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Unfinished Windows 7 Hotspot Feature Exploited

timothy posted more than 4 years ago | from the vestigial-tail dept.

Wireless Networking 234

An anonymous reader writes with this excerpt from Engadget: "It wasn't all that long ago that Microsoft was talking up the Virtual WiFi feature developed by Microsoft Research and set for inclusion in Windows 7, but something got lost along the road to release day, and the functionality never officially made it into the OS. As you might expect with anything as big and complicated as an operating system though, some of that code did make it into the final release, and there was apparently enough of it for the folks at Nomadio to exploit into a full fledged feature. That's now become Connectify, a free application from the company that effectively turns any Windows 7 computer into a virtual WiFi hotspot — letting you, for instance, wirelessly tether a number of devices to your laptop at location where only an Ethernet jack is available, or even tether a number of laptops together at a coffee shop that charges for WiFi."

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234 comments

Hey Frank remember this? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29965064)

My penis is made of cheese!

Re:Hey Frank remember this? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29965774)

you know, when I hear of a windows feature being "exploited" the utilization of a useful feature is not what comes to mind.

Wow (1, Informative)

Arcady13 (656165) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965066)

Just like I could do on a Mac with the included OS since 2001.

Re:Wow (4, Informative)

RichardDeVries (961583) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965098)

Exactly. I can do this with Ubuntu, too.

Re:Wow (1)

Catskul (323619) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965168)

Is there a package and UI that supports this, or are you referring to setting up the interface as ad-hoc and turning on IP-forwarding?

Re:Wow (0)

3vi1 (544505) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965236)

I'm a Linux fanatic, but I must note that anyone with half a brain could do this with Windows ICS for years now too.

Re:Wow (4, Informative)

lwsimon (724555) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965566)

No, ICS sets up an ad-hoc network. This sets the card into master mode *while simultaneously allowing you to send and recieve on another network*.

It really is pretty cool

Re:Wow (1)

mrsteveman1 (1010381) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965704)

Do the drivers in Windows actually support master mode?

Re:Wow (1)

realityimpaired (1668397) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965798)

Do the drivers in Windows actually support master mode?

I'm guessing that it can be emulated in software as long as the driver supports full duplex transfers. Otherwise, this software wouldn't be nearly as useful as TFA makes it out to be.

Re:Wow (1)

lwsimon (724555) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965928)

I would assume this to be the case, as (like I said) it can also join a network at the same time.

Re:Wow (2, Informative)

fedcb22 (1215744) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965258)

Why set it up as adhoc? If you have a decent card you can put it into master mode and broadcast like an AP.

Re:Wow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29965796)

Yes. It is called Network Manager and it is installed by default.

Re:Wow (0)

Korin43 (881732) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965834)

Last time I checked, you click on the network icon, click "Create New Wireless Network" (or something like that, I'm on a school computer right now), then you put in the SSID and security you want and it's done.

Re:Wow (1)

blitzkrieg3 (995849) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965480)

From TFA:

Connectify lets a Windows 7 laptop "tether" other wireless devices to a single Internet connection by effectively turning that PC into a software-based wireless router, added Gizis.

Serious question: can you do this easily with linux? I mean with only one wireless NIC.

Re:Wow (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29965794)

From TFA:

Connectify lets a Windows 7 laptop "tether" other wireless devices to a single Internet connection by effectively turning that PC into a software-based wireless router, added Gizis.

Serious question: can you do this easily with linux? I mean with only one wireless NIC.

On Linux, doubtful - on OpenBSD, very easily and much more advanced.

Re:Wow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29965786)

I dont think the he was lauding the technology, because as you point out, its been done.....
I think the point is how M$ effed up and left code available for a third party to exploit. and to further show how sloppy M$ can be.

Re:Wow (1, Informative)

sexconker (1179573) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965146)

Just like I could do on any recent Windows OS with ICS and wireless adapters, ethernet cables, bluetooth devices, or fucking firewire.

Re:Wow (1)

sajuuk (1371145) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965212)

Yeah, I did this with XP for years to share out my Verizon EVDO Broadband while on the road. 7 hours stuck on a bus with crappy movies is made much better when you can play Diablo 2 over LAN with your friend in the back of the bus.

Re:Wow (1)

XanC (644172) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965262)

Why do you need EVDO Broadband to connect with a guy in the back of the bus?

Re:Wow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29965332)

To connect to battlenet. so that your phat lewts are not limited to open games.

Re:Wow (5, Funny)

gbjbaanb (229885) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965468)

Why do you need EVDO Broadband to connect with a guy in the back of the bus?

because you missed it and had to catch the next one?

Re:Wow (0, Flamebait)

Thantik (1207112) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965232)

You could do this since Windows 95 with ICS easily...nothing to see here, please move along.

Re:Wow (4, Informative)

maxume (22995) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965406)

It's better than ICS, the host laptop shows up as an access point that the other laptops can connect to (in my experience, connecting to an access point is quite a lot easier than setting up an ad hoc network).

Re:Wow (5, Informative)

CrashNBrn (1143981) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965590)

From TFA (reformatting/emphasis mine):

The resulting Connectify differs from ICS that Windows already supports via an "ad hoc" network connection, which lets several Windows computers share a single connection.
1) It shows up as a real wireless access point.
2) ICS returns to default settings every time you shut down a connection.
3) You can join another wireless network and still run the Connectify Hotspot on the same Wi-Fi card.

Re:Wow (0)

Henriok (6762) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965408)

You could do this in Mac OS 9 even.. Apple introduced "AirPort" in 1999 and ad-hoc Internet sharing was available from day one, iirc. I've been doing this kind of bridging to and from a variety of interfaces regularly for a long long time. Wifi, Ethernet, Bluetooth, Firewire, dial-up.. What are we missing here? Really?

Re:Wow (5, Informative)

blackraven14250 (902843) | more than 4 years ago | (#29966002)

This isn't even remotely ad-hoc networking. This is turning a regular computer into an access point. You can also connect to one wireless network, then set yourself up as an access point to that network, which normally would require two separate network cards.

Mods, please RTFS. People saying "Ad-hoc has been around for years" and similar keep getting all the mod points, even though they're completely missing the point. Apple has something like this since Leopard, not anytime before like everyone here keeps mentioning.

Re:Wow (1, Informative)

jim_v2000 (818799) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965486)

Your Mac will show up as an actual access point instead of an ad-hoc wireless network with ICS enabled? No, it won't. This is different then what Windows, OS X, and desktop Linux distros have been doing before.

Re:Wow (2, Informative)

Josh04 (1596071) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965562)

Actually, it does. Loads of wireless cards are capable of being put in AP mode, which is not the same as ad-hoc. This is not different.

Re:Wow (5, Informative)

jo_ham (604554) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965614)

It does indeed show up as an access point.

On OS X itself (that is set up this way) the Airport icon changes into a base station icon with an arrow to show you the card is running in AP mode instead of ad-hoc wireless network (which is a different icon again) or normal wireless client mode.

Re:Wow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29965848)

If your Mac runs Tiger or an older version of OS X, it will show up as an ad-hoc network.

But if it's running Leopard or Snow Leopard it will show up as a regular access point.

Re:Wow (1)

harrumph (178433) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965682)

No, you're only thinking of Mac OS X. It was in the classic Mac OS, too, starting several years earlier.

Re:Wow (4, Informative)

rvw (755107) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965900)

Yeah but when you do you cannot connect to another hotspot anymore. And that's what this is about. And this is currently not possible in OSX, and probably not in OS9 (I cannot check that).

Can someone please tell me.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29965078)

Can someone please tell me why the Connectify [connectify.me] website is "(C) 2009 - 2010."

Re:Can someone please tell me.. (3, Funny)

Kippesoep (712796) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965888)

Or maybe they're just ahead of their time. This feature is obviously intended for Windows 8 only.

It'll be gone shortly (2, Interesting)

KeithH (15061) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965092)

If these are undocumented APIs, then you can bet that they'll be removed or otherwise disabled in the first service pack.

Re:It'll be gone shortly (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29965134)

My guess is that the wifi layer supports this without an issue, but there was no interface built to allow this kind of configuration.

Bloat... (4, Funny)

torkus (1133985) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965112)

Not surprising really. The secret formula for CokeCola is probably hidden in there too.

I wonder how many 'libraries of congress' could fit in the space occupied by unused but deployed windows code.

Re:Bloat... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29965192)

Hello, I haven't used Windows in a decade, and I think you sound like an idiot.

People like you are terrible advocates for your own OSes. You just scare off the people who aren't socially retarded.

Re:Bloat... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29965204)

You Windows haters need to get a life.

Re:Bloat... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29965488)

You non-haters need to start hating more.

Re:Bloat... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29965598)

The only person hate hurts is the hater. Paraphrased from:

Buddha
Jesus
Mohamad
And every other great religious teacher.

And if Microsoft and Windows are one of your biggest concerns in the World, you really need to get a grip and a life.

Re:Bloat... (2, Insightful)

jbezorg (1263978) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965836)

And if Microsoft and Windows are one of your biggest concerns in the World, you really need to get a grip and a life.

Where does feeling compelled to pontificate about personal philosophy on the internet fit in on that scale?

Re:Bloat... (2, Interesting)

jazzduck (1180033) | more than 4 years ago | (#29966130)

And if Microsoft and Windows are one of your biggest concerns in the World, you really need to get a grip and a life.

I dunno, I think that if Windows is your biggest concern, you've clearly figured out all the other more important aspects of life, and therefore you've probably got a better grip on the world.

;-)

Re:Bloat... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29965788)

So what? As long as inactive services in the OS don't slow me down, lay them on! Pile them on! If I decide I want something, like, I dunno, wi-fi hotspot capability, it's nice to have it.
 
Have you heard? Disk space is really cheap!

Re:Bloat... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29965908)

Open services and OS hooks can be tremendous liabilities when it comes to securing said OS. The best advice is to disable all services you aren't using - not pile them on and leave them open.

just like.. internet sharing (-1, Redundant)

johnrpenner (40054) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965176)

just like apple's OSX's built-in Internet Sharing feature did way back in OSX 10.4 (Tiger)..
you can share your ethernet > wifi or you can share a wired connection to your ethernet
(in case you have an older computer around which doesnt have wireless)

keep those photocopiers running MS...

Re:just like.. internet sharing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29965226)

just like apple's OSX's built-in Internet Sharing feature did way back in OSX 10.4 (Tiger).. you can share your ethernet > wifi or you can share a wired connection to your ethernet (in case you have an older computer around which doesnt have wireless)

keep those photocopiers running MS...

Is that similar to the Internet Connection Sharing that Windows has had since (at least) Windows 95?

Re:just like.. internet sharing (5, Informative)

gabebear (251933) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965350)

Is that similar to the Internet Connection Sharing that Windows has had since (at least) Windows 95?

Yes and no, Windows ICS is only DHCP/NAT software. OSX Internet Sharing also allows you to configure your Wifi card into access point mode. Connectify is promising to allow you to run Windows wifi cards in access-point mode WHILE using it in regular structured mode... which seems like a dubious claim. The makers of Connectify haven't yet listed which cards they are going to support.

In short

  • Windows ICS is just a simple DHCP and NAT server
  • OSX IS is a simple DHCP and NAT server, plus access-point mode supporting WEP
  • Connectify claims to be a DHCP and NAT server, plus access-point mode supporting WPA, plus structured mode

Re:just like.. internet sharing (1)

makomk (752139) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965726)

Connectify is promising to allow you to run Windows wifi cards in access-point mode WHILE using it in regular structured mode... which seems like a dubious claim.

Nope, a lot of wireless cards out there do support this in theory. Of course, you have to run both on the same channel.

Re:just like.. internet sharing (1)

CrashNBrn (1143981) | more than 4 years ago | (#29966160)

They are also planning on selling the software when it leaves beta. Which may very well wind up being a very short life-span indeed, considering the only reason it wasn't enabled in Win7 was driver support. One could reasonably expect driver-support for the native code will be forthcoming by Win7 SP1.

Re:just like.. internet sharing (1)

epedersen (863120) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965814)

Is that similar to the Internet Connection Sharing that Windows has had since (at least) Windows 95?

ICS Came out in Windows 98R2

Re:just like.. internet sharing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29965274)

Windows has had ICS (simple network bridging) since Windows 98 2e (May 1999). Would be hard for them to have cribbed an Apple feature] from April 2005 back then.

Re:just like.. internet sharing (0)

Bageloid (1131305) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965296)

That was a feature since windows 98SE, this talking about connecting to a hotspot with wifi and then letting other devices connect to the laptops wifi and access the internet that way. Instead of ethernet>wifi>internet or wifi>ethernet>internet this is wifi>wifi>internet where the host computer only has one wifi card.

Re:just like.. internet sharing (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29965348)

No. OSX does not allow you to use a single wireless card for both 1) connecting to a wireless network, and 2) broadcasting itself as a hotspot.

Windows has had Internet Sharing since the 90's (oh dear, did Apple not invent that feature?!). The new feature here is virtualizing the wireless card so it behaves as though it's two wireless cards. Try that on any version of OSX and let me know how it goes.

Re:just like.. internet sharing (1, Informative)

Useful Wheat (1488675) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965440)

Now slow down a minute.

My very first laptop that I purchased back in 2003 could do this, and it was running Windows XP. I used this feature almost every day in the dorms to put up a wireless network with Internet so that we could have some small lan parties. The Internet was a little slow with a huge group of people using a single connection, but it worked really well. This feature worked naively in Windows XP and didn't require an additional software or special tinkering, you just had link the Ethernet to the wireless port. It also worked in reverse (You just had to swap a check box), but I never had the opportunity to try it.

What this feature does (in addition to that) is reshare a wifi connection with a single wifi card. That way 1 person could pay for the wireless Internet, and then immediately reshare it on the same computer.

Just because you didn't know a windows machine could do it, doesn't mean it can't. Apple is not the foundation of all ideas when it comes to computers. Sometimes Microsoft gets something right too.

Re:just like.. internet sharing (2, Informative)

maxume (22995) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965646)

This software is nicer than that, it is using the same wireless hardware to connect to the internet and to offer the access point.

big deal (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29965178)

I can do this with my HTC phone and don't even need to find an ethernet port to do it.

Old news (0, Troll)

SirJorgelOfBorgel (897488) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965234)

Wow, you haven't been able to do this using any Windows since... long ago? With only about 10 clicks too. Not to mention my cellphone could already do this for ages. This news is approximately 8 years old, congrats Slashdot!

Re:Old news (1)

zjbs14 (549864) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965568)

If you did actually bother to read the actual article you would find the correct answer to your question is no. This isn't ICS with WiFi in ad-hoc mode, this turns windows into an infrastructure access point.

Stealing (5, Funny)

Reason58 (775044) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965246)

or even tether a number of laptops together at a coffee shop that charges for WiFi

That coffee shop has to pay for its connection, and bandwidth is a limited resource. Is Engadget going to instruct us on how to distract the employees while you pour free coffee into your thermos too?

Re:Stealing (3, Funny)

StormyWeather (543593) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965304)

Low tech solution. Show em yer boobies.

If they are man boobies, it might even work better as a distraction, but the lawsuit for emotional scarring will probably be more than the cup o coffee.

Re:Stealing (2, Funny)

BarryJacobsen (526926) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965394)

or even tether a number of laptops together at a coffee shop that charges for WiFi

That coffee shop has to pay for its connection, and bandwidth is a limited resource. Is Engadget going to instruct us on how to distract the employees while you pour free coffee into your thermos too?

Don't be silly - Engadget would never support you distracting an employee to steal coffee! The review for the device that distracts the employee for you is due any moment now, though.

Re:Stealing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29965648)

That's why they limit the amount of bandwidth each user can use? A single computer torrenting can use up as much bandwidth as 10 computers browsing the web.

Re:Stealing (2, Insightful)

Duradin (1261418) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965854)

Bandwidth isn't the only limited resource. Physical space is a limited resource.

That "overpriced" coffee includes the rent for the space (resources) you take up. If the place is charging for WiFi then it is because too many people were ordering a single small coffee of the day and then plunking themselves down for the day with their laptop and not ordering anything else.

If you like the coffee house enough to go there and make use of its services you should also be willing to pay for them. Really good coffee houses are hard to find and its a shame when a group of freeloaders disrupts things so that enough of the paying regulars go somewhere else and the place goes under.

When enough of the WiFi leeches become paying customers, the WiFi might become free again. If something is annoying for the regulars a good manager would want to change that, if it was affordable to do so. Pay WiFi is annoying to everybody.

"I like making use of your establishment but I don't feel the need to contribute towards its ongoing operations." seems to be all too common of an attitude these days.

Re:Stealing (1)

phizix (1143711) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965920)

That coffee shop has to pay for its connection, and bandwidth is a limited resource.

Which is why they should charge by the MB.

Re:Stealing (1)

vertinox (846076) | more than 4 years ago | (#29966114)

Is Engadget going to instruct us on how to distract the employees while you pour free coffee into your thermos too?

Hrm... Bad analogy.

The Cofeeshop already sold you the coffee (bandwidth) by the temporary key and you are simply pouring it in someone else's cup free of charge by running windows 7.

Clearing the Static (2, Informative)

huckamania (533052) | more than 4 years ago | (#29966200)

The resulting Connectify differs from the Internet connection sharing that Windows already supports via an "ad hoc" network connection, which lets several Windows computers share a single connection. "For one thing, it shows up as a real wireless access point," Gizis said. "Two, Internet connection sharing has issues. It returns to the default settings every time you shut down a connection. And three, you can join another wireless network and still run the Connectify Hotspot on the same Wi-Fi card."

One application came immediately to mind, Gizis continued. "You're sitting in a coffee shop that charges you for a wireless connection. With Connectify, I can pay for that connection, and still have all my other devices, like my iPhone, connected to the Internet."

Does it work with any wifi card?? (2, Interesting)

xtracto (837672) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965282)

I read the article and it does not make clear if it will work with any card.

I ask this because I was looking to do this some time ago (I want to connect my DS and Wii to internet using my existing PC as an access point) and, although there was some software (now discontinued) that allowed you to do that on WIndows, and on Linux you had to spend your time with ifconfig and whatnot (it was never clear for me, but the first step was to change your wifi card to AP mode).

Thus I wonder if this Vista feature would make it possible use the computer as an AP with all types of wireless cards.

Re:Does it work with any wifi card?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29965328)

More importantly, does it work without a wifi card? As TFS states:
"effectively turns any Windows 7 computer into a virtual WiFi hotspot"

Re:Does it work with any wifi card?? (1)

Kadagan AU (638260) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965534)

Seems ironic.. and on Linux you had to spend your time with ifconfig and whatnot (it was never clear for me, but the first step was to change your wifi card to AP mode). and then your sig says Ubuntu is an African word meaning 'I can't configure Debian'... I'm guessing you're a Ubuntu user?

Netfilter? (1)

TunaPhish (81577) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965484)

I swear I've been doing this with linux for years, routing this and routing that...

It's just two interfaces, an echo "1" to the ip_forward, and a little masquerading and we're good to go.

Windows 7 is cool though. Wish they kept the "E" edition.

~@~

Standard functionality... (2, Informative)

Nethemas the Great (909900) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965512)

This has been standard and expected functionality in Linux for years; practically as long as wi-fi cards have been supported. Why the hell is this news? Microsoft didn't even complete the support, it's a third party hack... This is worse than the claim that Aero Glass was revolutionary.

Re:Standard functionality... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29965600)

practically as long as wi-fi cards have been supported.

Which is an old but very short and incomplete list.

Internet sharing? (1)

Have Blue (616) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965572)

What is the difference between this and creating an ad-hoc network and enabling internet connection sharing for the physical port in Vista (and XP, and OS X, and Linux)?

Re:Internet sharing? (4, Informative)

jfim (1167051) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965650)

What is the difference between this and creating an ad-hoc network and enabling internet connection sharing for the physical port in Vista (and XP, and OS X, and Linux)?

It's an actual access point, not an ad hoc network. My Android Dev Phone 1(which does not support connecting to ad hoc networks) can connect to it.

Re:Internet sharing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29966076)

Sheesh.

Read the 27 bazillion posts above yours that have also covered this and you'll find out.

“Microsoft Research” (0)

harrumph (178433) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965746)

Seriously? It took their “research” division to come up with NAT, DHCP, and DNS caching or proxy? Seriously?

"Virtual" hotspot? (4, Interesting)

Captain_Chaos (103843) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965764)

Why a "virtual" hotspot? What's virtual about it? If this turns a Windows PC into a Wi-Fi access point, then surely that's a hotspot plain and simple?

Re:"Virtual" hotspot? (1)

jittles (1613415) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965980)

I think they call it virtual because you can connect to one access point, while sharing that same connection on the same radio with your own access point.

Re:"Virtual" hotspot? (5, Funny)

Toonol (1057698) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965996)

"Virtual" because it's on a computer, duh. "Cyber" would be an acceptable alternative prefix.

"2.0" could be added as a suffix, if it used Javascript.

Re:"Virtual" hotspot? (1)

blackraven14250 (902843) | more than 4 years ago | (#29966126)

From what I understand, they virtualize the WiFi card into two devices, the access point (so other computers can connect to your "access point") and the client (so you can get the internet access from a wireless access point).

In other news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29965942)

Half baked Windows 7 feature is actually used by people!

Where is the exploit here?!

Stupid Microsoft. (1)

crhylove (205956) | more than 4 years ago | (#29965968)

Sounds like MS actually finished a feature that would make Windows 7 more valuable than XP (I haven't found another one). But of course they had to cut it out because some of their customers would lose revenue because they currently rely on over-charging for WiFi.

This is just yet another example of why we need this functionality in Linux TODAY, and why we all need to switch to Linux IMMEDIATELY.

These corporations are all sucking the life blood out of technology just to make a couple extra bucks, and stifling our advancement as a species for monetary gain. It's absolutely disgusting and embarrassing.

Parallels (1)

HomelessInLaJolla (1026842) | more than 4 years ago | (#29966034)

or even tether a number of laptops together at a coffee shop that charges for WiFi

It sounds very similar to a case of conspiracy, aiding and abetting computer intrusion, and wire fraud [slashdot.org].

Maybe Microsoft could be prosecuted for producing software which may be manipulated.

Or maybe Motorola could be prosecuted for making hardware which could be modified to circumvent ToS.

Or maybe Sony could be prosecuted for making PlayStations which can be hacked.

Why are the innovative individuals always the ones bearing the legal load?

So what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#29966164)

The hacks allow you to operate a wireless network in infustructure mode similiar to a wireless access point.

Previously in windows you could do ad-hoc mode (conversation of peers) to share wired connections over ICS or by just bridging interfaces.

I personally don't care about the differences between ad-hoc and infustructure mode. They accomplish the same goal and sharing a connection is no more or less complicated either way.

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  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
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