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First iPhone Worm Discovered, Rickrolls Jailbroken Phones

Soulskill posted more than 4 years ago | from the maximum-threat dept.

Worms 215

Unexpof writes "Users of jailbroken iPhones in Australia are reporting that their wallpapers have been changed by a worm to an image of '80s pop icon Rick Astley. This is the first time a worm has been reported in the wild for the Apple iPhone. According to a report by Sophos, the worm, which exploits users who have installed SSH and not changed the default password, hunts for other vulnerable iPhones and infects them. Users are advised to properly secure their jailbroken iPhones with a non-default password, and Sophos says the worm is not harmless, despite its graffiti-like payload: 'Accessing someone else's computing device and changing their data without permission is an offense in many countries — and just as with graffiti there is a cost involved in cleaning-up affected iPhones. ... Other inquisitive hackers may also be tempted to experiment once they read about the world's first iPhone worm. Furthermore, a more malicious hacker could take the code written by ikee and adapt it to have a more sinister payload.'"

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215 comments

Summary: it affects ignorant fools (4, Insightful)

Nimey (114278) | more than 4 years ago | (#30021878)

FFS, why is there even a default password on sshd for the jailbroken phones? It should default to being disabled and then require you enter your own password when it's enabled.

Re:Summary: it affects ignorant fools (4, Funny)

stillpixel (1575443) | more than 4 years ago | (#30021926)

In the mean time Apple has cut a very handsome check for ikee's services in proving jailbroken phones to be bad bad bad : )

arguably Apple share the blame (2, Insightful)

CdBee (742846) | more than 4 years ago | (#30021994)

the attempts Apple makes to maintain control of devices they have sold are not dissimilar to the fanaticism shown by some of the more unbalanced elements of the user-base. Beyond the pale.

If their selling strategy for the iPhone was more in line with their competitors, and it could be bought unlocked / without lockdowns on application installation, off-the-shelf as most rivals can, we probably wouldnt need the jailbreaking scene and nor would the virus be spreading this way.

Re:arguably Apple share the blame (5, Interesting)

dingen (958134) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022058)

The problem is not in the jailbreaking or unlocking of the phone. The problem is people installing OpenSSH but not changing the password (which it does ask you to) and thus allowing SSH-connections to their phone by everyone.

Re:arguably Apple share the blame (1)

Dreadneck (982170) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022816)

The problem is people installing OpenSSH but not changing the password (which it does ask you to)

Perhaps the makers of OpenSSH should change the first-run behavior to require the user enter a new password in order to prevent this issue?

Re:arguably Apple share the blame (5, Insightful)

mat128 (735121) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022888)

This isn't OpenSSH developers' problem. The jailbreaking utility should prompt you to change your root password. SSH is only allowing you to remotely log on the device, in the end if your password is weak/default, you shouldn't run an SSH server.

Re:arguably Apple share the blame (3, Insightful)

DavidTC (10147) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022984)

Except there's no into the command line except SSH, and hence no way to change the password.

'First run' behavior is pretty meaningless when it's a daemon process installed from an interface that doesn't allow it to prompt.

Re:arguably Apple share the blame (3, Informative)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 4 years ago | (#30023056)

Perhaps the makers of OpenSSH should change the first-run behavior to require the user enter a new password in order to prevent this issue?

No. OpenSSH is a tool for allowing remote access to a host. It is not a password manager, login manager, etc. Such functions are best separated from OpenSSH. Perhaps it would be best if the jailbreak utility prompt for a root password or generate and provide
the new SSH private key for the root account to allow for ssh key exchange logins and instruct the user to login via SSH to change the root password. Something like that.

Re:arguably Apple share the blame (1)

Antique Geekmeister (740220) | more than 4 years ago | (#30023448)

OpenSSH doesn't have this behavior, it uses your system's normal passwords.. It's the particular Iphone-ported application.

Re:arguably Apple share the blame (3, Interesting)

J.Y.Kelly (828209) | more than 4 years ago | (#30023038)

It depends when you last jailbroke your iPhone. I did a jailbreak early on. I installed openSSH and changed the default password. I then found out that the phone entered an infinite loop of restarting the home screen and had to be forcibly restored.

The problem appears to be that the passwd binary on the phone is (deliberately?) broken so it generates incorrect hashes for the password entered. If you actually want to change your password then you need to jump through some hoops [matsimitsu.nl] to change it without using the usual passwd command.

Re:arguably Apple share the blame (2, Informative)

BLKMGK (34057) | more than 4 years ago | (#30023452)

Umm except I just did this with no problems? I logged out and back in with new password, no issues. This is on 3.12. what loop issue did you have and how do you go about triggering it? I will test...

Re:arguably Apple share the blame (1)

ahavatar (1672510) | more than 4 years ago | (#30023066)

yes same as the wireless router password. People just don't change the default password.

Re:arguably Apple share the blame (4, Informative)

bhtooefr (649901) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022060)

The only rivals that are completely unlocked are Palm OS (which is a joke,) Windows Mobile, and Maemo.

Android and WebOS do at least allow you to install unsigned apps, but you don't get root access without a jailbreak, and BlackBerry and Symbian both require signed apps and don't even give root to most signed apps. Useful for things like tethering (although not required.)

Re:arguably Apple share the blame (1)

LurkerXXX (667952) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022160)

I'm not sure why you think PalmOS is a joke. It's a nice Linux varient. The problem with it is it is hobbled by a handicapped SDK at the moment.

Re:arguably Apple share the blame (1)

bhtooefr (649901) | more than 4 years ago | (#30023520)

As others have pointed out, I'm not talking about the modern OS that the Pre is running, and the Pixi will be running.

I'm talking about the ancient kludge-on-top-of-a-kludge single-tasking OS that was originally written for the (m68k-based) Pilot 1000 and 5000, and is now emulating the RAM-based filesystem on flash and emulating the 68k on an ARM, with "ARMlets" that punch down through the bottom of the OS to run outside of emulation, and with a "multitasking model" that makes MS-DOS TSRs look like a good idea.

Re:arguably Apple share the blame (2, Insightful)

jcr (53032) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022360)

PalmOS isn't a joke, it's just outdated. It did quite well in its time.

-jcr

Re:arguably Apple share the blame (2, Interesting)

bhartman34 (886109) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022762)

In the case of WebOS, you have to be careful with the term "jailbreak". The process for WebOS is nothing remotely similar to what you have to do with an iPhone. In WebOS, it's a simple matter of entering one of two codes.

The other difference, of course, is that Palm wants people to hack on the Pre (and soon, the Pixi) as much as possible. They encourage the homebrew community, and don't even clamp down on apps that Sprint would prefer to not have on their phones like MyTether. (Sure, they don't have MyTether in the App Catalog, but they could easily prevent it from being installed altogether, if they had a mind to.)

As far as the original article, the really unfortunate thing is that Apple's likely reaction to this will be, "So? We told you not to jailbreak your iPhone!" It will lend some (false) legitimacy to the idea that jailbreaking an iphone is wrong, which will only help Apple lock down iPhones further in the future.

And I agree with stillpixel. I wouldn't be shocked if Apple themselves had a hand in this.

Re:arguably Apple share the blame (1, Insightful)

onefriedrice (1171917) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022980)

And I agree with stillpixel. I wouldn't be shocked if Apple themselves had a hand in this.

Oh brother. Apple doesn't care what you do with the iPhone, but they do have to close the holes that enable jailbreaking because they're security holes through which Something Bad could go to Do Something Bad. It's one thing to say that Apple is actively against jailbreaking and otherwise doing whatever you want with the phone (a popular and ridiculous notion often bandied about here), but it's quite another thing to realize that they don't care all that much but still have to close the holes. Thinking that Apple someone had a hand in creating this "worm" for jailbroken iPhones is not only considerably misguided (and unfounded), it's utterly moronic.

Re:arguably Apple share the blame (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30022864)

My N95 running Symbian allows me to install unsigned binaries.

Re:arguably Apple share the blame (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022936)

Uuum... on what planet? I developed software for Symbian. And I can install anything I like on the Symbian device. Even modify system files. On Maemo (I presume we're talking about the N900 here, you have root access right there. No jailbreaking. No tricks. Just a shell command to go to root mode. Which is expected,as it's Linux. And not that fake "Linux" that is called Android.)

Re:arguably Apple share the blame (1)

bhtooefr (649901) | more than 4 years ago | (#30023598)

I'm not disputing Maemo, and I listed that in my list of fully-open to the user OSes.

But, I was under the impression that S60 3rd Edition had mandatory code signing, and applications only got full root access if the manufacturer of the device signed the program - not if the developer rubberstamped the app, not if the user had the app signed for their device. Maybe I'm wrong, but I haven't seen any evidence to the contrary. (Symbian devices aren't the most common here, and Nokia has never sold a Symbian phone for CDMA, so I'll admit that I haven't used one.)

Re:arguably Apple share the blame (1)

secolactico (519805) | more than 4 years ago | (#30023342)

I can't speak for symbian since I have never used it, but you can install unsigned applications on a blackberry, but you will need to specify the level of trust manually.

In my (limited) experience, Blackberry phones are pretty open.

Re:arguably Apple share the blame (1)

bhtooefr (649901) | more than 4 years ago | (#30023620)

As of what version of the BB OS? I was under the impression that you had to purchase a signing key (cheap, but still) to sign applications, and even then, there was no root access to the "filesystem," to try to prevent piracy.

(Palm OS uses security by obscurity on its programs+databases "filesystem," but NVBackup and FileZ break that obscurity rather easily.)

What does this mean exactly? how to fix? (1)

goombah99 (560566) | more than 4 years ago | (#30021960)

I have a jailbroken iphone. But othet then the Cydia and ICY applicaions icons which are installed during the redsnow jailbrake I have not deliberately installed any other non-itunes apps. Do I have ssh running but not know it after I jail break?

If so how to I log into it and change the password?

Re:What does this mean exactly? how to fix? (2, Informative)

dingen (958134) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022024)

Only people who deliberately installed OpenSSH through Cydia and didn't change the default password are affect by this "virus". If you haven't installed OpenSSH, you're not a target.

Re:What does this mean exactly? how to fix? (2, Insightful)

tgd (2822) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022690)

And on top of that, leave it running.

SBSettings, folks. Turn it on when you need it. If you're not using it, why leave it on even if you have changed the password?

Re:What does this mean exactly? how to fix? (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30022034)

Go to Cydia, manage tab, packages, and see if OpenSSH is on the list of installed packages.

If it is, download and install a package from Cydia called MobileTerminal.

Start MobileTerminal, type in "su", then type in the default password "alpine", then type in "passwd", and set a new password (don't use " quote marks " in any of these commands)

Re:What does this mean exactly? how to fix? (3, Informative)

francium de neobie (590783) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022850)

You can also... ehh... ssh to your iPhone and change it right after you jailbroke your iPhone. You'll need a wifi network and another computer to do that, of course.

Re:What does this mean exactly? how to fix? (1)

bughunter (10093) | more than 4 years ago | (#30023018)

Or you can just leave it like it is and wait for someone like ikee to change the SSH password for you.

Re:What does this mean exactly? how to fix? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30022898)

The quotes don't hurt anything, except in the case of the password...

Re:What does this mean exactly? how to fix? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30023024)

Did they ever fix the passwd utility? Last time I tried running an ssh server on the iphone, changing mobile's password broke the springboard :/

Re:Summary: it affects ignorant fools (3, Insightful)

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) | more than 4 years ago | (#30021984)

...why is there even a default password on sshd for the jailbroken phones?

Probably because the people writing an SSH client for a hacked version of a cell phone have little or no incentive to spend time working on details like requiring the user to input a password when the client is installed. Look if you're going to jailbreak your cellphone and start adding network services like SSH, with very limited user types, you should probably have a clue what you're doing in the first place. I put this right up there with people running Apache on their home Windows XP machine and getting compromised when they don't update it regularly.

Re:Summary: it affects ignorant fools (2, Interesting)

tgd (2822) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022716)

SSHD isn't on jailbroken phones.

The jailbreak installs very little by default. Only users who installed SSHD deliberately, leave it running all the time, and didn't change the password are impacted.

Lots of hype, not as big of a deal as it seems. (And, frankly, wouldn't be a big deal if Apple would open up enough of their APIs for the typical apps most people seem to use when they are Jailbroken could work...)

Re:Summary: it affects ignorant fools (1)

v1 (525388) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022720)

one would assume that getting ssh working is part of the jailbreaking process.

But ya, if you enable ssh and leave the root pw as a default, you deserve a lot worse than a rickrolling...

Re:Summary: it affects ignorant fools (3, Funny)

Like2Byte (542992) | more than 4 years ago | (#30023346)

Egad!! Don't you "Get-off-my-lawn"-types get it?

NOTHING IS WORSE THAN GETTING RICKROLL'D!!

Re:Summary: it affects ignorant fools (1)

BLKMGK (34057) | more than 4 years ago | (#30023626)

Nah, I checked my phone and no SSHD running on it. I had to install cydia and then OpenSSH to get it installed and the instructions to CHANGE THE PASSWORD are pretty clearly right there. This shouldn't be a big deal...

Re:Summary: it affects ignorant fools (2, Informative)

ceoyoyo (59147) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022828)

The root "account" on an iPhone is the same for all phones but is normally disabled. At least at some points in time, a jailbreak consisted of enabling SSH and that root account. SSHing into your phone using that account was the only way you could to anything else - it WAS the break.

Admittedly now, with more user friendly jailbreaks, SSH could ask you to change the password when you install it.

Okay so I tried this... (4, Informative)

BLKMGK (34057) | more than 4 years ago | (#30023414)

My phone is Jailbroken but Cydia wasn't on it. I fired up Putty and nope, connection rejected. Tried to install SSH with Rock, it failed claiming that it didn't have Superuser privs. I fired up blacKra1n and installed Cydia. During the install Cydia appeared to install SSH but still no connection. I went in and reinstalled SSH, now I got a connection with the default password. But wait, at the bottom of the SSH install screen where it tells you how to use it they TELL YOU TO CHANGE THE PASSWORD! they also provide you a link to an article detailing HOW TO DO THAT. At this point I already had an SSH connection so I issued a passwd and changed it. TaDa, that hard to do - sheesh! I also installed an interesting little tool called Toggle SSH, gee guess what that does very well? Yup, blocks SSH connections at the press of a button - like a toggle ;-)

So, I had to jump through hoops to install the damned thing, then I received CLEAR instructions on how to change the default password, AND there's a simple to use FREE program out there that disables it. Obviously it might get installed as part of other things depending upon how you jailbroke but come on, they could not have made this too much easier to fix! If people are getting spanked by this well, perhaps they should have been a little more cognizant when they jailbroke? It's not hard to fix via any computer with SSH on it and you can even load a terminal program local to the phone to fix it....

Re:Summary: it affects ignorant fools (1, Flamebait)

BitZtream (692029) | more than 4 years ago | (#30023612)

Because the people writing software packages for jailbroken phones don't actually know very much about what they are doing?

The just quickly ported SSH and let it use the default passwords, which aren't unique. Which was fine before the phone had anything that used the password file other than UID info. Now that something is authenticating from it, its a bad thing, the fact that its for remote network access makes it a horrible thing.

There is a reason Apple doesn't want every douche bag in the world to be able to throw apps on someones phone. And now you have an example of why they want things to go through the app store.

Oh well, I stopped jailbreaking mine a long time ago, no real need to anymore other than 'omg apple doesn't control me!%!%@!@%'

So... (-1, Troll)

Antony-Kyre (807195) | more than 4 years ago | (#30021910)

I am reminded of those "I'm a Mac, and I'm a PC" commercials. So, Mac's "little brother" I guess is susceptible to the same plagues PCs are.

Re:So... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30021946)

Oh, looks like an Apple Fanboy or LLF (Linux Loving Faggot) has modded you "troll", my condolences.

Anonymous Coward is gay as AIDS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30022988)

I wish you were here so I could take a dump on your head.

Re:So... (4, Insightful)

bjackson1 (953136) | more than 4 years ago | (#30021956)

Yeah, it's the same kind of thing as Windows... Like if a user installed a remote management protocol, then left the default password on it, and then wondered why they got hacked so easily...

Not to mention this is NOT apple's software, or anything that apple sanctioned on their phone. It is from hacked phones. Sadly, this will do nothing but make Apple more sure that they should not open up the iPhone platform more.

Re:So... (1)

rvw (755107) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022782)

Sadly, this will do nothing but make Apple more sure that they should not open up the iPhone platform more.

...which is complete BS! Whether Apple opens up the platform or not will not depend on an issue like this. It will depend on their vision on how to make money and keep it selling. If they allow an ssh-server in the future, knowing this, they will force the user to change the password to something else.

Re:So... (-1, Troll)

ChromeAeonium (1026952) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022028)

I don't think this is too surprising, except that it hadn't happened sooner. Large similar populations make for easy targets for viruses. This seems to be a universal. For example, you can see the same principle as mono/multi-culture in agriculture. Compare, say, the diseases apples get with the ones pawpaws get. Apple has always been the minority but here, Apple is the apple. Welcome to having a large marketshare.

Re:So... (1)

dingen (958134) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022106)

Where do you get the iPhone has a large market share? The latest numbers from IDC [idc.com] suggest Apple has about 17% market share in the smartphone market. In the entire phone market, they're probably not even in the double digits.

Re:So... (1, Informative)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022634)

It's worth noting that the kind of person who compiles these statistics doesn't use quite the same terminology as everyone else. Smartphone only covers the top end of what most people would think of as a smartphone. The (much larger) rest of this market is comprised of things called 'feature phones,' which includes thing that were smartphones a couple of years ago. It's not just a simple split between dumb phones that make class and send SMS and smartphones which do other stuff too; they split the market into four or five largely arbitrary segments, of which smartphones is the smallest (although growing quickly).

Re:So... (0, Flamebait)

ToasterMonkey (467067) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022188)

I don't think this is too surprising, except that it hadn't happened sooner. Large similar populations make for easy targets for viruses. This seems to be a universal. For example, you can see the same principle as mono/multi-culture in agriculture. Compare, say, the diseases apples get with the ones pawpaws get. Apple has always been the minority but here, Apple is the apple. Welcome to having a large marketshare.

This was a problem with the jailbroken sshd config. The people effected by this should not be written off as stupid though! Cellular phone + RTFM or it will get broke into = _serious_ usability flaw. Yes, even something as simple as changing a default password to a remote service on a 24/7 public network connected device. Really, this shows how irresponsible the sshd for iphone package authors were, and why Apple locks things down in the iphone as much as they do. Good job! Now more people will be afraid to jailbreak, and Apple may have to spend more time making sure it can't happen. Way to spoil it for the rest of us.

Re:So... (2, Insightful)

secolactico (519805) | more than 4 years ago | (#30023534)

Cellular phone + RTFM or it will get broke into = _serious_ usability flaw

Yes, but what makes you think jailbreaking apps writers are interested in usability? It seems to me that if you are taking a device and making it perform outside its manufacturer-specified parameters, you are taking that responsibility upon yourself. If you are using your own tools or something provided by a third party is irrelevant.

How is this worse (responsibility-wise) than having a phone bricked because of a botched jailbreaking attempt?

I'm not writing off the users as stupid, but they are certainly not blameless.

Not Apple though (3, Insightful)

SuperKendall (25149) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022462)

The vulnerability does not happen on any iPhone coming directly from Apple. It's only devices that are jailbroken, then only devices that have sshd installed, and then only devices where those users left the default password in place because, hey - who is going to scan for an iPhone in a coffee shop?

I agree generally with your point about a monoculture, but this is not it. It's a stupid default on a security tool shipped by a third party, that a smaller percentage of users will have (though the last I head the jailbroken iPhone population was north of a million so it's still significant).

Re:So... (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30022364)

I am reminded of those "I'm a Mac, and I'm a PC" commercials. So, Mac's "little brother" I guess is susceptible to the same plagues PCs are.

Dude . . . it has nothing to do with Mac security. They've installed a third party application on their iPhone -- a service, no less. It's like giving out your house key to everyone, then complaining about how ineffective your house locks are. There are a couple of security practices being ignored by the end user here -- and these are users that, knowing how to jailbreak an iPhone, should know better.

1. Never leave a default password.

2. Never install a service if you don't need it. (Okay, maybe some DO need it, but I doubt all of them.)

The same applies to Windows. Windows is riddled with security problems, hence 75% of windows viruses still work, whereas less than .001% of mac viruses still work (if even that). But even so, many "security problems" in Windows are not the fault of Windows, but of the user running it. It doesn't matter how perfect your burglar alarm is if you don't turn it on.

On a lighter note:

Dark Helmet: "Give us the combination to the air shield!"

King Roland: "All right! All right. It's 1-2-3-4-5."

Dark Helmet: "That's the stupidest combination I've ever heard in my life! That's the kind of combination an idiot would have on his luggage."

[enter president Skroob]

President Skroob: "Did you get the combination to the air shield?"

Dark Helmet: "Yes! It's 1-2-3-4-5."

President Skroob: "That's amazing! I have the same combination on my luggage!"

Mel Brooks FTW.

firstp ost! (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30021920)

aye

Good thing its just Rick Astley (1)

Korey Kaczor (1345661) | more than 4 years ago | (#30021922)

Because at least Apple fans are no strangers to love. Microsoft just knows the game and they're gonna play it.

FRIENDS !! DON'T LET YOUR FRIENDS SUCK FROM JOBS' (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30021934)

TIT !! It's just not good for you or your friend.

Narrow Band detector (5, Insightful)

MasterOfGoingFaster (922862) | more than 4 years ago | (#30021950)

So this worm is aimed at people are are smart enough to jailbreak an iPhone, but stupid enough not to change a default password. Sounds like a narrow band detection device.

Re:Narrow Band detector (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30022046)

also this article fails to mention that the worm disables ssh after infecting the device.. therefore kinda cleaning up the problem ..

Re:Narrow Band detector (2, Informative)

ceoyoyo (59147) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022874)

Not exactly. Jailbreaking an iPhone these days isn't what it used to be.

It doesn't even require the command line anymore.

Something Ironic about the lyrics (5, Funny)

masmullin (1479239) | more than 4 years ago | (#30021964)

and the iPhone getting rickroll'd

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3KANI2dpXLw&feature=player_embedded#

Re:Something Ironic about the lyrics (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022978)

WTF? That video is not available in my country because of some greedy bastards from the stone age.

How about you give me an ed2k link or one to a torrent file, like in the 21st century?

SSH (2, Funny)

Lennie (16154) | more than 4 years ago | (#30021968)

I thought SSH was created to add more safety. ;-)

Re:SSH (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30022164)

So do condoms but how many Niggers have you heard wearing condoms when they are engaging in animalistic rape. Just assume that these retards running this are like niggers except a nigger would never be able to use an iphone, much less jailbreak one. They would probably look at it and break it while looking to rape something. And BTW imagine how the world would be if all those incarcerated niggers were out on the streets (Cause they don't have homes, unless you count crack houses). Having the highest incarceration rate is the only thing keeping US Major Cities from looking like Sudan or Somalia.

Similar case (5, Informative)

Stratoukos (1446161) | more than 4 years ago | (#30021970)

Ars technica reported a similar case in the Netherlands about a week ago. A teenage "hacker" replaced the wallpaper with one showing an alert that told the user to give him 5 euros for instructions to remove the "virus". Full article [arstechnica.com]

Re:Similar case (3, Funny)

dingen (958134) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022068)

As a response to this, T-Mobile is now in the progress of installing firewall software so phones on their network can't communicate with each other, making similiar hacks in the future a lot more difficult.

Re:Similar case (0, Troll)

adolf (21054) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022558)

Wow. Just, wow.

Are you fucking kidding me?

So much for the Internet being, well, an Internet.

Re:Similar case (2, Funny)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022696)

Wow. Just, wow.

Are you fucking kidding me?

And for you, sir, version 2 -

It looks for any flashlight app on your system and then when you try to run it, the phone plays "You light up my life".

Download it now. Be the first on your block.

Re:Similar case (1)

DavidTC (10147) | more than 4 years ago | (#30023050)

Erm...unless the phone wanders into range of a wifi network, and gets on that, in which case the phone company firewalling the phone network is hardly going to do anything.

Incidentally, I was unaware that phones actually could communicate with each other over the NAT IPs given out by the phone company. Interesting. That opens up all sorts of interesting concepts...

Re:Similar case (1)

dingen (958134) | more than 4 years ago | (#30023468)

Erm...unless the phone wanders into range of a wifi network, and gets on that, in which case the phone company firewalling the phone network is hardly going to do anything.

Of course. But then you're not on their network, so they have no responsibility there.

This story seems familiar (2, Informative)

Virak (897071) | more than 4 years ago | (#30021986)

Oh right. [arstechnica.com] Probably someone saw that story too and decided to have a little fun with the same gaping security hole too.

Wow i can't believe (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30022100)

My poorly written code made slashdot! I mean there's nothing here move along..

DEFAULT PASSWORD? (1)

argent (18001) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022198)

Holy Mother of Cheswick.

What was it, username "FIELD" password "SERVICE"?

Re:DEFAULT PASSWORD? (3, Informative)

MindCheese (592005) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022306)

User: root
Password: alpine

Unless you reset it with passwd once you get in (something no guide underscores the importance of, and your typical "ooooh shiny" mass-market Apple consumer won't know), this is the default.

Having a default password is bad enough, but my question is: why does the celluar network in Australia permit direct device-to-device connections over the air?

Re:DEFAULT PASSWORD? (4, Interesting)

argent (18001) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022392)

Having a default password is bad enough, but my question is: why does the celluar network in Australia permit direct device-to-device connections over the air?

Once you're running an IP stack, you'd have to make a deliberate and non-trivial effort to prevent direct connections, no?

Re:DEFAULT PASSWORD? (3, Informative)

ceoyoyo (59147) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022924)

Actually, most of the jailbreaking guides did make a big deal of changing your password, back when installing SSH was a required part of the process. Apparently when you install SSH through Cydia today it also suggests you change the password. So the people who got hacked ignored a clear warning.

Once you connect your phone to the Internet, device to device connections are sort of the default. You have to purposely block incoming connections to prevent it.

Re:DEFAULT PASSWORD? (1)

CharlyFoxtrot (1607527) | more than 4 years ago | (#30023642)

Also those being hacked could be using old firmware versions. Back in the old (1.1.3.) days the passwd command installed with the jailbreak was broken and users were advised [flipsidereality.com] not to use it.

Re:DEFAULT PASSWORD? (1, Insightful)

UnknowingFool (672806) | more than 4 years ago | (#30023358)

For this exploit to occur 3 things must happen:

  1. Consumer must jailbreak phone.
  2. Consumer must install SSH.
  3. Consumer must not reset root password.

You typical "ooooh shiny" mass-market Apple consumer generally does not do #1 above much less the two other things.

Re:DEFAULT PASSWORD? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30022344)

Since sarcasm travels so well over the internet, and I'm not sure if you're serious, user name is "root", password is "alpine" by default. I have thankfully changed mine. It shouldve been written better, as it has to be done through MobileTerminal, never good for inexperienced users...

Re:DEFAULT PASSWORD? (1)

argent (18001) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022372)

I was referring to the notorious "field service" back door DEC had back in the '70s.

They should have required you to set a password on initial install.

Re:DEFAULT PASSWORD? (1)

DavidTC (10147) | more than 4 years ago | (#30023064)

Erm, it doesn't have to be done though MobileTerminal, it can be done through SSH, of course.

mobile account user (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30022226)

There is also the "mobile" account username, which uses the same default password. It seems like this could also be vulnerable.

I did an interview with ikee-as is seen on my blog (4, Informative)

OzJD (1613377) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022258)

Quick spam, But it's a lot more informative http://blog.jeltel.com.au/2009/11/interview-with-ikee-iphone-virus.html [jeltel.com.au] I asked as many questions as I could come up with, and he answerred them all :) Source code is listed on that link as well

Re:I did an interview with ikee-as is seen on my b (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30022312)

Just adding some background info to this drama, OzJD was in cahoots with ikee before this was released and they are both making the most of their 15 minutes of fame

Re:I did an interview with ikee-as is seen on my b (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30022356)

Just adding some background info to this drama, OzJD was in cahoots with ikee before this was released and they are both making the most of their 15 minutes of fame

lol and you my friend "anonymous Coward" are a penis face

Re:I did an interview with ikee-as is seen on my b (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30022428)

They're also lovers.

Re:I did an interview with ikee-as is seen on my b (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30022790)

OzJD, you're so dreamy...:) I wish i could take you home with me

don't click it! (2, Informative)

jmil (782329) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022354)

don't click the link. i was fooled. the posting and comments above are sophisticated hacks to get you to click the link and be rickrolled. the tactic recently attempted here: http://bit.ly/3Xdrd [bit.ly]

Go Slashdot! (1, Flamebait)

red90tsi (1404931) | more than 4 years ago | (#30022834)

"Other inquisitive hackers may also be tempted to experiment once they read about the world's first iPhone worm."

Yay spread the word slashdot!

A message for default passworded iPhone users... (3, Informative)

TheJodster (212554) | more than 4 years ago | (#30023110)

If you are too stupid to change the default password on the SSH server running on your iPhone, you shouldn't have a jailbroken iPhone. You should leave the damn software alone so that Big Daddy Jobs can take care of security for you. Come back and see us jailbreakers when you get to wear your big boy panties.

this is what I would do (0, Flamebait)

ILuvRamen (1026668) | more than 4 years ago | (#30023200)

Since we all know only douchebags spend way too much on a locked down, overly-proprietary piece of crap iPhone to show off to their friends so they think they're cool, I'd like to see a worm that makes it randomly play over the speaker, "Warning! Incoming douchebag! Douchebag over here, watch out!"

1234567890 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30023286)

He he. How things are speeding up! Imagine this title, I dont know, 10-15 years ago. iPhone worm?? Rickroll??? Jailbroken Phone?

Apple conspiracy (-1, Troll)

justinlee37 (993373) | more than 4 years ago | (#30023496)

Has it occurred to anyone else how this could benefit Apple? The hack specifically only affects "jailbroken" phones. If people begin to see unlocked phones as less secure and safe than phones that haven't been tampered with, they are less likely to violate Apple's business agreements and also to make Apple appear incompetent by doing so. I wouldn't be surprised if Steve Jobs himself is responsible for this Rickrolling.
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