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EU ACTA Doc Shows Plans For Global DMCA, 3 Strikes

CmdrTaco posted more than 4 years ago | from the works-for-baseball dept.

Privacy 406

An anonymous reader writes "The European Commission analysis of ACTA's Internet chapter has leaked, indicating that the US is seeking to push laws that extend beyond the WIPO Internet treaties and beyond current European Union law. The document contains detailed comments on the US secret copyright treaty proposal, confirming the desire to promote a 'three-strikes and you're out' policy, a Global DMCA, harmonized contributory copyright infringement rules, and the establishment of an international notice-and-takedown policy."

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406 comments

Global government (2, Funny)

vvaduva (859950) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271044)

More evidence that there is a real movement afoot for a global government with the goal of undermining the freedom and liberties of U.S. citizens.

Re:Global government (5, Insightful)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271070)

No, evidence that there is a movement afoot by the US government to undermine the freedom and liberties of citizens of the world. You already have a corrupt copyright regime, now you're trying to foist it on the rest of the world.

Re:Global government (3, Insightful)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271336)

ROW is already just as corrupt as the US.

get your head out of your patriotic ass. corruption knows no country or ethnic boundaries. if you are human, you are corruptable.

its a wave right now. all countries are joining in. they love it! their leaders, that is. the citizens all hate it. but their needs were NEVER important. any illusion of that was just that, an illusion.

you are either in power or not in power. and those in-power right now are enjoying a huge rape-fest of those that are not in-power.

but this is WAY beyond any one country. its a WAVE and all leaders are enjoying the anti-freedom wave right now.

sorry for the wake-up call. you can go back to your disney view of the world if you really want to, I guess...

Perfect Place to Post This (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271472)

From http://www.heretical.com/miscella/frbigsis.html [heretical.com] :

We tell ourselves that in America we are the Free People. I wonder whether we might not better be called the Obedient People, the Passive People, or the Admonished People. I doubt that any country, anywhere, has been so regulated, controlled, and directed as we are. We are bred to obey. And obey we do.

It begins with the sheer volume of law, rules, and administrative duties. Most of the regulation makes sense in isolation, or can be made plausible. Yet there is so much of it.

Used to be if you wanted a dog, you got a dog. It wasn’t really the government’s business. Today you need a dog license, a shot card for the dog, a collar and tags, proof that the poor beast has been neutered, and you have to keep it on a leash and walk it only in designated places. It’s all so we don’t get rabies.

Or consider cars. You have to have a title, insurance, and keep it up to date; tags, country sticker, inspection sticker, emissions test. Depending where you are, you can’t have chips in the windshield, and you need a zoned parking permit. You have to wear a seatbelt. And of course there are unending traffic laws. You can get a ticket for virtually anything, usually without knowing that you were doing anything wrong.

Then there’s paperwork. If you have a couple of daughters with college funds in the stock market, annually you have to fill out three sets of federal taxes, three sets of state, and file four state and four federal estimated tax forms, per person, for a total of twenty-four. This doesn’t include personal property taxes for the country, business licenses, tangible business-assets forms, and so on.

Now, I’m not suggesting that all these laws are bad. Stupid, frequently, but evil, no. Stopping at traffic lights is probably a good idea, and certainly is if I’m crossing the street. But the laws never end. Bring a doughnut on the subway, and you get arrested. Don’t replace your windows without permission in writing from the condo association. Nothing is too trivial to be regulated. Nothing is not some government’s business.

I wonder whether the habit of constant obedience to infinitely numerous rules doesn’t inculcate a tendency to obey any rule at all. By having every aspect of one’s life regulated in detail, does one not become accustomed to detailed regulation? That is, detailed obedience?

For many it may be hard to remember freer times. Yet they existed. In 1964, when I graduated from high school in rural Virginia, there were speed limits, but nobody much enforced them, or much obeyed them. If you wanted to fish, you needed a pole, not a license. You fished where you wanted, not in designated fishing zones. If you wanted to carry your rifle to the bean field to shoot whistle pigs, you just did it. You didn’t need a license and nobody got upset.

To buy a shotgun in the country store, you needed money, not a background check, waiting period, proof of age, certificate of training, and a registration form. If your tail light burned out, then you only had one tail light. If you wanted to park on a back road with your girl friend, the cops, all both of them, didn’t care. If you wanted to swim in the creek, you didn’t need a Coast Guard approved life jacket.

It felt different. You lived in the world as you found it, and behaved because you were supposed to, but you didn’t feel as though you were in a white-collar prison. And if anybody had asked us, we would have said that the freedom was worth more to us than any slightly greater protection against rabies, thank you. Which nobody ever got anyway.

Today, the Mommy State never leaves off protecting us from things I’d just as soon not be protected from. We must wear a helmet on a motorcycle: Kevorkian can kill us, but we cannot kill ourselves. Why is it Mommy Government’s business whether I wear a helmet? In fact I do wear one, but it should be my decision.

And so it goes from administrative minutiae (emissions inspections) to gooberish Mommy-knows-bestism ("Wea-a-ar your lifejacket, Johnny!") to important moral decisions. Obey in small things, obey in large things.

You must hire the correct proportion of this and that ethnic group, watch your sex balance, prove that you have the proper attitude toward homosexuals. You must let your children be politically indoctrinated in appropriate values, must let your daughter get an abortion without telling you, must accept affirmative action no matter how morally repugnant you find it.

And we do. We are the obedient people.

As the regulation of our behavior becomes more pervasive, so does the mechanism of enforcement grow more nearly omnipresent. In Washington, if you eat on the subway, they really will put you in handcuffs, as they recently did to a girl of twelve. In 1964 in King George County, the cop would have said, "Sally, stop that." Arresting a child for sucking on a sourball would never have entered a state trooper’s mind.

Which brings us to an ominous observation. America is absolutely capable of totalitarianism. It won’t be the jackbooted variety, but rather a peculiarly mindless, bureaucratic insistence on conformity. What we call political correctness is an American approach to political control.

Our backdoor totalitarianism has the added charm of being crazy.

Think about it. Confiscating nail clippers at security gates, arresting the eating girl on the subway, the confiscation from an aging general of his Congressional Medal of Honor because it had points, the countless ejections from school of little boys for drawing pictures of the Trade Center in flames, playing cowboys and Indians, for pointing a chicken finger and saying "Bang."

This isn’t intelligent authoritarianism aimed at purposeful if disagreeable ends. It is the behavior of petty and stupid people, of minor minds over-empowered, ignorant, but angry and charmed to find that they can push others around. It is the exercise of power by people who have no business having any.

And we obey. We are the obedient people.

Re:Perfect Place to Post This (2, Interesting)

ericrost (1049312) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271598)

I know I shouldn't, but:

The condo stuff you mention is because you didn't read the contract you were signing. I own my home and the ground its on so I can do what I damn well please. Pet regulations aren't just for rabies, they are humanitarian so we don't have streets teeming with unvaccinated starving wild dogs and feral cats like Calcutta. Car insurance is so you don't get hit by a deadbeat who won't pay to fix your car, and is a common protection. Emissions tests are really only in California so you give yourself away as being against liberalism simply to be contrary since you have the choice to live where you will, but then you wouldn't have anything to bitch about, no? Your tax info is just wrong. You have to file one return for State (that includes your whole family), one for Federal, and possibly a local/COUNTY (not country you stupid non-english speaking copypasta) return. Airline security is theater to make sure people don't stop (as I have) using the air transit system since there is little to no REAL security involved in the system. Helmet/seatbelt laws are mainly there to stem the tide of braindead (literally) idiots who we pay to keep housed and fed since they turned themselves into drooling idiots and the government is left with their care when their broke white-trash families can't afford to pay after paying for all the chrome and noise. Mind you I ride, I ride safely, and I wouldn't think about getting onto a road with a bunch of cagers without a lid on.

Re:Perfect Place to Post This (1)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271784)

So what you're saying is that rabid adherence to a particular ideology is ridiculous, and instead, a combination of the better ideas of a series of ideologies would create a better system and one that provides a balance of positive benefits for all members involved?

In other words, we can find a balance between anarchy and fascism that provides a symbiotic relationship at the peak of some kind of curve.

"Cagers" is cute. I call them "four-wheels".

Re:Global government (2, Insightful)

palegray.net (1195047) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271420)

Trust me, EU politicians are already quite interested in eroding your freedoms. This may be extra encouragement, but it's not exactly starting the fire.

Re:Global government (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271492)

Well, the 3x and out is most likely from EU. However, there is little doubt that bulk of this idea is from US. Sadly, this copyright with no provisions for even fair-use is a good sign that America is truly ran by corps; that is, we have become a fascists gov, with very little difference than some of what we see in many EU and other govs.

America really needs to take on the idea that a corp is == to a person. That is one of the worst conclusions to come from our court systems. IIRC, I believe that a number of lawyers are about to take that on.

Re:Global government (2, Insightful)

Late Adopter (1492849) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271562)

The US by no means has exclusive domain over this madness, the content industry exploits corruption wherever it is. Witness the 3-strikes law, which we don't even have yet in the US.

This isn't about expanding any one country's paradigm, it's about imposing the worst-common-denominator.

Re:Global government (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271654)

Do you honestly still believe that the people (the ruled) and the government (the rulers) are one and the same? Years of history and evidence to the contrary aside, common sense tells me that you've concluded the logically impossible.

Re:Global government (1)

5KVGhost (208137) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271710)

Poor you. Last time I checked, the US was not part of the European Union.

And the EU is notorious for disregarding the will of its citizenry in favor of whatever is convenient or profitable for the bureaucracy. Or for the governments of the larger controlling countries. The whole EU constitution process is a good example: An elaborate sham that deliberately avoided all that pesky interference by those backwards, unenlightened voters.

Re:Global government (4, Insightful)

Shatrat (855151) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271080)

That's a bit unfair.
The goal is undermining the freedom of all people.

Re:Global government (1)

causality (777677) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271674)

That's a bit unfair. The goal is undermining the freedom of all people.

Why? Why would they prefer to rule with an iron fist over oppressed and unhappy masses when they could instead be revered as wise leaders of a happy, prosperous, free people? What makes the former scenario so much more appealing to our leaders than the latter? Are they just sociopaths (or if they are, is that alone really a satisfying explanation?)?

I'd be interested in whether anyone can adequately explain that. Obviously it appears to be the case, but the "why" answer is either missing or unsatisfactory.

Re:Global government (2, Insightful)

TheOrangeMan (884380) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271106)

The way the summary reads it seems more like a U.S. initiative with the goal of undermining the freedom and liberties of global citizens...

Re:Global government (1)

Yvanhoe (564877) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271118)

s/US citizen/worldwide consumers of cultural products/

Re:Global government (1)

wizardforce (1005805) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271150)

I think you've got that backwards. It's our government doing the undermining:

indicating that the U.S. is seeking to push laws that extend beyond the WIPO Internet treaties and beyond current European Union law.

Re:Global government (2, Interesting)

Wowsers (1151731) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271200)

Global government led by the failing USA?

Strange how both the crooked EU and USA have kept this quiet....
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/11/30/swift_tftp/ [theregister.co.uk]

European home affairs ministers are today set to approve a transatlantic deal that will see them turn reams of private banking data over to US intelligence.

The expected approval signals a remarkable diplomatic victory for Washington. The European Commission and the US had previously clashed over the Terrorist Finance Tracking Programme (TFTP).

TFTP began in secret following the 9/11 terror attacks. It allows US authorities to monitor SWIFT, the Belgian company that acts as clearing house for millions of daily transactions between European banks.

Re:Global government (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271310)

Strange how both the crooked EU and USA have kept this quiet....
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/11/30/swift_tftp/ [theregister.co.uk]

Quiet? That topic was discussed in the media in Germany last week almost everyday (eg concerning various groups/institutions voicing their concerns, all of them having been disregarded today by the German government...)

Re:Global government (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271426)

That topic was discussed in the media in Germany last week almost everyday

And also on Slashdot:

http://yro.slashdot.org/story/09/11/27/150234/EU-About-To-Grant-US-Unlimited-Access-To-Banking-Data

Re:Global government (1)

BlackCreek (1004083) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271760)

Strange how both the crooked EU and USA have kept this quiet....
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/11/30/swift_tftp/ [theregister.co.uk] [theregister.co.uk]

Quiet? That topic was discussed in the media in Germany last week almost everyday (eg concerning various groups/institutions voicing their concerns, all of them having been disregarded today by the German government...)

I am not the GP. The topic was nowhere to be found in the "main" Dutch news media.

"Failing" is a bit harsh (2, Insightful)

Vyse of Arcadia (1220278) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271410)

Politicians call it "strategically avoiding success."

Re:"Failing" is a bit harsh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271698)

Indeed.

Never let a "crisis" go to waste.

Re:Global government (2, Insightful)

Shikaku (1129753) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271424)

Do it. Make it into a law. It's called due fucking process.

The RIAA only worked with lawsuits now because they are all CIVIL cases.

If people start randomly getting arrested without due process for no reason like the RIAA randomly does with potshots, there will be hell.

Make it into criminal cases. There will be blood of executives on the streets, I guarantee it.

Re:Global government (4, Insightful)

digitalunity (19107) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271754)

I think you underestimate the pacifism of most Americans. They just don't care anymore.

240 years ago the men that founded the USA were running away from what we have become. Freedom has given way to corporations needs and our ever more difficult struggle to maintain our standard of living. We need a revolt, but I just don't see that happening. Just look at even more repressed countries like Iran and North Korea.

The time has come and gone to make peaceful change, but the country will have to descend much farther into the depths of hell before people will get off their ass and make a change.

FP (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271052)

FP!

DOA in the US Senate (3, Insightful)

tjstork (137384) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271074)

I don't think this treaty would pass in the US Senate. I would forsee the unlikely coalition of far rightists and far leftists actually collaborating to defeat this, just as they actually have on some other things.

Re:DOA in the US Senate (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271130)

The US Senate has nothing to do with a treaty. Once it gets signed, its in force, and even the Supreme Court would be hard pressed to alter a jot or tiddle on it.

As of now, treaties supersede domestic sovereignity. Look at WIPO. It is enforced on US citizens without any debate ever done in any branch of our government.

Re:DOA in the US Senate (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271222)

The Senate has to ratify a treaty.

He shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, to make Treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present concur[.]

Re:DOA in the US Senate (4, Insightful)

jandrese (485) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271356)

What's more, because US treaties are backed by the power of the Constitution, they are very difficult to repeal later down the road if they turn out to be a bad idea, or, as is more often the case, the other governments back out of the treaty and leave the US holding the bag. Few countries put as much force of law behind treaties as the US. This is also one of the reasons the US never signed on to Kyoto, because it was assumed that the other countries wouldn't be able to make the ambitious targets and would quietly back out, whereas the US would be stuck with it.

Re:DOA in the US Senate (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271392)

I don't think this treaty would pass in the US Senate. I would forsee the unlikely coalition of far rightists and far leftists actually collaborating to defeat this, just as they actually have on some other things.

Errr, have you got any "far leftists" in your senate?

Re:DOA in the US Senate (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271480)

No; but we, by convention, use the term to refer to our collection of center-right corporatists without actively theocratic tendencies.

Re:DOA in the US Senate (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271534)

What passes as "far left" in the US is actually center-right.

left/right (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271488)

There are no far rightists or far leftists. Adopting political ideologies is just for people who don't want to raise money. If you want to be able to afford to run campaign ads, then the first thing you do is forget all that left/right stuff and just do whatever the corporations pay you to do.

Re:DOA in the US Senate (1)

QuantumRiff (120817) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271506)

Does it matter which side they are on? They are all owned by Lobbyists, instead of by voters..

Re:DOA in the US Senate (1)

cmiller173 (641510) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271752)

Aha, but my understanding from earlier stories is that this is not being pursued as a regular treaty but instead as an executive agreement. Essentially the administration would agree to pursue regular legislation enacting these provisions, which only require a simple majority to pass, rather than a treaty that would require 2/3 of the senate. I doubt that anyone currently in the senate would burn the "political capitol" to filibuster to stop these from getting to the floor. Odds are they would break it up into a bunch of little pieces added on to other bills to get them through.

s999 An act to provide medical devices for elderly, and other reasons*

"Other reasons" of course equals some provision of ACTA

Everyone needs one. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271096)

Good thing we now have hand mounted flamethrowers. Now when they try to take us away for watching a clip with some random song we can burn them to ashes!

Live Free or Die Hard! (2, Funny)

ub3r n3u7r4l1st (1388939) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271100)

Down with the white-man based one world government!

Re:Live Free or Die Hard! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271362)

Down with the white-man based one world government!

This is not "informative", this is just racist.

Re:Live Free or Die Hard! (1)

EasyTarget (43516) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271444)

This is not "informative"

Indeed... it is "Insightful".

Means nothing. (0, Troll)

Ralph Spoilsport (673134) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271122)

All this will do is encourage LAN parties. That's how I get most of my music anyway. And videos? Rent once > Rip It > Done. Exchange at LAN parties.

Re:Means nothing. (2, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271184)

Did you see the bit about legal enforcement of DRM provisions. LAN parties might get you out of having your ISP 3 strikes you; but they won't do you much good if possessing gear that can actually rip and copy stuff is about as safe as possessing Schedule 1 substances...

Re:Means nothing. (3, Insightful)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271580)

Once something is ripped, you don't need any special tools to copy it.

That is the core of why DRM is so absurd. It only takes one guy with a cracking tool to give access to the other 6 billion of us.

Re:Means nothing. (1)

WinPimp2K (301497) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271256)

Silly fool:

1> once you and all your lan party buddies lose your internet connections how will you co-ordinate a large lan party?

2> this will be used to quash opposition as folks espousing unpopular opinions will hit their three strikes whenever any bureaucrat takes notice of them.

3> Going to just sign up with another ISP after you strike out? Think again as it won't take long for a legal blacklist of "repeat offenders" to show up and be maintained in order to assure that the ISPs maintain their "safe harbor" status.

Now I'd like to think that this will be an unsustainable process in the long run, but it is Monday and the week ain't getting off to a good start.

Re:Means nothing. (1)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271412)

once you and all your lan party buddies lose your internet connections how will you co-ordinate a large lan party?

via proxy. either human or other means.

this is simply an arms race. we know from history that those never 'finish' they just keep on going. this one will, too, if put into place.

Re:Means nothing. (1)

Anonymous Brave Guy (457657) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271532)

this is simply an arms race. we know from history that those never 'finish' they just keep on going. this one will, too, if put into place.

That is debatable. If they can get things like "3 strikes" passed, then the next step is to push for custodial sentences for repeat infringers who find ways to dodge the third strike, or licensing just for the "privilege" of being able to use an Internet connection. I think once the news starts carrying pictures of students getting locked up for three months or fined enough to bankrupt them because by their own admission they ripped off all their media, a lot of people who casually infringe because of the low perceived risk will reevaluate.

Re:Means nothing. (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Brave Guy (457657) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271314)

People like you are as much a problem as Big Media's absurd power grabs. You are unashamedly breaking the law, which makes you the poster boy for Big Media when they are pushing for ever more extreme laws. And while you will deserve it if you ever get screwed by those laws, lots of people will wind up suffering through no fault of their own if these measures go through.

Re:Means nothing. (1, Interesting)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271384)

You are unashamedly breaking the law

yes, he's laughing at a body of BAD, UNJUST LAWS.

you see a problem with that? I don't. and I'm not exactly a young kid by any stretch..

if you are not getting justice one way, get it another way. we each have that right and duty to ourselves. justice is not served at only one restaurant, fwiw..

Re:Means nothing. (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Brave Guy (457657) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271686)

The thing is, I don't have a problem with the basic principle of copyright, and frankly, I'm not sure most people do.

Sure, it sucks if you want the latest and greatest works but you can't afford the asking price. Life is tough. But whenever we have these discussions, no-one in the "everything should be free" camp seems to have a credible alternative system that still produces plenty of high quality works.

So, why don't you see if you can do better? Describe a credible system in which anyone can copy anything without restriction but there is still sufficient incentive for people to produce and share high quality work in the first place, and I'm sure the sceptics like me will be interested in what you have to say.

How would this fly (1)

aztektum (170569) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271148)

In the US even? I mean I know our politicians are bought and paid for, but wouldn't 3-strikes and you're cut off violate due-process? Granted I haven't read all the details, but it's a bit hard to when it's you know, hidden away from all.

Time to fire up the printer and send off more letters to the Congress critters.

Re:How would this fly (4, Insightful)

wizardforce (1005805) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271308)

I would think that after all that has happened in the last decade, people would stop being so surprised when our bloated government abuses its power *again*.

Re:How would this fly (1)

theCoder (23772) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271602)

Due process? You're not going to jail. Your life and liberty aren't being threatened, only your Internet connection. It would be "administrative", like revoking your driver's license.

Except you don't need an Internet license (yet), so this would be the Federal government telling private businesses (ISPs) that they cannot do business with a group of people. Nasty, but it has been done in some forms before, such as background checks for gun purchases and the no fly list. But those were done in the name of public safety. I don't know how much "public safety" there could be in someone downloading the latest Disney movie.

Generally, I would think that the Federal government doesn't even have to power to restrict Internet usage like that. However, they'd probably claim that the Internet is multi-state and you can buy things using the Internet, so they can regulate it as "inter-state commerce". I wouldn't be surprised to see some Supreme Court cases come out of it, but unfortunately, as a treaty, ACTA may carry significant weight.

Maybe it's time to start a grassroots campaign against ACTA. Something like how ACTA is an attempt "to take your Internet connection away for downloading music, movies, and TV shows from the Internet". I seriously doubt we'll here anything negative on the mainstream media about ACTA. It will be presented as for everyone since will enable studios to sell you more movies and music. They'd love to sell you their wares right now, but without ACTA it's just too dangerous. </sarcasm>

Obama ? Come on ! (4, Interesting)

Yvanhoe (564877) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271158)

On this point I am really saddened by the Obama administration. The 3-strikes-and-out is hugely unpopular including amongst artists. It is "lobbying for special interests" at its finest and really should not belong to the 21st century. There are already some countries who recognized access to internet as an opposable right.

I thought now there were progressives in the White House and in Senate ? Does nobody want geeks' votes anymore ? How many pirate party will be necessary in order for this madness to end ?

Re:Obama ? Come on ! (2, Informative)

Walterk (124748) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271218)

Don't blame Obama, blame Biden: http://news.cnet.com/8301-13578_3-10024163-38.html [cnet.com]

Re:Obama ? Come on ! (5, Insightful)

wizardforce (1005805) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271274)

Yes blame Obama. He picked Biden as his running mate and he isn't any more innocent in regard to the actual treaty than Bush was.

Re:Obama ? Come on ! (1)

sajuuk (1371145) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271530)

Don't blame either one of them. Blame the corrupt entertainment industry that lobbies our lawmakers into betraying the very people who elected them.

Re:Obama ? Come on ! (1)

mrsurb (1484303) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271584)

Don't fight - there's more than enough blame to be shared around here! Both for the corrupters and the corruptees.

Re:Obama ? Come on ! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271250)

What the fuck did you, and every other brainless hippy expect?

Did you actually think that a politician from CHICAGO cares about you?

You actually bought that shit? That every Chicago politician is corrupt, except this guy? You and the rest of America chose to ignore all of the signs.

Admit it, you went gay for the man, and voted for him on the basis of his winning smile and ability to feed you shit.

And you are now eating that very same shit, so smile and call it ice cream.

A corrupt, braindead, and incompetent government is perfectly representative of the US voters, so they have the government they deserve.

Re:Obama ? Come on ! (3, Informative)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271370)

probably should not feed the troll, but let me remind you of one simple fact:

as bad as obama is, the other choice would have fucked us over FAR WORSE.

yes, obama is disappointing. but we could only guess the kinds of damage the other guys would have done. ..just some perspective. yes, obama sucks right now. but it could be FAR worse. not exactly a pleasant thought but it might help to give perspective.

Re:Obama ? Come on ! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271670)

The argument that McCain would have been worse than Obama, while true, only shows how completely worthless and disconnected the United States government and it's so-called "two-party" system really is. Would you like crook A, or liar B? The people of the United States would get better leaders by drawing names randomly out of a hat.

Re:Obama ? Come on ! (4, Insightful)

Lendrick (314723) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271746)

Unfortunately, this treaty isn't a left/right thing (ACTA originated under the Bush administration, and the Obama administration is carrying on with it). Almost universally, the public hates it and the government loves it (save for a few principled politicians on both sides).

I'm unabashedly liberal, and I believe that there are places where the government can do a lot of good. This is definitely not one of those times. Rather than pointing fingers at other voters, what we need to do as the American public is band together and fight this thing.

A Plea to the Rest-of-the-World (4, Funny)

jekk (15278) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271194)

Dear Rest-of-the-World:

I realize that you have already had to deal with an invasion of Iraq to eliminate imaginary "weapons of mass destruction" and a world-wide financial collapse (although, to be fair, you bear some of the responsibility for that one... after all YOU believed our our uncritical rating agencies). And we're still stumbling around on that ruining-the-planetary-climate issue. So I know it's a big favor to ask, but would you please, PLEASE restrain my country's insane leaders?

Thanks...
-- A Sane American.

Re:A Plea to the Rest-of-the-World (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271254)

Go shoot yourself you farking pussy.

Re:A Plea to the Rest-of-the-World (4, Insightful)

wizardforce (1005805) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271288)

It's not the rest of the world's jo to restrain our leaders. It is OUR JOB to restrain our leaders.

Re:A Plea to the Rest-of-the-World (4, Insightful)

garcia (6573) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271574)

I think the majority of Americans thought that they corrected the mistakes they made 9 and 5 years ago when they elected the most recent idiot to office. Unfortunately they just brought a whole new idiot with a whole different secret agenda.

Meet the new boss, same as the old boss.

Re:A Plea to the Rest-of-the-World (1)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271608)

The rest of the world is responsible for it's own people.

Nothing can become "global law" without the cooperation of willing lackeys.

In this respect, Obama is no more responsible than Sarkozy or Berlisconi.

Re:A Plea to the Rest-of-the-World (5, Insightful)

muuh-gnu (894733) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271634)

In order to do your job, you'd have to vote them out of office. But you cant vote them out because your system in practice allows only two parties. The US hasnt had a third party winning somwhere since more than 100 years. 300 Million citizens and only _two_ fscking parties to vote for, every god-forgotten country-so-small-you-cant-find-on-the-map from the Balcans would laugh its collective ass off about calling that "democracy".

Add to that the fact that, at least regarding copyright, the two US parties basically agreed to form a cartel (MAFIAA isnt called MAFIAA for nothing), and youre simply out of luck.

Re:A Plea to the Rest-of-the-World (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271458)

Any limits on how?

Re:A Plea to the Rest-of-the-World (4, Insightful)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271482)

would you please, PLEASE restrain my country's insane leaders?

We'd love to, but right now we're having trouble restraining our own insane leaders. I'm not sure quite how we ended up with leaders - I thought I was voting for people to represent me, not lead me.

US or USSR? (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271206)

In soviet Russia DMCA take you down.

Re:US or USSR? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271342)

This IS funny.

3 strikes - how to enforce? (3, Interesting)

Skuld-Chan (302449) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271260)

So say you get kicked off the net - how do they enforce this? Just off the top of my head I can think of a dozen ways to browse the net semi-anonymously (coffee shop, library, college, neighbors wi-fi etc etc). Not to mention having internet access at work - does that mean I'd be denied employment world-wide for messing around on the net?

Re:3 strikes - how to enforce? (5, Funny)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271378)

It starts with RFID chips being implanted into everyone, which is then used only for convenience (like purchases) and then slowly becomes more and more integrated into everyday life. All of your information will be stored on this device and you will be tracked by the Government always. You will end up needing your chip to log into /. (.) Eventually you'll need it to even Access the internet. And then, once they find that you are abusing their laws, they just shut off your RFID, leaving you absolutely helpless in the world because you won't be able to do anything.

THEN they put Flouride or something in the water to make people forget. And then we find out they faked the Jupiter Landing! And then Copyright Laws become even more strict and Insane then they are now, And then Apple Gets arrested for being too Open Source and everything goes to hell!!!!

ITS NOT TOO LATE! REVOLT NOW!

Re:3 strikes - how to enforce? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271438)

Obviously, the coffee shop, library, college, neighbors and employer would be held responsible for your actions. That'll teach them to let you do things on the internet!

Re:3 strikes - how to enforce? (1)

AndrewNeo (979708) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271648)

As far as I know, the way the 3-strikes laws are supposed to work are only to disconnect your home ISP access. You're not 'banned' from the internet entirely, just from subscribing to it as a resident. I'm not so sure how this treaty works, though.

thousands of government bureaucrats (4, Insightful)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271262)

versus

millions of teenagers who are
1. technologically astute
2. media hungry
3. POOR

let them pass any goddamn law they want. who fucking cares?

its nothing more than damage to route around, like the internet was designed to do

Re:thousands of government bureaucrats (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271330)

I care, when I voice an unpopular opinion and those in power cut off my internet access because "I've been downloading media" regardless of the reality of the situation.

you are correct (1)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271490)

to point out that their INTENT is malicious and requires vocal opposition

but i am merely pointing out that regardless of their intent, they can have no real world effect

the intent of an ant might be to eat you, but who cares: its just an ant

governments do plenty of vile things in this world. however, in this specific arena, they are paper tigers: all bark and no bite. it is in fact a chance to laugh at their absurdity and make fun of their ineffectualness. of all the evils they could be fighting: corporate nepotism, for example, they instead decide to focus their energies on cutting off a common citizen's internet access for the horrid crime of downloading a movie. a download that does not represent lost business, a download that represents the future of media distribution: media free, ancillary revenue streams the only source of profits for the artist, NO DISTRIBUTOR NEEDED

these are clueless old fools distressed at the death of a cash cow who think that the pre-internet media distribution model deserves defending, or could even be propped up. the future of distribution companies is hype and promotion for pop media, a business perhaps 1/100th or 1/1,000th of their previious market capitalization. oh well, who fucking cares, good riddance dinosaurs

Re:you are correct (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271696)

You miss the point. It has no real effect on the target. It has plenty of effect on the freedom of speech. Our rights always seem to be collateral damage when there's money to be had, be it funding for more intrusive government (War on Drugs, "Security", etc...) or defending outdated business models on behalf of the (temporarily still) wealthy...

Re:thousands of government bureaucrats (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271340)

I've decided to spend mod points instead of post

Re:thousands of government bureaucrats (2, Insightful)

debrain (29228) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271394)

its nothing more than damage to route around, like the internet was designed to do

The media barons out there are saying "Internet piracy is nothing more than damage to route around or snuff out, like the global media conglomerates were designed to do."

Re:thousands of government bureaucrats (2, Insightful)

melikamp (631205) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271428)

By successfully censoring commercial art and removing it from the Internet, these clowns only help us to popularize the free-as-in-freedom art. I agree: let them pass more copyright laws if they so desire. Unlike with patents, nothing of value will be lost.

Re:thousands of government bureaucrats (4, Interesting)

mounthood (993037) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271450)

versus

millions of teenagers who are
1. technologically astute
2. media hungry
3. POOR

let them pass any goddamn law they want. who fucking cares?

its nothing more than damage to route around, like the internet was designed to do

Consider the war on drugs before you boast. The US is willing to damage millions of people even if the outcome they want is virtually impossible. (And like the war on drugs, the people will favor harsh treatment for "pirates" also.)

yes (3, Interesting)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271552)

your random grandmother or soccer mom will lose their internet access for what leachers on their insecured wifi do or what their children's friends do

and all the while the real action will move further underground, further encrypted, steganographed, obfuscated, made sparse, and otherwise evolved to be more and more resistant to any sort of inspection, interception or even tracking

thank you, governments of the "free" west, for breeding the ultimate untraceable file sharing network due to your overzealous protection of your corporate executive friends in dead media industries. fucking blind fools

it does you no good, assholes, to be the losers in the game of technological progress, and not even know it

one should know when they are defeated

On intellectual property.. (0)

snsr (917423) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271350)

ACTA is a fucking steaming pile of shit. A "trademark treaty" written by corporations, and intended only to protect the "copyrights" of said corporations.

A property right is a positive right: it gives you the freedom to use, sell, etc. something you own. These are rights governments must protect, by preventing activities (such as theft or vandalism) that would endanger them.

A copyright is an entirely negative right: it gives you no new freedoms, merely the ability to prevent others from something they would otherwise be allowed to do. It gives one individual (the copyright holder) full control of a whole market (the sale of their writing). This is a monopoly, something governments must protect us from.

Copyright is not a natural right, but merely an outdated invention from the era of the printing press. To call copyrighted works “intellectual property” corrupts thought, by subjecting those who want to replace the invention with a more effective one to nonsensical claims of “you’re stealing my property”.
-Aaron Swartz

Let's shoot it down. (1)

El Jynx (548908) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271376)

By all means, let's get writing, mailing, whatever. Set up a petition, a FB group and spam our MP's silly. I'm just a little vague on who to reach. Anyone with experience got some contact info for the various member states (EU, Canada, NZ, etc etc)?

look at the growth of disk space for $100 (5, Insightful)

paulsnx2 (453081) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271446)

By 2025 (at the current rate of advance sustained over the last 30 years) a TB of disk storage will cost about a penny. For $100, you will be able to buy a hard drive that will hold 2.5 *centuries* of HD video. While that might not be enough to hold all of mankind's copyrighted media, it will be more than enough to hold more media of whatever format will be in use in 2025 than a person could reasonably consume in their lifetime.

http://brownzings.blogspot.com/2009/11/disruptive-change.html [blogspot.com]

The point is, if we copyright any and every scrap of content produced, and maintain the same sorts of restrictions on such content that we enforce at the current time plus all the restrictions of the ACTA.... We will have no legal way to use a storage card we might get as a prize in a Cracker Jack box, much less a drive we actually buy.

And if people can carry around cheap storage sufficiently large to simply clone everyone's media libraries who they might meet, to sort out what they want later, who needs the Internet to "pirate"? (Thus what would be the real use of "Three Strikes"?)

When I write a joke, it is copyrighted. But jokes are so easy to repeat, and so hard to track that there isn't any way I can be paid for each time my joke gets retold. When media becomes easier to pass along than a joke, how can anyone require a payment for each retelling? There are other ways to be compensated, and the entertainment industry is going to have to learn to live with Moore's Law just like any high tech company does. Learn to leverage the efficiencies they gain with better technology to offset the loss of revenue that occurs as technology eliminates sources of income.

Live Concerts, Movie Theaters, endorsement deals, Shirts, and other value adds (plus who-knows what value adds might arise in the future) may be where the entertainment industry will have to go. Cheap (and I don't mean $10, or $5, or even $3) downloads of non DRM movies would bring in plenty of income from those that simply don't want to bother with other services.

Life is tough as technology takes away your income. But we are not going to kill the advance of technology, as much as the entertainment industry would like us to.

Re:look at the growth of disk space for $100 (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271600)

Three words: per capacity tax.

Basis in law? (1)

devnullkac (223246) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271452)

I thought the whole point of ACTA as a secret agreement was that it could be implemented by merely tweaking enforcement of existing law. I know of no element of US law that supports the 3 strikes notion. If Congress won't play ball, ACTA could fall apart no matter what the various international executive branches agree to.

Hey, good news for the little guy! (4, Interesting)

zmollusc (763634) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271474)

The little guy who sells bootleg dvds in order to support terrorism. Damn pirate bay have been cutting into his profits.

Re:Hey, good news for the little guy! (1)

serveto (1028028) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271606)

Wish I had mod points because you've highlighted the people who will benefit.

Equal Enforcement? (2, Insightful)

r_jensen11 (598210) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271478)

Just for curiosity's sake, could we ensure the following if these laws get passed?

Company A becomes convicted of copyright infringement 3 times
Company A loses permanent access to the internet

I'm sure that Time Warner, Sony, et. al. have all been convicted of copyright infringement at least 3 times. Can we have their access to the internet permanently revoked?

Free Software implications... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271508)

All these comments and nobody even mentions Free Software? I guess slashdot is indeed visited by too many windoze lusers...

Read and learn http://www.fsf.org/campaigns/acta/ [fsf.org]

3 strikes? (2, Interesting)

andy1307 (656570) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271536)

Thank god they're following baseball rules. It could have been worse. It could have been cricket.

Re:3 strikes? (1)

mrsurb (1484303) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271604)

At least in cricket there are neutral umpires and a referral system for appeals.

Re:3 strikes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271642)

Oh, right, Cricket. Marvelous game, really. You see, the bowler hurls the ball toward the batter who tries to play away a fine leg. He endeavors to score by dashing between the creases, provided the wicket keeper hasn't whipped his bails off, of course.

America's Last Hope (1)

boudie2 (1134233) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271544)

It seems when the only thing of value that the U.S. can produce is Britney Spears and her ilk, you've got to protect that to the fullest extent of the law. And if that doesn't work make some new laws. What the U.S. should be working on is a new business model. Three strikes and you're out. Nice analogy, another crooked game.

Easy as 1, 2, 3. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271558)

1.)Boycot all copyrighted music, film, television.
2.)Teach the next generation that pop culture is for morons.
3.)Make your own entertainment for entertainment's sake-- freely.

I'm a copyright holder (5, Interesting)

KitsuneSoftware (999119) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271572)

As a self-employed game developer, I own the copyright on all the stuff I sell. While I can recognise the need for a unified global copyright system (and unified global laws on sales and export/import tax), my sales model assumes I can sell any given product for 10 years, and I would be perfectly happy if copyright durations were reduced to that. That said, 10 years may well be optimistic, and I doubt I would have any problems if it was reduced to 5 years. Anyone in a who must make their money back quickly is in the same boat — the rest of the profits are just "keeping score".

From what I've seen, this treaty is not going to make the world a better place, it's going to make it worse, especially given how little most people know about IP law (patent != copyright != trademark != database right != industrial design right != geographical indication != trade secret). Short duration IP-monopoly-rights are non-issues for rapidly moving industries, and shorter durations make it easier to move faster.

Good luck with that (1)

agoliveira (188870) | more than 4 years ago | (#30271588)

There will always be places that will say "no thanks" to this kind of stupidity for several rerasons:

1) They have some sense (rare but possible)
2) They don't like US.
3) Their laws wouldn't allow
4) Their Constitution wouldn't allow.
5) They don't want outsiders telling them how to do things specially if they can't do themselves.
6) All of above? :)

My company really needs to change its name... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30271596)

I work for DMCA, Inc. We supply and install commercial floor coverings. When I see news stories like this it just makes me cringe and wonder if there are geeky facilities managers out there that don't want to hire us because of the name.

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