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The Internet Turns 40, For a Second Time

timothy posted more than 4 years ago | from the but-you-were-conceived-9-months-earlier dept.

The Internet 152

sean_nestor writes with this excerpt from The Register: "Some date the dawn of the net to September 12, 1969, when a team of engineers at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) connected the first two machines on the first node of ARPAnet, the US Department of Defense-funded network that eventually morphed into the modern interwebs. But others — including Professor Leonard Kleinrock, who led that engineering team — peg the birthday to October 29, when the first message was sent between the remote nodes. 'That's the day,' Kleinrock tells The Reg, 'the internet uttered its first words.' ...A 50kbps AT&T pipe connected the UCLA and SRI nodes, and the first message sent was the word 'log' — or at least that was the idea. UCLA would send the 'log' and SRI would respond with 'in.' But after UCLA typed the 'l' and the 'o,' the 'g' caused a memory overflow on the SRI IMP. ... 'So the first message was "Lo," as in "Lo and Behold,"' Kleinrock says. 'We couldn't have asked for a better message — and we didn't plan it.'"

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152 comments

First! (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29917509)

Yes!

Re:First! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29917529)

Shut up, nigger.

Re:First! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29917699)

How do you know he's an AOL user?

Hello (1)

Lord Lode (1290856) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917521)

Lo, as in "Hello, here I am". I wonder if the internet is developing some kind of AI, after all it's a complex network just like the human brain is.

Re:Hello (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29917941)

'Lo? Enybody here? Lolz internetz is lonely. :(((
 
I wesh sum1 wuld see this funny catz picture that I maed. :(((((

And so it began.

Ping Time? (3, Funny)

xmas2003 (739875) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917523)

So what was the ping time of the first message?

I.e. my guess is with a memory overflow after two characters, the network stack wasn't exactly the fastest thing around.

Re:Ping Time? (4, Insightful)

Burdell (228580) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917803)

Well, actually it was the fastest thing around, because it was the only thing around!

Re:Ping Time? (1)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917987)

Not the only thing. What about the 110 and 300 bit/sec modems that Bell Telephone provided for data transfers over regular phonelines? They date back to the 1950s.

It's interesting that the first ARPAnet line was no faster than a modern dialup modem (53-56 kbit/s).

Re:Ping Time? (1)

Mister Whirly (964219) | more than 4 years ago | (#29919949)

It's interesting that the first ARPAnet line was no faster than a modern dialup modem (53-56 kbit/s).

Well, internet porn was limited to ascii art at the time, so it didn't need to be all that fast.

Re:Ping Time? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29918697)

Well, actually it was the fastest thing around, because it was the only thing around!

lol beat me too the chase i was about to say the same thing

If i remember my computing history class correctly (2, Interesting)

kalpol (714519) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917819)

It wasn't caused by two characters, it was caused by the automatic command recognition on the receiving host - typing "LO" listed all the commands that started with those letters, and that caused the overflow.

Re:Ping Time? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29917827)

I bet it was very quick since the tubes weren't clogged with poker chips and race horses.

Re:Ping Time? (5, Informative)

kevmeister (979231) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917839)

Ping time?

I'm sorry, but the original Arpanet did not have ICMP or pings. This was years before the invention of IP.

I am not sure if it even used 8-bit ASCII. Many, many systems of that day were 6-bit ASCII (no lower-case letters) or EBCDIC. A "word" could have been 12, 16, 18, 24, 36, or 60 bits. (There were MANY other lengths including 1 and 29, but these were oddities.) Note that most of those were multiples of 6, so 6-bit ASCII was the more common unless it was an IBM Computer. I suspect that this initial use lacked anything that could be called a "protocol stack", but I was still in high school and thought the Arpanet was there so I could play Zork on the ITS systems at MIT, so I am far from sure.

Now, 40 years later, I'm pretty sure I was right about the reason for the Arpanet.

Re:Ping Time? (2, Interesting)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#29918077)

>>>thought the Arpanet was there so I could play Zork

ZORK online: Unfortunately this doesn't "fee" right; it should be light blue text on a dark blue background the way I remember. Or pale green on a dark green CRT. (shrug). http://thcnet.net/zork/ [thcnet.net]

You are in an open field west of a big white house with a boarded front door. There is a small mailbox here.

> open mailbox

Opening the mailbox reveals:
A leaflet.

> read leaflet

Welcome to Zork! Zork is a game of adventure, danger, and low cunning. In it you will explore some of the most amazing territory ever seen by mortal man. Hardened adventurers have run screaming from the terrors contained within.

No computer should be without one!

Your sig and light bulbs (-1, Offtopic)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | more than 4 years ago | (#29918239)

About your sig:

You're right, the old bulbs are better. When you're done all that's left is some recyclable glass and metal, no toxins, no plastics.

Manufacturing is easy, and cheap enough that at $0.25 a bulb GE makes a profit.

Do they produce heat? Sure, when it's dark out. That's usually in the winter, when you WANT more heat.

CFL bulbs are terrible; LEDs are worse.

Re:Ping Time? (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917985)

"...the network stack wasn't exactly the fastest thing around."

you want to think that through again?

Oh great... (2, Funny)

MindlessAutomata (1282944) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917541)

Great, I can just imagine all the corny jokes Slashdotters are goin[NO CARRIER]

Re:Oh great... (5, Funny)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917781)

Great, I can just imagine all the corny jokes Slashdotters are goin[NO CARRIER]

lo[NO CARRIER]

Ha! Now you'll never know if I was laughing out loud or just correcting you!

Re:Oh great... (4, Interesting)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#29918227)

ATDT5601750

(dialtone)..... dee-doo-bee-boop-da-ba-dee-bee.... skeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee skrooooooo....

CONNECT 1200
.
.
.
Welcome to Slash Dot BBS!
login: commodor
pass: $$$$

command (H for help): E

Welcome to Email. Command (H for help): N

TO: Mobile
SUBJ: Huh?
BODY: Hello. Your last message did not come through. All I received was "lo". Was that LOL? Or "lo here come the sheep"? hahahahahahahahahahahahaha. L8r. /end

command (H for help): S

Message sent. Command (H for help): +++

ATH
.
.
.
*#$!@^(!%!$(&

NO CARRIER

Re:Oh great... (1)

Idiomatick (976696) | more than 4 years ago | (#29918411)

Oh man I miss... uhh imagined the modem noise in my head. I seriously wish modems sounded like scatman john larkin [youtube.com] .

Re:Oh great... (1)

darkpixel2k (623900) | more than 4 years ago | (#29919715)

Oh man I miss... uhh imagined the modem noise in my head. I seriously wish modems sounded like scatman john larkin [youtube.com] .

The scatman's ok--but in my book nothing beats the sound of an old USR Sportster connecting at 56k [darkpixel.com] ....err..52k...or whatever the heck the feds limited it to.

I'll send a bottle of Guiness to the first person to figure out the phone number my modem dialed...

So whatcha saying is.... (5, Funny)

thatseattleguy (897282) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917547)

...that the very first even to occur on the Internet was a **buffer overflow**? Talk about a zero-day exploit.

Re:So whatcha saying is.... (1)

Ungrounded Lightning (62228) | more than 4 years ago | (#29919501)

...that the very first even to occur on the Internet was a **buffer overflow**? Talk about a zero-day exploit.

This sounds more like a memory leak than a buffer overflow.

Can you believe this? (0)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917631)

The first 3 bytes transmitted over what was to become the intarwebs were "log", and already it was porn - scatophilia in that case. Was that a sign or what...

Re:Can you believe this? (1)

caluml (551744) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917825)

Isn't it coprophilia? I am, however, DNAEITF. (definitely not an expert in this field).

40 years of 40th birthdays (2, Insightful)

gmuslera (3436) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917649)

Where you draw the line when really started the internet as we know it? Probably in the next days or years several dates will be claimed as the 40th anniversary of a basic and fundamental moment that we could say as the birth of internet, 1st ping, 1st mail, 1st web, 1st spam, 1st botnet, etc there are a lot of things on which we can draw a line and say that what was before wasnt properly "internet"

Re:40 years of 40th birthdays (3, Interesting)

NotBornYesterday (1093817) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917801)

Well, I don't get to change my age based on when I uttered my first words, why should the internet?

Re:40 years of 40th birthdays (1)

gmuslera (3436) | more than 4 years ago | (#29918007)

We have traditional definition on humans age, the line is drawn when you leave the body of your mother, not when you got conceived, or been 3 months since that, when you spoke your 1st word or did your 1st abstract thinking, but that don't exclude that could be valid criteria to consider all those other times your "starting" moment.

Re:40 years of 40th birthdays (1)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 4 years ago | (#29919315)

"or did your 1st abstract thinking,"

Wouldn't THAT be a mess! We still have neanderthals who live to 80, and never think of ANYTHING except food, sex, booze and sleep. It's a step up for some of them to think about mind altering drugs - the first taste of abstract that they ever experience!!

Re:40 years of 40th birthdays (1)

NotBornYesterday (1093817) | more than 4 years ago | (#29919585)

I kid, I kid. Actually, I love this article. My own recent 40th birthday is close to the middle of those two "internet birthdays". Like it's my brotha from anotha mutha.

Re:40 years of 40th birthdays (1)

octal666 (668007) | more than 4 years ago | (#29918553)

Maybe because you aren't a network of computers. Internet is nothing more than computers connected sending messages.

Re:40 years of 40th birthdays (3, Funny)

shaitand (626655) | more than 4 years ago | (#29918877)

"Maybe because you aren't a network of computers."

What an odd assumption.

Try 18 years. Re:40 years of 40th birthdays (1)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917947)

Funny.

I thought the internet was not born until January 1, 1981 - the day when the ARPAnet was replaced with today's modern IP addressing. That would make the internet only 18 years old.

Re:Try 18 years. Re:40 years of 40th birthdays (2, Informative)

kagaku (774787) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917997)

Only 18 years old? It must be 1999! Forget about buffer overflows, the world is going to end in two months!!

Re:Try 18 years. Re:40 years of 40th birthdays (1)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#29918399)

Damn 8-bit machine! (slaps C=64). Can't you even count higher than 18? That's it. I'm upgrading to an Apple IIgs. It's 16 bit - that means it has twice as much power.

The FIRST internet session had a buffer overflow?! (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29917675)

My god, that's more apropos than they could possibly have realized. Things haven't changed since then either.

Re:The FIRST internet session had a buffer overflo (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 4 years ago | (#29918943)

Yes, but our buffer overflows are a lot faster and bigger now.

7 Weeks Gestation (4, Interesting)

RobertB-DC (622190) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917677)

Some date the dawn of the net to September 12, 1969, when a team of engineers at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) connected the first two machines on the first node of ARPAnet... others peg the birthday to October 29, when the first message was sent between the remote nodes.

That's not such a difficult metaphor to construct. The net was *conceived* when the two nodes came together, just as you and I were *conceived* when two nodes, um, er, yeah. And just like then, nobody knew what the result of coupling of the first Internet nodes would be, if anything.

It was *born* when someone slapped it on the bottom and it did something seen by the people gathered around. You probably went "WAAAA!". The Internet went "LO". Of course "G" caused a fault, because the next letter was supposed to be "L".

So I think it would be fair to say that the world would want to celebrate the "birthday" of the Internet today, October 29, just as the world (or your corner of it) celebrate your birthday on the day you made your emergence into the world.

Celebrating the day the Internet was *conceived*... well, that seems a bit weird.

Re:7 Weeks Gestation (2, Interesting)

bondiblueos9 (1599575) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917747)

A child isn't born when it first makes noise or speaks, its born when it comes out! You could say the internet first learned to talk on Oct 29, was born on Sep 12, and was conceived, well, whenever they first thought of making it.

Re:7 Weeks Gestation (1)

dgatwood (11270) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917913)

Of course "G" caused a fault, because the next letter was supposed to be "L".

Either that or the first two letters were supposed to be "OM".

Re:7 Weeks Gestation (1)

CannonballHead (842625) | more than 4 years ago | (#29918167)

Either that or the first two letters were supposed to be "OM".

Or the last two letters...

(favorite in game advertising was that pirate with the huge pin that said Ask me about Loom...)

Re:7 Weeks Gestation (1)

shaitand (626655) | more than 4 years ago | (#29918927)

"Celebrating the day the Internet was *conceived*... well, that seems a bit weird."

Not if you are looking at it from dad's perspective. From the dad's perspective it is all down hill from the moment of conception.

Drinking Straw (1)

BlindSpot (512363) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917703)

A 50kbps AT&T pipe

Haha, had to laugh at that phrasing. Although I was around for the era where 50kbps would have qualified as a pipe, by today's standards it is more of a drinking straw... and a really thin one at that!

Re:Drinking Straw (1)

mikael (484) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917949)

Back in the mid 1990's, the USENET feed for some universities (and the companies who were downstream from them) was still provided by ISDN, which would often fail. Consequently, it was referred to as a "two plastic cups tied together by a wet piece of string".

Re:Drinking Straw (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29919131)

Actually I was thinking the opposite - 50kbps seems pretty fast for 1969.

I wasn't around in the 80's, but wasn't 300bit/s the norm even then? My first modem was 9600 and that was in the 90's!

Maybe they mean 50bit/s ... ?

surprising first message (1)

corbettw (214229) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917711)

What, nothing about penis size or how to make money at home? Things really were different back then.

Re:surprising first message (2, Interesting)

oodaloop (1229816) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917743)

I thought the first message sent across the internet was FrIsT Ps0T! If it wasn't, it should've been.

What is this Bullshit? (-1, Troll)

sexconker (1179573) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917715)

Assigning arbitrary dates to mark an amorphous event?

Why was this the "birthday" and not when two machines were first connected to eachother?

Why not when a printer was attached to a computer?

Why not when two people talked over the phone?
Shit - you know this was done over the phone.
"Okay, start typing!"
"L"
"Got it."
"O"
"GOT IT!"
"G"
"..."
"G?"
"FUCK! God dammit Bill you fucking moron FIX THIS SHIT."

It's nice to mark significant points and transitions, but with an amorphous, ill-defined thing like the internet, it's akin to saying your restaurant has the best burgers in town.

The end result, of course, is a non-news fluff story and my raging post, which will be modded as "Troll" even though I have completely valid points.

Re:What is this Bullshit? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29917883)

Your points are only valid if you don't celebrate your own birthday(you didn't begin at that point), anniversaries(surely you meet people before first kisses, first dates, first whatevers) or any other arbitrary dates that humans like to remember.

When someone mentions a baby's first words, does it make you mad because the baby first made sounds leading up to that? You see almost everything in time is anamorphous. What would be a better birthday for a network that the sending of information between two computers? What's your point troll?

Re:What is this Bullshit? (2, Insightful)

camperdave (969942) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917979)

Why was this the "birthday" and not when two machines were first connected to eachother?

Considering that an internet is when two NETWORKS are connected together, the event of the first connection between two machines does not qualify.

Re:What is this Bullshit? (4, Insightful)

dgatwood (11270) | more than 4 years ago | (#29918097)

Why was this the "birthday" and not when two machines were first connected to eachother?

Simple. This was not the first time two hosts were connected together via a serial line. If you only cared about that, you'd have to go back a lot farther. Heck, the first modem dates back to 1962. What made the Internet possible was not the notion of having computers that could talk to other computers. The key change that made the Internet possible was the notion of all the computers speaking a single language and having routers that knew how to pass messages on to other routers, eventually to another computer. That was not realized until the first packet was sent on a packet-switched network, which in its most primitive form, occurred on October 29, 1969.

Re:What is this Bullshit? (1)

pipingguy (566974) | more than 4 years ago | (#29919069)

Heck, the first modem dates back to 1962.

Which, coincidentally, is the year of my birth.

Evidence!

Re:What is this Bullshit? (1)

sootman (158191) | more than 4 years ago | (#29919859)

Funny. I *thought* that date looked familiar...

Four phrases--Black Thursday, Black Friday, then Black Monday, and Black Tuesday--are commonly used to describe this collapse of stock values. All four are appropriate, for the crash was not a one-day affair. The initial crash occurred on Thursday, October 24, 1929, but the catastrophic downturn of Monday, October 28, and Tuesday, October 29, precipitated widespread alarm and the onset of an unprecedented and long-lasting economic depression for the United States and the world.

From stock market crash to Internet in 40 years, then from Internet to LOLcats in another 40. (more or less.)

Re:What is this Bullshit? (1)

darkpixel2k (623900) | more than 4 years ago | (#29919773)

Assigning arbitrary dates to mark an amorphous event?

Yeah--I hear daylight savings time is this Sunday...

Midlife crisis (0, Redundant)

Dice (109560) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917717)

I wonder what sort of sporty two seater the Internet is going to buy for itself. A Miata? Z3? Or is the Internet going to go whole-hog and get a Ferrari?

too soon (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29917753)

I would have worked on being able to fit more than 2 characters in memory before I tried to tackle the whole networking thing.

of course (1)

nomadic (141991) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917787)

But after UCLA typed the 'l' and the 'o,' the 'g' caused a memory overflow on the SRI IMP. ... 'So the first message was "Lo," as in "Lo and Behold,

At the time they couldn't fathom anyone needing more than 2 bytes of memory.

second message (0, Redundant)

cheebie (459397) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917795)

And the second message was "Buy cheep c1al!5 now!".

Re:second message (1)

SnarfQuest (469614) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917855)

In the beginning, I wonder if they ever thought that 90% of the bandwidth would be consumed by fake viagra ads and Nigerian scams?

Re:second message (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 4 years ago | (#29918029)

It was 1969.

"Buy healthy c1gerett5!"
  Followed buy how pirates were causing a decrease in Beatles record sales.

Honestly... (2, Funny)

Smooth and Shiny (1097089) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917879)

Someone get Al Gore on the phone, please. He can clear this all up and tell us the very SECOND the intertubes was born.

Re:Honestly... (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917999)

he can tell you when the internet was created, since he signed it into being.
He never said he built the Arpanet.

Re:Honestly... (2, Informative)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 4 years ago | (#29918193)

As a congressman, his ultimate act was to vote "yes" on the appropriations bill which resulted in it eventually being signed into being.

I suppose you could say he "push-button'd" it into being. If they were using push-button vote tallying at the time...

Mid-life crisis... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29917895)

So all the porn and penis enlargement advertisements are just the internet's way of handling a mid-life crisis? Can't wait for the hilarity that'll ensue when it goes senile.

First Packet? (3, Interesting)

Comatose51 (687974) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917929)

When was the first IP packet sent? Shouldn't that be the birthday of the Internet?

Re:First Packet? (1)

Alien Being (18488) | more than 4 years ago | (#29918573)

Eventually IPv4 will go away just as but I won't consider that the death of the Internet. Plus, the IMPs were the implementation of RFC 1.

September 12 was the day the Internet was hatched. October 29 was the day it took flight.

Re:First Packet? (1)

FlyingBishop (1293238) | more than 4 years ago | (#29918725)

The internet is more than TCP/IP,though that's the main part. This was the first protocol used in any capacity.

Re:First Packet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29919335)

By "IP packet" do you mean "IP datagram" or the first time the RIAA tried to subpoena someone's ISP? Because there is a crucial 24 hour difference to account for...

Oblig. (0)

SnarfQuest (469614) | more than 4 years ago | (#29917933)

But after UCLA typed the 'l' and the 'o,' the 'g' caused a memory overflow on the SRI IMP

ok, here goes:

1. Imagine a beowulf cluster of these.
2. Does it run Windows 7?
3. Does it run Linux?
4. ???
5. Profit

Re:Oblig. (1)

shaitand (626655) | more than 4 years ago | (#29918983)

You listed windows 7 before linux you sick fsck. Get the fsck back in your hole and don't come back.

We don't tolerate your ki...

lo, I for one welcome ou...

Make believe (1)

theverylastperson (1208224) | more than 4 years ago | (#29918071)

The 'Internet', in MHO, goes back further.

Did it really start with digital machine communication?

Or did it start when we first learned distanced communication and created the wiring infrastructure that really gave rise to Internet.

What is the oldest form of long distance communication? There's people in Wales that have a whistle language that travels pretty far, I think.

Maybe we should date it to smoke signals?

Drum beats?

Screams?

I get it, it all started when Adam dropped his fig leaf. Eve's first scream. I think I have a jpeg of that. Stupid fig leaf...

Re:Make believe (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 4 years ago | (#29918161)

The first official use of the word internet was in rfc 675.(1974?)
in 1988 Al Gore's National High-Performance Computer Act made it available for all. So that would be the birth of it as we know it.

So pick on of those. I highly suggest you pick 1988 because people can relate to that kind of action, as opposed to the first rfc to mention it.

We are talking about the internet, not all forms of distance communication.

Re:Make believe (1)

theverylastperson (1208224) | more than 4 years ago | (#29918403)

>

We are talking about the internet, not all forms of distance communication.

We're talking about the 'birth' of the Internet and what started it. If you want to limit your definition to the first date the word "Internet" was jotted down somewhere or when Al Gore saved the polar bears, then those would be your opinions, just like mine.

What "is" the Internet other than a really fast way of communicating in a wide variety of forms (many non-existent in 1999) at a distance.

I'm sorry you couldn't appreciate the humor of the fig leaf. Just for that, I'm not posting my jpeg.

Re:Make believe (1)

shaitand (626655) | more than 4 years ago | (#29918999)

"I get it, it all started when Adam dropped his fig leaf. Eve's first scream. I think I have a jpeg of that. Stupid fig leaf..."

I think it started when that pic was first transferred. We all know the internet is for pr0n.

Better Message? (1)

Ksevio (865461) | more than 4 years ago | (#29918089)

We couldn't have asked for a better message and we didn't plan it

That's funny, since one of the guys who was working on it was just on NPR talking about how all these other historical firsts had meaningful or interesting messages, while this one was boring.

re: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29918267)

If you think the internet's birthay is to day. You got it
if you think is octuber 12, you got it. what's the problem?
Internet is not breathing, just still here

CNN has an interview ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29918525)

...with Professor Kleinrock, the chair of the UCLA group that created the first node. You can find it here [cnn.com] .

Rick Rolled (1)

dijjnn (227302) | more than 4 years ago | (#29918649)

I really, Really, *really* wish that the first message sent across the internet had been for the purpose of rick-rolling someone. I know that it would've taken a completely weird time-inversion to make that possible, but admit to yourself for just one second: it would've been effing hilarious.

The Mother of All First Posts (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 4 years ago | (#29918895)

Call it "First Post" day, almost as important as the first spam, or first dupe, or first goatse...

The Creator (0)

ElephanTS (624421) | more than 4 years ago | (#29918953)

It's funny, they didn't mention Al Gore was there?

Re:The Creator (1)

garynuman (1666499) | more than 4 years ago | (#29919357)

It's because he wasn't...he had just finished college and enlisted in the army as to help his dad's senate campaign... al gore didn't invent the internet till 1991 when he wrote the high performance computing and communication act... i guess we could celebrate December 9th as the 18th anniversary of the time al gore invented the interwibwebwobs

50kbps? (1)

Dan East (318230) | more than 4 years ago | (#29919791)

Isn't 50kbps really, really fast for 1969? I was expecting something more like 1200 baud at most. I remember how big a deal it was in the late 1980s that my 2400 baud modem supported MNP level 5 (compression and error correction), and then lusting after the 14.4 modems in 1990. I remember an engineer at Loral (defense aerospace contractor) in Akron in 1989 telling me that 56k modems were impossible, and that they couldn't even reliably sustain 56k on the LAN across campus. So I was rather surprised to see this sort of throughput in 1969. What also doesn't make sense is how could they begin to utilize 50kbps when their hardware couldn't even handle 3 bytes of data, or when computers only had 12k of memory? Just doesn't seem accurate.

Who designs this stuff, anyhow? (1)

verbatim (18390) | more than 4 years ago | (#29919993)

But after UCLA typed the 'l' and the 'o,' the 'g' caused a memory overflow on the SRI IMP.

So the Internets wasn't even 3 characters old and it was already being hacked and DOS'd. So, so lame.

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