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1,600 Names Suggested Daily For FBI's Watch List

Soulskill posted more than 4 years ago | from the by-reading-this-article-you-have-been-added dept.

Government 168

schwit1 writes with this excerpt from the Washington Post: "During a 12-month period ended in March this year... the US intelligence community suggested on a daily basis that 1,600 people qualified for the list because they presented a 'reasonable suspicion,' according to data provided to the Senate Judiciary Committee by the FBI in September and made public last week. ... The ever-churning list is said to contain more than 400,000 unique names and over 1 million entries. The committee was told that over that same period, officials asked each day that 600 names be removed and 4,800 records be modified. Fewer than 5 percent of the people on the list are US citizens or legal permanent residents. Nine percent of those on the terrorism list, the FBI said, are also on the government's 'no fly' list."

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168 comments

How do they define "reasonable suspicion"? (3, Interesting)

HalAtWork (926717) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942508)

How do they define "reasonable suspicion"? I couldn't find that information in the article.

Re:How do they define "reasonable suspicion"? (2, Insightful)

OzPeter (195038) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942530)

How do they define "reasonable suspicion"? I couldn't find that information in the article.

By asking that question I think you just became entitled to be placed on the list .. so perhaps you can do an FOI request and answer your own question?

Re:How do they define "reasonable suspicion"? (3, Insightful)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942534)

How do they define "reasonable suspicion"? I couldn't find that information in the article.

I'm a reasonable guy. You look suspicious. And so do you. And in fact YOU are looking kinda odd today. I think I will stick you all on the list, just to be sure.

I wonder if anyone over at the FBI understands the concept of signal to noise?

Re:How do they define "reasonable suspicion"? (2, Insightful)

hedwards (940851) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942678)

The answer to that is no, they don't understand the concept of SNR.

Which is obvious since some of the names on the list are extremely common names in various parts of the world and all they list is the name. Which has been obvious for many years given that they haven't actually been able to analyze all of the information they've been given. It would be just as effective to just pull over or tap random people on the list. Possibly more so since they'd at least know if those particular people were or were not terrorists.

Re:How do they define "reasonable suspicion"? (4, Funny)

grcumb (781340) | more than 4 years ago | (#29944332)

Which is obvious since some of the names on the list are extremely common names in various parts of the world and all they list is the name.

Nonsense. I'm sure that B^HTuttle is a perfectly unique name and entirely worthy of our attention.

Re:How do they define "reasonable suspicion"? (1)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 4 years ago | (#29943606)

What does everyone think those botnets are for? They're just raking in the names. Do a search for "Al-Queda.net" and the bot reports you. You only THOUGHT the botnets were all monitored by the criminal element, LOL

Slashdot effect and the watch list (5, Funny)

goombah99 (560566) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942820)

Okay let's test the slashdot effect.
monday: everyone reccomend sarah palin for the watch list
tuesday: everyone reccomend Nancy Pelosi
wednesday: Hannity
thursaday: Harry reid
friday: Lieberman.

either we'll slashdot the service or do the nation a favor.

Re:Slashdot effect and the watch list (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29943620)

That sounds anonymous!

Really Good Idea (1)

omb (759389) | more than 4 years ago | (#29943998)

You have, what about 600 Congresmen+Senators, so in about 2 years you could do them all, then start over if the list isnt abolished yet ... LOL

Re:Really Good Idea (2, Insightful)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 4 years ago | (#29944880)

http://mrl.nyu.edu/~dhowe/trackmenot/ [nyu.edu]
'TrackMeNot runs in Firefox as a low-priority background process that periodically issues randomized search-queries to popular search engines"
Now load that up with your 600 congresscritters and Senators and do your part to help warm up the NSA.

Re:How do they define "reasonable suspicion"? (4, Interesting)

MagusSlurpy (592575) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942826)

How do they define "reasonable suspicion"?

That's their euphemism for "foreign."

Re:How do they define "reasonable suspicion"? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29942902)

I'm familiar with the case of someone who got on the no-fly list for repeated short notice, one-way trips between Boston and Palm Beach. It involved considerable harassment to get off the list. An alternative explanation might be: affluent person with house in both cities. For an added dose of common sense it was a mother flying with multiple children. A human can see this immediately, but I suspect that a computer program put the person on the list.

Re:How do they define "reasonable suspicion"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29943580)

someone who got on the no-fly list for repeated short notice, one-way trips between Boston and Palm Beach... an alternative explanation might be: affluent person with house in both cities.

Alternative to what? I'm probably being especially slow today but I don't get what the suspicious explanation would be.

Re:How do they define "reasonable suspicion"? (1)

AlamedaStone (114462) | more than 4 years ago | (#29945002)

someone who got on the no-fly list for repeated short notice, one-way trips between Boston and Palm Beach... an alternative explanation might be: affluent person with house in both cities.

Alternative to what? I'm probably being especially slow today but I don't get what the suspicious explanation would be.

Stop being dense, everyone knows terrorists can't plan anything in advance and never buy two-way tickets.

It's the freedom. They hate it.

Re:How do they define "reasonable suspicion"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29944148)

Some of the "humans" doing the suggestions have no more common sense than a 1-bit "computer program". So, one can never know.

Re:How do they define "reasonable suspicion"? (1)

CHRONOSS2008 (1226498) | more than 4 years ago | (#29943002)

um anyone that won't bend over and get there rights abused up the ahole

Re:How do they define "reasonable suspicion"? (1)

Hadlock (143607) | more than 4 years ago | (#29943322)

They don't. It's modern-day McCarthyism, it's just that no one senator has stepped up to bat and get his name attached to this whole racket. At 1600 per day, either their criteria are completely wrong, or many of the government's policies are so out of whack with public opinion (although maybe admittedly a minority)that even discussing them gets you labeled as a "terrorist".
 
BEGIN RANT: I mean really, that number should be closer to 2 or 3 per day, with most of them being false positives. Most people are too busy finding a job, waxing their BMW (or something else...) drinking griping about the stock market to pick up "radical islamic tendencies". Let alone act on them. My guess would be that the CIA pays civilians to collect domestic intel, and they have a quota of "suspicious persons" to report each month (say, 10), and you have 160 people on the CIA payroll with this quota... well there's your number.

Re:How do they define "reasonable suspicion"? (1)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 4 years ago | (#29943690)

Pretty much on target, with the two or three per day. Credible leads concerning subversives don't just materialize out of thin air. Those subversive types who have been publicized recently lived in neighborhoods where all the neighbors thought they were fine, upstanding young men. "Muhammed? He's always at church worshipping, and always has something nice to say when we meet. He played catch with my Junior just last week. He has even carried my groceries from the car a few times!"

I like how they attempt to allay citizen's suspicions: "Fewer than 5 percent of the people on the list are U.S. citizens or legal permanent residents." To paraphrase that, "We're just targeting evil furriners!"

Re:How do they define "reasonable suspicion"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29943820)

It's modern-day McCarthyism, it's just that no one senator has stepped up to bat and get his name attached to this whole racket.

Senator Ted Kennedy did end up on the DHS list of known terrorists. [mail-archive.com]

Re:How do they define "reasonable suspicion"? (1)

Latinhypercube (935707) | more than 4 years ago | (#29943586)

Probably being brown skinned is enough, which seems to be the current trend of most western nations.

Re:How do they define "reasonable suspicion"? (1)

Narnie (1349029) | more than 4 years ago | (#29943648)

Suspicion: (n)
If you read /. your name has been added.
If you comment on /. your name has been double plus added.

Re:How do they define "reasonable suspicion"? (2, Insightful)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 4 years ago | (#29944912)

How many times do you have to post about the NSA and CIA before your phone starts having issues and your Mac, Windows or Linux box starts becoming extra unresponsive?

Re:How do they define "reasonable suspicion"? (5, Funny)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 4 years ago | (#29943840)

How do they define "reasonable suspicion"? I couldn't find that information in the article.

Judging by the numbers, I have a guess. If they arrest a terror suspect and search his house and find your contact information, you're on the list. Terrorists incidentally keep a LOT of contacts in things they call "Phone books," suprisingly well organized. Alphabetical and everything. Very neat handwriting as well. Business contacts are usually kept in books with yellowish pages, the significance of which is unknown. What's scary is that they have a number of contacts IN THE GOVERNMENT, on blue pages indicating they may be democrats.

Re:How do they define "reasonable suspicion"? (1)

lennier (44736) | more than 4 years ago | (#29944404)

Acting suspiciously reasonable?

Hehe (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29944876)

Awesome :)

91% of terrorists are allowed on planes (4, Interesting)

SSpade (549608) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942522)

If 9% of the list o' terrorists are also on the no-fly list, that means that the feds are happy with 91% of terrorists being on airplanes.

Re:91% of terrorists are allowed on planes (3, Insightful)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942558)

If 9% of the list o' terrorists are also on the no-fly list, that means that the feds are happy with 91% of terrorists being on airplanes.

Suspected terrorists. Let's not through due process out the window just yet. And I doubt that the Feds believe that those 9% are all actual terrorists, just people who may have links to some terrorist organization or other, and thereby deserve special attention. And of those, a few are considered bad enough to be kept out of the skies.

Re:91% of terrorists are allowed on planes (5, Insightful)

sg_oneill (159032) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942624)

And those who consider it shouldn't have the power to decide it except in a court of law.

Just because some paranoid mcarthyist hacks in the government think some guy seems a bit whack doesnt mean they should have a right to go around fucking people over with no fly lists unless its proven in a court.

The system is entirely at odds with the concept of liberty and needs to be *urgently* scrapped and subject to a public enquiry to identify the decision makers behind it so that they might be prevented from having anything to do with policy ever again.

Re:91% of terrorists are allowed on planes (1)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942946)

Just because some paranoid mcarthyist hacks in the government think some guy seems a bit whack doesnt mean they should have a right to go around fucking people over with no fly lists unless its proven in a court.

No argument there. The whole system is a crock, that's for sure, and is about as naked a power grab as I've ever seen. It's bad enough that several thousand people had to die because of some people's religious intoxication, but what we did to ourselves since is even more obscene.

It may have sounded like I was trying to excuse the Feds behavior, but I wasn't. I was objecting to the GP's presumption that everyone on some arbitrary list is a terrorist, just because someone in government says they are.

And maybe they are, but as I said, let's not throw due process out the window.

Re:91% of terrorists are allowed on planes (5, Insightful)

fyngyrz (762201) | more than 4 years ago | (#29943978)

Just because some paranoid mcarthyist hacks in the government think some guy seems a bit whack doesnt mean they should have a right to go around fucking people over with no fly lists unless its proven in a court.

Actually, this has been to the supreme court, and so isn't going to change.

You see, when the public backed the idea that people convicted of certain crimes (sexual, violent) should be publicly listed (on web sites, etc.), the courts decided to find a way to pretend that wasn't an ex post facto violation for the previously convicted (and those not convicted, because they put them on there as well, for instance those with adjudication withheld judgments.)

In order to pull that bit of conceptual legerdemain off, they said that the government has the right to list the citizens, because such listing is (get ready now) "not punitive" because the government isn't the agent causing the listee problems. It's the other citizens, businesses, etc. doing it, you see. That whole... can't get a job, a place to live, credit, being the targets of posters on telephone poles, the occasional outright mugging or murder, and of course, being driven to suicide. Not the government's problem or responsibility.

Since, the justices said, while giving each other dancing hip shots on the head of this particular pin, such listing (cough) isn't punitive, it doesn't violate ex post facto, which explicitly forbids [usconstitution.net] either the states or the feds from changing a punishment by adding to it after it has already been set at sentencing (among other things.)

Of course this concept -- the idea that such listing isn't punitive -- is utterly nonsensical, but the thing is, it is nonsensical at the level of the supreme court, which makes it a formidable thing to overturn (practically, it makes it almost impossible, actually.)

What falls out of it, though, is a magical government right to put citizens on all kinds of lists without their consent, and without any judicial process whatsoever, regardless of the consequences that fall out of such listing in trying to pursue one's life.

From this, we get no-fly lists, where the government isn't stopping you from flying, it's the airline; the no-buy lists, where the government isn't stopping you from buying, it's the car dealer or other dealer; the terrorist list, where the government isn't stopping you from getting a job, it's the employer, and so forth.

This is just one of many fine examples of why we should not tolerate the "re-interpretation" of constitutional issues by the people in the courts. The constitution obviously means exactly what it says; it is the literally the constituting authority for the government; therefore, the government does not have the authority to do anything that is outright forbidden in the constitution, not directly, and not by invoking this kind of legalistic bullshittery. If the people want to change something in the constitution, that's what article five is for.

So while the argument that the government "should" go through judicial process to commit these harms to the citizens and others within our borders is sound, sensible, and constitutionally obvious, the supreme court has made it a non-starter.

Re:91% of terrorists are allowed on planes (1)

lennier (44736) | more than 4 years ago | (#29944414)

"Just because some paranoid mcarthyist hacks in the government think some guy seems a bit whack doesnt mean they should have a right to go around fucking people over with no fly lists unless its proven in a court."

It's the "no breathe lists" which worry me more.

Through vs. Throw (1)

Sebilrazen (870600) | more than 4 years ago | (#29943070)

Totally off topic.

You do it too.

I've resorted to spelling throw as through for some damn reason and I can't figure it out.

Re:91% of terrorists are allowed on planes (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 4 years ago | (#29943426)

Suspected terrorists. Let's not throw due process out the window just yet.

Why are you bringing up due process?
Are you suggesting that there's due process when you get put on either list?
Because if there is, it isn't something the public has been informed of.

ReNo, it just means that the other 91% (1)

wiredog (43288) | more than 4 years ago | (#29943416)

Aren't considered a possible threat to aviation.

Inefficient System (2, Informative)

Cabriel (803429) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942544)

It only requires a few unscrupulous groups to voluntarily suggest names of innocent people to inflate the list, increasing the likelihood of false-positives on any given search and reducing the likelihood of being matched themselves within a meaningful time frame.

Re:Inefficient System (5, Insightful)

NFN_NLN (633283) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942670)

It only requires a few unscrupulous groups to voluntarily suggest names of innocent people to inflate the list, increasing the likelihood of false-positives on any given search and reducing the likelihood of being matched themselves within a meaningful time frame.

Then that's exactly how you defeat the system. If everyone suggested someone for the list, then in no time the list would include everyone, thereby making it useless.

Re:Inefficient System (1)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942776)

Then that's exactly how you defeat the system. If everyone suggested someone for the list, then in no time the list would include everyone, thereby making it useless.

With as many people are on the list now, its already useless.
Unless the real intention is something else, like kingdom building.

See what the NSA is doing to handle this list and others like it:

http://www.sltrib.com/news/ci_12744661 [sltrib.com]

Re:Inefficient System (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29942730)

It would take quite a heroic effort to increase the likelihood of a false positive, given that so far, it's stuck at 100%.

Re:Inefficient System (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29944660)

Nah. From the +1600 but -600 daily changes, I'd guessing they're modeling associations between people, using their connections in a big relationship graph - since the list will include some people already confirmed as terrorists by good old fashioned traditional investigation - to score each person on the list. Actual manpower is only divided among the high scorers. Low scorers get pruned from the list. This prunes the vast majority of false accusations before any human time/effort/money is ever wasted on them.

The reason the add:drop ratio is so high is that every human being has a LOT of connections to other humans. List inflation is naturally going to be way higher than linear. But you can't always tell which associations are trivial until AFTER you've run them through the computer. And since the algorithm is traveling-salesman-like in complexity, this means you need to both add lots of people into it AND aggressively remove the low scorers from the list. That's the most efficient use of time/money/effort/manpower for the best results.

Re:Inefficient System (1)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 4 years ago | (#29945006)

Thats where the NSA's better funded version of INDECT really shines.
http://wikileaks.org/wiki/EU_social_network_spy_system_brief%2C_INDECT_Work_Package_4%2C_2009 [wikileaks.org]
They comb webblogs, chat sites, newsreports, and social-networking sites building up automatic dossiers on individuals, organizations and their relationships.
Then things fall into place. Literate basement dweller, not a problem for now .
Credible student with links to former politicians, journalists, grass roots campaigns, consulting or just writes a good blog?
Then you start to glow a bit more.
Fly in and out of the US too?

one on there (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29942552)

CmdrTaco. What exactly is he commanding?

Re:one on there (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29942566)

Poopst!

Re:one on there (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29942650)

It has come to my attention that the entire Linux community is a hotbed of so called 'alternative sexuality,' which includes anything from hedonistic orgies to homosexuality to pedophilia.

What better way of demonstrating this than by looking at the hidden messages contained within the names of some of Linux's most outspoken advocates:

  • Linus Torvalds [microsoft.com] is an anagram of slit anus or VD 'L,' clearly referring to himself by the first initial.
  • Richard M. Stallman [geocities.com] , spokespervert for the Gaysex's Not Unusual 'movement' is an anagram of mans cram thrill ad.
  • Alan Cox [microsoft.com] is barely an anagram of anal cox which is just so filthy and unchristian it unnerves me.

I'm sure that Eric S. Raymond, composer of the satanic homosexual [goatse.fr] propaganda diatribe The Cathedral and the Bizarre, is probably an anagram of something queer, but we don't need to look that far as we know he's always shoving a gun up some poor little boy's rectum. Update: Eric S. Raymond is actually an anagram for secondary rim and cord in my arse. It just goes to show you that he is indeed queer.

Update the Second: It is also documented that Evil Sicko Gaymond is responsible for a nauseating piece of code called Fetchmail [microsoft.com] , which is obviously sinister sodomite slang for 'Felch Male' -- a disgusting practise. For those not in the know, 'felching' is the act performed by two perverts wherein one sucks their own post-coital ejaculate out of the other's rectum. In fact, it appears that the dirty Linux faggots set out to undermine the good Republican institution of e-mail, turning it into 'e-male.'

As far as Richard 'Master' Stallman goes, that filthy fudge-packer was actually quoted [salon.com] on leftist commie propaganda site Salon.com as saying the following: 'I've been resistant to the pressure to conform in any circumstance,' he says. 'It's about being able to question conventional wisdom,' he asserts. 'I believe in love, but not monogamy,' he says plainly.

And this isn't a made up troll bullshit either! He actually stated this tripe, which makes it obvious that he is trying to politely say that he's a flaming homo [comp-u-geek.net] slut [rotten.com] !

Speaking about 'flaming,' who better to point out as a filthy chutney ferret than Slashdot's very own self-confessed pederast Jon Katz. Although an obvious deviant anagram cannot be found from his name, he has already confessed, nay boasted of the homosexual [goatse.fr] perversion of corrupting the innocence of young children [slashdot.org] . To quote from the article linked:

'I've got a rare kidney disease,' I told her. 'I have to go to the bathroom a lot. You can come with me if you want, but it takes a while. Is that okay with you? Do you want a note from my doctor?'

Is this why you were touching your penis [rotten.com] in the cinema, Jon? And letting the other boys touch it too?

We should also point out that Jon Katz refers to himself as 'Slashdot's resident Gasbag.' Is there any more doubt? For those fortunate few who aren't aware of the list of homosexual [goatse.fr] terminology found inside the Linux 'Sauce Code,' a 'Gasbag' is a pervert who gains sexual gratification from having a thin straw inserted into his urethra (or to use the common parlance, 'piss-pipe'), then his homosexual [goatse.fr] lover blows firmly down the straw to inflate his scrotum. This is, of course, when he's not busy violating the dignity and copyright of posters to Slashdot by gathering together their postings and publishing them en masse to further his twisted and manipulative journalistic agenda.

Sick, disgusting antichristian perverts, the lot of them.

In addition, many of the Linux distributions (a 'distribution' is the most common way to spread the faggots' wares) are run by faggot groups. The Slackware [redhat.com] distro is named after the 'Slack-wear' fags wear to allow easy access to the anus for sexual purposes. Furthermore, Slackware is a close anagram of claw arse, a reference to the homosexual [goatse.fr] practise of anal fisting. The Mandrake [slackware.com] product is run by a group of French faggot satanists, and is named after the faggot nickname for the vibrator. It was also chosen because it is an anagram for dark amen and ram naked, which is what they do.

Another 'distro,' (abbrieviated as such because it sounds a bit like 'Disco,' which is where homosexuals [goatse.fr] preyed on young boys in the 1970s), is Debian, [mandrake.com] an anagram of in a bed, which could be considered innocent enough (after all, a bed is both where we sleep and pray), until we realise what other names Debian uses to describe their foul wares. 'Woody' is obvious enough, being a term for the erect male penis [rotten.com] , glistening with pre-cum. But far sicker is the phrase 'Frozen Potato' that they use. This filthy term, again found in the secret homosexual [goatse.fr] 'Sauce Code,' refers to the solo homosexual [goatse.fr] practice of defecating into a clear polythene bag, shaping the turd into a crude approximation of the male phallus, then leaving it in the freezer overnight until it becomes solid. The practitioner then proceeds to push the frozen 'potato' up his own rectum, squeezing it in and out until his tight young balls erupt in a screaming orgasm.

And Red Hat [debian.org] is secret homo [comp-u-geek.net] slang for the tip of a penis [rotten.com] that is soaked in blood from a freshly violated underage ringpiece.

The fags have even invented special tools to aid their faggotry! For example, the 'supermount' tool was devised to allow deeper penetration, which is good for fags because it gives more pressure on the prostate gland. 'Automount' is used, on the other hand, because Linux users are all fat and gay, and need to mount each other [comp-u-geek.net] automatically.

The depths of their depravity can be seen in their use of 'mount points.' These are, plainly speaking, the different points of penetration. The main one is obviously/anus, but there are others. Militant fags even say 'there is no/opt mount point' because for these dirty perverts faggotry is not optional but a way of life.

More evidence is in the fact that Linux users say how much they love `man`, even going so far as to say that all new Linux users (who are in fact just innocent heterosexuals indoctrinated by the gay propaganda) should try out `man`. In no other system do users boast of their frequent recourse to a man.

Other areas of the system also show Linux's inherit gayness. For example, people are often told of the 'FAQ,' but how many innocent heterosexual Windows [amiga.com] users know what this actually means. The answer is shocking: Faggot Anal Quest: the voyage of discovery for newly converted fags!

Even the title 'Slashdot [geekizoid.com] ' originally referred to a homosexual [goatse.fr] practice. Slashdot [kuro5hin.org] of course refers to the popular gay practice of blood-letting. The Slashbots, of course are those super-zealous homosexuals [goatse.fr] who take this perversion to its extreme by ripping open their anuses, as seen on the site most popular with Slashdot users, the depraved work of Satan, http://www.eff.org/ [eff.org] .

The editors of Slashdot [slashduh.org] also have homosexual [goatse.fr] names: 'Hemos' is obvious in itself, being one vowel away from 'Homos.' But even more sickening is 'Commander Taco' which sounds a bit like 'Commode in Taco,' filthy gay slang for a pair of spreadeagled buttocks that are caked with excrement [pboy.com] . (The best form of lubrication, they insist.) Sometimes, these 'Taco Commodes' have special 'Salsa Sauce' (blood from a ruptured rectum) and 'Cheese' (rancid flakes of penis [rotten.com] discharge) toppings. And to make it even worse, Slashdot [notslashdot.org] runs on Apache!

The Apache [microsoft.com] server, whose use among fags is as prevalent as AIDS, is named after homosexual [goatse.fr] activity -- as everyone knows, popular faggot band, the Village People, featured an Apache Indian, and it is for him that this gay program is named.

And that's not forgetting the use of patches in the Linux fag world -- patches are used to make the anus accessible for repeated anal sex even after its rupture by a session of fisting.

To summarise: Linux is gay. 'Slash -- Dot' is the graphical description of the space between a young boy's scrotum and anus. And BeOS [apple.com] is for hermaphrodites and disabled 'stumpers.'

FEEDBACK

What worries me is how much you know about what gay people do. I'm scared I actually read this whole thing. I think this post is a good example of the negative effects of Internet usage on people. This person obviously has no social life anymore and had to result to writing something as stupid as this. And actually take the time to do it too. Although... I think it was satire.. blah.. it's early. -- Anonymous Coward, Slashdot

Well, the only reason I know all about this is because I had the misfortune to read the Linux 'Sauce code' once. Although publicised as the computer code needed to get Linux up and running on a computer (and haven't you always been worried about the phrase 'Monolithic Kernel'?), this foul document is actually a detailed and graphic description of every conceivable degrading perversion known to the human race, as well as a few of the major animal species. It has shocked and disturbed me, to the point of needing to shock and disturb the common man to warn them of the impending homo [comp-u-geek.net] -calypse which threatens to engulf our planet.

You must work for the government. Trying to post the most obscene stuff in hopes that slashdot won't be able to continue or something, due to legal woes. If i ever see your ugly face, i'm going to stick my fireplace poker up your ass, after it's nice and hot, to weld shut that nasty gaping hole of yours. -- Anonymous Coward, Slashdot

Doesn't it give you a hard-on to imagine your thick strong poker ramming it's way up my most sacred of sphincters? You're beyond help, my friend, as the only thing you can imagine is the foul penetrative violation of another man. Are you sure you're not Eric Raymond? The government, being populated by limp-wristed liberals, could never stem the sickening tide of homosexual [goatse.fr] child molesting Linux advocacy. Hell, they've given NAMBLA free reign for years!

you really should post this logged in. i wish i could remember jebus's password, cuz i'd give it to you. -- mighty jebus [slashdot.org] , Slashdot

Thank you for your kind words of support. However, this document shall only ever be posted anonymously. This is because the 'Open Sauce' movement is a sham, proposing homoerotic cults of hero worshipping in the name of freedom. I speak for the common man. For any man who prefers the warm, enveloping velvet folds of a woman's vagina [bodysnatchers.co.uk] to the tight puckered ringpiece of a child. These men, being common, decent folk, don't have a say in the political hypocrisy that is Slashdot culture. I am the unknown liberator [hitler.org] .

ROLF LAMO i hate linux FAGGOTS -- Anonymous Coward, Slashdot

We shouldn't hate them, we should pity them for the misguided fools they are... Fanatical Linux zeal-outs need to be herded into camps for re-education and subsequent rehabilitation into normal heterosexual society. This re-education shall be achieved by forcing them to watch repeats of Baywatch until the very mention of Pamela Anderson [rotten.com] causes them to fill their pants with healthy heterosexual jism [zillabunny.com] .

Actually, that's not at all how scrotal inflation works. I understand it involves injecting sterile saline solution into the scrotum. I've never tried this, but you can read how to do it safely in case you're interested. (Before you moderate this down, ask yourself honestly -- who are the real crazies -- people who do scrotal inflation, or people who pay $1000+ for a game console?) -- double_h [slashdot.org] , Slashdot

Well, it just goes to show that even the holy Linux 'sauce code' is riddled with bugs that need fixing. (The irony of Jon Katz not even being able to inflate his scrotum correctly has not been lost on me.) The Linux pervert elite already acknowledge this, with their queer slogan: 'Given enough arms, all rectums are shallow.' And anyway, the PS2 [xbox.com] sucks major cock and isn't worth the money. Intellivision forever!

dude did u used to post on msnbc's nt bulletin board now that u are doing anti-gay posts u also need to start in with anti-black stuff too c u in church -- Anonymous Coward, Slashdot

For one thing, whilst Linux is a cavalcade of queer propaganda masquerading as the future of computing, NT [linux.com] is used by people who think nothing better of encasing their genitals in quick setting plaster then going to see a really dirty porno film, enjoying the restriction enforced onto them. Remember, a wasted arousal is a sin in the eyes of the Catholic church [atheism.org] . Clearly, the only god-fearing Christian operating system in existence is CP/M -- The Christian Program Monitor. All computer users should immediately ask their local pastor to install this fine OS onto their systems. It is the only route to salvation.

Secondly, this message is for every man. Computers know no colour. Not only that, but one of the finest websites in the world is maintained by a Black Man [stileproject.com] . Now fuck off you racist donkey felcher.

And don't forget that slashdot was written in Perl, which is just too close to 'Pearl Necklace' for comfort.... oh wait; that's something all you heterosexuals do.... I can't help but wonder how much faster the trolls could do First-Posts on this site if it were redone in PHP... I could hand-type dynamic HTML pages faster than Perl can do them. -- phee [slashdot.org] , Slashdot

Although there is nothing unholy about the fine heterosexual act of ejaculating between a woman's breasts, squirting one's load up towards her neck and chin area, it should be noted that Perl [python.org] (standing for Pansies Entering Rectums Locally) is also close to 'Pearl Monocle,' 'Pearl Nosering,' and the ubiquitous 'Pearl Enema.'

One scary thing about Perl [sun.com] is that it contains hidden homosexual [goatse.fr] messages. Take the following code: LWP::Simple -- It looks innocuous enough, doesn't it? But look at the line closely: There are two colons next to each other! As Larry 'Balls to the' Wall would openly admit in the Perl Documentation, Perl was designed from the ground up to indoctrinate it's programmers into performing unnatural sexual acts -- having two colons so closely together is clearly a reference to the perverse sickening act of 'colon kissing,' whereby two homosexual [goatse.fr] queers spread their buttocks wide, pressing their filthy torn sphincters together. They then share small round objects like marbles or golfballs by passing them from one rectum to another using muscle contraction alone. This is also referred to in programming 'circles' as 'Parameter Passing.'

And PHP [perl.org] stands for Perverted Homosexual Penetration. Didn't you know?

Thank you for your valuable input on this. I am sure you will be never forgotten. BTW: Did I mention that this could be useful in terraforming Mars? Mars rulaa. -- Eimernase [slashdot.org] , Slashdot

Well, I don't know about terraforming Mars, but I do know that homosexual [goatse.fr] Linux Advocates have been probing Uranus for years.

That's inspiring. Keep up the good work, AC. May God in his wisdom grant you the strength to bring the plain honest truth to this community, and make it pure again. Yours, Cerberus. -- Anonymous Coward, Slashdot

*sniff* That brings a tear to my eye. Thank you once more for your kind support. I have taken faith in the knowledge that I am doing the Good Lord [atheism.org] 's work, but it is encouraging to know that I am helping out the common man here.

However, I should be cautious about revealing your name 'Cerberus' on such a filthy den of depravity as Slashdot. It is a well known fact that the 'Kerberos' documentation from Microsoft is a detailed manual describing, in intimate, exacting detail, how to sexually penetrate a variety of unwilling canine animals; be they domesticated, wild, or mythical. Slashdot posters have taken great pleasure in illegally spreading this documentation far and wide, treating it as an 'extension' to the Linux 'Sauce Code,' for the sake of 'interoperability.' (The slang term they use for nonconsensual intercourse -- their favourite kind.)

In fact, sick twisted Linux deviants are known to have LAN parties, (Love of Anal Naughtiness, needless to say.), wherein they entice a stray dog, known as the 'Samba Mount,' into their homes. Up to four of these filth-sodden blasphemers against nature take turns to plunge their erect, throbbing, uncircumcised members, conkers-deep, into the rectum, mouth, and other fleshy orifices of the poor animal. Eventually, the 'Samba Mount' collapses due to 'overload,' and needs to be 'rebooted.' (i.e., kicked out into the street, and left to fend for itself.) Many Linux users boast about their 'uptime' in such situations.

Inspiring stuff! If only all trolls were this quality! -- Anonymous Coward, Slashdot

If only indeed. You can help our brave cause by moderating this message up as often as possible. I recommend '+1, Underrated,' as that will protect your precious Karma in Metamoderation [slashdot.org] . Only then can we break through the glass ceiling of Homosexual Slashdot Culture. Is it any wonder that the new version of Slashcode has been christened 'Bender'???

If we can get just one of these postings up to at least '+1,' then it will be archived forever! Others will learn of our struggle, and join with us in our battle for freedom!

It's pathetic you've spent so much time writing this. -- Anonymous Coward, Slashdot

I am compelled to document the foulness and carnal depravity [catholic.net] that is Linux, in order that we may prepare ourselves for the great holy war that is to follow. It is my solemn duty to peel back the foreskin of ignorance and apply the wire brush of enlightenment.

As with any great open-source project, you need someone asking this question, so I'll do it. When the hell is version 2.0 going to be ready?!?! -- Anonymous Coward, Slashdot

I could make an arrogant, childish comment along the lines of 'Every time someone asks for 2.0, I won't release it for another 24 hours,' but the truth of the matter is that I'm quite nervous of releasing a 'number two,' as I can guarantee some filthy shit-slurping Linux pervert would want to suck it straight out of my anus before I've even had chance to wipe.

I desperately want to suck your monolithic kernel, you sexy hunk, you. -- Anonymous Coward, Slashdot

I sincerely hope you're Natalie Portman [geocities.com] .

Dude, nothing on slashdot larger than 3 paragraphs is worth reading. Try to distill the message, whatever it was, and maybe I'll read it. As it is, I have to much open source software to write to waste even 10 seconds of precious time. 10 seconds is all its gonna take M$ to whoop Linux's ass. Vigilence is the price of Free (as in libre -- from the fine, frou frou French language) Software. Hack on fellow geeks, and remember: Friday is Bouillabaisse day except for heathens who do not believe that Jesus died for their sins. Those godless, oil drench, bearded sexist clowns can pull grits from their pantaloons (another fine, fine French word) and eat that. Anyway, try to keep your message focused and concise. For concision is the soul of derision. Way. -- Anonymous Coward, Slashdot

What the fuck?

I've read your gay conspiracy post version 1.3.0 and I must say I'm impressed. In particular, I appreciate how you have managed to squeeze in a healthy dose of the latent homosexuality you gay-bashing homos [comp-u-geek.net] tend to be full of. Thank you again. -- Anonymous Coward, Slashdot

Well bugger me!

ooooh honey. how insecure are you!!! wann a little massage from deare bruci. love you -- Anonymous Coward, Slashdot

Fuck right off!

IMPORTANT: This message needs to be heard (Not HURD [linux.org] , which is an acronym for 'Huge Unclean Rectal Dilator') across the whole community, so it has been released into the Public Domain [icopyright.com] . You know, that licence that we all had before those homoerotic crypto-fascists came out with the GPL [apple.com] (Gay Penetration License) that is no more than an excuse to see who's got the biggest feces-encrusted [rotten.com] cock. I would have put this up on Freshmeat [adultmember.com] , but that name is known to be a euphemism for the tight rump of a young boy.

Come to think of it, the whole concept of 'Source Control' unnerves me, because it sounds a bit like 'Sauce Control,' which is a description of the homosexual [goatse.fr] practice of holding the base of the cock shaft tightly upon the point of ejaculation, thus causing a build up of semenal fluid that is only released upon entry into an incision made into the base of the receiver's scrotum. And 'Open Sauce' is the act of ejaculating into another mans face or perhaps a biscuit to be shared later. Obviously, 'Closed Sauce' is the only Christian thing to do, as evidenced by the fact that it is what Cathedrals are all about.

Contributors: (although not to the eternal game of 'soggy biscuit' that open 'sauce' development has become) Anonymous Coward, Anonymous Coward, phee, Anonymous Coward, mighty jebus, Anonymous Coward, Anonymous Coward, double_h, Anonymous Coward, Eimernase, Anonymous Coward, Anonymous Coward, Anonymous Coward, Anonymous Coward, Anonymous Coward, Anonymous Coward, Anonymous Coward, Anonymous Coward. Further contributions are welcome.

Current changes: This version sent to FreeWIPO [slashdot.org] by 'Bring BackATV' as plain text. Reformatted everything, added all links back in (that we could match from the previous version), many new ones (Slashbot bait links). Even more spelling fixed. Who wrote this thing, CmdrTaco himself?

Previous changes: Yet more changes added. Spelling fixed. Feedback added. Explanation of 'distro' system. 'Mount Point' syntax described. More filth regarding `man` and Slashdot. Yet more fucking spelling fixed. 'Fetchmail' uncovered further. More Slashbot baiting. Apache exposed. Distribution licence at foot of document.

ANUX -- A full Linux distribution... Up your ass!

Woohoo! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29942556)

Good ol' Germany is catching up to you suckers. Back in the day, before my beloved wall was torn down, I loved the Stasi. It made feel secure! I knew how many of my neighbours were working undercover for them, too. It was like totally out of Soviet Russia. <3

Lessons from the STASI (3, Insightful)

MarkvW (1037596) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942596)

The STASI (East German Secret Police) got awesome participation from its citizens when it asked them to help them spy on their fellow citizens.

There is a scary lesson in that.

Re:Lessons from the STASI (2, Interesting)

NFN_NLN (633283) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942706)

The STASI (East German Secret Police) got awesome participation from its citizens when it asked them to help them spy on their fellow citizens.

There is a scary lesson in that.

http://www.fourwinds10.com/siterun_data/government/homeland_security_patriot_act_fema/news.php?q=1255711589 [fourwinds10.com]

They don't need STASI, they already have the Boy Scouts:

"...military and police indoctrination of Boy Scouts at the Boy Scouts Of America Great Lakes Centennial Jamboree, held on September 25, 26, and 27 at Oshkosh, Wisconsin.

“I thought it would be a great adventure with thousands of scouts from all over the Midwest,” an assistant Scout Master writes in an email. “The official count was 10,144 people in attendance (Boy Scouts, Cub Scouts, Girl Scouts, Adult Leaders, Parents, and Staff).”

Instead of an old-fashioned Boy Scout event of camping and outdoor activities, the attendees were subjected to unrelenting military and police propaganda."

Re:Lessons from the STASI (2, Informative)

NFN_NLN (633283) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942788)

Here's your precious NYTimes article...

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/14/us/14explorers.html [nytimes.com]

The Explorers program, a coeducational affiliate of the Boy Scouts of America that began 60 years ago, is training thousands of young people in skills used to confront terrorism, illegal immigration and escalating border violence — an intense ratcheting up of one of the group’s longtime missions to prepare youths for more traditional jobs as police officers and firefighters.

“This is about being a true-blooded American guy and girl,” said A. J. Lowenthal, a sheriff’s deputy here in Imperial County, whose life clock, he says, is set around the Explorers events he helps run. “It fits right in with the honor and bravery of the Boy Scouts.”

Re:Lessons from the STASI (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29942982)

> “This is about being a true-blooded American guy and girl,”

What is that supposed to mean? "true-blooded"? There is no such thing as 'true' American blood, unless this guy is referring to native americans...

Re:Lessons from the STASI (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 4 years ago | (#29943874)

Instead of an old-fashioned Boy Scout event of camping and outdoor activities, the attendees were subjected to unrelenting military and police propaganda."

I was in boy scouts years ago. Even before 9/11, the line between "old-fashioned boy scout event" and "state propaganda" was thin.

Re:Lessons from the STASI (1)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 4 years ago | (#29945180)

In 2006 it was still funny
http://www.australianit.news.com.au/story/0,24897,19869727-15391,00.html [news.com.au]
Now its falling into place.
http://www.upi.com/Top_News/2009/09/08/Girl-Scouts-preparedness-patch-unveiled/UPI-76591252438255/ [upi.com]
They have the boy scouts, girl scouts trained to spy, down your street, online and not just in the USA.
Next time you buy some high-fructose corn syrup fundraising treats make sure anything that can be seen from your front door is 'boring'.
Dont have your Ron Paul, Bob Barr or Chuck Baldwin campaign material on display.
Army intelligence will get your licence plate number and photo at the next rally anyway.

bummer (5, Interesting)

tommeke100 (755660) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942628)

a socialist (caucasian) Belgian politician got on that list because the immigration officer thought he had too much South American stamps on his passport. So after taking him into a small office, they googled his name and found his articles to be too "left wing" to their taste and he was refused access and said that if he wanted to come to the US he had to apply for a visa. He did just that and of course it was refused. Lately, he took the plane to Brazil (a direct flight), and they had to detour the whole plane for hundreds of miles, because he was on it and they weren't allowed to fly over US territory (the crew told him afterwards) . And of course, there is no way to get off that list.

Re:bummer (1, Insightful)

billybob_jcv (967047) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942696)

I don't trust anyone from a country where they put mayonnaise on french fries.
 

Hey... that's how it goes... (4, Informative)

denzacar (181829) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942726)

When you invent [wikipedia.org] something - you get to do what you want with it. Even put mayonnaise on top.

Re:Hey... that's how it goes... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29943340)

We liberated those fries from that mayonnaise.

That's why we call them freedom fries.

Fucking-a. (1)

WiiVault (1039946) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942772)

Can I move to where you live? I'm black, so it goes without saying that mayonaise to me is like garlic to a vampire. If those people in gated communities were really serious about keeping us out they would spray paint their house with the shit.

Re:Fucking-a. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29942822)

So, even black nerds are comedians.

Re:Fucking-a. (1)

6ULDV8 (226100) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942836)

Would spray painting with hot sauce keep the mayonnaise crew at bay?

Re:Fucking-a. (1)

WiiVault (1039946) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942930)

Yeah but then the Ranch Crew wouldn't have anything to do when they should up now would they.

Undercover Brother reference (1)

attemptedgoalie (634133) | more than 4 years ago | (#29943064)

Smartly done, lad.

Re:Fucking-a. (4, Interesting)

Hatta (162192) | more than 4 years ago | (#29943262)

Try making your own, it's a quality condiment. It's just the stuff in stores that they call mayonnaise that's disgusting. It's just some egg yolks and a bit of lemon juice in a blender, and you slowly drizzle oil in until it's stiff. You can add some flavor too, a bit of nice mustard and black pepper is good. Sometimes I'll add garlic, capers, or a touch of cayenne. Whatever I have on hand really, it's fun to play around with. Of course, everyone's tastes vary, but I'm of the opinion that you shouldn't decide you don't like something until you've tasted it done right.

Re:Fucking-a. (1)

Scrameustache (459504) | more than 4 years ago | (#29943298)

I'm black, so it goes without saying that mayonaise to me is like garlic to a vampire.

What? :S

There's whole areas of food related racism I just don't get.

Re:bummer (5, Informative)

tommeke100 (755660) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942798)

I don't know why I get modded down for what I wrote, maybe because I didn't give any references. So here is an official question asked to the Belgian minister of Foreign Affairs in the Belgian Senate about it. I was wrong about the destination though (but it doesn't matter in this context), it was to Mexico. Also, he isn't merely a left wing politician, he's actually a member of the European Parliament.
http://senat.be/www/?MIval=/Vragen/SchriftelijkeVraag&LEG=4&NR=4398&LANG=nl [senat.be]
It's in Dutch though, here's the google translation in english:
http://translate.google.com/translate?prev=hp&hl=nl&js=y&u=http%3A%2F%2Fsenat.be%2Fwww%2F%3FMIval%3D%2FVragen%2FSchriftelijkeVraag%26LEG%3D4%26NR%3D4398%26LANG%3Dnl&sl=nl&tl=en&history_state0= [google.com]

Re:bummer (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#29943220)

Says someone who eats chilli cheese fries and blueberry pancake and sausage on a stick, dipped in baconnaise and barbecue sauce (just as disgusting). :P

We* invented it, we decide how it's meant to be eaten. ^^

We promise we won't tell you how to make those meatballs with sweet tomato jam and starch sponges around them that you call hamburgers. Deal? :)

(Now we're equal.)

___
* I'm from Luxemburg, which is right next to Belgium, where you get the best fries in the world, because they invented them.

Re:bummer (2, Interesting)

buchner.johannes (1139593) | more than 4 years ago | (#29944922)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No_Fly_List [wikipedia.org]

In an article in The Atlantic[11], security expert Bruce Schneier described a simple way for people to defeat the No Fly List:

        Use a stolen credit card to buy a ticket under a fake name. Print a fake boarding pass with your real name on it and go to the airport. You give your real ID, and the fake boarding pass with your real name on it, to security. They’re checking the documents against each other. They’re not checking your name against the no-fly list—that was done on the airline’s computers. Once you’re through security, you rip up the fake boarding pass, and use the real boarding pass that has the name from the stolen credit card. Then you board the plane, because they’re not checking your name against your ID at boarding.

Among other problems, it is unknown
  - who is on the list,
  - what criteria are used to get on the list
  - how you can get off the list

Effectively, it is a reversal of the presumption of innocence. Terrorists should be treated as criminals, we should not forget that they are human. The situation is truly Kafkaesque, with the public being happy to not be on the list.

Watch list? (4, Interesting)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942634)

I'd be more interested in knowing what the average length of time a person remains on the list, and a demographic breakdown. The problem with compiling lists like this is the same as with sex offender registries: Even after people are removed from it (sometimes winding up on it for petty reasons in the first place), they continue to be linked to it. Computers don't forget, and there's always some bureaucrat who wants to keep a list of everyone that's ever been on the list available and searchable. There is a point at which even justice becomes injust.

So what are the numbers, Big Brother?

A more interesting number (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29943190)

A more interesting number would be how many of those 400,000 or 1 million, depending on your interpretation, actually committed a terrorist act. or were caught actually planning one.

Re:Watch list? (1)

Threni (635302) | more than 4 years ago | (#29943776)

> I'd be more interested in knowing what the average length of time a person remains on the list, and a demographic breakdown.

I'd like to know why these people aren't arrested, if they're so dangerous? Shouldn't the list be provided to the owners of other transit systems, shopping centres etc? Or have these people been shown to only be interested in performing terrorist activities on planes?

If CCTV and ID cards are Orwell's `Big Brother`, then this sort of moderate, impersonal persecution is closer to Kafka's `The Trial`.

Re:Watch list? (4, Insightful)

Fulcrum of Evil (560260) | more than 4 years ago | (#29944578)

I'd like to know why these people aren't arrested, if they're so dangerous?

Because there's no evidence of criminal activity. I'm fine with the fed keeping lists, just not with them being published or used to deny people their rights through intermediaries.

A question of resources. (3, Insightful)

nuckfuts (690967) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942652)

Does the FBI actually have the manpower and /or systems to effectively monitor the activities of 400,000 people? If not, they are are watering down their list and reducing its usefulness.

r2k-in-the-vortex (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29942654)

wow united states are turning more and more like cccp used to be

Mandatory reading if this concerns you (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29942674)

Cory Doctorow's book Little Brother. Free PDF download from his site: http://craphound.com/littlebrother/ [craphound.com]

Re:Mandatory reading if this concerns you (1)

justthinkit (954982) | more than 4 years ago | (#29943180)

Except that the free pdf link [samlaget.no] does not resolve...

i'm on the list (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29942680)

One family friend is a military lawyer; another works in sigint. Two things I learnt:

(1) Since I wrote a bunch of anti-war articles a few years ago, I am at least documented - although nothing much is said, I guess since most of what I co-wrote with my partner was published only under their name.

(2) It's worryingly trivial to obtain a list of recent peers of any particular US IP. IOW, even a routine background check will include a list of regular web sites visited.

What is needed is for any as many as possible to be on such lists: it is only by getting as many people as possible inconvenienced, while making the amount of data too great to focus too hard on harassing any one individual or small group, that such methods lose their efficacy.

Re:i'm on the list (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29942782)

What is needed is for any as many as possible to be on such lists: it is only by getting as many people as possible inconvenienced, while making the amount of data too great to focus too hard on harassing any one individual or small group, that such methods lose their efficacy.

You know, you might be onto something.
How hard would it be to create a automated system that would dig around online forums (utterly unsecured most of them), gathering logins and IPs, then back-tracking their IPs to "sensitive websites" and then reporting all those "aliases" to the list?

#'s, lists, names etc..., what's it all amount to? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29942690)

less than a hill of beans in relation to the creators' wwwildly popular newclear powered planet/population rescue initiative/mandate, aka 'the big flash'. the lights are coming up all over now.

Leak the List. (1)

arthurpaliden (939626) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942802)

I am still waiting for the list to be released into the wild. It would prove to be an interesting read. Much like the lists of 'evil' web sites.

Can I join in? (4, Funny)

Lemming Mark (849014) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942818)

Dear US Authorities,

I have heard so much about your big list of suspicious people; with so many other people being included I am beginning to feel left out. I'm not a very naughty person but sometimes I wave subversively at CCTV cameras. If it would help, I could also wear a long trenchcoat and shades and carry a briefcase. I've been practicing looking at things through narrowed eyes a lot, so I would probably be quite good at being suspicious.

If you will put me on your special suspicious list, I will return the favour by putting you on my list of suspicious countries. It currently includes every other country in the world, ever - but I'm sure it's still not as long and impressive as your list is.

Love and hugs,
Lemming Mark

The crap list (5, Insightful)

thammoud (193905) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942840)

My son, 12 now, with a middle eastern name but born in the US. We travel a lot and they always flag his name for a second check. Ever since he was a toddler. You would think that after the first or second time, they will somehow amend the records with my name, his mom's name and DOB. But no, we go through the process every time we fly. It is a minor irritant at his age now, but I am very worried about him when he is an adult. We are seriously thinking about changing his name but I am not sure that it will make a difference.

AC360 on this very subject (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29942894)

There was a series of investigative reporting on this subject on Anderson Cooper's AC360.

Basically, the list is worthless as it doesn't contain enough information to narrow down searches and misspelling or adding a middle name breaks the search.

Don't change his name, next time add a middle name to the booking and see if it works.

Re:AC360 on this very subject (1)

thammoud (193905) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942908)

I thought about that, but then it will make a real hard core middle east name :)

Re:AC360 on this very subject (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29942974)

As long as the middle name is not "bin", you should be ok. if you really want bin, you could use an equivalent from another language, as in "Osama von laden".

Re:AC360 on this very subject (1)

attemptedgoalie (634133) | more than 4 years ago | (#29943092)

Try the middle initial.

John Kennedy might be on the list
John Fitzgerald Kennedy might be on the list.
John F. Kennedy or J. Fitzgerald Kennedy might not be. How stupid is that?

Re:AC360 on this very subject (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29943720)

If you learn how to write in proper English that should help your son a lot as well...

Re:The crap list (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29943144)

So you and your son are of a terrorist persuasion, then.

Re:The crap list (1)

lena_10326 (1100441) | more than 4 years ago | (#29943386)

It's much easier to change a name before 18. Once they go to college, start working, and start buying things... it's a major pain in the ass to redo that trail of documents and papers. If you're serious, I would do it sooner rather than later.

Re:The crap list (2, Interesting)

Alomex (148003) | more than 4 years ago | (#29944010)

It's all security theater. If they really cared about the security of the country they would whittle down the list as fast as they can, so that they can concentrate on the true potential threats.

For nearly five years I was on some form of list and an analyst back in Washington DC had to waste an hour looking at my file every time I crossed the border just to confirm that, as in the previous n-1 times, I still pose no threat to the USA. Eventually I did get off the list (no reason given) and for the last two years or so I can go through without any hassle.

This is absolutely ridiculous. (1)

moxley (895517) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942860)

Unfortunately I suspect that the story of all of this, that has happened since 9/11, will one day be a disgusting, cautionary tale about how an open and free society was slowly transitioned into an authoritarian fascist nightmare...I'm not sayuig we're completely there yet, but there is a progression - and once these rights, civiliberties, freedoms (whatever you call them) are taken, they never get given back without a severe upheaval or revolution or some sort. Once the security apparatus gets used to being able to list anyone at will for simply having divergent political or religious views (and we all know that is what is happening), good things do not follow.

Once torture (and the stuff we've heard about, sexual torture of children, people being tortured to death, people being tortured until they should have died but being kept alive only so that so they can be tortured further, people being boiled alive....severe psychological torture...It disgusts me and makes those who practice it no different than the most heinous members of the deathshead SS contingents and those who blindly support it share their shame.

I want my country back - but I fear we're in for some terrible days ahead..I hope I am wrong.

Need a 'priority list' (1)

gurps_npc (621217) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942868)

If they don't have a second, smaller list, restricted to say no more than 1,000 names that would actually be likely to be used, then they are idiots.

Due Diligence (2, Interesting)

mindbrane (1548037) | more than 4 years ago | (#29942944)

Recently, in Vancouver, RCMP officers were publicly challenged for stopping known protesters to the upcoming Olympic winter games and asking them why they were against the games. I don't know the ins and outs of the whole episode but the criticism of the RCMP in the media seemed to centre on their stopping people in public places and questioning the reasons for their political opinions. A news broadcast carried the response from an RCMP public relations officer who used the term "due diligence" in defense of the RCMP's actions. Due diligence as I was schooled in the subject matter had to do only with commercial dealings wherein a party to a contract was expected to have scrutinized the terms of a pending contract to ensure they understood the value they would receive for their part in the contract. It may be that in law the term "due diligence" has a wider meaning, but, I think, the RCMP's use of the term is symptomatic of the use of law suits to resolve many issues in terms of monetary damages and contractual obligations that tacitly put aside principles that should invest more fundamental laws addressing vital issues like freedom of speech. There seems to be developing an adversarial, highly litigious approach to addressing issues that rightly belong to more sober venues.

Law enforcement agencies wield what should be illegal force. Force that necessarily must be used for a variety of reasons, not least of which is the infantile need among a high proportion of people to make the world in their image, but, if we take the core principles of democracy and subject them to remedies that belong in commercial enterprises then, I think, we run the risk of debasing those principles and turning democracy into a commercial venture wherein all principles and actions are arbitrated by monetary awards, and, the duties and responsibilites of persons with extraordinary powers are also simply monetized.

I'm a strong backer of the military and the police, the more so because I believe the current state of affairs places them collectively and individually in conflicts both individual and collective that subject them to more stress than their pay warrants and, perhaps, more stress than can be expected to be suffered without considerable negative consequences, but, I sure, this being /. many will disagree.

You may not have room to complain... (1)

papapurinii (1668842) | more than 4 years ago | (#29943038)

... if you've been critical of the US government for knowing that terrorists were intending to attack on September 11, 2001. Before 9/11, the FBI received word of possible threats all the time, and there was no way they could possibly pursue all of them. Thus they glossed over the possibility of a terrorist-instigated hijacking of planes and subsequent piloting into buildings. Now the FBI is trying their best to make sure that doesn't happen again, and are keeping a better eye on ALL possible threats with their Watch List. So what's it going to be, folks? You can't have it both ways. Don't complain that they're doing their jobs if that's what you demanded in the first place.

Re:You may not have room to complain... (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29943376)

Something is SERIOUSLY fucked up if the FBI is putting 1600 new people on their watch list every day. There is no way that there is even a reasonable fraction of people on here who deserve that suspicion. That is over 500,000 people a year.

The FBI is supposed to be looking for terrorists, not spying on the populace at large. Yes, we *can* most certainly have it both ways. The FBI should be looking for terrorists, not random people who may have expressed some sort of sentiment that rubs the FBI the wrong way.

Keeps them employed (1)

Alain Williams (2972) | more than 4 years ago | (#29943250)

something that is very important in these uncertain times, no one wants to loose their job. ''Hey Joe - I have a new batch of names for our list''

This is pretty good, actually. (1)

RudeIota (1131331) | more than 4 years ago | (#29943408)

How *ever* do we intend to qualify everyone in the U.S. populace as a terrorist if we can't even keep up with the rate of population growth?

Slackers!

At this rate, I'll take nearly 5 centuries to burn our current citizenry at the stake. I'm sure we'll have many more people by then...

I recommend to add "Anonymous coward" to the list (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29943428)

every one of them. yeah.

Manypulation? (1)

sepelester (794828) | more than 4 years ago | (#29943558)

Those not on the list should be suspected of manipulating the list

Where's the terrorism? (5, Insightful)

Maltheus (248271) | more than 4 years ago | (#29943950)

1600 suspected terrorists a day? If even 1% of that was real then we'd be dealing with 58,000 people a year intending to commit terrorist acts a year? Are we suppose to believe that the FBI has managed to stop them all in every case??? It's not that hard to blow a bus up or derail a train, so why aren't they doing it? Oh I know, because it's all bullshit.

The only terrorists I see are in the government and the media. They're the only ones using terror to get us to change our way of life. Ooh, Iran is gonna nuke the world, global warming/cooling is going to put our cities underwater/put us in a deep freeze, swine/bird flu/monkey pox/SARS is going to be the next plague that kills us all, main street will starve to death if we don't give your money to these bankers over here, Islamofascism seeks to establish a dictatorship over the world. Eurasia is our friend, Eastasia is our enemy. Eastasia is our friend, Eurasia is our enemy. It's gone well beyond the little boy who cried wolf at this point and has become more akin to yelling fire in a crowded theater. And in each case, the cry is the same: "We can protect you from all these horrors if only you give us more power. We all have to sacrifice to do what is necessary."

"Necessity is the plea for every infringement of human freedom. It is the argument of tyrants; it is the creed of slaves." -- William Pitt

Re:Where's the terrorism? (1)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 4 years ago | (#29945318)

57,000 academics, students, citizen journalists and press who have published or are under review.
The watch list just slows them down a bit.
Extra searches, harder to get promoted, no security clearance later in life ect.
Pulling a critic out of a random line and cloning their laptop is chilling.
Hinting to their family/friends with them that it is routine for a 'single person on holidays' ect.

Where is the list? (1)

boltik (683813) | more than 4 years ago | (#29944586)

How do i check if my name is on the list?

Re:Where is the list? (1)

schwit1 (797399) | more than 4 years ago | (#29944700)

Exit the country and come back in. If you get overly scrutinized then you're on the list.
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