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New Optomechanical Crystal Allows Confinement of Light and Sound

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 4 years ago | from the crystal-lightswitch-rave dept.

Technology 91

PBH writes "Physicists and engineers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have developed a nanoscale crystal that traps both light and sound. The interaction of light quanta (photons) and sound quanta (phomons) are so strong that they produce significant mechanical vibrations. 'Indeed, Painter points out, the interactions between sound and light in this device—dubbed an optomechanical crystal—can result in mechanical vibrations with frequencies as high as tens of gigahertz, or 10 billion cycles per second. Being able to achieve such frequencies, he explains, gives these devices the ability to send large amounts of information, and opens up a wide array of potential applications—everything from lightwave communication systems to biosensors capable of detecting (or weighing) a single macromolecule. It could also, Painter says, be used as a research tool by scientists studying nanomechanics. "These structures would give a mass sensitivity that would rival conventional nanoelectromechanical systems because light in these structures is more sensitive to motion than a conventional electrical system is."'"

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Could this be related? (2, Interesting)

symbolset (646467) | more than 4 years ago | (#29878075)

Re:Could this be related? (2, Interesting)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 4 years ago | (#29878183)

Better -- an ansible [wikipedia.org] .

Well, one can dream anyway.

Re:Could this be related? (1)

UltraAyla (828879) | more than 4 years ago | (#29882333)

My thoughts exactly. I know almost nothing about the actual deep physics of these, but my first thought with this was to entangle it with another one and make an ansible. mmmmm.

Better Audio Speakers, Mics, Ultrasound, Sonar? (3, Interesting)

sanman2 (928866) | more than 4 years ago | (#29878717)

I'm not sure what applications extremely high frequency vibrations have, but I'm thinking that this could be used to make better quality audio speakers, microphones, ultrasound, sonar, etc.

If you have such fine control over vibrations, perhaps you could create fancier waveforms, for sound that has weird properties. Phased array sonar?
Constructive and destructive interference?
I own a pair of Bose noise-canceling headphones that I enjoy, so maybe that tech would be enhanced by these crystals. Or perhaps you could make sonic weapons by building up massive disruptor wave pulses

I'm trying to think of what high frequency synchrotron radiation makes possible through EM. The extremly short wavelengths allow imaging of very tiny objects like molecules. So would extremely short mechanical wavelengths allow extremely fine sonic imaging of... individual cells?

Re:Better Audio Speakers, Mics, Ultrasound, Sonar? (3, Interesting)

DJRumpy (1345787) | more than 4 years ago | (#29879235)

I was thinking more along the lines of communication data. Crystals of this sort could be placed on either end of a pipe, and translate the data into and from ultra high frequency. Essentially working like a switch. If the data travels well in those frequencies, I could see massive potential in communications.

I also see storage potential here as well.

Re-discovered ancient technology. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29885661)

This crystal technology is the similar to the ancient technology of Atlantis and other ancient civilizations. This is just re-discovered.

Re:Better Audio Speakers, Mics, Ultrasound, Sonar? (1)

villageidiot357 (808966) | more than 4 years ago | (#29880593)

Mechanical vibrations are used to measure molecular relaxations in polymers (rheology and dynamic mechanical analysis). The devices I am most familiar with have an upper limit of about 100 hz, however, by controlling the temperature high frequencies can be effectively measured.

Re:Better Audio Speakers, Mics, Ultrasound, Sonar? (1)

Jurily (900488) | more than 4 years ago | (#29880955)

I'm not sure what applications extremely high frequency vibrations have,

Do you have a CPU?

Re:Better Audio Speakers, Mics, Ultrasound, Sonar? (1)

Dragonslicer (991472) | more than 4 years ago | (#29882419)

Do you have a CPU?

No, why do you ask?

Re:Better Audio Speakers, Mics, Ultrasound, Sonar? (-1, Flamebait)

u38cg (607297) | more than 4 years ago | (#29881369)

I'm not sure what applications extremely high frequency vibrations have

But it didn't stop you rabbitting your ill-informed speculation for the rest of your post, did it? Egads, if you are not familiar with the basic properties of waves in general and acoustic waves in particular, why would you pollute the network with your ignorant ravings? Be quiet.

Re:Better Audio Speakers, Mics, Ultrasound, Sonar? (1)

Maxmin (921568) | more than 4 years ago | (#29892849)

Ah, that's rich - empty ranting about naive speculation, with the added bonus of stentorian patronization! You forgot to toss in a "better to keep ones mouth shut and be thought a fool than to ..."

Egads, slashdot is so fucked up these days.

Re:Better Audio Speakers, Mics, Ultrasound, Sonar? (2, Insightful)

dontmakemethink (1186169) | more than 4 years ago | (#29881489)

I own a pair of Bose noise-canceling headphones that I enjoy, so maybe that tech would be enhanced by these crystals.

LMAO... just mod me troll... just do it before I post ad nauseam how fucking idiodic that is...

Re:Better Audio Speakers, Mics, Ultrasound, Sonar? (1)

Genda (560240) | more than 4 years ago | (#29881879)

Only if you're listening to sounds in the 10 Gigahertz range... I think that's beyond the fidelity of even Bose...

Re:Better Audio Speakers, Mics, Ultrasound, Sonar? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29881939)

Would I be right in thinking that this wasn't invented by BLACKS?

But don't worry - I'm sure your "Racist" "Racist" "Racist" alerts are going off in your brainwashed heads already.

After all - once the number of non-whites in your country reaches 90%, I'm sure your children will be having a WONDERFUL time, despite the fact that there will be no more inventions like this, no electricity, no power stations, no internet, no computers, no cars, no food, nothing - because the "We're all the same" BLACKS will have totally destroyed your country.

Anybody have any factual, logical rebuttals to what I've just written?

Re:Better Audio Speakers, Mics, Ultrasound, Sonar? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29882215)

These crystals could be used for any number of clocking applications. Typically, quartz crystals are used as reference frequencies all over the place. There are many standard crystal frequencies for different communications standards. The frequency of today's crystals are multiplied up and distributed out. They make for a very cheap and easy main frequency reference clock for a local clocking system. These higher frequency crystals could be used for the same type of application down the road. Communications system designers are always looking for clean, cheap, reliable clock sources.

Re:Better Audio Speakers, Mics, Ultrasound, Sonar? (1)

DarthStrydre (685032) | more than 4 years ago | (#29883973)

Technically, the clock is divided DOWN from a PLL VFO (not multiplied up from a crystal), and locked to the crystal reference.... though the effect is the same.

Re:Better Audio Speakers, Mics, Ultrasound, Sonar? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29892527)

Not exactly. Phonons are quantized sound, like a photon is quantized light, or in other words, something very small.

The most likely applications are in photonics and plasmonics.

I'm guessing this must be important. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29878095)

Since the title bar is red.

Re:I'm guessing this must be important. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29878347)

Yes. Eventually someone will find a way to use such devices to surf porn faster. What I want to know is, can one of these crystals store a Goatse image and the screams that surely accompanied the creation of that image?

Re:I'm guessing this must be important. (3, Funny)

maharb (1534501) | more than 4 years ago | (#29878625)

They can aid in transmitting it in "HD 4X" faster than it takes someone to realize the mistake of clicking a tinyurl.

Dangerous stuff we have here.. better ban it.

Keeping Time, Better and Better (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29878117)

It's about time we got some better watch technology.

first (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29878127)

first

Phonon, not phomon (5, Informative)

pac109 (1171789) | more than 4 years ago | (#29878165)

Re: Phonon, not phomon (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29878513)

But wasn't it Shakespeare who said, "If Guinness be the drink of love, phomon?"

Re:Phonon, not phomon (1)

Colonel Korn (1258968) | more than 4 years ago | (#29878853)

Thanks for ending my agonizing 30 seconds of wondering whether I was wrong through 5 years of grad school.

Re:Phonon, not phomon (2, Funny)

The_mad_linguist (1019680) | more than 4 years ago | (#29880815)

Phomon phonon!

Doo doo-doo doo doo!

Re:Phonon, not phomon (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29882385)

Phokemon!

Aha! So actually it's a Phokemon ball! So Phokemons are made of phonons and phomons! You 'gotta catch 'em all!

Re:Phonon, not phomon (2, Interesting)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 4 years ago | (#29882771)

I'm having trouble wrapping my head around this, despite (or because of?) a class I took in college in the late 70s. Photons I understand; light has characteristics of both waves and particles. That was covered in the class. However, phonons? Sound is simply the vibration of matter. There are no "subatomic sound particles". Where there is no matter there is no sound, unlike light. The vibration of an object IS sound. Nowhere in the wikipedia article about phonons does it say what they actually ARE and why modern physics says they're necessary.

Can anybody shed any light on this?

Re:Phonon, not phomon (1)

Luyseyal (3154) | more than 4 years ago | (#29884043)

The idea is that the physics of sound can be quantized into wave packets. From wikipedia:

Phonons are a quantum mechanical version of a special type of vibrational motion, known as normal modes in classical mechanics, in which each part of a lattice oscillates with the same frequency. These normal modes are important because, according to a well-known result in classical mechanics, any arbitrary vibrational motion of a lattice can be considered as a superposition of normal modes with various frequencies (compare Fourier transform); in this sense, the normal modes are the elementary vibrations of the lattice. Although normal modes are wave-like phenomena in classical mechanics, they acquire certain particle-like properties when the lattice is analysed using quantum mechanics (see wave-particle duality.)

-l

Re:Phonon, not phomon (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 4 years ago | (#29886739)

Yes, I read it, I'm still having problems with the concept.

Although normal modes are wave-like phenomena in classical mechanics, they acquire certain particle-like properties when the lattice is analysed using quantum mechanics (see wave-particle duality.)

That applies to light, but again, why would you analyse something that has no particle component as if it indeed has one?

Re:Phonon, not phomon (2, Informative)

Luyseyal (3154) | more than 4 years ago | (#29887069)

I think this is better than the wikipedia intro:
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/Solids/phonon.html [gsu.edu]

The vibrational energies of molecules, e.g., a diatomic molecule, are quantized and treated as quantum harmonic oscillators. Quantum harmonic oscillators have equally spaced energy levels with separation DE = hu. So the oscillators can accept or lose energy only in discrete units of energy hu.

The evidence on the behavior of vibrational energy in periodic solids is that the collective vibrational modes can accept energy only in discrete amounts, and these quanta of energy have been labeled "phonons". Like the photons of electromagnetic energy, they obey Bose-Einstein statistics.

-l

Re:Phonon, not phomon (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 4 years ago | (#29888097)

Ah, finally making some sense. Thank you!

Memory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29878179)

If they are literally trapped, can this be used as some form of solid/trapped state memory?

Finally... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29878213)

...a cone of silence [wikipedia.org] that (doesn't) work as intended.

Add an electret or piezoelectric bit... (2, Interesting)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 4 years ago | (#29878251)

...and maybe have a new kind of microwave antenna?

Re:Add an electret or piezoelectric bit... (3, Informative)

Interoperable (1651953) | more than 4 years ago | (#29879109)

Well the confined optical mode is 200THz so an RF EM mode wouldn't be confined and therefore wouldn't overlap effectively with the vibronic modes in the nano-structure. I also really doubt that inducing vibrations in the nano-structure would generate an optical (or other EM) field. It's probably a one way coupling given that it's driven by photon pressure and not any net charge in the nano-beam.

Re:Add an electret or piezoelectric bit... (2, Interesting)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 4 years ago | (#29879681)

> Well the confined optical mode is 200THz so an RF EM mode wouldn't be
> confined and therefore wouldn't overlap effectively with the vibronic modes
> in the nano-structure.

Right. It would be radiated. That's the idea.

> I also really doubt that inducing vibrations in the nano-structure would
> generate an optical (or other EM) field.

The idea is to convert the GHz vibrations into an oscillating electric field. Thus the piezo material (or perhaps electret).

Re:Add an electret or piezoelectric bit... (1)

Interoperable (1651953) | more than 4 years ago | (#29880355)

I see. So, your idea is to optically excite the structure to induce GHz oscillations and then convert those vibrations into GHz RF by using a piezo-electric material for the nano-beam?

It's a neat thought, a nano-scale emitter could have interesting applications.

Re:Add an electret or piezoelectric bit... (1)

FiloEleven (602040) | more than 4 years ago | (#29885555)

I love it when I read /. and can't tell if two people are having a real conversation about some obscure specialized tech or playing a forum version of Mornington Crescent.

Re:Add an electret or piezoelectric bit... (1)

Interoperable (1651953) | more than 4 years ago | (#29886759)

Ha! I'm out of my league for all the serious techie conversations on /. so I play it up when an article from my field of expertise (optics) comes around :-)

Far out dude (1)

Alarindris (1253418) | more than 4 years ago | (#29880915)

vibronic modes in the nano-structure

I can totally, like, dig that man.

Re:Add an electret or piezoelectric bit... (1)

bar-agent (698856) | more than 4 years ago | (#29884007)

Time Cube? Is that you?

Wouln't that be a... (4, Funny)

camperdave (969942) | more than 4 years ago | (#29878355)

A crystal that captures light and sound...? Wouldn't that be called a DVD?

Re:Wouln't that be a... (1)

sydbarrett74 (74307) | more than 4 years ago | (#29887797)

No, you're thinking of the Phial of Galadriel.

Get Smart... (2, Funny)

mpdolan37 (675902) | more than 4 years ago | (#29878365)

This brings to mind the Cone of Silence...

Re:Get Smart... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29878887)

Also, I'll support the research if it works with my wife. And I'm not talking about blocking the blinding shine of her beauty.

Kryptonian? (2, Funny)

soconn (1466967) | more than 4 years ago | (#29878387)

Optomechanical Crystal Allows Confinement of Light and Sound ..... Upon hearing the news, General Zod was heard to say... "ohh crap"

Steampunk (2)

JobyOne (1578377) | more than 4 years ago | (#29878455)

It's not Steampunk fiction meanderings, it's real-life science! Wow.

That's what was bad on my Truck (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29878457)

Sounds like what my mechanic told me what was wrong with my truck.

"You're Flux Capacitor is bad. That will cost you (pinky up!) One Miiiiiillion Dollars!! Wait....One Hundred Biiiiillion dollars!!!"

Victory (0, Offtopic)

cjfs (1253208) | more than 4 years ago | (#29878469)

Physicists and engineers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have developed a nanoscale crystal that traps both light and sound.

And due to a bizarre property of quantum entanglement, the trapped light and sound can never be reproduced again. Finally we'll be rid of Kanye West.

Phonons (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29878509)

I don't see how this is news. The concept of optical and acoustic phonons has been around for at least the past 50 years. It's long been understood that optical and acoustic phonons exist in periodic potential crystal lattices. It's also been long understood that you can excite both optical and acoustic phonons using optical photons. This is the premise behind coherent raman scattering, which has long been observed. The article makes it seem like this is the first time this concept has ever been discovered.

It really annoys me when "prestigious" university professors publish crap like this. They make it sound like they've discovered some new amazing phenomenon and prey on the public's lack of understanding of physics to get a nice pat on the back, and perhaps a fat paycheck, from university bigwigs who like having their institution linked with these "discoveries". About once a year, some professor tells the world he has transmitted information at faster-than-light speeds, and everyone buys it, but it always comes down to group velocity - a concept discovered and understood over a century ago.

Re:Phonons (3, Funny)

fyngyrz (762201) | more than 4 years ago | (#29878713)

This is the premise behind coherent raman scattering

Well, thank goodness. I can never keep that stuff in the bowl; maybe now that the scattering mechanism is understood, I can get a full serving of noodles.

Re:Phonons (4, Insightful)

Interoperable (1651953) | more than 4 years ago | (#29879175)

"It really annoys me when "prestigious" university professors publish crap like this"

It really annoys nobodies post crap like that. Raman scattering typically occurs when photons scatter off a molecule or crystal thereby exciting a phonon (a vibration) in the internal structure of the molecule/crystal. This is Raman scattering that excites a nano-structure that is engineered into the beam by the researchers. It is similar to regular Raman scattering, but is an engineered process at this point. It's an extremely exciting result!

Re:Phonons (4, Insightful)

Artifakt (700173) | more than 4 years ago | (#29879621)

There are all sorts of things that have been theoretically known of for quite some time. Still, if you come up with a new, reliable engineering application with major economic consequences, for the Edison or Peltier effects, Superconductivity, Raleigh scattering, or Frame Dragging, that's quite an accomplishment. Hell, if someone finds a genuinely new application for Archimedes model of a waterscrew as an inclined plane wrapped around a cylender, or Thag's heat from rubbing two sticks together theorem, it's still worth respect.

Re:Phonons (1)

rgviza (1303161) | more than 4 years ago | (#29885425)

I thought Raman scattering occurred if you didn't open the packaging carefully enough, scattering nano noodles all over the place.

Re:Phonons (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29880863)

The effect of coherent Raman scattering has been around for a while, but only recently have we seen bulk excitation of materials via coupling to the stokes and anti-stokes modes. Just because Raman effect exists and you happen to have an optical cavity undergoing some sort of mechanical parametric excitation does not imply that this is the mechanism by which your excitation was generated. Confirming the presance of raman sidebands in the cavities was one small step. Creating high quality factor oscillators driven by radiation pressure is another huge step forward. Characterizing these crystals so that they can be used for single molecule detection opens up the nano-scale for us to explore and exploit. This stuff has been in the making for a while and in that sense isn't news at least to applied physicists working in this area, but calling developmental research "crap" is unjustified. Simply because we had a theory of gravity for centuries did not prevent launching something into orbi. From changing the way we live and think.

C'mon scientists... (2, Funny)

ZarathustraDK (1291688) | more than 4 years ago | (#29878539)

Demonstrate this new tech by making a nano-rickroll inside a chrystal.

Re:C'mon scientists... (1)

StikyPad (445176) | more than 4 years ago | (#29879113)

...making a nano-rickroll inside a chrystal.

We'll see who gets the last laugh when God finds out you made a crystal out of Jesus.

Old news (1, Insightful)

GigsVT (208848) | more than 4 years ago | (#29878583)

They used one of these to trap the bad guys in that old Superman movie.

Holy Cow, an entire telecom on a chip! (1)

stoicfaux (466273) | more than 4 years ago | (#29878597)

An entire Telephone/ISP network will now fit on a computer chip? Methinks it's time to get out of the telecomm industry...

Isolinear chips? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29878753)

When can I get my own Starship? ENGAGE!

Interesting name (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29878785)

"New Optomechanical Crystal Allows Confinement of Light and Sound"

Oddly enough they named it RIAA.

I'll bet you five bucks... (1)

assemblerex (1275164) | more than 4 years ago | (#29878831)

How can the net amount of entropy of the universe be massively decreased? Please respond Optomechanical Crystal !

Not a fundamentally new idea (2, Informative)

eh2o (471262) | more than 4 years ago | (#29878891)

Obviously the nano scale fabrication seen here is an innovation, but the idea of acoustic-optical interactions is not a fundamentally new one. For example an acousto-optical tunable filter uses piezo-actuation (sound) to setup standing waves in a crystal that modulates a band-pass filter. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acousto-optics [wikipedia.org]

Re:Not a fundamentally new idea (2, Interesting)

Steve525 (236741) | more than 4 years ago | (#29880161)

This is different than acousto-optics. There is no outside force here; all the movement is generated by the light itself. The miniscule amount of force from the light is enough to excite a resonance in the mechanical structure. The structure is both resonant to light and to acoustics. The two resonances are coupled because as the structure moves, the optical resonance shifts a little bit.

It is really cool work, but I haven't figured out what it'll be useful for.

Re:Not a fundamentally new idea (1)

LuxMaker (996734) | more than 4 years ago | (#29882389)

My guess is if you want to build a light and sound cloak you would need tech like this. Think super-stealth.

Re:Not a fundamentally new idea (1)

Rogerborg (306625) | more than 4 years ago | (#29881845)

That, plus, you know, Superman's Fortress of Solitude. We all scoffed at the crystals, but who's laughing now?

Star Trekkin' (0)

sbeckstead (555647) | more than 4 years ago | (#29879223)

Put a crap load of these on top of a huge pile of high frequency vibration sensitive super explosives and a cheap ten year battery powered lazer pulser pointed at the crystals in one of those nifty photon torpedo shaped things from the movie and what have you got? Instant photon torpedo.

Re:Star Trekkin' (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29881461)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photon_torpedo

So... high frequency vibration sensitive super explosives can turn into antimatter?

Re:Star Trekkin' (1)

sbeckstead (555647) | more than 4 years ago | (#29899033)

Or be used to break the bottles containing the higher energy components!

Lightsabers! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29879465)

Finally! One step closer to lightsabers!

help me with this (2, Interesting)

swell (195815) | more than 4 years ago | (#29879547)

Am I the first to be dazzled by this?

When electron tubes gave way to transistors I sensed a revolution in progress, but it was hard to wrap my brain around a simple transistor being able to do such a variety of things with such a small energy cost.

Now this. My now aged brain struggles to comprehend and see the implications. I expect all to be revealed in this forum.

Re:help me with this (1)

TD-Linux (1295697) | more than 4 years ago | (#29879731)

Unfortunately, these devices are huge compared to transistors, with the device in the picture about 30 micrometers long. While these might be neat for all sorts of sensors and possibly new ways to send information using light or mechanical vibration, I don't expect them to come close to the practicality of transistors for switching or computation.

Re:help me with this (2, Informative)

gtbritishskull (1435843) | more than 4 years ago | (#29879963)

You seem to have been asleep for the past 50 years, so I will let you in on a little secret. Transistors were big too when they were first invented. They got smaller as there was more investment and research into them. I would not expect the first form of something in the lab to be at the pinnacle of its efficiency.

implications (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29882549)

porn

phomons (1)

Snufu (1049644) | more than 4 years ago | (#29879717)

There appears to be a trapped particle vibrating in your first n.

Re:phomons (1)

Snufu (1049644) | more than 4 years ago | (#29879763)

And of course, the Anti-Stokes version: phonoms.

Dark Matter (1)

Tomun (144651) | more than 4 years ago | (#29879897)

Hey lets wrap the whole solar system in this stuff so less advanced aliens can't spy on us.

Science fiction story parallel - "slow glass" (2, Interesting)

Traf-O-Data-Hater (858971) | more than 4 years ago | (#29880009)

The concept of this material reminded me of Bob Shaw's science fiction story "The Light of Other Days" in which "slow glass" is used to capture scenes and images which could be released later. Interesting!

Re:Science fiction story parallel - "slow glass" (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29880627)

I remember that book! He called it the piezoluctic effect.

Screw all that- it'll make a great delay line (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29880121)

for electric guitars!

All is lost! (1)

FatdogHaiku (978357) | more than 4 years ago | (#29880321)

...nanoscale crystal that traps both light and sound...

It's only a matter of time before some idiot unleashes... nano disco...(sob)

ok, i give up on the flying car (2, Funny)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 4 years ago | (#29880401)

now i'm waiting for my fiber-optic headphones

Re:ok, i give up on the flying car (1)

Teckla (630646) | more than 4 years ago | (#29882155)

now i'm waiting for my fiber-optic headphones

I'm holding out for one of these new crystals to hold the audio and video of a complete Low Budget HDV Filipino Horror Movie in NYC myself.

Where is that guy with that sig (2, Funny)

LuxMaker (996734) | more than 4 years ago | (#29880557)

This guy has a forum signature that "Light is faster than sound. That is why people appear bright until you hear them speak."

Now you can capture both in an optomechanical crystal. I would like to see how he weighs in on the issue.

about time (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29880675)

So we are starting to find some Ballybran-like crystal!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crystal_Singer [wikipedia.org]

In other words... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29880785)

It's a trap!

The name is.. (1)

Pravetz-82 (1259458) | more than 4 years ago | (#29882189)

My name is Painter, Corel Painter.

In the name of love and justice we take away that! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29882535)

> a nanoscale crystal that traps both light and sound

Such a thing would be eminently useful as a plot device for japanese anime. Supervillains, whom those miniskirt high-school girls battle day after day, usually steal light, singing and music from people to make their lives miserable. Now the bad guys have a storage for all that happiness they removed from people.

Thank God (1)

Sir Foxx (755504) | more than 4 years ago | (#29886839)

We finally have the technology to destroy PinHead forever. Amen.

Power (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29895895)

Mechanical vibrations = heat = energy, produced from simple light and sound. These crystals could form the basis for new forms of energy production. Create a massive array of these things and you end up with a new form of panel that uses both photons and sound waves for energy production.

Might be fantasy but imagine the mere light and sounds of daytime Manhattan providing power to the city.

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