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openSUSE 11.2 Released

Soulskill posted more than 4 years ago | from the new-and-shiny dept.

SuSE 207

An anonymous reader tips news that openSUSE 11.2 has reached its official release. You can get it from their download page, or just grab the torrents (32-bit, 64-bit). "openSUSE 11.2 will come with the latest version 2.6.31 of the Linux kernel, the beating heart of every openSUSE system. The default file system of openSUSE will be switched to the new Ext4 as well. Of course, openSUSE will continue to support Ext3 and other filesystems — but on install, new partitions will automatically be designated Ext4. ... Desktops and servers can use the same kernel, but it's better to tune the kernel for the job at hand. That's why openSUSE now includes a desktop kernel specially tuned for desktop users. ... In addition to the work of the openSUSE Project in the desktop, openSUSE 11.2 includes the latest versions of the two desktop environments, KDE 4.3 and GNOME 2.28. KDE users will enjoy the new Firefox KDE integration, OpenOffice.org KDE4 integration, consistent KDE artwork and all standard applications being ported to KDE4 including KNetworkManager, Amarok, Digikam, k3b, Konversation and more."

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207 comments

But... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30075676)

will my wifi work *EVERYTIME* without giving me an ulcer?

Re:But... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30075724)

No (it's a Linux distro)

Re:But... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30076048)

No (it's a Linux distro)

It's just not ready for the desktop.

Re:But... (3, Insightful)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076170)

Suse read NTFS partitions out of the box years before Ubuntu could.

Re:But... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30076898)

good story bro

Re:But... (1)

Vetruvet (1639267) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076154)

I dunno, my wifi has worked perfectly since 10.3... on 2 different laptops and 1 dektop... all three had different chip makers (Atheros, Intel, Broadcom).

Re:But... (1)

Rip Dick (1207150) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076936)

Wifi is sketchy on my Toshiba Satellite. If the network requires a WEP key or anything, it just wont connect sometimes... no matter how many times I mess with the settings. I liked OpenSuse (11.1 I believe) and KDE, but it was too annoying to use daily, as I'm always changing wireless networks.

Re:But... (1)

CannonballHead (842625) | more than 4 years ago | (#30077078)

10.1 and 10.3 and wifi worked fine for me (I actually really liked 10.3 and was excited ... until 11.0), 10.2 and 11.0 weren't so great.

Re:But... (1)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076922)

Suse 9.something worked out of the box for me, when Windows wouldn't. I installed a half dozen different distros, before I found a 64 bit OS that "just worked". In fact, that was the straw that broke the camel's back. I disowned Microsoft within days after purchasing my first 64 bit Opteron.

Re:But... (1)

Bacon Bits (926911) | more than 4 years ago | (#30077440)

I have the opposite experience. Windows XP and later work out-of-the-box on my system, but OpenSUSE never has. I started with 9, and also tried 10.1, 10.2, and 11. The system typically works fine from LiveCD, giving me false hope, but installation always fails to produce what I'd call a usable system. Anything from no sound or no network to X not starting. I tend to just get frustrated and go back to Windows. It's too bad. I want to run something other than XP or Ubuntu, but those are the only systems that work well with the PC.

The beating heart... (3, Funny)

CannonballHead (842625) | more than 4 years ago | (#30075696)

openSUSE 11.2 will come with the latest version 2.6.31 of the Linux kernel, the beating heart of every openSUSE system.

As opposed to all those other distros, which don't use the Linux kernel as their "beating heart." :)

Re:The beating heart... (3, Insightful)

ZERO1ZERO (948669) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076482)

at least its a differentiation of Linux and Distro. As in Ubuntu is not Linux. Really? Try telling (most) Ubuntu users. When somebody on the internet claims 'their Linux i not working' I'd say the odds are good that they are running Ubuntu.

Re:The beating heart... (3, Insightful)

CannonballHead (842625) | more than 4 years ago | (#30077046)

Even geeks on slashdot refer to it as "Linux" and distros are named "RedHat Linux" and "Ubuntu Linux" and "SuSE Linux."

If you called your car a "Mercedes Car" you might be under the impression that the entire thing was called a "car" and that "Mercedes" made a "version" of it. You probably wouldn't think that the "car" was actually just the engine and all the rest was called a "distribution." :)

And frankly, I'm fine with calling it as a whole "Linux" just like people refer to Windows as a whole as "Windows," even if it's Windows XP or Windows 2003 or Windows Vista or Windows 3.1. Most people differentiate, but not all the time.... "Windows" is the least common denominator. "Linux" is the least common denominator. :)

Re:The beating heart... (2, Insightful)

houghi (78078) | more than 4 years ago | (#30077372)

Even geeks on slashdot refer to it as [...] "SuSE Linux."

Then they must hand over their card as soon as possible. It is openSUSE or SUSE Linux Enterprise for some time now. The latter is the 'official' Novell one and is also called SUSE. openSUSE is community based where Novell is a very important part of the community.

Re:The beating heart... (2, Insightful)

CannonballHead (842625) | more than 4 years ago | (#30077526)

I know it's openSUSE or SLES... it's actually "SUSE Linux Enterprise Server" if you want to be picky. I've used openSUSE personally and SLES at work.

(I actually had the capitalization wrong though, I thought the U wasn't capitalized. Oh well. Learn something new...)

But most people don't get caught up in saying exactly the right name, I don't think. Nobody calls it GNU/Linux ;) (hehe)

Seems that most people call it by the distro name first, though, since most distros market it as such, I guess...

Re:The beating heart... (1)

caluml (551744) | more than 4 years ago | (#30077070)

When somebody on the internet claims 'their Linux i not working' I'd say the odds are good that they are running Ubuntu.

Rewind 10 years, and s/Ubuntu/Redhat/g

Re:The beating heart... (3, Funny)

Bralkein (685733) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076802)

Depends if they set CONFIG_NO_HZ=y :P

Re:The beating heart... (3, Funny)

Mr. DOS (1276020) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076828)

Yeah; the others have the tick(er)less kernel.

      --- Mr. DOS

Re:The beating heart... (4, Funny)

Bralkein (685733) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076938)

Here on Slashdot today, not only did two people make a joke about an obscure techincal configuration option of the Linux kernel, we both made the same joke, and we made it one minute apart. This place is terrifying.

Re:The beating heart... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30076960)

Please quit signing your posts. It is considered tactless and obnoxious by most people. If you want a sig then put it in your sig block so that people can block it.

Re:The beating heart... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30077480)

It is clear you are not Bruce, Falcon, =Smidge=, or jcr. Many others, one presumes...

Re:The beating heart... (1)

Gilmoure (18428) | more than 4 years ago | (#30077436)

OpenSUSEbsd?

Re:The beating heart... (1)

Blakey Rat (99501) | more than 4 years ago | (#30077504)

Most distros don't need to move gallons of blood...

Come to think of it, what the heck is SUSE doing!?

Who...cares? (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30075704)

Linux is not, has never been, and will never be the desktop of 20xx. Get used to Windows, please! Thanks.

Re:Who...cares? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30075758)

Exactly. Let me know when I can buy things from the iTunes store, sync my iPod and iPhone, install a native Photoshop client, have professional video and audio editing tools, tear-free video playback, actual Blu-Ray support (not having to rip to the hard drive or use some esoteric library that only half works) and then we'll talk.

Re:Who...cares? (-1, Flamebait)

Disgruntled Goats (1635745) | more than 4 years ago | (#30075786)

Oh and saying to run things through Wine isn't going to cut it. If freetards are going to claim that I can do everything in Loonix like one can do in Windows I don't want to have to use some emulator for Windows to get things running.

Re:Who...cares? (4, Interesting)

filesiteguy (695431) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076068)

It is unfortunate, however, you'll need to run Wine or VMWare or Virtualbox or Xen to get those viruses loaded and running.

(I tend to think the other way: How can I run Nautilus, KTorrent, KRDC, and GMountISO in Windows.)

Re:Who...cares? (1)

Disgruntled Goats (1635745) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076812)

(I tend to think the other way: How can I run Nautilus, KTorrent, KRDC, and GMountISO in Windows.)

By installing KDE for Windows [winkde.org] .

Re:Who...cares? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30077146)

It is unfortunate, however, you'll need to run Wine or VMWare or Virtualbox or Xen to get those viruses loaded and running.

Of course if you want to root a machine. Most rootkits will only run on Linux, sure there are plenty of Windows rootkits nowadays but rootkits originated on (hence the ROOTkit name) and are still most actively developed on Linux.

Re:Who...cares? (1)

Vahokif (1292866) | more than 4 years ago | (#30077242)

(I tend to think the other way: How can I run Nautilus, KTorrent, KRDC, and GMountISO in Windows.)

Explorer, uTorrent, built-in remote desktop or VNC client of your choice and Daemon Tools, respectively. The issue isn't with specific software but functionality, and you aren't helping Linux by pretending that it can natively do everything Average Joe wants.

Re:Who...cares? (0, Offtopic)

Zombie Ryushu (803103) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076270)

I don't know what hole you crawled out of, but I suggest you stay there until you have legitimate concerns.

when I have a problem, I report it, and I actively do everything I can to fix it, I don't actively attack others sensibilities.

Re:Who...cares? (-1, Flamebait)

Disgruntled Goats (1635745) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076842)

I don't know what hole you crawled out of, but I suggest you stay there until you have legitimate concerns.

So not being able to run native apps to buy from iTunes, sync my iPod and iPhone or a lack of profesional apps for doing image/video/audio editing aren't legitimate? No wonder you'll never have more than 1% of the desktop.

Re:Who...cares? (4, Insightful)

TheNinjaroach (878876) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076896)

So not being able to run native apps to buy from iTunes, sync my iPod and iPhone

It's almost like you blame Linux for the fact your hardware vendor tries so hard to lock out 3rd party support.

Re:Who...cares? (4, Interesting)

CannonballHead (842625) | more than 4 years ago | (#30077156)

It's almost like you blame Linux for the fact your hardware vendor tries so hard to lock out 3rd party support.

You're right. Some people do. Because Linux "evangelists" like to say that Linux can do everything Windows can do.. .except better, AND it's more secure, AND it's free, AND it has a GREAT community.

MOST of which is true. It may or may not be better, it is more secure and it's free and it does have a good community (there are plenty of Windows communities as well, of course).

But it does not do everything Windows can do, because not everything runs on Linux. And most people do not want to lose hardware that works well for them for the sake of switching to Linux. Like iPods and iPhones.

Sure, blame Apple and not Linux for the actual hardware issue (interesting: Apple is a great company at Slashdot until it is convenient for it not to be a great company at Slashdot :) my experience, anyways)... but blame Linux fans for claiming things that either aren't true or are only true if you are more committed to using Linux than using your existing proprietary hardware. Some people care more about their existing hardware that works well and that they like than whether or not it works with Linux. And it's a perfectly valid reason, too. Doesn't mean Linux is bad, it just means some people have different priorities.

Re:Who...cares? (1, Troll)

mcrbids (148650) | more than 4 years ago | (#30075840)

Really? (typing this on my Fedora Core laptop)

It's been my desktop for nearly 10 years...

Re:Who...cares? (1)

Disgruntled Goats (1635745) | more than 4 years ago | (#30075868)

WorksForMe(TM)

I certainly don't anymore (1)

Santana (103744) | more than 4 years ago | (#30077594)

Don't get me wrong, please.

I love KDE since 1.x. I've always hated GNOME since it was shipping with RH 5.2.

But I've been waiting for KDE and the whole Linux desktop experience to be good, and 11 years have passed.

Today, I have embraced Mac OS X for my personal desktop, and *love* it: I'm not looking back any more; I use OpenBSD for most of my servers of course; and for the PCs at work, I have succumbed to Ubuntu, a very customized Ubuntu that doesn't expose a whole desktop, but just a dock with only the applications the users need for work.

I fail to see why an easy to use desktop on Linux is needed any more, because all my three uses for a computer are already perfectly covered.

Not that I would reject using Linux as a desktop somewhere. Heck, I have used OpenBSD as a desktop. But just because I want to contribute to the project, or learn their internals. And for my users, it's better for them and for the company/institution that forget that they have a "Personal Computer": they don't; the machine in front of them is just a tool to get their job done. Then a whole desktop is overkill.

Finally (3, Informative)

kimvette (919543) | more than 4 years ago | (#30075710)

Finally, easy upgrades come to OpenSUSE.

sudo zypper dup !

I just had to cleanly install OpenSUSE 11.1 the other day because I was in the middle of patching 10.3 when Novell took down the repositories. I worked on the broken system for a week before making the time to reformat/reinstall. I started patching it by hand to make the 10.3 -> 11.1 dup work, but it was just too time consuming.

But anyway, I'll be running zypper dup in the next few days after demand on the servers dies down. It's about time SUSE users get a clean in-place upgrade process. :-)

Re:Finally (1)

houghi (78078) | more than 4 years ago | (#30075914)

I also welcome it. Many people have already used it and seened to be happy with it. I will wait till 11.3 till I use it. Although by then I hope to be just using my own distri that I will be making on http://susestudio.com/ [susestudio.com]

Re:Finally (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30076758)

zypper dup already worked in 11.1 .....

It's working pretty well and I have updated a few systems (4) already.

Re:Finally (1)

Macka (9388) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076650)

Zypper *groan* .. what the hell was wrong with yum? It pisses me off that if I am ever called on to work on a SuSE system that I can't use the knowledge and experience I have with yum and have to learn yet another fucking package manager. If they had a problem with Yum, why not just work closer with Redhat to improve it and keep the development effort/cost down for everyone. They obviously haven't learned from Unix history: that trying to be a "better" unix than everyone else by being different doesn't win you more market share, it just makes you a niche player. Commercial unix vendors fell into this trap years ago and look where it got them !

Re:Finally (1)

metamatic (202216) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076718)

Zypper *groan* .. what the hell was wrong with yum?

Well, for starters it's incredibly slow. I have quad-core 3GHz servers with RAID arrays that take longer to update using Yum than my 1GHz VIA C3 EPIA box does using APT.

Re:Finally (1)

Macka (9388) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076982)

And you've tried zypper and it's faster? And what does quad-core have to do with anything? yum isn't multi-threaded. I have a bunch of HP Proliants at work with 2.13GHz CPUs, also with RAID and yum whizzes along quite nicely from a local repo server over NFS.

Re:Finally (1)

Macka (9388) | more than 4 years ago | (#30077072)

I should clarify that NFS statement. Was thinking about when I do a yum localupdate ... of cause you don't need NFS to install/update from a local repo.

Re:Finally (1)

metamatic (202216) | more than 4 years ago | (#30077154)

Yes, zypper is significantly faster.

I mentioned quad-core and RAID to reassure readers that it couldn't be a CPU or disk speed constraint causing yum's slowness.

I don't think I've ever seen yum do something I would describe as whizzing. I've seen it take a crap a few times, but that's probably due to RPM.

Re:Finally (1)

Macka (9388) | more than 4 years ago | (#30077446)

That's not justification enough for pissing off your users who have to work with multiple linux distributions. An update is something you do very infrequently, and yum not that slow that shaving a few minutes off an update is going to make a snot of difference. The important thing is whether or not it works, resolves dependencies properly and preserves changes you've made to local config files. And yum does the job very well.

Zypper to me is a "political" move, not a technical one, and it's not going to win them any friends in industry.

I've seen it take a crap a few times, but that's probably due to RPM

Um, but SuSE are still using RPM underneath zypper, so how is that a better situation exactly?

Re:Finally (1)

houghi (78078) | more than 4 years ago | (#30077536)

Well, then keep on using yum. It is still there.
An old blog about the time differences: http://duncan.mac-vicar.com/blog/archives/309 [mac-vicar.com]

The reason they started with zypper was the problem of speed. In the beginning it was slow. Now it is seriously fast. And yet you can still use yum if you want that. It is there. The choice is yours.

Why switch to openSuse? (2, Interesting)

RiotingPacifist (1228016) | more than 4 years ago | (#30075730)

This is nice and all but that's a pretty standard distro release, can anybody tell me why i would want to switch from a similar distro, say ubuntu 9.10 or fedora 12 to openSuse?

sure I could try them all but there is only so much time i want to spend installing/setting stuff up.

Re:Why switch to openSuse? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30075782)

Don't! It is made by Novell so this is actually a M$ Linux and thus evil!!11one

Re:Why switch to openSuse? (1)

RiotingPacifist (1228016) | more than 4 years ago | (#30077080)

I forgot about pissing of the boycott Novell types, I'm downloading the torrent NOW!

Re:Why switch to openSuse? (1)

russlar (1122455) | more than 4 years ago | (#30075850)

yast

Re:Why switch to openSuse? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30075958)

If you like whichever distro you're currently using, stick with that. You're not the only reader here, and some of the others use OpenSUSE or simply have an interest in what's happening with different distributions.

Re:Why switch to openSuse? (4, Interesting)

houghi (78078) | more than 4 years ago | (#30075998)

Only you can tell. If you are happy with what you have, stay where you are. (This also goes for Windows users.) If you are interested in trying out, download it and try it out. I use it as I like YaST and zypper. I also like to use it to combine it with the repositories I can make myself on https://build.opensuse.org/ [opensuse.org] and I like it because I can easily make my own distro based on it on http://susestudio.com/ [susestudio.com]

Re:Why switch to openSuse? (4, Interesting)

Krondor (306666) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076128)

Sure a few reasons;

OpenSUSE has one of the best KDE4 setups. They've done a lot of work into making KDE4 really shine. The Firefox KDE integration is AWESOME, and not something I am sure the other distros are shipping with. There is also additional work above and beyond stock on OpenOffice and such. A great attention to detail on the theming (not that you can't change that on Ubuntu and Fedora).

Zypper is hands down the best RPM tool and I would say on par or superior to Apt. Definitely a step over yum.

Nomad provide an RDP server for Linux that supports Compiz, not sure if that's been ported to other distros.

iFolder (if you care about that) is so far only packaged for SUSE, I believe.

Also Yast is great to administer your system if you're not command line friendly. It used to be atrocious, but now is very much decent. I still don't use it that much, but it has an appeal to people (especially our Windows friends). Overall it's a solid distro and I would say on par with Ubuntu and others.

Re:Why switch to openSuse? (1)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076478)

One of the best aspects of Yast is that the core design and libraries are agnostic of the toolkit. So the CLI version of Yast looks and operates the same was as the GTK+ and Qt versions.

Re:Why switch to openSuse? (3, Informative)

cbhacking (979169) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076806)

Actually, one of the major advantages of Yast is that it has an excellent NCurses-based terminal interface, which works beautifully over ssh. Easiest distro to remotely manage that I've ever tried (also, back in the day, easiest one to fix on the occasion that a graphics driver update made X stop working).

For those who don't know, Yast is basically the configuration tool for *everything* - repository and package management, network configuration, video driver configuration, user accounts, runlevel and login behavior, configuring a hypervisor, re-partitioning, managing GRUB... basically, it's a centralized management tool. It's graphical and designed for user-friendliness, with help info for every setting, but it will also display the relevant config files and allow you to edit them manually too. I've actually found it useful when trying to learn the format of a given config file, since Yast's help info + comparing the options on the graphical display with the generated config file = an easy way to learn the format and options of a config file.

Re:Why switch to openSuse? (1)

houghi (78078) | more than 4 years ago | (#30077290)

For those who don't know, Yast is basically the configuration tool for *everything*

It is also used for the installation itself. If you make your own openSUSE or SUSE based distribution, you can completely change the whole installation process.
http://forgeftp.novell.com//yast/doc/SL11.1/ [novell.com] has a TON of information and if you desire you can even write your own modules.

e.g. the part about automated partitioning [novell.com] under AutoYaST. [novell.com]

Re:Why switch to openSuse? (2, Informative)

slonik (108174) | more than 4 years ago | (#30077334)

For those who don't know, Yast is basically the configuration tool for *everything* - repository and package management, network configuration, video driver configuration, user accounts, runlevel and login behavior, configuring a hypervisor, re-partitioning, managing GRUB... basically, it's a centralized management tool.

Your forgot to mention that Yast also manages Apache, Samba, security, sshd, printers/scanners, fax, network time ntp, etc. Pretty much Yast configures everything that is configurable:-)

Re:Why switch to openSuse? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30077228)

Yast was great until Novell bought SuSE. Then it went downhill with all of the enhancements that Novell wanted to have in it. It is getting better, it was much faster in 11.1 than in 10.1, for example.

Compared to Redhat's built in tools for administration, Yast is amazing. Then again, if you can't use the command line, you may as well just use Linux as a personal Desktop OS. I'll never care about Yast or any other admin tool like it on the servers that I support.

Re:Why switch to openSuse? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30076140)

openSuSE's a nice, user-friendly distro that doesn't need too much fiddling from the user to work out of the box but comes with some nice admin tools that might help when you do want to mess around. i have a habit of ending up back on openSuSE because it works with all my hardware (except the inevitable wireless, which no linux will work with easily, thanks to broadcom) without any fuss.

if your distro suits you fine then i wouldn't bother swapping -- to any other distro. what would be the point? if, on the other hand, you're one of those that's been stung by hardware issues with ubuntu updates or fedora pushing something that's not quite roadworthy then openSuSE's worth a punt.

sorry for the lack of flames :(

Re:Why switch to openSuse? (1)

H.G.Blob (1550325) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076148)

IMHO openSuse is the by far the most polished KDE distro out there and yast is a very useful tool if you don't like editing config files.

Re:Why switch to openSuse? (2, Informative)

sricetx (806767) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076644)

And it's problematic if you do like editing config files. At least when I was using it (Suse 10.0 or 10.1?) before I switched to Kubuntu, Yast didn't play well with config files I had hand-edited and tended to overwrite my changes. Package management was god-awful in the Suse 10 release too, but I'm assuming that's been fixed by now.

Re:Why switch to openSuse? (1)

Krondor (306666) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076800)

Package management was god-awful in the Suse 10 release too, but I'm assuming that's been fixed by now.

It has been fixed, thank god! OpenSUSE 10 made the horrible mistake of trying to wedge in the redcarpet (ZENworks for Linux) stuff. It went horribly horribly bad. They lost a lot of people as dependency hell ensued. 10.1 was a complete rewrite of how they handled packages, and with zypper standard now (even with Yast). It's not just fixed but it is the best RPM distro at handling packages, IMO.

Eww 10.0... shudder.

Re:Why switch to openSuse? (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30076162)

It's a bit more stable that Fedora, or at least that's been my opinion from using it. It's well balanced new enough packages but it doesn't change every 6 months and when it does change it's possible and fairly easy to upgrade.

It has java packages, mono packages, all the dev tools you can image. The repository collection they have is fairly rich and complete as well. Flash runs in Firefox, there are VLC package with video codecs and all the good stuff. Honestly, to me as a user and I've sort of done my time being a bleeding heart libre/free software advocate and monk, it's not ideological, it's simply a platform and it works pretty darn well. I know people get butt hurt about mono and java and who Novell has done business with but it works out of the box, has damn never everything I need and it has all the fluff that is nice to have. If you've got some ideological feelings, you'll be happier with FC12. Firefox is called "Firefox" in OpenSuse. I believe it has a webkit based browser now as well. Opera is in the non-OSS repo. It has a non-OSS repo.

As far as comparing it to Ubuntu? It's RPM based. It seems like a very competitive product with Ubuntu but I couldn't say which is "better."

It's a high quality, community driven distribution with all the bells and whistles.

Re:Why switch to openSuse? (1)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076450)

The reason I run openSUSE is that they have great packages. Ubuntu's 9.10 release was like every other release they have, which is broken. Fedora also likes to push bleeding edge.

openSUSE does live fairly close to the bleeding edge, but they have a lot of developers pushing upstream code, and making solid packages. Heck, I often run weekly development snapshots from them and feel pretty secure in knowing they won't break my box.

They have arguably the best KDE 4.x desktop out there (Arch and Sabayon also being solid contenders). They also put a lot of time and attention into their Gnome desktop, but I don't run it and can't comment on it.

Yast is a fantastic tool.

Novell seems to be pushing the bulk of development in major projects like Evolution, Openoffice, etc. Novell and Red Hat seem to be the two kings of upstream development.

The knock against openSUSE is that they're falling a little behind in certain features (they're just now pushing EXT4, I think they still haven't moved to Upstart or DeviceKit, etc.) Sadly, I think think this is a result of the Novell layoffs last year. I wish there were fewer distros, so that the Linux community could consolidate and focus on putting out the best possible product as oppose to replicating everyone else's efforts.

Re:Why switch to openSuse? (1)

TheGreatOrangePeel (618581) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076680)

When I'm curious about a distro, I test ride it on VirtualBox as it minimizes the amount of time I waste on the distro. That's not to say that all Linux distros are a waste of time ... My advice is that you install a few apps and go through a couple of updates in the virtual machine before you spend any time on doing an install on a real machine.

Re:Why switch to openSuse? (1)

anandrajan (86137) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076848)

This is nice and all but that's a pretty standard distro release, can anybody tell me why i would want to switch from a similar distro, say ubuntu 9.10 or fedora 12 to openSuse?

I've been running opensuse since 9.3 (when it was just SUSE 9.3). I don't know about switching from fedora, but opensuse 11.2 has a very nice kde 4.3 implementation. And you can run kde 4.3 without using pulseaudio which is a plus in my book since I don't see the need for pulse on my standard desktop. Of course YMMV.

Re:Why switch to openSuse? (4, Informative)

kimvette (919543) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076928)

If you want to get actual work done, OpenSUSE is pretty much ready to go out of the box. Its achilles' heel has historically been poor wifi support (requiring a lot of tinkering, whereas Ubuntu has worked consistently well with wifi in my experience) but hopefully 11.2 fares a lot better in that regard.

Re:Why switch to openSuse? (1)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 4 years ago | (#30077100)

I can't think of any "compelling reasons" to switch distros. Suse is nice, it gave me my "entry" into Linux because it worked on hardware that everything else balked at. But - I've actually moved away from Suse to Deb derivatives - mostly Ubuntu.

As for testing everything - I've encouraged many Windows users to download and run LiveCD's. That advice might apply to seasoned *nix users as well. Curious, but not willing to go to all the work of installing? Test drive those LiveCD's!!!

Oh yeah - I made a convert last evening. He brought me an e-Machine with Vista. Totally Fubar'd. I sat him down, demonstrated E-live and Ubuntu, and he demanded that I install Ubuntu for him. I'll be getting some support calls from him, but I won't be cleaning any virus off of Ubuntu!

Wokring Link? (1)

SirBigSpur (1677306) | more than 4 years ago | (#30075826)

Anybody know of a mirror that actually works?

Re:Wokring Link? (1)

Vetruvet (1639267) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076006)

No... it seems just about all mirrors (that I checked) are either timing out or give 403 Forbidden messages. I was able to start a download from a direct link (but it got flaky and stopped), and now I can't even start (or find a working torrent).

Re:Wokring Link? (2, Informative)

houghi (78078) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076122)

http://software.opensuse.org/112/en [opensuse.org] which will point you to a mirror automatically, to bittorernt, metalink or a mirror you can select.

If you have a bit of experience, you can go with the Network version. Otherwise go with the GNOME or KDE version. Only if you will be installing on several machines should you download the DVD.

After installation there is no difference between the different versions, except for the obvious difference between KDE/GNOME. The CD versions are live versions can be run from USB stick as well.

More infor on the above URL

I use windows 7 (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30075858)

is there a compelling reason for switching to 11.2?

Re:I use windows 7 (0, Troll)

Disgruntled Goats (1635745) | more than 4 years ago | (#30075892)

Sure, if you think you're being too productive and you have way too many useful programs available to use under Windows.

Re:I use windows 7 (1)

SirBigSpur (1677306) | more than 4 years ago | (#30075964)

I use Windows 7 as well and so far really like it. However I find that its fun and interesting to play with different Operating systems from time to time.

Re:I use windows 7 (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30076772)

is there a compelling reason for switching to 11.2?

Yes. There are several. Do you want to have your wireless randomly forget your settings? Do you want a lack of software? Do you want your desktop to crash a few times a week? Do you want the majority of hardware available in stores to not work? Do you want your sound to not work?

If you answered yes to any of those, Linux is for you! Why doesn't everyone use it?

Re:I use windows 7 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30077478)

Score minus 1,000,000.

Nice, but ... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30075948)

How does this compare to, say, a train, which I can also afford?

Be still my beating heart (0)

westlake (615356) | more than 4 years ago | (#30075984)

the beating heart of every openSUSE system.

Linux as the love object of a Harlequin romance.

KNetworkManager, Amarok, Digikam, k3b, Konversation and more.

I suppose the geek learns to live with this sort of thing. But words like Korny and Konfusing also come to mind,

Re:Be still my beating heart (1)

TheModelEskimo (968202) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076126)

But words like Korny and Konfusing also come to mind,

*booop beeep* INSERT COIN

Only 11.2? (1)

filesiteguy (695431) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076120)

I'm suprised to see they're only at 11.2. I honestly had moved away from SUSE/openSUSE towards Ubuntu after the zypper wars and teh KDE3/4 issues. (I succumbed to using GNOME on Ubuntu and am okay with it.) The last I used openSUSE was 11.1 almost a year ago, and I would have figured they to be at 11.3 or even 12.0 by now.

Re:Only 11.2? (1)

houghi (78078) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076174)

Every 8 months there is a new version (used to be 6). So 11.3 will be out in 8 months. I can't wait. :-D

Re:Only 11.2? (1)

Vlad_the_Inhaler (32958) | more than 4 years ago | (#30077040)

A downloaded a brand new opensuse level around 20-December last year and am pretty sure it was 11.1. That is a l-o-n-g 8 months. I am grabbing it now and will put it up on my test machine when BitTorrent finishes.

Re:Only 11.2? (1)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076520)

They moved to an 8 month release. 8 months is almost a year. Are you suggesting that Ubuntu is superior because the increase the version number every 6 months as opposed to 8 months?

What does a version number mean?

Ext4 makes me nervous as Hell. (1, Insightful)

Zombie Ryushu (803103) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076206)

When ext3 came out, I had reservations about it, and I stuck to ext2 until I was reasonably sure ext3 was totally safe. I've heard bad things about Ext4 corrupting data. While not as overtly malicious as Pulse Audio, (Which is an insidious parasite. Difficult to remove.) ext4 scares the Hell out of me at this state.

I urge Linux users to stick to ext3 for the protection of your data. At least for another year, give ext4 the chance to mature, then, when we are certain ext4 is safe, start using it.

Re:Ext4 makes me nervous as Hell. (0)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076540)

Ext4 has been mature and stable for at least 3 years now.

I also think openSUSE is the last of the big distros to switch to it. So it isn't like they are pushing something brand new.

Re:Ext4 makes me nervous as Hell. (3, Informative)

Rhapsody Scarlet (1139063) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076774)

Ext4 has been mature and stable for at least 3 years now.

No, it's been in the kernel for three years but was developmental for most of that. It was only declared stable with 2.6.28 [h-online.com] , which was released just over one year ago. Personally, I'm going to wait another year or two here. When it comes to file systems, I tend to be on the conservative side.

Re:Ext4 makes me nervous as Hell. (3, Interesting)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 4 years ago | (#30077042)

Ext4 is merely an extension (that is mostly backwards-compatible) of Ext3. Ext4 was born out of patches that were intended for Ext3. In 2006, the decision was made to split some of the newer features being pushed into Ext3 under the namespace of Ext4. It isn't like they started development on Ext4 in 2006. In 2006, there was a usable file system from the day it was annouced as a "new" project.

It was pretty damn stable then, and even more stable now.

I've been running it for 3 years. The age of a product does not always equate directly to stability. There are old releases that aren't very stable, and then there are projects that are well designed, and are stable pretty much from day 1.

Ext4 is one such project. However, if you're terrified of Ext4 eating your dog, you're welcome to run Fat32 if it makes you feel better.

Re:Ext4 makes me nervous as Hell. (2, Interesting)

Bacon Bits (926911) | more than 4 years ago | (#30077302)

However, if you're terrified of Ext4 eating your dog, you're welcome to run Fat32 if it makes you feel better.

Don't be obtuse. FAT is a horrible file system. He's going to stick with ext3.

A simple Google search [google.com] shows that many people and many different distros have experienced data corruption and data loss and it has been attributed to anything from bugs in ext4 to the kernel not behaving as the ext4 developers were expecting due to specific configurations made for a given distro. Some people are very paranoid about data loss. Using ext3 instead is his choice, and choice is what Linux is all about.

Re:Ext4 makes me nervous as Hell. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30076918)

Ext4 has been mature and stable for at least 3 years now.

From wikipedia:

"on June 28, 2006, Theodore Ts'o, the ext3 maintainer, announced the new plan of development for ext4"

So they went from planning to "mature and stable" in less than five months?
I did not know Chuk Norris was a kernel contributor.

Re:Ext4 makes me nervous as Hell. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30076614)

I remember /. arguing about weather it was ext4's fault or KDE's that data was lost. Because it was /. the truth was not discussed despite how intelligent and informed every single +5 was.

Ext4 is fine. You can stop the paranoia. It isn't necessary now and it won't be two years from now when you are still trolling it like it's hot off the press.

Re:Ext4 makes me nervous as Hell. (1)

Vlad_the_Inhaler (32958) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076944)

That statement loses all its impact when made by an AC.

Re:Ext4 makes me nervous as Hell. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30076720)

ext4 is the one that loses data. That Ted Ts'o "your data means nothing to me" programmer tries to defend this as somehow "correct" but was forced to backtrack to keep users from massive data loss. The fact that Ted Ts'o still has commit access to any kernel level code repositories is a strong negative for Linux when competing for mindshare. The powers that be should have booted him the minute he spewed his boneheaded "explanations" blaming the userland programs for the data loss when the data loss didn't occur with previous file systems.

I tried it and had incredible amount of truncated files, but fortunately for me it wasn't on a system that had important stuff. Stay away from ext4 until they get around to removing Ts'o commit access to the main kernel repositories and somebody with a clue steps in to fix the mess he created.

Re:Ext4 makes me nervous as Hell. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30076910)

What exactly makes you nervous? Just because of what you heard? Have you even tried it for yourself?
I've tried it with several different distros and they all worked great.

I wouldn't trust ANY file system without current backups.
Oh, please say you are making current backups and if you are, what's the worry?

Re:Ext4 makes me nervous as Hell. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30077036)

Who cares about ext4? They are using the usual "throw it away before it's even finished and start on another one" development method. Just wait for btrfs, or until btrfs gets dumped for something else far better.

Re:Ext4 makes me nervous as Hell. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30077130)

"I urge Linux users to stick to ext3 for the protection of your data. At least for another year, give ext4 the chance to mature, then, when we are certain ext4 is safe, start using it."

You are not a file systems expert. So why give out shady misinformed advice and why do you think anyone will listen.
ext4 is stable. Very stable. The tiny amount of people experiencing minor data loss happened during the development stage and was nipped in the bud a long time ago.

Stop giving advice out for things you haven't tested and stop spreading FUD. Yes. You.
Leave the decision to what is good for your system to the experts. Yes. The OpenSuSe developers have selected ext4fs as the default file system because they have tested it for you and have not found it to corrupt or loose data.
It is your loss if you don't want to use the improvements of the new file system and stick with a should be depreciated fs but please don't advise others to follow your misguided theory that everything is broken "Because you heard/read about it somewhere."
ext4fs is good!

Re:Ext4 makes me nervous as Hell. (0, Troll)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 4 years ago | (#30077238)

I've been waiting for Reiser to go mainstream. Whatever happened to that? Huh? Oh, you say Reiser went to prison? DA-YUM!! They won't give him access to the intartubez, or what?

This is just the schitz.

Ext4? Hmmmm. We're not being set up for ANOTHER murder mystery, are we?

"or just grab the torrents " (5, Funny)

rickb928 (945187) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076320)

There you go again, egging us on to use such tools with no legitimate use for actual *legal* purposes.

Somewhere, the CEOs of Comcast, Time-Warner, the RIAA, and AT&T have collectively felt a great disturbance in the Force, as if most of their objections to actual legitimate Internet use were suddenly silenced...

Upstart, DeviceKit, etc. (2, Interesting)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 4 years ago | (#30076562)

Congrats first and foremost to everyone who worked on this release.

I use and love openSUSE. I've been running betas of 11.2 for a while now.

My only gripe is that openSUSE still apparently hasn't switched to Upstart, nor DeviceKit. I assume Novell's layoffs last year are the reason that openSUSE seems to be falling a little behind in feature adoption. I hope this isn't a growing trend.

huh? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30076716)

"Verify your download (optional, for experts)"

how about:

"Verify your download (mandatory, for everybody)"

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