631) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779027)

But taking things down from the internet, tidying up as it were, doesn't sound the least bit questionable. Now if they remove the video, bio, and all his other stuff from their files and destroy it, then there might be a problem.

Re:IANAL, let alone a Fed... (2, Insightful)

HiThere (15173) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779223)

Yeah. There's nothing against cleaning up your image, only against destroying the evidence. Or something that could be construed as evidence. You can generally even supply it to the court under seal, if you don't want your neighbors to know.

(Well, that's civil law. Criminal law might be different. But I doubt it. If you're supplying the evidence rather than having it seized, I think you generally get a lot of control over how widely it's shown.)

Bernie Madoff (4, Interesting)

br00tus (528477) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779051)

Before Madoff was arrested, a Google search for his name pointed to many pages at Yeshiva University, which he gave a lot of money to. If you clicked on the Google cache, there were glowing profiles about him. If you clicked on the actual pages, his name had been pulled out of all those pages almost as soon as he was arrested, because I was Googling all of this the day after he was arrested. It's still all probably on archive.org [archive.org]

Bernie Mad(e)-off [with the money] (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29779117)

Thereby proving the saying that, "everyone loves a winner, and hates a loser".

I for one welcome... (0, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29779063)

the removal of my future overlord.

With Friends Like These ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29779077)

'I have talked to a few IBMers today, and there seems to be a lot of cheering in the halls of IBM over his arrest,' said Lee Conrad of Alliance@IBM."

... Who Needs Enemies ?

RIP IBM Thinkpad... (3, Interesting)

brxndxn (461473) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779099)

IBM Thinkpad was by far the best laptop line.. Now, it's basically just another piece of crap laptop. Moffat deserves jail time just for this.. "Crimes against quality."

Re:RIP IBM Thinkpad... (1, Funny)

shashark (836922) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779165)

I'd say with Vista on it, evey 'piece of laptop' out there is crap. If only you could install ubuntu on it....oh wait.

Re:RIP IBM Thinkpad... (1)

NoYob (1630681) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779465)

Lenovo was the manufacturer that IBM outsourced/offshored the manufacturing of their laptops and PCs to for quite a few years. What was purchased was the PC business and the names.

The quality hasn't changed because it's the same machine.

Re:RIP IBM Thinkpad... (2, Informative)

KlaymenDK (713149) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779499)

The quality hasn't changed because it's the same machine.

Crikey, I have been using IBM Thinkpads for over a decade, and I can tell you the quality has changed, and not for the better. These days, a Thinkpad is no more desirable than an Acer machine, I'll tell you that. They were making *business* machines, now I can't get one that *hasn't* got a glossy, widescreen display on it.

Re:RIP IBM Thinkpad... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29779531)

now I can't get one that *hasn't* got a glossy, widescreen display on it.

You're full of shit. One of the main reasons I went with a Lenovo T61p is that it has a matte screen. Oh, and it was crazy cheap, and except for the overheating NVIDIA card, it's been holding up great after ~1.5 years.

Re:RIP IBM Thinkpad... (1)

KlaymenDK (713149) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779735)

Yeah well good luck getting IBM internal IT to deal that kind of sense unto their employees.

Re:RIP IBM Thinkpad... (4, Insightful)

lukas84 (912874) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779627)

Lenovo's quality of the "real" ThinkPads (T-series, X-series, W-series) is still pretty good.

The R-series have always been not-as-good. What Lenovo did was to introduce the SL-series, which are crap.

I've been using a T60, until i needed more power and switched to the W500 in last december. It's a great machine. I'm using it with Windows 7 x64, with WS08R2 on a VHD to run VMs through Hyper-V.

Re:RIP IBM Thinkpad... (4, Insightful)

Teckla (630646) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779515)

The quality hasn't changed because it's the same machine.

Sorry, but...no, it's not.

My company has been using ThinkPads exclusively for years, and once IBM sold the unit to Lenovo, the quality of the ThinkPad line has gone down, in my opinion.

I think IBM demanded a higher of level quality than Lenovo demands of itself. My experience seems to indicate there is now a higher failure rate, as well as evidence of cutting corners.

R.I.P. ThinkPad

Re:RIP IBM Thinkpad... (1)

NeutronCowboy (896098) | more than 4 years ago | (#29780529)

Ditto.I think I bought my last thinkpad last year. From what I've seen, Lenovo doesn't know how to create solid laptops that have business-level specs, can take a beating, and don't have features that you will never need or use (like a fold-out screen).

Re:RIP IBM Thinkpad... (2, Insightful)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 4 years ago | (#29780637)

IBM invented all kinds of goofy laptop stuff, including the butterfly keyboard. To be fair, the fold-out screen idea is stupid, but trying new things is commendable. Failing to build reliable hardware is just failure, though.

Now if we just got the same thing for Ballmer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29779115)

We'd be all set!

MSFT: Steve who? Never heard of the guy.

And nothing of value was lost.

Re:Now if we just got the same thing for Ballmer (3, Funny)

Old97 (1341297) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779193)

Bad idea. Won't happen. First, Steve is too filthy rich to care about money. It's all about the game. Secondly, Steve is taking down Microsoft as fast as he can. Soon they will be just another mediocre software giant with no relevant monopolies. Let's not slow that down by arresting him.

Eh.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29779119)

it's working fine here. Full bio + a 1 MiB picture available for download.

Missing BIO seems innocent enough (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29779125)

I think they use Notes for that sort of thing.

It is a wonder that everything doesn't go missing all the time.

tidying up (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779137)

I bet its a simple matter of removing evidence from public view during an active investigation, and it still exists for when its all hauled into court.

Who Cares? Why Is This On Slashdot??! (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29779141)

It's not exactly news that people or companies want to dissociate themselves from people charged with crimes. Removing any connections with these people has been going on for years.

In any case, I don't know why this is even news on slashdot. If this insider trading case didn't involve a tech company, would this still be here? How is this is news for nerds??

As an ex-ibm'er from the Hudson Valley... (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29779153)

I just want to testify to the anger towards IBM in the Hudson Valley. IBM has moved from being a socially responsible organization towards being a profit driven company. During the process a lot of people have gotten hurt. People who invested their lives working for IBM lost their pensions. They went from being a massive economic presence and benefactor to being a fading sun. If this guy was one of the reasons for the move towards a new cutthroat IBM then good riddance.

Re:As an ex-ibm'er from the Hudson Valley... (3, Insightful)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779275)

IBM has moved from being a socially responsible organization towards being a profit driven company.

Maybe if you ignore the monopoly thing a few decades ago. What has gone from companies like IBM and HP is job security. They are now process and project driven instead of technology driven, so when a product goes, so do the people.

US's comparative advantage is change, not technology per se. Any technology that starts to become a commodity is shipped overseas, and the US companies have to move on to emerging, difficult, or sales-centric technologies to stay ahead of the game. Thus, there's high turn-over and burnout. You're a star one decade and "dead-wood" the next. IT is not the best career if you like stability.
         

Re:As an ex-ibm'er from the Hudson Valley... (5, Interesting)

coolgeek (140561) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779473)

If Watson were still here, the people would be retrained into the next phase/project/product. It would cost money. Having people with such a diverse skill set would be a huge boon to innovation. Watson would see that end game and hold out for it.

People used to know, if you got hired at IBM, you were set for life. This is how Watson attracted the best of the best. Their failure to keep their eye on the ball is a primary contributor to their current position as an irrelevant has-been.

My friend's dad was a typewriter repairman for IBM most of his life. He had MS. When the Selectrics started disappearing in the mid-80's and as the MS started to impair him, they retrained him to work on a bench, repairing PCs. When his MS progressed to the point that the PC repair was too much for him, they gave him an office, and his one responsibility was to file a report on a monthly basis. He was not required to come to work every day. Still received full pay and benefits until he could no longer show up once a month, after he took a fall resulting in injury. He was able to leave with his pension and full benefits.

IBM was more than a corporation, it was an institution. It is extremely sad that this institution no longer exists.

Re:As an ex-ibm'er from the Hudson Valley... (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779807)

That whole economy no longer exists.

IBM was changed by the marketplace it competed in. The suits just bullshitted there way along, same as always.

I wouldn't go so far as to call IBM an irrelevant has-been. Though they once owned a small industry, they now compete profitably in many large ones.

"Workforce rebalance" (5, Insightful)

blind biker (1066130) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779169)

Anytime such grandiose outsourcing and/or workforce cutting schemes are created, you can suspect that a psychopathic suit just got an idea how to look busy and useful.

Speaking of such.... (5, Interesting)

NoYob (1630681) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779397)

From one of TFA:

Cost is part of the calculation, Mr. Moffat noted, but typically not the most important consideration. "People who say this is simply labor arbitrage don't get it," he said. "It's mostly about skills."

You know, I keep hearing that, but I have yet to see any proof. And if you walk into any American CS program, you'll see plenty of American students as well as foreign ones. What I'm saying is that there are plenty of qualified US students coming out of US universities and there are plenty of qualified US citizens to do any IT job. If you find that not to be your experience, I'd like to point out a few issues your organization may have:

  1. Your HR department may be screening out folks you want.
  2. Many times, your job reqs get changed by HR and they publish something completely different from what you're looking for.
  3. You are demanding too much, and if that's the case, you still won't get it overseas - unless, they're lying about their skills.
  4. You are located somewhere that no one really wants to live. Has your local population been trending down: like in the rust belt areas?

In other words, I am very skeptical of anyone who says they can't get qualified people - especially in this economy.

Re:Speaking of such.... (5, Interesting)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | more than 4 years ago | (#29780113)

It's never about skills. I have worked for companies that do off-shoring. They're no better. They're the same. Some are good but some aren't. But the off-shore team was much bigger because you can get developers for less than minimum wage in this country and amazingly companies can live with loads of incompetence when labour is dirt cheap.

It's not just about wages, it's also about labour laws and not having to give benefits like pensions. They would probably even pay uk wages to these people as long as they still get to treat them like shit.

These people aren't dumb, they know they're being taken advantage of. The good ones are looking to move to the UK, Canada, US, etc to get their decent wage and benefits.

Re:Speaking of such.... (3, Insightful)

tyllwin (513130) | more than 4 years ago | (#29780835)

God, I wish I had points to mod this up. I've never ever seen it be about skills -- usually, in fact, the people doing the arbitrage don't even *know* what the relative skillsets are.

Re:Speaking of such.... (2, Interesting)

Jaysyn (203771) | more than 4 years ago | (#29780277)

In the past 2 years, my company's bread & butter has been cleaning up GIS (Smallworld, specifically) crap done by an Indian outfit for one of the largest ISPs in the country. They got paid to screw it up & we get paid to fix it. Needless to say, the ISP in question no longer outsources design.

Re:"Workforce rebalance" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29779919)

I think the Globalized Workforce endeavour and Insider Trading are very similar in many ways. Both benefit the doer, and both hurt society as a whole. Where will his children work? Not in Information Technology I bet! Both show that money is not the final arbiter in all decisions.

Not accessible by you does not equal destroyed (3, Insightful)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779227)

> Do you need approval from the Feds before tidying up after someone who's
> under investigation?

While the courts might frown on destroying records relating to such a person there is no requirement that they remain on public display.

Re:Not accessible by you does not equal destroyed (1)

ClosedSource (238333) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779301)

Unless it involves real evidence that relates to the alleged crime, I can't image why the courts would have any opinion at all.

It amazes me that some Slashdotters (not necessarily the parent) who pride themselves on believing in the most remote stretches of "freedom" fail to understand how it applies in it's most obvious and direct form of free speech. The government can't arbitrarily order websites to add or remove any content about an individual no matter how much the Slashdott crowd may hate him or assume he's guilty before a trial.

Re:Not accessible by you does not equal destroyed (1)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779589)

> Unless it involves real evidence that relates to the alleged crime, I can't
> image why the courts would have any opinion at all.

That's why I wrote "might". Parties to the case would be well advised to refrain from destroying any records for fear of being accused of destroying evidence (justifiably or not) but they have every right to remove stuff from public display. Third parties such as LinkedIn are free to do as they will unless the prosecutors present them with court orders demanding preservation (but no court is going to require them to keep the stuff up on the Web).

This is all most likely moot: I'm sure the SEC and the prosecutors have long since downloaded anything that might possibly be of interest.

Bio link works. (1)

nbetcher (973062) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779257)

The link to Moffat's bio at IBM's site works just fine for me. Makes me wonder how fast this (or another) story made it to IBM web developers to fix this 'problem'.

Re:Bio link works. (2, Insightful)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779525)

I noticed that too. I think someone was a bit too happy about this and the company decided they have to show some level of support for the guy even if he's a complete ass.

He made a schoolboy error (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29779277)

Being in a position to do large deals, you always get people offering "incentives". ie cash in envelopes to sign a deal. Brown envelopes and all that. However I spoke to my boss at my old place ie before I became management and asked his advice.

Basically, its a case of dont, ever! Basically, if a company gets audited, they will be looking for a scapegoat. Guess who gets that joy. Not only that, but it's your reputation also. In our game, reputation is worth its weight in gold!

The way to do it, is to accept offers of kit on long term loan, that they dont want back. Im not saying I take it and sign a deal. Its more a case of it they want to give me freebies to test, I dont mind. ie the odd high spec laptop here, the odd day out there. They also understand what they give me is no strings and I treat it as such.

At the end of the day price and quality are deciding factors.

Encryption (1)

andsens (1658865) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779341)

Makes you wonder why the hell they didn't encrypt their phone conversations... I mean ffs, he worked at IBM, it's not like they didn't have access to that kind of technology.

Bad summary (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29779427)

What the fuck does BTW mean? This isn't a SMS message, at least write the summary like an adult.

WTF is your problem? (1)

argent (18001) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779463)

Adults don't use obscenity as punctuation.

Common PR tactic. (2, Informative)

slasho81 (455509) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779433)

Hiding an embarrassing employee's web presence is a common PR tactic used to delay journalists by making them look for facts about the employee longer. The lazy journalists and bloggers who just want to publish now will have fewer facts and skimpier stories which translates to less interesting stories and less media attention.

This made my day..... (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29779445)

Worked for 23+ years at IBM Greenock Personal Systems Manufacturing, then they sold us off to Sanmina - SCI who closed us down less than 2 years later. Always remember Moffat's speech to those being jetissoned about how we were all like his children and how you have to let go of your children if they are to grow and realise their true potential. Patronising c**t..... More like hiring Jeffrey Dahmer as a babysitter. Am organising a reunion of my old department to celebrate.

Re:This made my day..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29779657)

thats sick man!

The original Dsigner of AirWolf? (0, Offtopic)

shareme (897587) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779449)

What the origninal designer of AirWolf arrested? Wjoops wrong Moffat..

IBM'ers, be proud and tell your friends why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29779455)

The funny thing is, at IBM right now there's this campaign going on to "TELL" of all your great experiences and why IBM is such a great company to work for. They're giving out small boxes of mints and such, to help you speak you know (rolleyes). Mostly, my colleagues and I have been looking at one another, going "the kind of stories we'd be telling would NOT benefit IBM. Personally (and I believe my colleagues share this opinion), I have just enough loyalty to NOT go telling all my stories.

Posted Anonymously just in case this turns ugly. In any event, the mints are tasty enough.

No surprise (3, Insightful)

sjames (1099) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779537)

It's not the least bit surprising. Who would want to remind the world that they heaped praise on someone who turned out to be a felonious swindler and a cheat (and probable psychopath)?

The PR people fear that it reflects very poorly of the judgment of the others. I wouldn't be too hard on them though, psychopaths smart enough to not go to jail in their youth are notoriously hard to spot in a crowd.

Re:No surprise (3, Insightful)

Junta (36770) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779871)

someone who turned out to be a felonious swindler and a cheat (and probable psychopath)?

To be fair, that really could be any sufficiently successful executive.

M.I.A as In ... (1)

dmomo (256005) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779675)

All I wanna do is (BANG BANG BANG BANG!)
And (KKKAAAA CHING!)
And take your money

?!?

The test will be IBM's Data Retention and Phones (2, Interesting)

turtleshadow (180842) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779863)

IBM may be able to as a legal maneuver remove all the Bios and promos made by this executive. However IBM's data retention and phone system logging is going to be hotly tested. Not much is done in IBM without some tracking system. Most the company phones have logs, all the emails are archived/retention for a few years. I think even the old Sametimes messages were also logged once long ago. It sounds like the US Justice Dept will have wiretaps as the big evidence.

Unfortunately IBM's polices on email retention may put at jeopardy the cache. I think it was 3-5 years worth. IBM learned not to keep a lot of communications after problems with anti-trust lawsuits. Law enforcement may face a mess if they need to go back into the mainframe system because only a few persons know that system outside IBM and internally that generation was being wiped out.

I will laugh out loud if IBM drags its feet in producing all the documents when this hits the courts as this is what it sells to customers at a high premium. IBM's legal legions are 2nd to none for litigation and maneuvering and the do not fear the US gov.

Anyhow it is trival as I think this guy got caught with his hand in the cookie jar when the US gov was fishing for bigger fish such as hedgefund managers who are suspected of funding terrorists. [businessinsider.com]

IBM has more scrubbing to do... (4, Informative)

bylo (1211278) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779877)

e.g. http://www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/biography/10068.wss [ibm.com]

[In case their scrubbers find this bio] "Robert W. Moffat, Jr.
Senior Vice President and Group Executive, Systems and Technology Group

Full biography

Robert W. Moffat, Jr. is senior vice president and group executive, IBM Systems and Technology Group. Named to this position in July 2008, Mr. Moffat is responsible for all IBM hardware offerings as well as the microelectronics division, which translates IBM research and development into semiconductor solutions for IBM systems and OEM clients. In addition, the company’s integrated supply chain operations, which include global manufacturing, procurement and customer fulfillment, report to him.

Mr. Moffat was senior vice president, Integrated Operations. In this cross-functional role created in July 2005, he led an initiative to transform and integrate the company’s supply chain and service delivery operations globally, leveraging new business process designs and advanced technology to achieve greater levels of efficiency while improving IBM's market responsiveness.

Prior to that, Mr. Moffat was senior vice president and group executive of IBM's Personal and Printing Systems Group, where he was responsible for worldwide sales, development, manufacturing and marketing of Personal Computers, Printing Systems and Retail Store Solutions. Before that, he was vice president, finance and planning for the Enterprise Systems Group.

Mr. Moffat has held a number of executive positions at IBM, including general manager of manufacturing, fulfillment and procurement initiatives for the PC business. He led the team that pioneered the Advanced Fulfillment Initiative, and channel collaboration initiatives, which were awarded the 1999 Franz Edelman Award, the highest recognition for achievement in operational research and management sciences, and supply chain management.

His other positions at IBM, since joining in 1978, included assistant general manager, finance, planning, and business support for the IBM PC Company in Europe, and vice president of finance and planning.

Mr. Moffat is a member of the IBM Performance Team and the IBM Corporate Operations Team. He serves as a member of the Board of Trustees for The Manufacturing Institute, an educational and research affiliate of the National Association of Manufacturers. He is also a non-voting observer on the Board of Directors of Lenovo Group Limited.

Mr. Moffat is a graduate of Union College in Schenectady, New York, with a B.S. degree in Economics. He also holds an MBA in Management Information Systems from Iona College in New Rochelle, New York.

July 2008"

Time Was... (3, Interesting)

Greyfox (87712) | more than 4 years ago | (#29779999)

IBM used to boast during the new employee orientation that IBM "Put the employees first, the customers second and the shareholders last." Time was people would network throughout the company and someone would be happy to help out if someone from another department needed help to move a project forward. Time was we believed we could do anything and our company wouldn't fuck us over.

Too bad there's not a company like that anymore...

Re:Time Was... (1)

war4peace (1628283) | more than 4 years ago | (#29780795)

"Put the employees first, the customers second and the shareholders last."
You sure it wasn't in Hebrew? I think they were supposed to read it backwards. Would make much more sense...

IBM CEO Gerstner raided the Pension Fund (3, Informative)

CuteSteveJobs (1343851) | more than 4 years ago | (#29780595)

There's a lot Lou Gerstner did at IBM that wasn't well known, like his raiding the pension funds and decimating the product line (DB2 anyone?). The business press is fawning of Gerstner (these are after all the same people who praise Madden and the Wall Street investment banks after all), but if you look at Amazon's review of his book you'll find many comments that tell the parts he left out in Gerstner's masturbatory little book:

http://www.amazon.com/Elephants-Dance-Inside-Historic-Turnaround/product-reviews/B00009NDAF/ref=cm_cr_dp_hist_2?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=0&filterBy=addTwoStar [amazon.com]

Many like these:

"It is strangely ironic that, after doing his best to suppress all negative communication within IBM, it should be the reader feedback on amazon.com that alerts Gerstner to what the world at large really thinks of him. Ever since 1994 the newsreading public has been conned into a set of beliefs about IBM and Gerstner, simply through IBM's vice-like control of all media that wanted a share of IBM's ad spending. It is bizarre that he expects us to read through a critical employee e-mail on pages 81-82 of his book, when he admits that he couldn't even spare the time to reply to it himself.

Gerstner was the IBM CEO with a worse revenue record than John Akers, the man he replaced. The only way Gerstner could find to grow revenue was by buying firms like Lotus. He turned what was a fantastic company to work for into a an ordinary one. He writes in the book that he transformed the company into a firm where the most able got the most rewards. In fact he converted it into a firm where the most aggressive individuals, like Gerstner, win through. He destroyed IBM's employee benefits schemes across the world, claiming they were unaffordable at the time of IBM's darkest hour. Perhaps they were at that time, but Gerstner's greatest sin was that he never returned any of the benefits to the employees when business improved, except through a silly bonus scheme that in my experience never motivated anyone. The result is that IBM has become a company that people still want to have on their CV, but those who join in mid-career almost never stay more than two years.

Gerstner groped around and never really found the right idea for growing revenue. His shift to services meant that he took his eye off all the products in the IBM catalogue, and IBM architectures have become an irrelevance in a world now dominated by Windows, TCP/IP, Linux, Solaris and Oracle. He used the AS/400 as a cash cow when a very aggressive pricing scheme could have seen the system create the market that Windows NT instead built. Gerstner has said the Internet saved IBM, but frankly it did a lot more for rivals like Microsoft and Sun.

There's a part of me that makes me think this book is one huge, ironic joke -- the guy only pretends to be unaware of the impact of his decisions on others. He boasts about a turnaround that never was and advocates management behaviour that no-one should accept.

That would be fine if it were confined to the pages of this book. But unfortunately the impact of Gerstner is written large across the lives of many, many individuals who crossed his path, both inside and outside IBM. The blight cast over their lives means that, when they get the chance, they usually don't recommend IBM products. Gerstner just doesn't understand that.

These pages on amazon ought to be required reading for anyone foolish enough to think they want a career in IBM. "

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