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Anti-Smoking Vaccine Is Nearing the Market

kdawson posted more than 4 years ago | from the kicking-it dept.

Biotech 237

eldavojohn writes "Almost 6 years ago we discussed a vaccine to help people quit smoking as it entered human clinical trials. Now it looks like the finishing touches have been put on a deal that will go into effect once phase III testing of the drug now called NicVAX is completed. NicVAX was developed by Nabi Biopharmaceuticals, who have agreed to license it to GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals; it is expected to complete phase III testing successfully. Others have fallen short of this goal, in pursuit of a smoking-cessation market expected to hit $4.6 billion worldwide by 2016. Nabi has also sold an experimental vaccine for staph infections; and in 2008 we discussed news of a cocaine vaccine."

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Zombieland (2, Interesting)

sundru (709023) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178732)

Not sure why it reminds me of this movie .. :)

Equilibrium (3, Interesting)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178814)

To me, it sounds more like the story of Equilibrium...

Or (1, Insightful)

Kratisto (1080113) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178744)

I hear will-power and the notion of a life plagued by health problems followed by an early death completed clinical trials sixty years ago. What's more, there are no side effects, and when taken properly, there is a 100% chance of success.

Re:Or (4, Insightful)

Icegryphon (715550) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178758)

Willpower, either you own the cigarettes, or they own you.

Re:Or (4, Interesting)

camperdave (969942) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178830)

It's not an either-or. If you own cigarettes, then they own you.

Re:Or (1)

mikael_j (106439) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178848)

What about social smokers? You know, those who have a cigarette or two when having a few drinks with friends but who don't smoke otherwise?

/Mikael

Re:Or (1)

Icegryphon (715550) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178910)

Which is why I posted this,
I am lucky to have 1 or 2 a week.
I use to smoke a pack a day.
Now I don't have the cravings and could be considered a "Social smoker"

Re:Or (1)

Philip K Dickhead (906971) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179010)

Ditto.

Even less because it's so much trouble to fuck-off work and have a fag, these days. No smoking in pubs. That's like no sex in hotels. Who'd've thought?

Re:Or (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178856)

Please. I know plenty of people who only smoke after a night of drinking. Do the cigarettes own them?

Re:Or (1)

umghhh (965931) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178946)

I think there is a set of people that do both every day. Do they need this vaccine or maybe we should leave them alone?

Re:Or (2, Insightful)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179048)

I do not know, I am really not a doctor. My point was that people can use tobacco without developing a dependence on it, that's all.

I would be interested in finding out if people with a dependence on both alcohol and tobacco would really be helped by this "vaccine" -- maybe taking the joy out of tobacco could lead to people consuming even more alcohol.

Re:Or (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30179028)

I would argue yes, otherwise they wouldn't need to smoke after a night of drinking. If you can't stop yourself, then you are owned by it. I say this as someone who only drinks occasionally, rarely to excess, but will not deny that I can't go without alcohol forever

Re:Or (3, Insightful)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179070)

What if you don't need to but like too?

I don't need to have diet pepsi, but I like it.

Having a couple smokes after a long night is no big deal. Unless you live in a bubble you are getting far worse from daily exposure to car exhaust.

Re:Or (1)

dncsky1530 (711564) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179096)

Please. I know plenty of people who only smoke after a night of drinking. Do the cigarettes own them?

That would depend how often they have a night of drinking and if it is regularly they could end up being addicted to smoking. At any rate, a night of drinking and smoking wouldn't be good for anyone's health.

Re:Or (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179248)

Life is not good for your health, and if your never going to have any fun you might as well end it now.

Using anything is not the behavior of an addict, not being able to stop is.

Believe it or not lots of folks use all kinds of drugs recreationally and never do develop a habit. Some people can, some can't. The difference between those that can and those that can't is some blend of genetics and having a decent life so they are not just seeking escape.

I say this as a man addicted to one drug that comes in pill form, levothyroxine sodium. Your addicted to something similar though, human thyroid hormone. That is addiction, I must have it, otherwise I am useless and quite frankly would do near anything to get it.

Re:Or (1)

Hadlock (143607) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179618)

So is levothyroxine sodium a mood enhancer? hypothyroidism seems to cause general depression of the body's functions. Do you get a minor high off its stimulant properties, or are you just making a case that addiction == genuine physical dependence?

Re:Or (2, Informative)

dragonxtc (1344101) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179068)

As a former 2 pack a day smoker who thought "I can quit anytime" I'll tell you its not quite as easy as all that, it took a few times (as in 5 or 6) trying to quit to actually quit. In the end I found Chantix helped me quite a bit to kick the habit, for those that are curious I smoked heavily for about 12 years.

Re:Or (1)

PitaBred (632671) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179324)

And then there are people like my mom, who smoked for almost 20 years before deciding to quit, and she did. On tax day. Never smoked since. She went through atomic fireballs by the bulk-club size package for a few weeks, but it depends entirely on who the person is. Some people actually can just quit any time. Others can't.

Re:Or (1)

R3d M3rcury (871886) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179726)

My favorite story is a friend of mine in Vermont who loudly proclaimed she was quitting smoking. And she did.

Well, not really. She'd sneak a few every day.

Then one day she was taking out the trash and sneaking a cigarette. It was about -20 degrees Fahrenheit outside. She's standing there smoking her cigarette and freezing her ass off. And she thinks, "Why am I doing this? I'm not fooling myself--I know I haven't quit smoking. I'm not fooling my son--he knows it doesn't take 20 minutes to throw out the trash, especially when it's this cold out! I should either throw out the cigarettes or go inside and smoke where it's warm."

She threw out the cigarettes and never touched another one. One she came to that realization, she said that quitting smoking was pretty easy.

Re:Or (1)

Martin Blank (154261) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179832)

My mom quit smoking ahead of a hysterectomy probably around 20 years ago. To this day, stress makes her want to smoke. By this time, I'm certain that it's a psychological need that drives the desire, not a physical one, but it's a powerful reminder of the hold cigarettes can have.

Re:Or (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30179150)

It's not an either-or. If you own cigarettes, then they own you.

Right, because absolutely all smokers are hopelessly addicted and compelled to smoke all the time. Or you're a moron. One of the two.

Re:Or (2, Interesting)

tommy_greene (1666401) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179670)

I quit smoking 4 weeks ago. I have a pack in my freezer that I bought as a "just in case." I could easily throw them away as I don't smoke anymore, or I can look at them and know I don't need them. So I own cigarettes and now, they don't own me. Poor choice of words, but I get your point.

Re:Or (1)

Tubal-Cain (1289912) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178858)

Unlike cats, which you most definitely do not own.

Re:Or (4, Insightful)

dncsky1530 (711564) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179004)

While willpower alone could and should make someone stop smoking, unfortunately not everyone is able to muster that willpower. There are a wide range of reasons people have trouble quitting (on top of the fact it's physically addictive), maybe they have smoked to a long long time or they are very stressed. I'm sure many of these people know it's bad for them and many smokers I've talked to say they want to quit but just can't. I think this vaccine is a brilliant step forward and it will give many life long smokers a second chance to quit. I'm sure there are many people to really have tried everything to quit and hopefully this vaccine will be the last thing they have to try.

Re:Or (1)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179526)

You missed an important point - that one of the most difficult parts about not smoking is that fact that there are often family and close friends who don't want to quit. I smoke socially and am resistant to tobacco addiction, but it always bugs me that I end up smoking at get-togethers because a lot of my friends smoke. I usually hold out until the 8th or 9th beer, then I come extending the bum-hand to whomever's holdin' a pack.

Re:Or (1)

Rynor (1277690) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179676)

Same goes for me as well, damn alcohol.

Re:Or (1)

Erikderzweite (1146485) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179820)

That's because you need willpower before, you know, to say no.
If you smoke already, you've lacked either the willpower or brains when you've started.
Never start to smoke is still the best method. Thankfully throughout Europe there is a strong trend to ban smoking from public places so it's getting harder to passive smoke here -- no need to ruin your health because some fucker thought he'll get more chicks if he smokes like that cowboy he had seen on TV.

dart in your neck! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30179688)

Where can i get this and a dart gun... so many people to "fix"

Re:Or (1)

NiteMair (309303) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178766)

will-power

Does this part of the remedy come in pill form?

Re:Or (5, Insightful)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178808)

What's more, there are no side effects

Clearly you've never been addicted to something. Like, ADDICTED addicted, in the sense that your body physically feels different when you try to ween it off.

Don't get me wrong, I think you are right, that quitting is more about a person being disciplined and wanting to quit more than anything else, but to say that you won't feel anything when trying to quit is inaccurate.

Yes, you will get the shivers, and you will get the sweats, and you might even get the shakes. But you gotta fight through that shit.

Re:Or (1)

Kratisto (1080113) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178838)

That's a response to the lack of the drug, not the will power. :P

Re:Or (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178900)

And the patch, and probably this Vaccine, essentially keep a bit of nicotine in your system, so that you don't feel those effects to lack of drug.

The drug is still in you, you just don't have all the harmful effects that come with smoking it.

Re:Or (1)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178970)

The problem with smoking isn't just the physical dependency, it's the psychological dependency. I've talked to plenty of people who have used the patch and the gum, and the problem is as much, if not more, the associations with cigarettes. That was the toughest for me, drinking coffee and coding. Both activities were ones that I just sort of subconsciously required a cigarette for, and I'd chain smoke when I was programming. Even after the physical symptoms receded, there were times when I'd sit down with a cup of coffee or sit down in front of the computer to hash out some new utility for work and I'd get a watery mouth and just feel a tenseness.

Re:Or (1)

umghhh (965931) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179082)

funny that I got sweats, shivers and shakes and I almost puked the first time I tried to smoke (cigarettes that I stole from my parents by the way). Consequently this was the last time I used nicotine or at least last time that I tried to use it actively. Now this either means that I have a character or that I do not. Whichever way it was makes no difference now but I find it funny that one industry makes stuff that should nullify effects of an addiction caused by stuff made some other industry. I suppose humans could save some health by bypassing nicotine/vaccine and just giving money to said industries directly without polluting our bodies but I guess that would skip the fun part too.

Re:Or (4, Insightful)

mikael_j (106439) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178816)

*gives Kratisto nightly heroin injections for a few weeks just to see what happens*

Re:Or (1)

NoYob (1630681) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178890)

It's funny you should mention heroin.

I worked in a rehab one time, and I talked to various folks who were getting off of things: alcohol, coke, crack, etc... all of the ones who smoked cigarettes said that nicotine was the hardest drug to kick. Meaning, many of them beat all the other drugs but were struggling to kick cigarettes.

Re:Or (2, Interesting)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179016)

Well of course nicotine is going to be the hardest drug to kick. Its A) Available, you don't have to go to some shady part of town to buy it, you find it easily enough in every single gas station, grocery store, etc. B) It is socially acceptable C) It is cheap

Re:Or (1)

PitaBred (632671) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179370)

Still, the physical effects of the other drugs shouldn't be taken lightly. Crack is not really that expensive compared to cigarettes. Just because nicotine is legally available doesn't tilt everything in it's favor. Especially considering that all of your benefits of nicotine apply equally to alcohol, and the GPP said that the nicotine was still harder to kick that booze.

Re:Or (1)

smellsofbikes (890263) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179312)

It's funny you should mention heroin.

I worked in a rehab one time, and I talked to various folks who were getting off of things: alcohol, coke, crack, etc... all of the ones who smoked cigarettes said that nicotine was the hardest drug to kick. Meaning, many of them beat all the other drugs but were struggling to kick cigarettes.

I know a couple ex-heroin junkies, an ex-meth-head, and some mostly ex-potheads who still smoke. The heroin junkies in particular said that the withdrawal symptoms of heroin were excruciating, but once they were off, they could stay off. The problem is how difficult it is to stay off smoking because cigarettes are so widely available and there are people smoking everywhere. There is just enough difficulty in getting illegal drugs to make it fairly easy to stay away from them, but nicotene is too easy to get.

Which is, by the way, the only valid reason I see for keeping illegal drugs illegal: it just slightly reduces the ease of availability, which reduces the number of people who use them until they die. I don't think anti-drug laws are a good idea, because of the other damage they're causing to society, but I do think there's evidence that they have some effect on reducing long-term usage.

Re:Or (1)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179570)

Unfortunately, many addicts of harder drugs never really kick the habit, they just substitute their addiction for something more legal.

Go to an AA meeting and you'll see everybody chain-smoking and chugging gallons of coffee.

Re:Or (4, Informative)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178908)

Indeed.

I was a heavy smoker; three packs a day, and I rolled my own (so no filter to douse any of the carcinogenic goodness!) I never thought I'd quit, and really didn't want to. Then, almost nine years ago to the day, I came down with a horribly bad lung infection coupled with probably the single worst ear infection ever. I remember walking up the stairs to the second floor of my apartment would literally take about ten minutes to recover from. I realized at that moment that, while I'd probably get over this one (I was about 28 years old at the time), and I'd get over the next one, and so on, but eventually, sometime in the next fifteen to twenty years my lungs were going to be so fucked up that I'd be stuck with emphysema, probably congestive heart failure and ultimately dying by drowning in my own fluids, and that was if I was lucky, because I could also get lung cancer, and the process would be all the worse.

I threw out my tobacco, left my wallet at home when I went to work so that even if I caved in, I'd have to go out like a bumb on to the street to beg for a smoke. I ate carrots like I was a rabbit with an OCD, just so I had something to do with my mouth. The first week I was still so sick that I couldn't tell withdrawal from everything else that was wrong with me. The second week, it was tough, I was irritable and my mouth seemed to be constantly salivating. The third week it was a little better, and after a month the nic fits were coming only a couple of times a day. I called myself done after a year, and have never picked up a cigarette since.

It was tough at times, but I'm proud of myself that I didn't run to the doctor, stick a patch on, chew nicotine gum or do anything to try to wean myself. I quit cold turkey and never looked back.

Re:Or (1)

hrimhari (1241292) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179240)

I'm proud of you too. Must be that martian blood of yours : )

Re:Or (4, Interesting)

Amouth (879122) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179398)

I was 1/2 to 1 pack a day for 13 years - then the day before my 26'th birth day i realized that 1 more day and i would have smoked for 1/2 my life and at that point i was a smoker never a non smoker.

looked at the one in my hand - dropped it through the pack i had away and that was it.

Sure i had cravings - i chewed tooth picks for weeks - some times i miss the flavor but to be honest i can't even stand the smell of it any more if i'm around smokers.

Congrats for quiting - and while i'm glad i quit - i'd never be a zealot to go and tell smokers they need to quit, it's a personal thing - but quitting is defiantly a mind over matter thing

Re:Or (1)

hisstory student (745582) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179734)

Your anecdote gives a good idea of what it's like to quit 'cold turkey'. I congratulate you that you had the fortitude to accomplish that. Many smokers have tried multiple times to quit 'cold turkey' as well as programs involving both physical and emotional aids, with little or no success. The federal and state governments see this as a source of revenue, and refuse to recognize their failure to help a large part of their citizenry. Words are cheap, and actions speak much more loudly. Shame on them!

Re:Or (4, Insightful)

value_added (719364) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179760)

Rough going, huh? For me, it's quiet the opposite.

I've been smoking for over 20 years, and on occasion I get the urge to quit. The reason has to do with the habit itself. Any habit taken to the extreme or adopted for far too long tends to get less enjoyable as time passes.

When, I do quit, it's typically for a few weeks or maybe a few months at a time. No real withdrawl, except for the day or two, of course. By the end of that period, I come to the same conclusions. Namely, that the "benefits" of smoking (enhanced concentration, relaxation, creativity, etc.) are gone and I want them back. Not need them, but want them. Life, I think, is a bit too ordinary without a vice.

Say what you will about the dangers of smoking, it has its rewards. Besides, what else to do when having a drink, after sex, or when you need to ponder a big idea? And no, nicotine in drug form (as a safer alternative) isn't the answer any more than taking caffeine pills is a substitute for enjoy a coffee. With a cigarette of course. ;-)

As a side note, all cigarettes sold in the US and EU are now required to "fire-safe". That's an oxymoronic term for "they're doused with a chemical to retard burning and prevent fires". The result is a cigarette that doesn't burn properly and tastes like shit. If I do ever quit, it'll be because I've taken up cigars and Scotch.

Re:Or (0, Flamebait)

MrMista_B (891430) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178978)

You're an asshole.

Who has obviously zero knowledge of addiction, or what addiction is.

'Willpower'? Are you going to accuse people who get cancer of not having enough 'willpower' too?

Addiction causes often physical changes to the structure and chemistry of the brain.

Accusing 'willpower' is just an easy way to for you to feel haughtily superior.

Re:Or (1, Interesting)

Hyppy (74366) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178996)

I hear will-power and the notion of a life plagued by health problems followed by an early death completed clinical trials sixty years ago. What's more, there are no side effects, and when taken properly, there is a 100% chance of success.

Oh, yes, willpower. Just like everyone getting to be an astronaut if they just want it bad enough. Nevermind the host of withdrawal symptoms, the psychological aspects of which are more severe than most people can imagine. Case in point: a veteran friend of mine quit smoking. He had his PTSD and depression under perfect control for years until his family pressured him into quitting cold-turkey because "all he needed is willpower." Things went downhill fast, but he was hassled by everyone for wanting to start again because he wouldn't be "man enough" if he couldn't quit. Three days later, he committed suicide in front of his wife and two children.

Grow up and realize that not everything is as cut and dried as your tunnel-vision world view.

Re:Or (2, Insightful)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179052)

If you're story is true, then this guy already had one foot through the Loony Tooney Mad House before he quit smoking. He should have been seeing a shrink and being monitored. Suffice it to say, most people ain't going to blow their brains out because they quit smoking, and those that do were nuts to begin with. This is like blaming Judas Priest for some dumb-ass kids' suicide pact.

Re:Or (1)

Hyppy (74366) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179136)

What I'm hearing from you is "Oh, he was nuts, so no big deal." You seem to be trying to rebut my assertion that quitting smoking strongly affects people by downplaying my anecdote. I shall then assume that you contending that quitting smoking has negligible psychological impact. Are you just going to do some cryptic hand waving and blame it on sheer coincidence?

Re:Or (1)

CannonballHead (842625) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179214)

Perhaps it'd be better to say that there are some cases where other issues can be emphasized by the additional stress or whatever caused by quitting.

But a single anecdote where someone was pressed and belittled into doing it with "willpower" as a means of disproving an entire method seems silly.

And I think the belittling aspect is huge. It's one thing to try to do it "cold turkey." It's another to tell someone that they aren't a real man, they're stupid, their weak, their pathetic, etc., if they can't do it. I don't know that that kind of social pressure is what people here are advocating. Belittling and berating people is not the best form of encouragement... unfortunately, it does appear to be what people like watching on TV and whatnot...

Re:Or (1)

Hyppy (74366) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179332)

I'm not attempting to disprove the entire method. It has clearly worked for many people. Just like lots of hard work has worked for many aspiring astronauts. I am disproving the "100% effective" claim. Saying that willpower alone is good enough for absolutely everybody (which the G^n-P implied) is clearly false. Any additional avenues becoming available for people who suffer from addiction can only help.

Re:Or (1)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179268)

Two points.

1. It's an anecdote. If you can provide some actual statistical data, then I might be the slightest bit compelled to take it seriously.
2. I don't particularly believe you. Even if the story is based on truth, I have deep suspicion that certain relevant facts have been heavily minimized to increase the emotionally potency of the underlying claim "Quitting smoking kills!"

Re:Or (1)

Hyppy (74366) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179378)

1) It only takes a single negative event to disprove an assertion of "100%."

2) I didn't make the underlying claim that "quitting smoking kills." I made the underlying claim that "willpower alone is the panacea for all" is bullshit.

Re:Or (1)

PitaBred (632671) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179414)

He's saying that blaming the suicide on quitting smoking is stupid. And it is. The suicide was because of many other problems that existed without the nicotine. Of all the people I know who quit smoking, none of them have killed themselves. Your anecdote is pointless because it is just that... an anecdote. It's about the straw that broke the camel's back, and you are too self-righteous to realize that the cause was not only the straw, it was everything else loaded on his back.

Re:Or (1)

Hyppy (74366) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179452)

So, you're saying that he should have had some therapy and perhaps medication to help him quit smoking? Instead of ... just willpower?

Thanks, that's all I needed.

Re:Or (1)

g253 (855070) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179000)

Exactly : I don't need this vaccine, I can quit whenever I want.

Re:Or (1)

hrimhari (1241292) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179166)

I hear will-power and the notion of a life plagued by health problems followed by an early death completed clinical trials sixty years ago. What's more, there are no side effects, and when taken properly, there is a 100% chance of success.

It did, but those who failed on one or more aspects of this cure may still want to get free. It's good to have multiple solutions to a problem, no?

Re:Or (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179300)

I hear will-power and the notion of a life plagued by health problems followed by an early death completed clinical trials sixty years ago. What's more, there are no side effects, and when taken properly, there is a 100% chance of success.

Sure, but there are people who don't have willpower, and while there's something to be said for consequences, there's also something to be said along the lines of "smokers who don't quit will cause everyone else's health-care costs to indirectly go up."

I'm not trying to open a can of worms: that's true no matter what health insurance system you have, reform or not. The only way we don't all end up paying somewhat for their health-care is if we were to decide they're barred from any health-care at all. (I'm not advocating that either.)

Willpower? (1)

Akira Kogami (1566305) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179476)

What about people who don't have enough of this magical willpower to quit? What if they don't have enough to gain by quitting smoking to make it worthwhile?

Re:Or (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179626)

While this is true(unless you categorize any withdrawal symptoms as side effects); it is only true in a rather sneaky way.

It's like saying "abstinence is 100% effective as a means of contraception". This is true; but it is only true because the definition excludes people who attempt, but fail, to use the method. In this case, willpower is 100% effective because anybody who fails was, by definition, not using it correctly.

Re:Or (1)

R3d M3rcury (871886) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179644)

As my old boss said, "Cigarettes will take years off of your life. However, it's the years at the end of your life--the ones where you're wearing an adult diaper and spending most of your days drooling."

The health problems you mention come later in life. It's not like you're going to smoke a cigarette and suddenly be incapacitated. Heck, I smoke and I used to ride my bike a minimum of 100 miles a week and had no problems. So the ethereal, "You'll have health problems later in life" isn't much of a dissuading factor for young people.

When my Mom quit, it was because she watched her oldest sister die from lung cancer. When my Dad quit, it was after seeing a chest X-ray. Something that really brings the point home is usually the best way to convince yourself to quit smoking.

From what I've been told, it's pretty easy to quit smoking once you want to quit. But if you'd like to quit or you think that quitting smoking might be somewhat better for you in regards to your health, it's going to be tough.

nicVAX? (1)

Mikkeles (698461) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178754)

Well, 'tis said that nothing sucks like a VAX.

?.?.? eh (2, Funny)

ae1294 (1547521) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178770)

Step 4, Anti-Smoking Vaccine
Step 5, Profit! ...
Step 8, Anti(Anti-Smoking) Vaccine
Step 9, Profit!

Anti-smoking-vacine vacine. (1)

Kenja (541830) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178800)

I should get my patents in now!

Easyway (1)

cliveholloway (132299) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178846)

I stopped through it, and so have millions of others. And for less than $20. Screw vaccines. http://www.amazon.com/Easy-Way-Stop-Smoking-Non-Smokers/dp/1402718616/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1258756811&sr=8-1 [amazon.com] Best approach I've ever seen to deconstructing smoking addiction.

Re:Easyway (1)

EddyGL (15300) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178954)

Lets see, I can read 224 pages, and take weeks learning why I smoke, how to combat withdrawal, and work on changing my life to remain smoke free..... OR.. I can take a quick lil shot and be done with it?? hmmm let me think

Re:Easyway (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30178990)

What am I supposed to do with a book? Tear out the pages, roll them up into little pieces and smoke it?

Re:Easyway (1)

cupantae (1304123) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179334)

You've got it all wrong - you need to replace the addiction with something else, so every time you would usually go for a cigarette on a lunch break, stay at your computer and troll slashdot. Simple. Take it one post at a time. Here, say something about Linux or intelligent design or DRM.
I believe in you.

"Vaccine" (2, Insightful)

oldhack (1037484) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178854)

Another useful word lost: "vaccine".

Re:"Vaccine" (5, Insightful)

RManning (544016) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179044)

From TFA...

NicVAX works by stimulating the immune system to produce antibodies that bind to nicotine in the bloodstream, making the nicotine molecule too large to cross the blood-brain barrier and enter the brain.

So it effects the immune system to recognize some particular foreign matter and deal with it? That sounds like a vaccine to me.

Re:"Vaccine" (1)

oldhack (1037484) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179110)

Actually, you're right. Its mechanism is that of the traditional vaccine, although its purpose is treatment, not prevention.

Re:"Vaccine" (3, Insightful)

Hyppy (74366) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179232)

So it's a nicotine absorption vaccine. Hence the name NicVax. They're preventing absorption, which has the beneficial side effect of helping with addiction.

Re:"Vaccine" (1)

kindbud (90044) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179132)

Nonsense. Vaccines can be prophylactic, or therapeutic. You just mistakenly think the word has a narrower meaning than it actually does.

Re:"Vaccine" (1)

oldhack (1037484) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179198)

Not according to dictionary. Why don't you cite a medical dictionary that distinguishes vaccine from other types of drugs. Go ahead.

Re:"Vaccine" (1)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179516)

Um, why don't you cite the particular dictionary that you claim proves your point? "Not according to dictionary," indeed ...

RTFA (1)

im_thatoneguy (819432) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179192)

"Hatsukami said NicVax would probably be most helpful for smokers who already quit smoking and are trying to avoid a relapse."

Re:"Vaccine" (1)

noidentity (188756) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179702)

What, vaccine doesn't mean "something related to either preventing or causing more of something"? Next you'll be telling me that theft doesn't mean "something I don't like", and bricked doesn't mean "problems with electronic device that I'm not able to find the immediate cause of"...

Sings: They tried to send me to Rehab, (1)

Nautical Insanity (1190003) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178880)

but I said no, no, give me the goddamn shot.

Finally, something to deal with anti-smoking (3, Funny)

noidentity (188756) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178918)

Like H1N1 vaccines, this anti-smoking vaccine will help eradicate anti-smoking once and for all, along with all the ill effects it's caused. People will be able to stop worrying about anti-smoking when around other people.

(Brought to you by the people who brought you cooler temperatures, larger sizes, wider width shoes, and cheaper price tags.)

Re:Finally, something to deal with anti-smoking (1)

beefnog (718146) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178942)

Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of statistics in America.

So, this new vaccine... (4, Funny)

camperdave (969942) | more than 4 years ago | (#30178928)

So, this new vaccine... Does it come in a smokable version?

Re:So, this new vaccine... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30179160)

No but i heard you can stick it up your nose now.

Re:So, this new vaccine... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30179298)

Side effects may include heart attack, stroke, loss of sleep, headaches, hemorrhaging, paralysis, and in rare instances autism. Consult your doctor if any of these effects persist longer than 2 weeks this may be a sign of a rare but life threatening condition. Exercise is not recommended for the first 4 weeks of treatment. Do not smoke while you are taking the drug as it may increase the risk of stroke, heart attack and/or death.

Unfortunately... (0, Flamebait)

BobMcD (601576) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179042)

...the word 'vaccine' usually winds up linked to the word 'mandatory'.

Otherwise this would be very good news indeed.

Re:Unfortunately... (4, Interesting)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179088)

This has me worrying about "vaccines" for other drugs. In a century, maybe nobody in the USA will be able to relax with $drug_of_choice, because of mandatory "vaccination" against the effects of any psychoactives.

Re:Unfortunately... (2, Insightful)

BobMcD (601576) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179216)

You're probably correct. It isn't hard to imagine a world where $drug_of_choice will no longer be effective for self-medication, and only prescribed pharmaceuticals will still work, because only those will be left outside of what the vaccine targets.

Although the vaccine does not reduce the cravings or withdrawal symptoms of quitting, it will reduce the rewarding effects of smoking. It is designed to curb the "high" smokers feel when they light up.

Re:Unfortunately... (1)

psyque (1234612) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179226)

If nobody knows what they're missing since they were vaccinated at an early age then who will care?

Re:Unfortunately... (2, Insightful)

Carrot007 (37198) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179376)

People needing release will always find something.

In some contries around the world alcohol is not allowed.

If you think that means they have no recreational drugs (legal ones as like alcohol) then you are very naive.

The only solution to addiction is to make people happy and contented. No one seems to be interested in this. there is no money in it.\

Re:Unfortunately... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30179112)

What a load of bullshit.

Re:Unfortunately... (1)

Akira Kogami (1566305) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179442)

Bullshit. No government would give such a fuck you to big tobacco.

Billions on smokes then NicVAX then cancer, woohoo (0, Troll)

kaptink (699820) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179086)

Spend billions on cigarettes, then billions on NicVAX and then likely billions on cancer treatments. All while smoking is still legal? I think we are still doing it wrong. If the government was serious, they would make tobacco a scheduled drug. Wouldn't they?

Re:Billions on smokes then NicVAX then cancer, woo (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179416)

The legality of drugs has nothing to do with safety, it never really has.

Re:Billions on smokes then NicVAX then cancer, woo (1)

kaptink (699820) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179642)

Very true. It's just annoying that a drug that is so detrimental to health is treated as a lesser evil than say pot or LSD or even ecstasy which have almost no fatalities. And then for the big drug companies to sell us an "antidote" on top of the cancer treatment is just missing the point. I guess I am trolling the obvious but I think it would be easier to stop the tobacco trade then sell a patch. And I'm a smoker. Maybe just a ever increasingly bitter one.

Side-effects (4, Funny)

Reason58 (775044) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179382)

Unfortunately, this new vaccine is highly addictive. Not to worry though, they are hard at work on a cure for vaccine addiction. It is passed into the bloodstream through the lungs...

Sounds good (1)

davidwr (791652) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179408)

I wonder if this [wikipedia.org] would be considered overkill, or if it would even work in the first place?

Vaccine? (1)

Ironchew (1069966) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179430)

So these "vaccines" deliver a weakened version of nicotine and cocaine to our adaptive immune systems to condition them to attack the chemicals later?

Oh, wait, the chemicals are too small for our immune system to detect and disassemble.

Don't call them vaccines. It sounds stupid.

This will be the cause of the zombacalypse (1)

steak (145650) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179720)

and if regular zombies won't shoot themselves, you know zombies with nicotine cravings will be three times less likely to shoot themselves.

time to stock up on canned peaches and napalm.

Vaccine (2, Funny)

WilyCoder (736280) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179798)

My vaccine for both tobacco addiction and alcoholism was marijuana. True story.

Were is tha vaccine for WOW addiction? (1)

bobsdesk (1308623) | more than 4 years ago | (#30179812)

This would also lower the average weight and white pasty skin color of the populous
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