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Synthetic Stone DVD Claimed To Last 1,000 Years

timothy posted more than 4 years ago | from the will-your-progeny-the-warranty dept.

Data Storage 416

Lucas123 writes "A start-up launched a new DVD archive product this week: a disc that it says will hold its data for 1,000 years. The company, Cranberry, says its DiamonDisc product, which can be used in any standard DVD player, is not subject to deterioration from heat, UV rays or material rot due to humidity or other elements because it has no dyes, adhesives or reflective materials like standard DVD discs, and its discs are made from a vastly more durable synthetic stone. Data is laid down on the platter much in the same way as a standard DVD disc, but with DiamonDisc the burner etches much deeper pits. Cranberry said it is also working on producing a Blu-ray version of its 1,000-year disc."

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What the bets the first release will be... (5, Funny)

s0litaire (1205168) | more than 4 years ago | (#30082728)

..."The 10 commandments" Remastered Special Edition.
It's the 2 (Synthetic) Stone DVD Version...

Re:What the bets the first release will be... (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30082842)

Hopefully in 1000 years it will be appropriately categorized as "fiction."

Re:What the bets the first release will be... (5, Funny)

Cryacin (657549) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083122)

Hopefully in 1000 years it will be appropriately categorized as "fiction."

It's not as if that's written in stone!

Re:What the bets the first release will be... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30083284)

Hopefully in 1000 years it will be appropriately categorized as "fiction."

Lol, yeah well most likely in a 1,000 years you'll be saying, "Crap! It was real - all of it was in that Book! Now what do I do?"

Re:What the bets the first release will be... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30083362)

Amen

Re:What the bets the first release will be... (2, Funny)

Al Dunsmuir (758685) | more than 4 years ago | (#30082854)

Nope.... Flintstones!

YOG LIKE ROCKS! (0)

Philip K Dickhead (906971) | more than 4 years ago | (#30082860)

YOG EAT!

Re:What the bets the first release will be... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30083016)

It better include the Adam Smithee version and the 2 deleted Commandments that the producer made God cut out as 10 tested better with audiences.

Re:What the bets the first release will be... (0)

goombah99 (560566) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083056)

Yes but don't buy it in the boxed Boxed set. or you'll end up like Nazi's in an an Indiana Jones film.

Re:What the bets the first release will be... (2, Funny)

SEWilco (27983) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083170)

The director's commentary is to die for.

1,000 years? (4, Interesting)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 4 years ago | (#30082734)

You know, when CDs and DVDs came out, they claimed they would last 50 years. I have yet to find one that lasts longer than 5. So I'd say, 1,000 years translates to about a hundred years, tops. Also, it may not be vulnerable to humidity in a controlled environment, but in the outdoors, a few seasons of freezing/melting and it'll be shot. Water beats rock every time.

Re:1,000 years? (5, Informative)

batrick (1274632) | more than 4 years ago | (#30082790)

I have music CDs that are over 10 years old still working perfectly.

I Hate ROCK Music (4, Funny)

Philip K Dickhead (906971) | more than 4 years ago | (#30082896)

What are they recording?

The Rolling Stones?

The Stone Roses?

The Stone Temple Pilots?

Rainy Day Women # 12 & 35?

Re:I Hate ROCK Music (1)

slasher999 (513533) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083030)

Live at the Stone Pony Series

(all the New Jerseans are laughing)

Re:1,000 years? (2, Insightful)

itlurksbeneath (952654) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083244)

I have some 20-ish year old CD's that work great.

Re:1,000 years? (5, Informative)

stinerman (812158) | more than 4 years ago | (#30082794)

Burned or stamped?

My stepfather has an extensive collection of CDs he bought in the mid-to-late 80s that play as well today as they did back when he bought them. I ripped a Cars album without need for any cdparanoia correction. The resulting file played fine.

Re:1,000 years? (1)

ducman (107063) | more than 4 years ago | (#30082898)

Yikes! I have collection of CDs that I bought in the mid to late 80s. Thanks for making me feel old!

Re:1,000 years? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30082832)

well, you're a fucking dumb ass. i have cds that are about 20 years old that are just fine and burnables for over a decade. i guess you just suck the big dick. dumb bitch.

Re:1,000 years? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30082848)

Water beats rock every time.

I thought it was rock, paper, scissors, lizard, spock. Where'd the water come from?

Re:1,000 years? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30083268)

from Muad'Dib?

Re:1,000 years? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30082864)

"I have yet to find one that lasts longer than 5."
Generally true (esp.TDK) - but all of my Memorex "white label" discs work perfectly, some 10-12 years later.

Re:1,000 years? (1)

schon (31600) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083194)

Generally true (esp.TDK)

The oldest TDK I have were bought in late 2007 - they all work well (amazingly enough, just going through them, copying to my new Myth box so the wife can view them :)

all of my Memorex "white label" discs work perfectly, some 10-12 years later.

Holy shit - so *you're* the guy who got the only good box of Memorex

I've never seen a Memorex disc last longer than a couple of months - some are unreadable *minutes* after burning.

Sony are a bit better, but not much (typically 2 years.)

I've had good luck with Phillips, but the best I've used are Maxell.. haven't had one fail yet.

Re:1,000 years? (2, Interesting)

maharb (1534501) | more than 4 years ago | (#30082886)

*Currently playing an 8 year old burned CD with no issues*

Re:1,000 years? (1)

tonycheese (921278) | more than 4 years ago | (#30082988)

Well everybody's hating on this guy's post, so I'll back him up. I find that the CD's I usually buy at Staples for cheap don't last more than 5 years, either. They start getting little corroded black dots on them or something and lose data.

Re:1,000 years? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30083022)

So stop buying the cheap ones. Spend a little more now so you don't have to spend more later.

Re:1,000 years? (1)

haruchai (17472) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083200)

Cheap ones? I bought nothing but brand name, expensive CDR/RW years ago and I find that most
of them, particularly the RWs are hosed. I was paying as much as $5/each in 1997-2000.

Re:1,000 years? (-1, Offtopic)

onemorechip (816444) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083054)

Hmm, girlintraining is a guy?

Re:1,000 years? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30083094)

used to be

now training to be a girl

Re:1,000 years? (0, Offtopic)

tonycheese (921278) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083176)

Haha, whatever. Guy refers to anybody, dude! At least for me. Or, the other guy's answer.

Re:1,000 years? (0)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 4 years ago | (#30082970)

maybe it's the disc's your buying. try spending more then a $1 per disc and you'll find they last.

Re:1,000 years? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30083004)

All of the stamped CDs that I have that are 20+ years old still play perfectly fine (and rip with minimal or no errors, too). And of the burned discs that I have (going back to 1996), only 3 or 4 have had unreadable portions. I was still able to retrieve most of the data from those successfully, too.

Re:1,000 years? (4, Funny)

onemorechip (816444) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083038)

Water beats rock every time.

No, paper beats rock. There's no water in the game.

Re:1,000 years? (2, Informative)

hldn (1085833) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083090)

you need to upgrade to rps7 or greater.

http://www.umop.com/rps.htm [umop.com]

Re:1,000 years? (1)

BiggerIsBetter (682164) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083088)

Water beats rock every time.

So you're saying we should be making our CDs out of water?

Re:1,000 years? (4, Insightful)

bcwright (871193) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083092)

Also, it may not be vulnerable to humidity in a controlled environment, but in the outdoors, a few seasons of freezing/melting and it'll be shot. Water beats rock every time.

I really don't care if my archival storage can stand being left outside for several years, because I don't intend to do that. I'd be quite happy if it were at least as durable as a book, which if well made and with reasonable care can last at least a couple hundred years, possibly over 1000 under ideal conditions. So what if it can get ruined if it's left in the rain? If I care enough about the data, I just make a few copies and put them in different places and hopefully if I've chosen well at least one will survive. Right now it's not at all clear that typical CD's and DVD's are even as durable as cheap pulp paperbacks.

Re:1,000 years? (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083310)

You know, when CDs and DVDs came out, they claimed they would last 50 years

I've had one music CD fail on me, out of several hundred. My oldest is from 1987.

CD-R's do have high failure rate, in my experience. Most of my "Kodak Gold" discs from 1996 are filled with errors. My newer (post 2002) discs are all Taiyo Yuden, and knock on cyanine they're still all good (but not as old).

Re:1,000 years? (1)

isny (681711) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083386)

Paper covers rock. Rock beats scissors.

Presumably... (4, Insightful)

popo (107611) | more than 4 years ago | (#30082742)

... they also make a DVD player that lasts 1000 years?

Re:Presumably... (4, Funny)

The Grim Reefer2 (1195989) | more than 4 years ago | (#30082922)

... they also make a DVD player that lasts 1000 years?

At $4995 for the burner it better last 1K years too.

Re:Presumably... (1)

FlyingBishop (1293238) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083292)

You misunderstand, that's not a player, it just writes the media.

Re:Presumably... (2, Funny)

fm6 (162816) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083338)

Tightwad. You can afford to buy a new burner once a century.

Re:Presumably... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30082962)

or content that's fun to watch/listen to/use more than twice.

Re:Presumably... (5, Interesting)

glyn.phillips (826462) | more than 4 years ago | (#30082976)

Presumably all DVD readers made for the next 1000 years will be backward compatible. Have you tried to read an 8-inch floppy disk lately? And they're only three decades old!

When the equipment for reading these starts to become museum pieces people will migrate the data to whatever the state of the art is at the time. Then these stone DVD's will last a long time in the landfill.

It does raise some fun things to speculate about though.

There are some ancient writings which no one knows how to read anymore. Will future archaeologists wonder what the microscopic pits in our coasters with holes in them are all about?

Will they suffer from data overload?

What will future archaeologists, with PhD's, think when they read what you, personally, wrote in a forum? Now that's scary.

Re:Presumably... (4, Interesting)

QuoteMstr (55051) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083026)

Presumably all DVD readers made for the next 1000 years will be backward compatible. Have you tried to read an 8-inch floppy disk lately? And they're only three decades old!

The nice thing about he optical disc form factor is that it decouples the encoding and retrieval technology from the moving parts involves in loading, unloading, and spinning the disc. It's very easy to support additional optical media formats by simply including another kind of laser in the read head.

On the other hand, an eight-inch floppy needs a custom loading mechanism that isn't cost-effective to build anymore, so of course we don't have anything that's backward compatible.

As long as we have optical media at all (and I don't see the idea fading any time soon), the readers will be backwards-compatible all the way back to Red Book audio. I would be amazed if we couldn't read CDs in 100 years, and only moderately surprised if we couldn't read them in 1,000.

Re:Presumably... (1)

mosb1000 (710161) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083282)

"and I don't see the idea fading any time soon"

Flash media maybe? I wonder if they can some up with an archival format for that.

Re:Presumably... (2, Funny)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083130)

Assuming anybody in the future cares more than a tiny bit, I'd strongly suspect that the file formats(and possibly the disk layout) will be a bigger challenge than the lack of compatible drives.

The surface details on DVDs just aren't all that small, since they have to be easily accessible to ~$50 worth of cheap, mass-market optics, even after some kid gets greasy fingerprints all over them. Unless the future belongs to degenerate savages and murderous rat-men, rigging up a spindle, an optical microscope, and a camera to automatically record the pit structure will presumably be within the realm of a doable for a few decent engineering grads. Assuming, of course, that we don't all have cyborg mecha-vision by that time. It wouldn't necessarily be anything close to fast; but it would be conceptually simple and reasonably economic for anything of some historical value.

If, however, the files on the disk are all AES-256 encrypted, decodable only with the cooperation of a DRM keyserver that was deconstructed by a rogue nanite swarm during the H+ omnipurge of 2076, all bets are off.

Re:Presumably... (1)

obarthelemy (160321) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083158)

DVD is a consumer electronics media, 8" was a computer media. You can still read Vinyls without having to look to hard... the first commercial one was released in1946. that's 63 years, and counting.

Re:Presumably... (5, Interesting)

QuoteMstr (55051) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083230)

There are some ancient writings which no one knows how to read anymore. Will future archaeologists wonder what the microscopic pits in our coasters with holes in them are all about?

That's an interesting thought experiment. Let's say civilization fell and rose again, and that future archaeologists came across some of our optical discs. They wouldn't need much beyond 19th-century technology and mathematics to decipher them.

Once cleaned, 1,000-year-old discs would still shimmer the way they do today. Under a microscope (well-developed by the 19th century), pits and lands would be visible. A pit [freepatentsonline.com] is approximately the same size as a bacterial cell [wikipedia.org] , after all. The pits and lands would form a recognizable pattern. That pattern looks nothing like binary, being a clocked encoding [wikipedia.org] of it. But it's obvious that a CD would spin, so eventually someone clever will realize that information is encoded at clock boundaries.

That having been figured out, these future archaeologists will see repeating patterns of eight units. Presuming that our language came down intact (much like Latin has to us), 19th century cryptanalytical [wikipedia.org] techniques could determine the correspondence of the mysterious 8-pit repeating units to letters. (After all, what is ASCII except a simple substitution cipher?)

ECC information would be gibberish, but it could be ignored. (And once even one Wikipedia backup were deciphered, the ECC information would be understood.)

Of course, there's a huge amount of information on each disc. It'd take a long time to go over even part of one by hand, but it could be done. After all, even in the 17th century, huge logarithm table [wikipedia.org] books were produced.

Once technology advanced a bit, it'd be possible to build an electromechanical system to read and print the contents of CDs. Even Babbage had a workable printer design [bbc.co.uk] , and printing telegraph machines emerged by 1910. The hardest part for our future archaeologists would be reading the discs at high speed, for which (I think) they'd need a laser. But maybe the problem would stimulate them, and they'd build lasers before we got around to discovering the things.

Of course, this is just idle speculation, but it's fun!

Re:Presumably... (5, Insightful)

QuoteMstr (55051) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083306)

By the way: if you think this is an interesting thought experiment, you'll love A Canticle for Leibowitz [barnesandnoble.com] by Walter Miller.

Re:Presumably... (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083324)

Of course, there's a huge amount of information on each disc. It'd take a long time to go over even part of one by hand, but it could be done. After all, even in the 17th century, huge logarithm table [wikipedia.org] books were produced.

Deciphering the MPEG-2 stream might turn out to be the hard part. But if they're human and have some clue it's porn, the grad students will get it done sooner or later.

Re:Presumably... (1)

mlts (1038732) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083048)

Will we have the ability to make DVD players that last 1000 years? Factories retool often, so components which are in easy supply for DVDs right now may not be available in 20-50 years, similar to finding wax cylinder needles or heads for reel to reel tapes.

Also, will we have the ability to decode the pits on a DVD? If someone doesn't know the exact error correction, parsing of Gray codes, and other stuff, the DVD will be completely unreadable.

Trick is... make a DVD player model that can be made as technology progresses, sort of (obligatory car example) having the Jeep Wrangler of optical drives, which keeps being made, but is essentially older technology.

Re:Presumably... (0)

dissy (172727) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083080)

Presumably... they also make a DVD player that lasts 1000 years?

You aren't much of a geek if you don't plan on upgrading beyond DVD technology once the next technology gets to the same price point and is an order of magnitude better. I know I will be!

However, I don't know when that will be. However I wouldn't mind my current DVD archives to last until that day.

Why bother making a DVD to last 10 years or 25 years or 50 years, when it is quite possible I might not want to migrate to the next best thing for 11 years, 26 years, or 51 years.

1000 will more than cover what I need.

Besides, you know better than anyone this is just their way to say it will last basically forever, based on the construction methods and materials.

Re:Presumably... (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083148)

Is that really interesting outside of the post-apocalyptic scenarios? I'm thinking the point here is to have something you can throw in a vault and actually pick up in a few centuries and use. Unlike pretty much all things magnetic or solid state based, this is more a competitior to digital microfilm or something. For data that's constantly changing this it's easier to just migrate it to new HDDs, but there's a helluva cost to that over a 1000 year perspective. Perhaps the rapid improvements in technology make it cheaper and easier to go with the flow of terabyte hard disks, but it's also worth pursuing what we can find of really long-term storage so we don't get killed by upkeep.

Re:Presumably... (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083348)

... they also make a DVD player that lasts 1000 years?

Maybe some will be around in 100. To turn marketing speak into 4D space-time, divide claims by 100. My 100-year Kodaks lasted 10, so maybe these will be around in 100. By which time, all of our collective information ought to fit on one USB-key-sized widget. (I'm kidding, but Moore may not be).

Apparently not that special (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30082746)

Apparently it's not like your choice is between 3 years and 1000 years. From TFA:

"... [the new disks] outlast the durability of competitors that claim a 300-year shelf life."

I don't know, but 300y sounds like a pretty good improvement over the standard, too...

Fun with ceramics (2, Funny)

icebike (68054) | more than 4 years ago | (#30082756)

Coasters have come full circle now.

I remember my mom's ceramic coasters (bone china she called it, which as a 5 year old, creeped me out).

They were pretty durable, and lasted my mom all here adult life. The writing on the bottom was still readable after all those years.

Re:Fun with ceramics (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 4 years ago | (#30082784)

They were pretty durable, and lasted my mom all here adult life.

Sounds like there pretty tough.

Re:Fun with ceramics (1)

icebike (68054) | more than 4 years ago | (#30082806)

Ahhh, run away, the typo police are here.

Re:Fun with ceramics (1)

Jesus_666 (702802) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083276)

Ahhh, run away, the typo police are her.

FTFY

Re:Fun with ceramics (1)

rockNme2349 (1414329) | more than 4 years ago | (#30082942)

Your joking right?

Finally, a convenient alternative to pyramids... (4, Funny)

Bob_Who (926234) | more than 4 years ago | (#30082762)

Jeeez, it took long enough to come up with a practical alternative to hieroglyphics carved in stone. So far, that was the best technology for millennial storage. I just want to be certain that I get that 1000 year warranty, in case its just a bunch of empty promises. I don't want to be disappointed 800 years down the road.

Re:Finally, a convenient alternative to pyramids.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30082956)

Thats IF Cranberry hasn't already been sunk due to lawsuits over the disks lasting only 100 years.

Re:Finally, a convenient alternative to pyramids.. (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083178)

I'd be interested to see, actually, how "practical" hieroglyphs in stone could be made to be, if somebody did a completely straight-faced interpretation of the idea, using fully modern techniques.

With all the research that has been done for barcodes, and the resulting wealth of fairly high density, surprisingly robust, and monochrome printable data encoding systems, plus modern CNC gear and a dash of robotics, you should be able to produce a device that would swiftly, automatically, and (comparatively) efficiently write data to stone tablets, and interface with ordinary computer systems as a WORM drive...

Re:Finally, a convenient alternative to pyramids.. (1)

Angst Badger (8636) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083202)

As it stands, you might want to get a solid five-year warranty on existing recordable DVDs, because the odds are you'll be disappointed as little as two years down the road. I have 5.25" floppy disks from the 8-bit Apple II era that have a higher data retention rate than a lot of DVD-R discs.

Re:Finally, a convenient alternative to pyramids.. (1)

umbrellasd (876984) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083414)

We've just entered the Neoneolithic Age.

1000 years? (3, Funny)

Obliquitous Cowherd (689384) | more than 4 years ago | (#30082772)

We'll see.

Re:1000 years? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30082824)

Indeed. I'm going to spend a couple of years at the speed of light and I'll find out.

brb.

Re:1000 years? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30083012)

Will you? really?

Expensive (2, Interesting)

techrolla (902384) | more than 4 years ago | (#30082788)

It's going to be really hard to convince average computer users who think their data will last forever that it won't. And after 50 years no one might even own dvd players.

Re:Expensive (1)

david@ecsd.com (45841) | more than 4 years ago | (#30082936)

I, for one, can see this as a stop gap for data that I don't want to degrade. Photos from my childhood, scanned into jpg and stored on a DVD that's intolerant to bitrot? Priceless. Growing up, my mother took countless photos of my siblings and me, and now, some thirty-mumble years later, who knows where the film can be found, or how long they'll last until the yellow overtakes all the other colors? I'd love to be able to scan them and store them semi-permanently. Is this "synthetic stone" resistant to fire? If so, that'd be a real bonus. Can you put a price on your memories? That's how you convince the average computer user.

Re:Expensive (1)

Vainglorious Coward (267452) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083018)

[I] see this as a stop gap for data that I don't want to degrade...I'd love to be able to scan [30 years of photos] and store them semi-permanently

We already have stop-gap semi-permanent storage - you simply copy that multi gigabyte archive onto each new computer as you upgrade. The huge pain in the ass is not keeping files longterm, it's the effort of scanning all those photos in the first place.

Only one downside (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30082800)

The .000000000000000001x record rate.

Microwavable? (1)

bigjarom (950328) | more than 4 years ago | (#30082826)

Unless they still make the cool sparking design whilst in the microwave, I am not interested!

Pits? (1)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 4 years ago | (#30082858)

Recordable DVDs don't use pits, do they?

will it be shot down? (1)

the_Bionic_lemming (446569) | more than 4 years ago | (#30082882)

Knowing that a significant revenue source for the distributors of DVD's is the fact that people scratch and rebuy, will the various distributors allow it to prosper?

Re:will it be shot down? (1)

Inschato (1350323) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083102)

Actually.. a lot of distributors of DVDs will usually let you send back a damaged disc for a replacement (although, sometimes you're charged a fee for this. I seem to recall EB Games having a 2$ deal for pre-owned game discs, but I can't be sure if that's still around) so your point may still be valid anyway.

This new archival format from Cranberry... (3, Funny)

turing_m (1030530) | more than 4 years ago | (#30082906)

... seems to have been designed to linger.

Re:This new archival format from Cranberry... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30082984)

Did you have to?

Re:This new archival format from Cranberry... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30083166)

I get it.

Hate these claims: These guys can't lose (1)

syousef (465911) | more than 4 years ago | (#30082910)

What are the odds the company's around to sue if they're wrong in 100 years let alone 1000? I can tell you the odds of the guys who made the claim being around are zero. If you're going to put your faith in this nonsense I have a bridge to sell you.

Stone DVDs? (3, Funny)

QuoteMstr (55051) | more than 4 years ago | (#30082940)

They'll come in several varieties:

  • Mafic
  • Felsic
  • Pornographic

Re:Stone DVDs? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30083238)

And here I thought they would just come in Igneous, Metamorphic, and Sedimentary. Shows what I know.

Re:Stone DVDs? (1)

Stupid McStupidson (1660141) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083382)

I just want to know where the pterodactyls that fit inside a DVD burner come from

badass (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30082948)

I hope it works as advertised.

Even if it only lasts for 10% of the advertised time. There have been all kinds of questions about safeguarding and backing up data to insure that it won't go bad in a couple years and if this turns out to be a good solution then great.

Course, I'm not ever going to buy from them so my feelings won't be hurt if it's a crock of shit.

Convienient... (1)

smitty777 (1612557) | more than 4 years ago | (#30082950)

...it will probably take about that long for me to figure out the lyrics to my Municipal Waste DVD.

Who gives a FRACK? (0, Flamebait)

slasher999 (513533) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083008)

We'll all be LONG DEAD by then! Who cares if it lasts beyond the lifespan of our children? I honestly couldn't care less - so not impressed!

Curious... (5, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083044)

TFA quotes temperature resistance of 176 degrees. Fahrenheit. For a "synthetic stone" product that is supposed to be super durable, that is chickenshit. It's barely warmer than parked-car-in-summer-sun.

I have to wonder, did some journalist fail at accuracy, or are these things actually pretty painfully unexciting in terms of temperature resistance?

Re:Curious... (1)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083162)

> For a "synthetic stone" product that is supposed to be super durable, that is
> chickenshit.

That's because they are actually plastic.

Re:Curious... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30083224)

Well, plastic is just a rather soft stone.

Re:Curious... (4, Informative)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083208)

http://cranberry.com/faqs.php [cranberry.com]

How is the Cranberry Disc(TM) different from regular DVDs? ... Instead [of organic dyes], the Cranberry Disc's data layer is composed of rocklike materials known to last for centuries. The Cranberry Writer(TM) etches the Cranberry Disc's rocklike layer creating a permanent physical data record that is immune to data rot.

What temperature can the Cranberry Disc withstand?
The Cranberry Discs can withstand temperatures of 176F indefinitely with no effect to the data or the readability of the data in a standard DVD drive.

Can the Cranberry Disc withstand UV rays and prolonged exposure to the sun?
Cranberry Discs can withstand the full spectrum of the sun, including UV rays, indefinitely with no effect to the data or the readability of the data in a standard DVD drive.

The data layer is their synthetic material.
Presumably, they still sandwich it between plastics that are vulnerable to heat.

Re:Curious... (1)

jda104 (1652769) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083266)

Their site states "300 degrees" (F?).

Ironically, they also sell a safe into which you can put your super-durable DVDs. They list as one of the justifications:
"Fire. The DVD can withstand temperatures as high as 300 degrees. Unless you can make sure that your house doesn't burn down at more than 300 degrees, you need the DVD Vault."

Re:Curious... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30083372)

Errr, a parked car in summer will roughly reach 120F. And you're complaining that 176F isn't good enough?!

is this a joke ? (0, Troll)

shakuni (644197) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083114)

DVD that can store data for 1000 years. Who cares even if it does ?

Re:is this a joke ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30083354)

The generations that rediscover our tech and culture around that time will, when they try to find out what mistakes we made. Unfortunately the DRM will render the fate of humanity unviewable!

Made from Diamondium or Diamondillium? (1)

ndelta (1102663) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083124)

It won't deteriorate. Until some trans-dimensional being gets shklis or shkler tentacles on it.

ComputerWorld astroturfing (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30083150)

WTF is up with all the ComputerWorld pigpiling on Slashdot lately? Usually it's "CWMike" but today Lucas123 AKA Lucas Mearian is doing his own self-promotion.

other than laughing (1)

memnock (466995) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083228)

at our current high tech stuff, there can't be that many reason to worry about 1,000 year retention.

Is it took much to ask for something afordable? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30083236)

At 60X the cost of a standard DVD it's pretty much for the buyer with no other choice. I want a stable solution for movies. I'm willing to pay the price for even Blu-rays but what pisses me off are the fact over half my DVDs give me a bad sector warning at least once. That's from the factory and it gets worse even after a year or two. I happily bought Laserdisks which were much more expensive but at least they were good quality. They degraded but they tended to work from the factory. The image quality may be better on DVDs than VHS but the product quality is much worse. I want archival quality retail products, movies and music. I'm tired of rebuying products because of poor quality media.

1000 years later..... (1)

Whiteox (919863) | more than 4 years ago | (#30083370)

Sounds like "Conan The Librarian" when after the Mayan apocalypse of 2012, 1000 years later when the vestiges of humanity finally rediscover metalworking, Conan goes on a mission to find the mythical Stone DVD which a shamanic priest who has access to a pre-apocalypse technology, inserts it into the player only to find porn.

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