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Mininova Removes All Copyright-Infringing Torrents

Soulskill posted more than 4 years ago | from the another-one-bites-the-dust dept.

Movies 352

Pabugs writes with news that popular torrent site Mininova has abandoned their attempts at filtering and simply deleted all torrents other than the legal ones they facilitate through their Content Distribution service. According to their blog post, they were left "no other option than to take [their] platform offline" after a court ruling from August. "The judge ruled that Mininova is not directly responsible for any copyright infringements, but ordered it to remove all torrents linking to copyrighted material within three months, or face a penalty of up to 5 million euros."

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352 comments

And thus dies Mininova. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30237618)

Farewell.

And a huge FUCK YOU to the MPAA/RIAA.

Re:And thus dies Mininova. (1)

isama (1537121) | more than 4 years ago | (#30237752)

The MPAA/RIAA are not the ones to blame for this..
It was BREIN, the dutch RIAA... bastards.

Same droppings, different pile (4, Insightful)

tepples (727027) | more than 4 years ago | (#30237814)

The MPAA/RIAA are not the ones to blame for this..
It was BREIN, the dutch RIAA... bastards.

Same droppings, different pile. The nine members of the MAFIAA (Sony, GE, Disney, Fox, Time Warner, National Amusements, Vivendi, WMG, and EMI) are the same no matter which country they operate in.

Re:Same droppings, different pile (3, Informative)

PizzaAnalogyGuy (1684610) | more than 4 years ago | (#30238112)

Yep, RIAA/MPAA have their fingers everywhere. The only reasonable anti-piracy entity is BSA which mostly just goes against piracy sellers and those who use pirated apps in corporations/work.

Let me tell you a true story from real life.

While traveling the endless lands of The Barrens and sipping my Mountain Dew drink with ices, I remembered a note my mother left for me in my childhood. It was on the fridge door, with a lovely heart magnet on top of it. I read the note and it said she'll be late home today and she had left me a good salad to eat in the fridge. But that is bad food. I didn't want to eat bad food. I wanted a PIZZA. But I was scared. I truly was. It was the first time I had to go against an authority and it was the first time I had to make a tough decision myself - what kind of a pizza to order. I went to Google and typed in "pizza". There was a nice lady that asked from me what kind of a pizza I would like to have. I just mumbled something along the lines of.. Sliced ham, bacon, pineapple and roasted red peppers with provolone cheese on a parmesan crust.. Family size, pan pizza! And one Mountain Dew. And some chocolate ice cream with strawberries! She said "I'll be there in 20 mins". I felt like a man and went back to my computer.

The thing I'm trying to say here is that whatever they will try, someone will get around it and do what he wants. So did I.

i wonder... (1)

mrlarone (1288904) | more than 4 years ago | (#30237620)

...if they're working with a white or black list?

Re:i wonder... (1)

appleguru (1030562) | more than 4 years ago | (#30237648)

FTFS, whitelist: "simply deleted all torrents other than the legal ones they facilitate through their Content Distribution service"

Re:i wonder... (0)

sopssa (1498795) | more than 4 years ago | (#30237846)

This basically means they're dead. Good luck to the guys who we're working on it tho, they had a nice office [google.com] and all. But I don't think the advertisement revenue will be the same. Maybe they find a new business model though, will be interesting to see.

And now that TPB killed their trackers and seem to be a sinking ship.. uh, bay, times are really changing.

Re:i wonder... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30237910)

Bah. Remember Suprnova? It is only a matter of time until something else replaces it.

Re:i wonder... (4, Insightful)

sopssa (1498795) | more than 4 years ago | (#30237960)

Bah. Remember Suprnova? It is only a matter of time until something else replaces it.

I've always wondered about this. Pirates get all upset and "they are traitors!" when the website operators give up and move on with their lives under heavy pressure from lots of multinational corporations and governments.

But when something bad happens to the guys running these websites, everyone goes "bah. someone else will replace it" and everyone turns their back to them.

Is this a growth some few persons like to fight for on their free time against such a power?

Re:i wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30237992)

"Is this a growth"

Yeah, it's cancer.

Re:i wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30237698)

They're working with an axe. There are 8857 torrents left. Does anyone have a cache version to compare how much got taken down?

Re:i wonder... (1)

thejynxed (831517) | more than 4 years ago | (#30237918)

The last time I was on there, there was over 16 thousand torrents in the Games section alone.

That should give you a good idea.

Ah shit, not again.... (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30237622)

Damn it.... Oh well, first post.

-CVroyovXO

Well, dang. (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30237628)

Where do those of us looking for not-legally avaliable stuff, like dubbed anime go now?

Re:Well, dang. (3, Funny)

tepples (727027) | more than 4 years ago | (#30238060)

Where do those of us looking for not-legally avaliable stuff, like dubbed anime go now?

You could always go teach English in Japan.

Debate! (4, Interesting)

headkase (533448) | more than 4 years ago | (#30237632)

There is obviously an issue with regards to copyright in our society. Millions and more are sharing all the time. This points the finger at the issue being systemic. We need to educate people to enable a wider debate. That is the only thing that will lead to fair change. Piracy is not the answer. There is a place for copyright that is not todays distorted parameters. Boycotting in the mean time is the answer, however, unless boycotting is whipped into shape it is also not the answer. Debate! Educate your friends and family it is a small start but it is the only way.

Re:Debate! (5, Interesting)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 4 years ago | (#30237706)

The whole thing smells more and more like the old P&P RPG Paranoia. Everyone hates secret societies, everyone hates mutants, yet everyone is a mutant in a secret society.

I worked for our version of the RIAA for a while (I didn't mean to, they were part of the bundle of companies I had to support). My moment of "wtf" came when one of their lawyers approached me and asked if I knew anything about flashing a Nintendo DS for their kids so they can play copies.

My answer was "since you're suing people who know aynthing about flashing Nintendos or even do it, my answer has to be no". This is when he offered money...

Re:Debate! (2, Insightful)

headkase (533448) | more than 4 years ago | (#30237780)

That shows a lack of principle. We are all fallible, I'm petty and arrogant all the time - especially here ;) - but if we want to improve our lot as a whole education is the only answer. It may be too late for us cynical and jaded adults but perhaps we can try an experiment with our children. Teach them to be responsible citizens. Start with restoring an actual functioning public domain. Then teach copyright obligations in civics classes to primary school students. It will never be easy as we all want what is best for us. But, collectively, we have to have room for compromise or we will all get nothing.

Re:Debate! (-1, Troll)

sopssa (1498795) | more than 4 years ago | (#30237924)

It's nice that you have this "fight the power!" attitude and all, but some of us actually have lives and loved ones to care about. Most of us, actually. They fighted in court, lost and now they're complying to the court order. What is the other way? Yell "NO YOU WONT DO THIS TO US" and go to jail? No thank you.

But seeing you're here to write about their lack of principle, why don't you do something?

Re:Debate! (4, Interesting)

headkase (533448) | more than 4 years ago | (#30238006)

I am doing something. See my signature. And I actually don't have anything to lose so I'm choosing to stick it to the man because I can. People can force change through virtue all that is needed is the appropriate vehicle. Slashdot almost gets there, see my signature for a vehicle-in-progress that would allow you to say fuck you in as neutral a setting as possible. Organization is the key. Individually we are relatively intelligent, collectively we are a juggernaut. All we need is the mechanism to arrive at fair truth. What policy maker will risk flying in the face of that? They'd be taken to the nearest tree and hanged. Figuratively of course, we are a democracy.

Re:Debate! (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 4 years ago | (#30237942)

The problem is "morals". And I don't mean antiquated decency laws or waggling index finger sermons, I mean examples and principles. When you see people who are allegedly moral models, from politicians to economic leaders to celebrities, be selfish, arrogant idiots who have nothing but their own agendas in their mind, people start to wonder why they should be different. It's not like they weren't in the past, but at the very least they kept the facade up that they don't. Politicians tried to appear honest and do their best for the country, economy leaders appeared like the ones that create jobs rather than sending them abroad and celebrities were "decent". And I'm not talking about their sex life, let them fuck who they want, but they were not primitive sluts that don't show off how you can be a bimbo and still be famous, as long as you have money.

So what should the average person think? All you see is crooked politicians, economy leaders that drive around in 200k cars while they eliminate your jobs and celebrities that are mostly known for how much they are a bumbling fool. Nobody gives a shit about country or society.

So why should you?

Re:Debate! (1)

Maxo-Texas (864189) | more than 4 years ago | (#30238280)

Morals have always been for the common people and not for the powerful.

It's just easier to catch the president of france breaking copyright law while pushing Draconian copyright laws these days.

I think the combination of computers, cameras, and suppression of computer and camera evidence against the powerful (re: england) will put the nail in the coffin and we will indeed end up with an endless future of a boot on the face of humanity.

Re:Debate! (1)

drgould (24404) | more than 4 years ago | (#30238074)

It may be too late for us cynical and jaded adults but perhaps we can try an experiment with our children. Teach them to be responsible citizens. Start with restoring an actual functioning public domain. Then teach copyright obligations in civics classes to primary school students.

Considering the abysmal state of education in the United States, teaching history would be a good start. Including American history (in America obviously), of which the Constitution and Copyright is a part.

Re:Debate! (5, Informative)

masmullin (1479239) | more than 4 years ago | (#30238046)

That was sort of dumb of you. The answer to ANY request an RIAA person has for you is "no"... not some big shpeel about "how you sue people who know stuff". Just say No and be done with it.

Eg.
Q:Could you help me flash my NintendoDS?
A:No

Q:Could you find me the latest cd on thepiratebay?
A:No

Q:Could you grab me a coke?
A:No

Q:Could you call 911 since I am about to go into cardiac arrest?
A:No

Q:Could you stop aliens from kidnapping my children?
A:No

Q:Could you give me the time of day?
A:No

See, its easy.

Re:Debate! (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30238170)

+1. If more people learned the power of saying "no" the world would be a better place.

Q: Want to work a 60 hour week for 30 hour pay?
A: No

Q: Want to let us look after your money so we can leverage it and then give you a tiny fraction of the profit?
A: No

Q: Want to borrow some of that money to buy an overpriced house?
A: No

The only reason "no" is not a viable answer to any of these and many similar questions is because there are far too many suckers who are willing to say "yes."

Re:Debate! (3, Interesting)

MachDelta (704883) | more than 4 years ago | (#30238224)

Q:Could you call 911 since I am about to go into cardiac arrest?
A:No

Depending on where you live, that answer may technically be illegal. Plenty of countries and a few states (oh and Quebec too) have a "Duty to rescue" law which, in a nutshell, states that you must attempt to assist an individual in peril provided that it doesn't also put your life at risk. At the very least, you would be expected to call for help.

It's all semantics though. I can't imagine any decent human being simply standing there and watching while another human has a heart attack, no matter who they work for.

Re:Debate! (3, Interesting)

Maxo-Texas (864189) | more than 4 years ago | (#30238304)

Let's see.

Imagine that other human being destroyed your life and put you in prison for five years.

How about, your children were sexually abused while in child protective services and one committed suicide.

Of course, if the law requires that I go get help, I'd have

to

go
.
.
.
get
.
.
.
help
.
.
.
as
.
.
fast
.
.
.
.
as
.
.
.
.
possible.

I've done the non-vengeance thing and I've done the vengeance thing and let me tell you, vengeance was damn sweet and I have no regrets. It's the only thing that made me smile now and then for a couple years while I recovered back to human.

Re:Debate! (2, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 4 years ago | (#30238320)

Unfortunately, when you're working for them, such a denial of service could be seen as a refusal to work. Which not only could cost you your job but also seem a bit suspicious. And ya know, this time and age suspicion is all you have to raise to be a criminal.

What is a copy? (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 4 years ago | (#30238110)

[A record label lawyer] approached me and asked if I knew anything about flashing a Nintendo DS for their kids so they can play copies.

By "copies", do you include homebrew games that implement the same rules as a non-free commercial game? Would Lockjaw [pineight.com], for instance, be considered a "copy" of Tetris DS?

ObTopic: I've seen torrents of just homebrew. I imagine they'd go away too because Nintendo would object to including them in "Content Distribution" on patent grounds.

Re:What is a copy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30238240)

By "copies", do you include homebrew games that implement the same rules as a non-free commercial game? Would Lockjaw, for instance, be considered a "copy" of Tetris DS?

Yeah, that's obviously what he meant! *rollseyes* The lawyer's kid knew *all about* the homebrew scene out there and really wanted to play all those half-baked buggy games. But he just didn't know where to begin with using a flash cart, so he asked his lawyer dad. Yep, that's obviously what he meant. *rollseyesagain*

Re:What is a copy? (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 4 years ago | (#30238370)

The problem is that, homebrew or not, altering the DS alone is already considered illegal in some countries. Yes, altering something that you legally bought and should by any means own, i.e. altering your property, is illegal. So even if he asked for homebrew my answer would have had to be "no". But he directly and bluntly asked for a way to play what they labeled pirated copies.

Re:Debate! (1)

gowen (141411) | more than 4 years ago | (#30237748)

You're trying to start an intelligent and informed debate on copyright? Based on the premise that some copyright is quite reasonable?

On Slashdot?

Good luck with that...

Re:Debate! (0)

Kethinov (636034) | more than 4 years ago | (#30237832)

You're trying to start an intelligent and informed debate on copyright? Based on the premise that some copyright is quite reasonable?

On Slashdot?

Good luck with that...

Some copyright is quite reasonable. What we need is a legalization of noncommercial copyright infringement. Leave the rest of copyright law perfectly as it is. I should be able to share all the files I want, but as soon as I start trying to make money doing that, that's when it should become illegal (as it is today).

The exclusive distribution rights granted by copyright were meant to give you an exclusive right to profit from your work. Copyright law when originally drafted could not anticipate a scenario where copying cost nothing, so they simply assumed that any copy must have a profit motive which as of the advent of consumer electronics is no longer necessarily the case.

Re:Debate! (1)

Kharny (239931) | more than 4 years ago | (#30237912)

non-commercial is a bit of an interesting misnomer.
If I would download every movie/piece of music i want to watch/listen too, is that non-commercial?

Up to a point, i agree that current copyright is problematic. There needs to be a reward for making things people want, limited in time/ownership maybe.

Re:Debate! (1)

Kethinov (636034) | more than 4 years ago | (#30238038)

non-commercial is a bit of an interesting misnomer.
If I would download every movie/piece of music i want to watch/listen too, is that non-commercial?

Yes. That constitutes a noncommercial, private use.

Up to a point, i agree that current copyright is problematic. There needs to be a reward for making things people want, limited in time/ownership maybe.

Granting copyright owners an exclusive right to profit from their works is reward aplenty. Legalizing noncommercial copyright infringement isn't going to cause massive market failures across the board, it'll just force people to stop selling digital bits for money and start getting more modern and creative with their business models.

Re:Debate! (2, Insightful)

gnasher719 (869701) | more than 4 years ago | (#30238012)

Some copyright is quite reasonable. What we need is a legalization of noncommercial copyright infringement. Leave the rest of copyright law perfectly as it is. I should be able to share all the files I want, but as soon as I start trying to make money doing that, that's when it should become illegal (as it is today).

I don't think there should be a distinction between commercial and non-commercial, there should be a distinction depending on the amount of damages, and obviously commercial copying would give more evidence of damages.

But consider what could happen if non-commercial infringement wasn't punished: Let's say Steve Jobs has an argument with someone who happens to be the boss of a record company. So Steve Jobs buys two dozen XServes, goes to a record store and buys all CDs made by that record company, plus orders all their back catalogue, hires someone to load these CDs onto the computers, then makes them available to the whole world, without asking for a penny. For a million dollars, he could drive that record company into bankruptcy. Completely non-commercial.

Re:Debate! (1)

Kethinov (636034) | more than 4 years ago | (#30238094)

I don't think there should be a distinction between commercial and non-commercial, there should be a distinction depending on the amount of damages, and obviously commercial copying would give more evidence of damages.

That distinction already exists today in our legal system and there already is an adjustment to the amount of damages awarded depending on whether or not an infringement is commercial.

But consider what could happen if non-commercial infringement wasn't punished: Let's say Steve Jobs has an argument with someone who happens to be the boss of a record company. So Steve Jobs buys two dozen XServes, goes to a record store and buys all CDs made by that record company, plus orders all their back catalogue, hires someone to load these CDs onto the computers, then makes them available to the whole world, without asking for a penny. For a million dollars, he could drive that record company into bankruptcy. Completely non-commercial.

You don't need a super rich person to do that, it's already being done today on dozens of bit torrent sites...

All I'm advocating here is for copyright law to face reality. Noncommercial copyright infringement in the form of file sharing is never going away. If we just legalize it already we can start focusing on how to build business models that can coexist with it rather than playing an endless game of whack-a-mole.

Re:Debate! (4, Insightful)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 4 years ago | (#30238176)

And stop with the stupid after copyright. It's not like Miles Davis can benefit from any copy of Kind of Blue sold today. The purpose of copyright is to provide a source of revenue for the creator, so more people will create stuff, not for some label can profit more.

Re:Debate! (1, Informative)

Plekto (1018050) | more than 4 years ago | (#30238290)

Some copyright is quite reasonable. What we need is a legalization of noncommercial copyright infringement. Leave the rest of copyright law perfectly as it is. I should be able to share all the files I want, but as soon as I start trying to make money doing that, that's when it should become illegal (as it is today).

The interesting part here is that the person in question wouldn't have paid for the product anyways, unless it was something that was critical to their work or life(ie - physical item like a light bulb). And entertainment isn't. People will just go elsewhere if the price is too high. For instance, I could have seen my favorite band in concert, but at $140 a ticket, it was too expensive. Since there was no "free" option either, I simply opted out. I heard that they only sold about 2/3 of the total tickets as well. I didn't cost the promoter a sale. There were no damages. I just went elsewhere.

This is a critical point for the producers to understand. Copying isn't a lost sale. I never would have been a sale at all anyways.

So what's the upside? How many of us have bought something after playing a demo or listening to a sample of the music online? Getting exposure for your product means a lot lately, and that means you have to give it away to attract new listeners or viewers. Attempting to squash it will just end up making people spend their money elsewhere. And in this economic climate, you'd think that the major studios and recording companies would figure this out. If they thought it was bad before, with these continuing tactics, they're in for a rude awakening.

My son doesn't even care about watching TV much any more or music on the radio. He watches YouTube for entertainment because it's free. I doubt if he'll even bother to download music at this rate or buy a single CD before he's 18. They just simply put, lost a future customer because there are better free alternatives out there without the idiocy and rules to deal with. He gets $5 a week and that's like gold to him. Spending it on music is the last thing he wants to do at this point. So it goes to his guitar or his bike or video games... all physical things, since YouTube and other similar sites(he likes those free Java-driven game sites for instance) offer him an enormous number of ways to waste time for free.

Even I have never downloaded a single music or movie file. Because there's an almost unlimited amount of better stuff out there for free. I pay a lot of money per month for a fast connection and to be honest, I'd rather watch some crazy video on YouTube (was watching old Battlebots segments for instance last night with my son(who now wants to build a Battlebot - heh)) than more of the boring drek that Hollywood puts out. And I'd rather go out to one of the local bars around town to hear some *live* music than waste it on a CD.

I've seen only three movies in a theater this last year. With online content and 80+ channels of Cable TV, I just don't need music or movies in my life at this point.

Note - since I do live in a major urban area, yes, it is simply a matter of going down the street to find entertainment, so I admit that that's a factor in my favor.

Re:Debate! (3, Insightful)

Krneki (1192201) | more than 4 years ago | (#30237762)

The Pandora box was open a long time ago and since then the piracy has become more and more mainstream. Since the dawn of the net it has never, ever had a setback longer then a week, hell will freeze over before the piracy will see a decline.

Re:Debate! (1)

srussia (884021) | more than 4 years ago | (#30237816)

There is obviously an issue with regards to copyright in our society. Millions and more are sharing all the time. This points the finger at the issue being systemic. We need to educate people to enable a wider debate. That is the only thing that will lead to fair change. Piracy is not the answer.

You're not giving people enough credit. Sharing is the answer, and the're doing it. Copyright is going the way of "droit de seigneur" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Droit_de_seigneur). Come to think of it, "copyright" in French is "droit d'auteur". Kinda makes the analogy a lot clearer.

Re:Debate! (1)

headkase (533448) | more than 4 years ago | (#30237860)

See this: Thread [slashdot.org] for all the nasty, posturing details. Truth can be established and boycotting is the only answer but that requires organization.

Re:Debate! (4, Interesting)

ivoras (455934) | more than 4 years ago | (#30237996)

There is obviously an issue with regards to copyright in our society. Millions and more are sharing all the time. This points the finger at the issue being systemic.

I'd rather look at the cause of this "issue" - i.e. *why* does it exist. And I'll offer an answer - because it is harder and harder to get rich quickly while staying legal. The fact that I download movies all the time didn't influence my moviegoing one bit - I still go out to the movies every week or two because of the experience and the company of friends - both of which suck over DIVX. My problem is that there usually isn't anything good out there to see. Some nights, we don't remember what we watched around 5 minutes after leaving the cinema! I doubt the problem is with a lack of quality writers or actors or directors - I think most of it comes from producers and other financiers trying to cram in special effects, political correctness and crowd-pleasing stories (especially endings) to try to maximize the profits, like art can be expressed by equations. I don't feel one bit bad about downloading "2012" but I watched Inglorious Basterds and Watchmen twice (just a recent example) and I have a hefty collection of (legal, bought) DVDs of good films and TV shows. My point is that that a significant part of the piracy issue (not all of it!) is the direct result of the fall in quality and resorting to formulaic "this script equals this much $$$" thinking on the part of producers.

I'm sure the same thing goes for music.

One other large thing is convenience - sometimes people just don't feel like going to the movies and it's easier to download the film right now and watch it than waiting months for it to come on DVDs, etc. It is human nature - the baby wants what it wants. There are surely more problems, but I have a feeling these two combined are the cause of over 50% of the piracy issues. Heck, solve the distribution issue (make it cheap and easy and at the same time worldwide as the cinema releases) and I'd bet that 40% of all piracy would simply disappear over night.

Re:Debate! (2, Interesting)

headkase (533448) | more than 4 years ago | (#30238102)

You have hit the nail right on the head. Industry in the form of the RIAA and MPAA is not meeting the needs of their customers. I want to download all my movies with none of that idiotic DRM, I want a public domain so that others can pick up the ball and continue where the current holder doesn't, I want many more things as well. But RIAA and MPAA members only want one thing: money. How they get it is control and they are playing a maximization game. What they fail to realize is that there are other agents out there and they have pissed some of us off. They shouldn't have pissed me off because I have nothing better to do than snipe at them all day all over the web wherever appropriate.

Piracy IS the answer {was "Debate!} (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30238186)

Piracy IS the answer, same as sipping an alcoholic drink was the answer during Prohibition.

The trick is, we need mobsters to facilitate piracy, same as the mobsters helped restore freedom during Prohibition by trafficking in stuff the majority of people wanted.

Re:Piracy IS the answer {was "Debate!} (1)

headkase (533448) | more than 4 years ago | (#30238266)

But unless there is mass revolt, and there won't be without education and a common cause, then the collusion of big business and government can pick themselves up, ignore the truth, and carry on.

Re:Debate! (4, Interesting)

Znork (31774) | more than 4 years ago | (#30238288)

There is a place for copyright

I used to think that, but I don't any more. Any monopolies handed out by the government and whose cost is borne by the public and the distributed economy will be treated as of interest for the receiving stakeholders only, and thus will permanently expand as the paying parties will not be represented in discussions around the issue. See the claims about IP jobs 'lost' to piracy, yet where are the discussions about jobs among plumbers, pizzamakers or other branches of the economy when copyright shifts money and resources from one part of the economy to the other? Are those branches represented when it's arbitrarily decided that they should be deprived of resources in favour of media industries? Copyright creates no resources, it merely redistributes them.

So no, there is no place for copyright. Any honest industry or creators support scheme requires that it be managed within the normal budget of governments and, like any other redistribution scheme, have its benefits weighed against its costs, and accounted for to the public. No other government scheme has anywhere close to as bad efficiency of copyright; if any other program had less than 5% of funding going to the actual intended beneficiaries there'd be an uproar.

That's not to say there can't be reasonable schemes for encouraging creativity; the easiest would simply be mandatory licensing which dispenses of any contracts no matter what outlet or reproduction, and simply requires a percentage (50-75%, for example) of any revenue derived from the copying to be paid to the creators (via a public agency, such as the IRS, not through private entities like in radio, and modulated by policy). Then it would also be easy to manage reasonable cost/benefit levels (should there be a ceiling on payouts and the rest spread along the long tail to encourage more production, for example, how many years of payout is the optimum to keep creative material flowing, etc).

Boycotting is not enough, the corrosive effect of corruption on politics is too strong, and politically it's only used to claim that anyone boycotting is pirating anyway. But it's certainly a right thing to do; paying for anything from the RIAA/MPAA corps means supporting the type of corruption going on as ACTA and other back-room deals, which I find utterly unacceptable by now.

Another site will replace it. (4, Insightful)

purpledinoz (573045) | more than 4 years ago | (#30237634)

Mininova replaced Suprnova, and Mininova will be replaced by another site. It's like playing whack-a-mole, except there are 1000 moles and 1 hammer.

Re:Another site will replace it. (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30237682)

Agreed. The only reason why it is so difficult is because the process takes so long. You can get a new site up in 2 hours, and after 2 days have the word spread around the world. Until the law can match that speed of taking the sites down, they will always be ahead. Conventional methods of *any sort* really haven't proven useful when applied to the Internet. Music and movie industries have to adapt, and so will countries, laws, and their law enforcement branches. Luckily for the pirates they are slow to act.

Re:Another site will replace it. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30237696)

In some other countries servers that holds torrents (=links) are not ilegal because the copyrighted material are not stored on the server, and the normal people has some rights than protects them.
Yes, we can run, but being hunted is not fun...

Re:Another site will replace it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30237792)

1000moles1hammer ? Sounds hot

Re:Another site will replace it. (2, Interesting)

CharlyFoxtrot (1607527) | more than 4 years ago | (#30237866)

I don't know, quality of (public) torrent sites has been on the decline for a while. Now with demonoid still down, mininova dead and the piratebay in limbo what will replace them ? This feels like after Napster when the last of the replacements like audiogalaxy were running out of steam.

Another site already replaced it (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30237930)

kickasstorrents.com

Re:Another site will replace it. (5, Insightful)

ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) | more than 4 years ago | (#30238184)

The internet is actually a smaller place than most people think. When it comes to any given field, no matter how large, there are really only a few dozen major sites to consider. Sometimes less.

How many large torrent trackers are there really? Twenty, Thirty? I doubt it's over a hundred. Depends on your definition of large perhaps, but I'll make mine; A tracker which hosts TV, Movies, Music, Games and Software, and which has a large number of seeders and leechers (>10000). How many of these site are there? I estimate that there are about a dozen who really count.

Throw out as many platitudes as you like, but the RIAA et al are putting the bittorrent genie back in the bottle. Technology has not kept pace with legal manoeuvres and one by one the top sites are being shut down. With them goes the hundreds of thousands of technically inexperienced seeds and leechers need to keep torrents healthy. Trackers need critical mass for torrents to be useful, but this mass makes them an easy target for legal action.

This is still whack a mole, but the ratio of moles to hammers is, at most, 10:1. The decline of bittorrent began with the Pirate Bay but it will not stop there. Without major changes to how it is centralised, bittorrent will go the way of napster before it and you'll be back to getting your stuff on irc again.

The Net has changed. The Chinese government has proven that the internet and its users can be brought to heel on a massive scale. Netizens in general, and in particular the geeks whose obligation was to defend the network, have shown though lack of innovation that they are not going to defend users freedoms, anonymity or rights online. We'd all rather give our data to webhosts, ISPs, and Google; trusting them not to betray us. Technology has given power back to the big players, and not delivered on its promise to ordinary people.

This may kill their CDN (4, Insightful)

Guspaz (556486) | more than 4 years ago | (#30237654)

Most of the success from the CDN service relied on the fact that millions of users visiting Mininova for general torrents would also be exposed to the CDN torrents. With Mininova's general torrent index deep-sixed, traffic will plummet to a tiny fraction of what it was before, and activity on CDN torrents will drop correspondingly.

While this means that users of the CDN won't get any extra exposure, it's still a useful service for pure distribution (they handle the tracking and seeding). Unfortunately, with no revenue stream, mininova won't be able to support that for long.

Whack-A-Mole (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 4 years ago | (#30237656)

So Mininova is gone. The King is dead. Long live the King!
The media industries have been playing Whack-A-Mole with the internet since Napster and nothing has changed.
As long as they don't get any ISP level laws passed, let them have their minor victories.

Re:Whack-A-Mole (1)

Chatterton (228704) | more than 4 years ago | (#30237886)

Yes, Whack-A-Mole is fun. But as a user, where is the next mole?

Re:Whack-A-Mole (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30238162)

google

Re:Whack-A-Mole (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30238208)

"So this game is whack-a-mole, except your next mole has a machine gune... you still just get a hammer."

Re:Whack-A-Mole (1)

thejynxed (831517) | more than 4 years ago | (#30238050)

They won't even stop people even if they get ISP level laws, which is what ACTA does.

That combined with torrent clients steadily moving away from the central-server weakness, they can have fun with their content filtering.

Lots of luck stopping DHT + PEX. They haven't been able to stop eDonkey/eMule and the like (which also uses DHT), and that has been around for years before the Bit Torrent protocol was even written.

It's not just whack-a-mole, it's a complete exercise in futility coming from organizations that are rapidly heading the way of the dinosaur.

This is great (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30237664)

It's always annoying to have loads of stolen software music and films come up when I am searching for a torrent.
Having mininova get rid of all the illigal stuff will make it much easier and more pleasant to use. Legitimate stuff gets buried as there is so much more stolen stuff.

I hope other torrent sites follow suit, even just for the ease of use reasons.

At least the judge is sane (5, Insightful)

T Murphy (1054674) | more than 4 years ago | (#30237672)

The judge ruled that Mininova is not directly responsible for any copyright infringements

After seeing the Google/Italy article, it's nice to see that sanity holds elsewhere.

Re:At least the judge is sane (1)

Koby77 (992785) | more than 4 years ago | (#30237932)

Hopefully in future cases, however, the judges will see that filtering is not feasible from a technical standpoint. It doesn't matter if you're found not responsible and must filter, or guilty and are forced offline. Both result in the same outcome. So why should someone found not responsible for a problem be forced to walk the plank?

This hearkens back to the Betamax vs Universal case (yes I know this is a Dutch case). The burden is on the RIAAs of the world to prove infringement and then deal with it (and in a legal manner as well).

well this sucks (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30237702)

maybe gnutella can save us like it did after napster went down the drain. this really bites, though. how many major indexers are left?

Not too sorry to see Mininova die (4, Interesting)

Chris Tucker (302549) | more than 4 years ago | (#30237730)

Mininova included far too many torrents on private trackers. Sort of defeating the purpose of BitTorrent, actually.

No great loss, all things considered.

Re:Not too sorry to see Mininova die (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30237902)

Private trackers are sort of defeating the purpose of BitTorrent, actually.

There, fixed that for ya.

Re:Not too sorry to see Mininova die (2, Insightful)

Dr. Spork (142693) | more than 4 years ago | (#30238040)

I agree in principle, but in practice things tend to be less elegant. I expect to see an increase of private trackers, because their hosts will not be the huge, tempting targets that Mininova and TPB were. This means that we'll all join exclusive, secret societies online and share files that way. It's not more egalitarian, etc., but it's probably more sustainable and seems more like a bunch of overlapping communities, which is sort of nice.

Re:Not too sorry to see Mininova die (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30237908)

Mininova sucks for other reasons as well (like a slow, crappy interface).

ThePirateBay is still alive and kicking. Use the magnet links. If your client doesn't do magnet links, just switch to one of the openbittorrent.com trackers after you get the .torrent file.

illegal ones? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30237766)

How they knew which torrents were illegal?

LegitTorrent (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 4 years ago | (#30238146)

How they knew which torrents were illegal?

Some of these trackers have "LegitTorrent" services designed for publishers of quality works that aren't blatant copyright infringements. Mininova just deleted every torrent that wasn't in its LegitTorrent section [mininova.org].

Aw man! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30237768)

And with Demonoid being down, I'm finding myself pressed for some new sites.

"search item" type:torrent (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30237848)

So mininova turns into www.legaltorrents.com. What they could do though it just de-reference the links, but keep the torrent names in the list. That way people could simply do a websearch on them. That way the only way to take them down would be to outlaw web searches :)

OMG!!!!!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30237874)

The situation is getting out of control!! It is getting harder and harder to steal movies!! Something must be done!!

Oh no! What will I do? (5, Funny)

DJCouchyCouch (622482) | more than 4 years ago | (#30237990)

Mininova is gone!

If only there'd be some kind of alternative! I guess I'll just have to rely on sumotorrent, btjunkie, eztv, fenopy, isohunt, seedpeer, torrentz, torrentbox, torrentdownloads.net, torrent portal, torrentreactor.net, torrentreactor.to, alivetorrents, demonoid, boxtorrent, animelab, animesuki, kickasstorrents, torrentplaza, movietorrents, torrentomega, flixflux, overget, superfundo and all the other sites I can easily find on google by doing a simple search.

I hope I'll be able to survive!

Re:Oh no! What will I do? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30238090)

Demonoid is down and isohut currently has searching issues.Oh noes!

Re:Oh no! What will I do? (2, Informative)

Pteraspidomorphi (1651293) | more than 4 years ago | (#30238360)

box is now called bakabt. animesuki is only a meta-index, but look into scarywater or nyaatorrents. I hope that helps with your survival ;)

Typo in summary (2, Funny)

dvh.tosomja (1235032) | more than 4 years ago | (#30238098)

> Mininova Removes All Copyright-Infringing Torrents

Mininova Removes All Torrents ...Here, fixed that for ya

Penalizing legal uses? (1, Interesting)

Oshawapilot (1039614) | more than 4 years ago | (#30238100)

Here in Canada we pay a huge levy on blank CD media, MP3 players, and virtually any other media capable of holding music. This "goes into a fund to pay musicians and songwriters for revenues lost from consumers' personal copying. ", as per the Cnet article here http://news.cnet.com/2100-1025_3-5121479.html [cnet.com]

Therefore, this shutdown is infringing on my legal right to download music.

Meh, there's always ISOhunt, or like everyone else has already said, plenty of other choices.

R.I.P. Old friends (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30238132)

Let's have a moment of silence, or as it goes on the internet a sad smiley, for all our old friends lost to MPAA, and alike, lawsuits all the way from Napster to this. :(

I'm curious... (3, Interesting)

naasking (94116) | more than 4 years ago | (#30238138)

...how can Mininova not be liable for any copyright infringing links, but still be ordered to remove the links? If they're not liable for that content, then they shouldn't have to remove anything.

and as usual... (5, Insightful)

v1 (525388) | more than 4 years ago | (#30238140)

And as happens so often, a judge basically says "Well, technically what you're doing isn't illegal, but I still don't like what you're doing, and people are breathing down my neck to do something about you, so stoppit or we're going to bring the legal system down on you anyway. We may not be able to make it stick, but we certainly can make your life hell in the attempt." Surrender your rights and we'll leave you alone - persist and we'll make you regret it. Wonderful legal system we have here.

Judges that make rulings like that need to either be re-educated, or removed. Their job isn't to make the law, but to judge whether or not you've broken a law. (except in trial by jury, and then they don't even get that) Whether or not they like what you're doing, or whether or not they think what you did should be illegal isn't supposed to have anything to do with it. If they're more interested in writing the law, they need to give up their bench and run for senator.

Senators make laws and place restrictions on police and judges. Citizens break laws. Police arrest citizens that appear to have broken laws. Juries (/judges) interpret law and decide if citizens have broken a law. Judges insure a fair trial. Problem here is everyone wants a piece of everyone else's action. Oh if it only weren't for that pesky "separation of powers" thing...

Not all bad (2, Insightful)

orkysoft (93727) | more than 4 years ago | (#30238258)

Now, I didn't really know Mininova before this. I had heard of it, but that's about it.

I did visit the site just now, and I saw lots of items about music that I'd never heard of.

Maybe it can become a good site to find new music from non-RIAA signed artists, who generally don't have much of a marketing/distribution platform? RIAA, meet foot, gun.

strange (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30238272)

That no-one even started talking about tor or even freenet..

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