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Making Carriers Shoulder Smartphone Security

timothy posted more than 4 years ago | from the wait-for-per-byte-malware-removal-fee dept.

Cellphones 57

alphadogg writes "Georgia Tech researchers have received a $450,000 NSF grant to boost security of iPhones, BlackBerries and other smartphones and the wireless networks on which they run. And it's those networks where the researchers are really zeroing in. The researchers are looking into ways wireless carriers such as AT&T and Verizon can detect malware on devices and clean up the devices before they do further damage. 'While a single user might realize that a phone is behaving differently, that person probably won't know why,' says Patrick Traynor, assistant professor at Georgia Tech’s School of Computer Science. 'But a cell phone provider may see a thousand devices behaving in the same way and have the ability to do something about it.' Georgia Tech is going to build out a cellular network test bed to try out its remote repair techniques."

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57 comments

Anyone else have a bad feeling about this? (5, Insightful)

rolfwind (528248) | more than 4 years ago | (#30067418)

The researchers are looking into ways wireless carriers such as AT&T and Verizon can detect malware on devices and clean up the devices before they do further damage.

Last time a company had access to the contents of a device (Amazon -> Kindle), they caused a really big uproar.

Re:Anyone else have a bad feeling about this? (2, Informative)

XPeter (1429763) | more than 4 years ago | (#30067508)

T-Mobile -> Sidekick is another failed example.

Re:Anyone else have a bad feeling about this? (4, Insightful)

nine-times (778537) | more than 4 years ago | (#30067546)

Yeah, it seems like it has to be a fine line. Like what gets defined as "malware"? Anything that uses more bandwidth than the carrier likes?

It reminds me slightly of broadband providers blocking port 25 in order to prevent spam. I don't mind that as a concept, but if so they should be willing to open it on request without too much of a hassle. Charging an extra $15 a month to open it seems like they're not really trying to cut down on spam, but rather trying to milk their customers by charging for things that really should come free with access.

Re:Anyone else have a bad feeling about this? (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#30068576)

It's obvious: If it limits the money-making, it must go.

Programs, freedoms, family life.
All your friends and then your wife.
Leisure, pauses, sleep and fun.

And the redemptory gun.

Re:Anyone else have a bad feeling about this? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30068434)

I am leery of giving unfettered regulatory power to a gatekeeper that has obvious financial interests to act in a manner that conflicts with my own:

No, I dont run spam botnets, nor do I write malware; however, what about people that write SSH proxies to bypass walled garden policies on their devices? If the verbiage of the "agreement" about malware is poorly written, this useful software could (and likely would) be classified as "Malware", and systematically removed from connected devices.

I would settle for the following scenario though:

$Telco detects that I have $Malware installed on $Device. They call me on either my landline or my cell, and inform me of the infection-- THEN-- OFFER to remove it for me.

Depending on my decision, they remove it remotely, or they don't remove it.

This way, the control of what is running on my phone is still ultimately MY decision as the consumer, and is not the authority of an outside and financially motivated regulator.

Re:Anyone else have a bad feeling about this? (1)

linhux (104645) | more than 4 years ago | (#30070082)

Mind you, they don't necessarily need access to the device internals to detect that it's running malware. There are products for ISP's that detect traffic patterns that indicate an infected computer, and then isolate the computer in question in a sandbox network where all HTTP requests go to a support page with cleanup tools and links to anti-virus vendors. I guess you can employ a similar strategy for wireless networks.

(My employer used to have such a product, I think it's still in use in some Finnish broadband companies.)

Re:Anyone else have a bad feeling about this? (1)

pnblake (1677170) | more than 4 years ago | (#30072376)

Agreed. There better be a way to shut it off too. I'm not really afraid of the whole big brother thing, rather I don't want anything inhibiting my ability to run apps that I want to run. That is why I switched to a blackberry from an iphone. I loved the iphone (except for the keyboard) but the appstore was full of shit that had to be approved. With the blackberry I can install/develop whatever I want and not worry about it getting approved before it can be run on the device.

Re:Anyone else have a bad feeling about this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30078638)

Yeah, what happens when you make registry changes for better performance and disable features/apps that came with the phone to clean it up... Then the Cell phone provider will be able to "undo" your hacks and put their garbage programs back on. No thanks!

Contract addendums (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30067488)

Next, they'll add into their contracts: 'Costumer does not own their phone. We reserve the right to make whatever changes to the device we deem acceptable. Any and all changes made that cause injury or loss of use of the device are not cause for release from this contract.'

Re:Contract addendums (4, Funny)

peragrin (659227) | more than 4 years ago | (#30067630)

you forgot all contacts entered into this phone are open to our marketing department. all photos taken can be used by the carrier for advertisements. all calls made will be recored to insure "quality" control

Re:Contract addendums (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30071684)

you forgot all contacts entered into this phone are open to our marketing department. all photos taken can be used by the carrier for advertisements. all calls made will be recored to insure "quality" control

I know you're joking, but that seems to be happening with T-Mobile. People logging in to their accounts are seeing other people's pictures (including nudie shots) in ads for other T-Mobile services:

http://consumerist.com/5397214/t+mobile-surprise-porn-not-an-isolated-incident [consumerist.com]

signs your smartphone's been p0wned (4, Funny)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 4 years ago | (#30067530)

Upon turning on your phone, it demands a cookie.

Your phone tells you it needs antivirus installed.

Hold music is replaced by a twisted AI that sings about cake and says it's okay if you want to leave (a message). ...

Re:signs your smartphone's been p0wned (1)

bertoelcon (1557907) | more than 4 years ago | (#30067674)

Hold music is replaced by a twisted AI that sings about cake and says it's okay if you want to leave (a message). ...

But GLaDOS makes a great answering machine. She is a good way to filter out the messages I didn't need, but I haven't had any voicemails in a month so maybe I should make sure she's working.

Oh gawd, she's using my phone as a sonic weapon against me. HEEEEEEELLLLLLLL

LOST CARRIER

Re:signs your smartphone's been p0wned (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30071190)

You don't have any messages.

Re:signs your smartphone's been p0wned (4, Funny)

highbulp (1216382) | more than 4 years ago | (#30067770)

Upon turning on your phone, it demands a cookie.

And if you give your phone a cookie, it's going to ask for a glass of milk. One thing will lead to another, and soon it will want your social security number.

Re:signs your smartphone's been p0wned (1)

lamapper (1343009) | more than 4 years ago | (#30070566)

And if you give your phone a cookie, it's going to ask for a glass of milk. One thing will lead to another, and soon it will want your social security number.

Then it will want your first born's social security number,

Oh great (5, Interesting)

the_Bionic_lemming (446569) | more than 4 years ago | (#30067540)

So they are going to deploy the ability to remotely update the users device. Because the bad guys will never figure out how the company does it. I can see it now. An entire carriers smart cell line bricked by a remote exploit that updates phones.

Re:Oh great (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30068574)

If that draws attention to how organized criminals and criminal governments are already utilizing the technique, then God bless them. I mean, do you really believe that the telcos aren't already providing governments with a way to activate their own programs remotely? Really? Like a program that replaces the software power off sequence with one that blanks the screen then activates the mic? What sorts of classified domestic eavesdropping programs do you suppose Obama is protecting in the name of national security. Wake up, the walls have had ears for years now.

Re:Oh great (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30068748)

So they are going to deploy the ability to remotely update the users device.

What "deploy"? Is there a carrier/phone combo which doesn't have this right now?

Re:Oh great (1)

Mike1024 (184871) | more than 4 years ago | (#30070364)

So they are going to deploy the ability to remotely update the users device. Because the bad guys will never figure out how the company does it. I can see it now. An entire carriers smart cell line bricked by a remote exploit that updates phones.

People often say things like this here on Slashdot, but automatic update tools like Debian's apt-get and Microsoft's Windows Update have never been hacked and used to distribute virus-ridden updates*. My Ubuntu netbook has never been "bricked by a remote exploit" even though it's open source, so be bad guys know exactly how the update mechanism works.

In other words, we have the technology to make secure remote update software. Technology like public/private key cryptography to digitally sign updates, and only apply those with a valid, trusted signature.

What makes you think remote updates for cell phones would be any less secure?

*Unless you count [WGA / .NET / Ubuntu 9.10 (delete as appropriate)]. Rimshot!

Re:Oh great (1)

CRiMSON (3495) | more than 4 years ago | (#30074410)

I personally can't wait for everyone smartphone in North America to just one damn stop working lol.

I think it would be fucking hilarious.

Rather not... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30067576)

I'd really rather not allow a company access to "clean up" my devices. While this might be good in certain corporate or university based environments where all the equipment is owned by a central group, is isn't a good idea for public cellular networks where individuals own the phones. That is, unless we go to a phone lease system instead of purchase. I should really shutup before I give the networks more ideas on how to screw us over...

Bitpipe (5, Insightful)

BodeNGE (1664379) | more than 4 years ago | (#30067670)

Wireless Internet Providers are just that, ISP's. They should have the same level of monitoring and control of the sites I surf and the applications I run as a terrestrial ISP, ie NONE. I can see that they would welcome this move, it helps them disguise the fact that they have become dumb bitpipes and are losing money on value added services.

In the corporate space however there are device management solutions available for Windows Mobile, Blackberry and Symbian that have seldom been rolled out at carrier level. These can lock down devices so that malware cannot be installed, and unauthorized applications removed. I cannot see that working as a consumer proposition, it really doesn't work well at the corporate level either. importantly these solutions are all at the IP layer (dumb bitpipe) and don't care how the device connects to the management server. ActiveSync, WiFi, cellular connection (and yes, via SMS too) will all trigger a wiped device or an app uninstall.

Nothing to do with telcos. Move along.

Re:Bitpipe (1)

sacrilicious (316896) | more than 4 years ago | (#30069286)

Agreed. And the headline that slashdot tacked on to this article: "Making Carriers Shoulder Smartphone Security"... "MAKING" them "SHOULDER" it like it's some kind of burden?? wow, you'd think the editors of /. were in bed with the cell industry, doing their NewSpeak PR for them. A more accurate headline would be "Cell carriers delighted to portray naked power grab as good for users".

Re:Bitpipe (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 4 years ago | (#30069550)

Wireless Internet Providers are just that, ISP's. They should have the same level of monitoring and control of the sites I surf and the applications I run as a terrestrial ISP, ie NONE.

The difference between wired and wireless is that one is a shared & finite resource.
Your suggestion, that they both get treated the same way, ignores reality.

The worst thing a wired internet connection can do is max its own bandwidth.
One mobile device behaving badly can bring an area's network to a standstill.

Why is the NSF? (4, Insightful)

joocemann (1273720) | more than 4 years ago | (#30067742)

Spending money to facilitate better service for these private businesses who have not only made billions from customers, but took billions of tax dollars and screwed us as citizens.

NSF should not be paying a cent for this. The issues need to become prominent enough for the customers to demand better products from the oligopoly of telcos.

Re:Why is the NSF? (2, Insightful)

OctoberSky (888619) | more than 4 years ago | (#30067850)

Spending money to facilitate better service for these private businesses who have not only made billions from customers, but took billions of tax dollars and screwed us as citizens.

NSF should not be paying a cent for this. The issues need to become prominent enough for the customers to demand better products from the oligopoly of telcos.

I'm usually quite on board with the government not paying money to help businesses further their own causes, but there are exceptions to every rule.

This should be seen as acceptable, just like it's seen as acceptable for the government to pay for the NHSTA to crash cars to test them. Those tests are given back to the manufacturers to make... wait for it... better cars. Sure it helps the manufacturers, but more importantly it helps the consumer, or more important to the governments cause, the citizenry.

No government can safely doll out money and not expect it to get back into the pockets of big business somewhere down stream in commerce. To think so is asinine (and I'm not suggesting that's what your suggesting). But there has to be exceptions, and this one, I think falls under such exceptions.

Re:Why is the NSF? (1)

Paco103 (758133) | more than 4 years ago | (#30068050)

There's a huge difference here though. Nobody is going to die if a cellphone performs horribly in a security test (ruling out side effects such as not being able to call 911). Also, testing the phones does not require them to be destroyed, unlike testing a car. Understandably, auto manufacturers are not interested in crashing thousands of cars, and those tests have to be standardized to have an fair comparison between the different brands.

There's also a line between what they're attempting to do. With auto tests, they see how safe the car is and with that information I go buy the one I want and it's mine for me to control. They're wanting to install backdoors into phones so that carriers can fix your problems. I'm sure this offers the government a little incentive to fund this plan. It's a good thing that we all know backdoors never, EVER fall into the hands of the bad guys, and nobody will EVER be able to exploit such a hole. I'm serious, it's a really good thing!

Re:Why is the NSF? (1)

joocemann (1273720) | more than 4 years ago | (#30068134)

I can agree with that.

Akin to what Paco103 said, though, these phones aren't a necessity to human life, and the backdoors they're looking at are also inherently a security issue.

Personally, I don't agree with the money, but you've reasoned me enough to not disagree with the notion of others thinking it is being appropriated well enough. They can think that and I can agree that they are being reasonable enough.

Re:Why is the NSF? (1)

CodeBuster (516420) | more than 4 years ago | (#30069566)

But there has to be exceptions, and this one, I think falls under such exceptions.

If your fancy-pants smartphone gets p0wned nobody gets killed. If you want a reliable emergency phone there are cheaper basic alternatives. Think about this whenever you think about the government spending money: if the government is going to spend money it first must take it from somebody else by force (taxes aren't optional...and yes inflation is a tax too). That is an extremely disagreeable process which should be reserved only for the greatest collective needs of society. This should include the branches of government mandated by the US Constitution, the courts, the police, the military and not much else. I completely disagree that improving your iPhone rises to that level of public urgency. Sheesh, the sense of entitlement of the leftie cultists of Apple really is galling sometimes.

Re:Why is the NSF? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30068844)

The amount and the fact the principal investigators are both assistant professors makes this sound like a CAREER grant from NSF. It's meant to help out new faculty and is pretty far-ranging in scope. Basically, if you're an assistant professor and you have some project that'll cost around $400k, you can write up a proposal for this particular NSF program. It's unlikely that NSF asked for people to submit proposals about cellular networks, that's just what these guys chose to write up.

Re:Why is the NSF? (1)

CodeBuster (516420) | more than 4 years ago | (#30069496)

NSF should not be paying a cent for this.

That is absolutely correct. Why should public money go to yet another private company? Is Apple going to give the US Treasury a cut of the profits from future iPhone sales (not likely)? The whole bailout mentality is such bullshit; what ever happened to taking responsibility for one's own successes and failures? Another 200,000 ordinary Americans lost their jobs last month, joining millions already on the unemployment rolls. The taxpayer is drowning in red ink, our kids will curse us when they are old enough to realize what we have done, and NSF spends $450,000 on a bullshit project to improve corporate products on the public dime. Apple, RIM, and AT&T have more then two nickles to rub together, let them pay for their own damn product improvement . These damn NSF bureaucrats should spend a month or two working a real job for ordinary working class wages; maybe then they would better appreciate the real value of the money they so frivolously spend.

Re:Why is the NSF? (1)

lamapper (1343009) | more than 4 years ago | (#30070710)

Why should public money go to yet another private company?...bailout mentality is such bullshit... These damn NSF bureaucrats should spend a month or two working a real job for ordinary working class wages; maybe then they would better appreciate the real value of the money they so frivolously spend.

I could not agree more, with your quotes and especially the last couple of lines. The fact that the Republicans dug Americans a very DEEP financial hole is enough of a reason never to see them ever elected to office again as they put party politics ahead of the citizens they take an oath to serve and protect. Hypocrisy. And do not get me started on lying to start unnecessary wars killing Americans, makes me sick. Profanes the sacrifice that many in my family have made serving in our US military. As far as I am concerned, they violated their oath of office and if they had a soul worth a darn, would resign in shame!

With that said, the Democrats went along with it (bail outs), in spite of the public out cry against them, and are just as guilty of playing party politics. So they are not much better, however I am willing to give them another 4 years while we build a viable 3rd party in this country.

We need a 3rd party focused ONLY on the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, period without all the extraneous and decisive issues used by both parties to continue their party political BS and divide Americans. Hard core Republicans amount to less than 9% and hard core Democrats are less than 18%; the rest of Americans (approx 73%) are somewhere in between, being distracted by a variety of issues (brought up by both parties to divide us), especially religion. They do not even realize they jeopardize "freedom of religion" for all of us by focusing on any one religion and/or making any religious based laws. They need to wake up before they do something that can NOT be undone and hurts us all.

Everything we need to control both parties and save America is in the Constitution and Bill of Rights. When a politician takes money and or votes in such a way that their actions go against either of those two documents, they should be removed from office for violating their oath of office.

As for Public Money being spent...has already happened in many areas via American Tax dollars, one area very close to the heart of this article is tax money + fees + money given to telcos to build out Fiber networks across America AND OVER THE LAST MILE to our homes. The American telcos have received in excess of $200 Billion since the 1990s to build Fiber. Yet they perpetuate the scarcity myth, do not build out fiber offerings as fast as they could for fear of being ONLY an TCP/IP packet passing company (the only way most of my friends and I view them anymore, whether they like it or not!) simply to charge us higher and higher fees each month with no regards to the economy or economics that would dictate prices should fall unless being artificially held up and increased as they have been for the last two decades.

They have taken our money and our parents money, given debt, our children's money....Where's the Fiber? (think 1980 Wendy's commercial "Where's the Beef" and you have the right idea)

Perhaps you are right, perhaps a real job working for what most of us get paid in wages would serve as a wake up call, perhaps...

Froth much? (1)

chihowa (366380) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076958)

NSF should not be paying a cent for this.

That is absolutely correct. Why should public money go to yet another private company?

Where did you read that the NSF was giving money to a private company? This is a research grant that is being paid to faculty at a university to fund research on how to make smartphones more secure. This is spelled out in the first sentence of the summary.

Seriously, sometimes the game of rabid-emotional-frenzy telephone that goes on here is a little much.

Re:Froth much? (1)

CodeBuster (516420) | more than 4 years ago | (#30078972)

Improving the products of private companies benefits primarily the private companies because any additional profits from increased sales accrue to the owners and not taxpayers. Investments in technology can be done quite adequately by the private sector. IMHO, unless the technologies in question have a clear public use, as part of other necessary functions of government, research and development should be left to the private sector and private money.

Not a big issue... (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 4 years ago | (#30067834)

There is hardly any malware for mobile platforms out in the wild. I don't see how security is a huge issue. Sure, some may point to the jailbroken iPhone worms but that is because they were running SSH with a default password! I'm surprised it took this long, whats next having the government sniff our Facebooks in the name of "security" because a few people with the password of "password" were hacked? This is opening a can of worms we should leave unopened.

Re:Not a big issue... (1, Troll)

arminw (717974) | more than 4 years ago | (#30068376)

...There is hardly any malware for mobile platforms....

That is because there is a huge variety of mutually incompatible devices. Manufacturers of phones also tend to design security in, rather than an afterthought, such as happened with Windows. When a device is hacked, such as jail broken iPhone's, the built in security from the manufacturer is nullified. Even though millions of iPhones have been sold, none of them, except for the jail broken ones have any problems with rogue software. Because Apple checks all programs for the iPhone, no bad programming can ever get through.

Re:Not a big issue... (3, Insightful)

bertoelcon (1557907) | more than 4 years ago | (#30068562)

Because Apple checks all programs for the iPhone, no bad programming can ever get through.

You in the market for a bridge in the Brooklyn area?

Re:Not a big issue... (2, Informative)

socsoc (1116769) | more than 4 years ago | (#30068712)

no bad programming can ever get through

You realize that Apple doesn't vet the programming and there have been approved apps that later got revoked or the ire of the community for being shady?

Re:Not a big issue... (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 4 years ago | (#30069092)

No. The fact that your iPhone is jailbroken or not doesn't make it any less secure. The fact was it had SSH running with a default password. Having SSH running is of course a huge flag that says "Connect to me!", having the default password means that anyone can connect to it. Its not the difference between it being jailbroken that it is insecure its the stupidity of having SSH running with a default password.

Re:Not a big issue... (1)

mdwh2 (535323) | more than 4 years ago | (#30072328)

Most mobile platforms adopted a common standard - there are something like 2 billion Java smartphones out there. I can download an app from anywhere, and run it on my Motorola with no hassles.

Unfortunately Apple have decided to go with an incompatible phone, but that's only about 1% of the market anyway, so hopefully we won't return to the bad old days of the 80s where there were millions of platforms all incompatible with each other.

Re:Not a big issue... (1)

arminw (717974) | more than 4 years ago | (#30075080)

....but that's only about 1% of the market....

Last time I looked, there were about 18 million happy owners of the iPhone, about 17% of the total smartphone market. Most users don't care if there's a mouse running around inside the phone making it do its thing, but what matters is that it is easy to use and works reasonably well. They could care less about Java or any other technical details. That's just for us Slashdot users to talk about. There is nothing standard about phones from other manufacturers that allows the same piece of software to run on them all. It's not like windows on PC. They are all mutually incompatible and that includes the various flavors of the Android system. It's just like the various flavors of Linux are generally incompatible out-of-the-box and require special tweaking, by someone knowledgeable, to adapt it to a particular flavor.

Stay Out Of My Phone! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30067860)

'nuff said.

netphone-neutrality (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30067902)

is netphone-neutrality politically different than net-neutrality?

how about stop useing network locks & custom s (0)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 4 years ago | (#30068140)

how about stop useing network locks & custom software this more like the same carp that you get on new pc's.

My Phone, No Touch! (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30068328)

I hate to be an obnoxious twit, but I REALLY don't like the idea of a carrier messing with my phone, even for the sake of carrier network stability. I would rather have the phone's carrier network access locked down so all IP traffic is stopped and all non-emergency voice calls get redirected to a call center who can inform me that my phone behaves like a virus laden whore. When and if I want to modify my phone OS and applications is my call. At least for GSM, the SIM card is by design an easily transferable token confering network access and an authentication token. Whomever holds this token is authorized as far as the system is concerned.

  While putting a stop to virus outbreaks may be altruistic, fundamentally allowing such functionality is dangerious. That recent incident of carrier spyware being slipped into a fake blackberry update (in Dubai?) illustrates this, and that's probably only the tip of the iceberg. Only until very recently, consumers have put up with carriers getting root access to their phones.

Fuck that noise.

If I need an OS update, I get it from the phone manufacturer. If I need mobile antivirus, I get that from a vendor. The carriers are still living in the fantasyland that they are not a provider of dumb bandwidth pipes and can bleed their customers dry for things from bluetooth activation to single character charges in SMS.

If anything, this is the reason why a real opensource phone like OpenMoko was necessary.

I'm from ATT and I'll be your admin (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30068400)

The concept of traffic analysis to identify malware seems credible at first glance from a technical perspective. But the last thing we need is another justification the mobile operators can use to assert admin control over our devices.

Uuum what?? (1, Funny)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#30068542)

Are we cattle or what?

"Ohh, I don't know what's... happening to me."
"Ohh, it all happens... automatically."
"Ohh, you keep me well and safe."
"Ohh, you rule all of my life."

"You are just... too kind my masters."

Mobile devices are the same as your computer! (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30068780)

Seriously, how many people think it's a good idea to let your ISP into your computer. Controlling it, installing/removing software, etc. Nobody would stand for that.

Mobile devices are not that different. They are still your personal computer and nobody should be screwing with it unless you explicitly allow it.

Now the phone company is certainly within their rights to degrade or isolate malfunctioning devices on their network but they better be doing that at the network level and not actually touch your device. They also better not completely disconnect a device just because it's malfunctioning. People's lives can depend on a phone working. In the case of a virus infected or otherwise malfunctioning device they could isolate its functionality on the network so that it can only be used with certain critical functions.

Re:Mobile devices are the same as your computer! (1)

RMH101 (636144) | more than 4 years ago | (#30070526)

Agreed. A lot of FUD gets spouted about network stability, but what we should bear in mind is that the comms part of your phone - e.g. the GSM radio - isn't hackable by the OS. It's effectively addressed a little like a hardware modem - being passed specific AT commands. A rogue app isn't going to be able to bring down a cell tower - unless it's by something low tech like just making an awful lot of calls. I'd expect the network to be able to notice a specific handset that does anything that might interfere with their network and knock it off the network, but I don't expect a network to have anything whatsoever to do with the software that I run on my phone.

Do govs really want Smartphone security? (1)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 4 years ago | (#30070760)

What would the NSA's, CIA's, DIA's, GCHQ's ect do if the public started running heavy encryption in their pockets?
Part of the charm is tracking, easy to tap, seeing who you phone and getting a voice print.
Some computer company could upset this balance of total information awareness that is the phone.
Costas Tsalikidis, the Greek telco whistleblower who was found hanged.
Adamo Bove head of security at Telecom Italia who exposed the CIA renditions via cell phones ‘fell’ to his death.
Or http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2009/07/blackberry-spies/ [wired.com]
So an average this is all just warmed over epic Magic Lantern for your pocket.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magic_Lantern_(software) [wikipedia.org]
An always on zfoneproject.com like layer would be great :)
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  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
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