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Scientology Charged With Slavery, Human Trafficking

kdawson posted more than 4 years ago | from the to-name-but-a-few dept.

Censorship 802

eldavojohn writes "A formal complaint was filed in California (caged PDF) last week by John Lindstein naming David Miscavige and the Church of Scientology International as defendants. Lindstein claims that for sixteen years (from age 8) he was forced to work as a slave at Gold Base, a secret CoS site run by Golden Era Productions with 'razor wire, security guard patrols, surveillance posts, and three roll calls each day.' The pay was $50 a week. The allegations include 'Violations of wage and hour laws as well as unfair/illegal business practices actionable under California B&P 17200 Et. Seq.' and a complaint under the 13th Amendment of the US Constitution, which abolished slavery. Members of the group Anonymous praised the summons."

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really? (3, Interesting)

sopssa (1498795) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289174)

Was this a surprise to anyone?

Re:really? (3, Insightful)

Narcocide (102829) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289466)

I hate those motherfuckers and I live right in their neighborhood but seriously, it was a surprise to me.

Yes... (4, Interesting)

SuperKendall (25149) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289498)

I'm not fan of scientology, or any cult really - but a mainstream organization with illegal work camps? I just never expected that, at all. You'd think the lid would have come off something that extreme some time ago. And what are they even having them do in these camps, build the theta monitors?

Re:Yes... (4, Informative)

royallthefourth (1564389) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289642)

I think you're confusing "mainstream" and "infamous"

Re:Yes... (4, Insightful)

Penguinisto (415985) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289660)

Dude - there are (and were) cults out in the US today that do much, much worse. Past examples? Branch Davidians (Waco), the SunYungMoon group during the 1980's ("Moonies"), and the recent polygamy compound in Colorado City, Arizona. They all stand out as some rather egregious examples, and I don't doubt there are more of 'em out there today.

They don't have barbed wire and guards per se, but I'm willing to wager that their denizens are brainwashed enough that none of the fencing and such is necessary.

Re:Yes... (5, Informative)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289700)

And what are they even having them do in these camps, build the theta monitors?

From the Infinite Complacency Link:

At 12, he was “deemed finished with schooling” and Golden Era Productions, an unincorporated division of Church of Scientology International (CSI) hired him as a messenger and errand boy.

But in 1997, at the age of 15, he was demoted to the post of dishwasher. “He worked 16-hour days cleaning pots, pans and the dining facilities,” says the lawsuit.

And soon afterwards, he was assigned to do construction at the base near Hemet, California.

So the answer to your question is messenger, dish washer then construction worker. I mean, why use all the money you take from your followers to hire people to do this work when you can force the followers to do it for less or even free? L Ron Hubbard's Get Rich Quick Scam is yet another valid title for Scientology.

Re:Yes... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30289734)

Sounds like grad school to me...

Re:really? (1)

Jugalator (259273) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289534)

Yes, definitely.

Re:really? (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30289674)

Posting anonymously because... well... I'm anonymous, and this information has been removed from slashdot before due to COS C&D letters.

In the words of Trey Parker and Matt Stone, 'THIS IS WHAT SCIENTOLOGISTS ACTUALLY BELIEVE!!'

As quoted from L. Ron Hubbard:

The head of the Galactic Federation (76 planets around larger stars visible from here) (founded 95,000,000 years ago, very space opera) solved overpopulation (250 billion or so per planet, 178 billion on average) by mass implanting. He caused people to be brought to Teegeeack (Earth) and put an H-Bomb on the principal volcanos (Incident II) and then the Pacific area ones were taken in boxes to Hawaii and the Atlantic area ones to Las Palmas and there "packaged".

His name was Xenu. He used renegades. Various misleading data by means of circuits etc. was placed in the implants.

When through with his crime loyal officers (to the people) captured him after six years of battle and put him in an electronic mountain trap where he still is. "They" are gone. The place (Confederation) has since been a desert. The length and brutality of it all was such that this Confederation never recovered. The implant is calculated to kill (by pneumonia etc) anyone who attempts to solve it. This liability has been dispensed with by my tech development.

One can freewheel through the implant and die unless it is approached as precisely outlined. The "freewheel" (auto-running on and on) lasts too long, denies sleep etc and one dies. So be careful to do only Incidents I and II as given and not plow around and fail to complete one thetan at a time.

In December 1967 I knew someone had to take the plunge. I did and emerged very knocked out, but alive. Probably the only one ever to do so in 75,000,000 years. I have all the data now, but only that given here is needful.

One's body is a mass of individual thetans stuck to oneself or to the body.

One has to clean them off by running incident II and Incident I. It is a long job, requiring care, patience and good auditing. You are running beings. They respond like any preclear. Some large, some small.

Thetans believed they were one. This is the primary error. Good luck.

If he was paid $50, he wasn't a "slave" (1, Funny)

tekrat (242117) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289182)

Slaves aren't paid, last I checked. Did he file a 1099?

Re:If he was paid $50, he wasn't a "slave" (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30289212)

Historically, American slaves were fed and clothed, and occasionally paid. A few saved up to buy their freedom (less of the agricultural variety, more of the city-dwellers who could collect tips.)

Re:If he was paid $50, he wasn't a "slave" (1)

NFN_NLN (633283) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289214)

Slaves aren't paid, last I checked. Did he file a 1099?

1. Force people to work for you
2. Pay them 1 cent a year as an annual salary
3. Hire as your lawyer
4. Profit

Something isn't right, isn't there suppose to be a '???"' somewhere. Oh well...

Re:If he was paid $50, he wasn't a "slave" (4, Funny)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289240)

Silly fool, working for $50 a week. Lord Xenu pays *his* slaves $100 a week.

Re:If he was paid $50, he wasn't a "slave" (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30289254)

I don't believe you actually did check. Every definition of slavery has nothing to do with compensation or lack thereof, and everything to do with being bound, out of your control, in service to another.

Re:If he was paid $50, he wasn't a "slave" (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30289336)

Slavery actually connotes a position of involuntary servitude rather than one where payment is withheld. That is, it is the lack of freedom that is the main attribute of slavery, not the lack of compensation.

Re:If he was paid $50, he wasn't a "slave" (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30289694)

Slavery actually connotes a position of involuntary servitude rather than one where payment is withheld. That is, it is the lack of freedom that is the main attribute of slavery, not the lack of compensation.

Slavery actually connotes a position of involuntary servitude rather than one where payment is withheld. That is, it is the lack of freedom that is the main attribute of slavery, not the lack of compensation.

The barbed wire at Gold Base is on the inside of the fence not on the outside.

Re:If he was paid $50, he wasn't a "slave" (4, Insightful)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289704)

You don't count being held in a compound surrounded by razor wire and forced to work 16-24 hours a day at age 8 as "involuntary servitude"? Wow, you must have had a much rougher childhood than me.

Re:If he was paid $50, he wasn't a "slave" (5, Funny)

Chris Burke (6130) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289808)

You don't count being held in a compound surrounded by razor wire and forced to work 16-24 hours a day at age 8 as "involuntary servitude"?

No, obviously they do count that as involuntary, since the point was to contradict a post claiming this wasn't slavery due to him being paid. In other words, they are saying he was a slave.

This post has been brought to you by the Center For Explaining the Obvious to the Reading Comprehension Impaired, a tax-exempt religious charity organization that you can join and learn more about for the low low cost of $5000.

Re:If he was paid $50, he wasn't a "slave" (4, Insightful)

Suiggy (1544213) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289356)

Pay as meager as $50 is similar to the allowance given to indentured servants back in old times. He was also forced into labor, he couldn't leave. That $50 had to be spent on the compound at the canteen. It was slavery.

Re:If he was paid $50, he wasn't a "slave" (1)

jjohnson (62583) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289378)

The negro workers in the deep South, picking cotton on plantations before the civil war, were given food and a roof over their heads. By common labor law, that counts as compensation. Does that mean they weren't slaves?

Re:If he was paid $50, he wasn't a "slave" (1)

confused one (671304) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289392)

Forced labor. There, is that better?

Re:If he was paid $50, he wasn't a "slave" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30289614)

Perhaps he should be investigated for not filing taxes on his $50 a week.

Re:If he was paid $50, he wasn't a "slave" (1)

AndrewNeo (979708) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289802)

There's a minimum floor of income under which you don't have to pay taxes.

two words (1)

martas (1439879) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289184)

hell yeah!

I love it! (4, Insightful)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289186)

Now if we can see a slashdot article saying that they were found guilty and someone went to prison for it... the fat lady ain't sang yet, boys.

Re:I love it! (1)

zero0ne (1309517) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289224)

But it is a step in the right direction!

Re:I love it! (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30289272)

Sorry, that won't happen. The Co$'s lawyers will ensure that they get off. Not only that, but they've infiltrated the government and justice system to the point where I'm surprised they don't have laws exempting them from these types of charges.

That's pretty evil. (3, Funny)

FatSean (18753) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289194)

First the Catholics with child rape, now the Scientologists with slavery and human trafficking.

Any wagers on which one true religion will be busted next?

Re:That's pretty evil. (4, Insightful)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289304)

It isn't religion that is the problem, it is organization and trust. Take any group of trusted people and you will find that a minority want to use their trust for personal gain. In America, corporations, schools, etc. are all looked at pretty thoroughly for abuses, religion usually isn't.

Re:That's pretty evil. (5, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289472)

Religions, though, have the unpleasant architectural problem of (in the vast majority of cases) coupling social and organizational power with strongly implied, or even overt, assertions of trustworthiness.

Because they purport to deal in moral and divine matters, those who have power within the organization generally(either as an official point of doctrine, or in lay understanding) tend to be imbued with greater "goodness" or "holiness" or access to divine command, or whatever. Priests and CEOs are both potentially dangerous, and quite likely to cover for their buddies; but you don't generally tell children that CEOs are trusted authority figures who deserve their respect and obedience.

Re:That's pretty evil. (5, Funny)

WarwickRyan (780794) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289608)

> but you don't generally tell children that CEOs are trusted authority figures who deserve their respect and obedience.

Well, unless their name is Steve Jobs.

Re:That's pretty evil. (1)

PalmKiller (174161) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289314)

The Church of Nibbles and Bits for Compu-fornication maybe?

Re:That's pretty evil. (5, Insightful)

Xtravar (725372) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289382)

Hmm, how come every Scientology story must have some post diverting attention to Catholicism, trying to lend legitimacy to Scientology as a religion?

Let's stick to the topic at hand, shall we? And that topic is that Scientology apparently enslaved this person.

Re:That's pretty evil. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30289412)

First the Catholics with child rape, now the Scientologists with slavery and human trafficking.

Any wagers on which one true religion will be busted next?

My money's on the Jews.... for price fixing.

Re:That's pretty evil. (5, Insightful)

Anachragnome (1008495) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289666)

Sticky subject that is likely to insult somebody, no matter how you approach it.

I can say that I have met some Jewish people with questionable business morals, but then again I've met people with NO religious beliefs that are far worse.

As far as slavery and forced labor goes, the long-running genocide in Darfur is essentially Muslim controlled militias attacking indigenous tribes-people, people that have been a source of slaves for Muslim slavers for hundreds of years.

The rallying cry for some of the Janjaweed (means "devil on horseback") militia forces has been "Kill the slaves, kill the slaves!"

But then again, the region where the Janjaweed are killing defenseless, unarmed villagers also happens to center around a government-held oil pipeline that sends 80% of the regions oil to China.

So maybe religion has nothing to do with it? Maybe some people are just assholes?

And to complicate matters, some people seem to feel compelled to put Scientology in the same group as Christianity and Islam when we ALL know Scientology is just a big SCAM. It is NOT a religion just because they say it is. It is a scam disguised as a religion.

Oranges and Apples, my friends...Don't give them the credit they so desire.

Re:That's pretty evil. (5, Insightful)

houstonbofh (602064) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289442)

I think you started a little late. The Muslim crusades. The Catholic crusades. The Inquisition. (What a show...) The common thread is people... A corrupt person has no problem using anything as an excuse from religion, to communism, to security, to social justice. No "idea" stays pure once people start to use it.

Re:That's pretty evil. (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30289644)

If you learn more about the inquisition and compare it with the other trials of the time (that is, not by today's standards), you'll surely prefer to be judged by the inquisition; and the spanish one which so much bad publicity was better than the anglican one, which burnt the most witches.

Re:That's pretty evil. (3, Interesting)

tbannist (230135) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289718)

Many people would say some organizational structures are better able to resist corruption than others. It's been my perception that (monotheistic) religion is particular vulnerable to corruption since it's trivially easy for the organization to be corrupted from the top down. In most cases the leader is expected to be the holiest of people and thus even questioning the leader can easily be cast as lack of faith in the entire religion.

Even if everything can be corrupted, but it might useful to look at how easily corrupted different organizational structures are.

Re:That's pretty evil. (0, Troll)

Anonymous Nutjob (1690904) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289462)

My friend, you are aware that The Jews are behind this, yes?

I know, I know! (1, Flamebait)

RJBeery (956252) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289502)

The Religion of Anthropogenic Global Warming...! :)

Re:I know, I know! (1)

Sebilrazen (870600) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289606)

The Religion of Anthropogenic Global Exothermia...! :)

As a member of R.A.G.E. I fixed that for you.

Re:That's pretty evil. (5, Funny)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289622)

I have it on good authority that the Amish are running a dog fighting ring.

Re:That's pretty evil. (1)

eegad (588763) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289648)

Any wagers on which one true religion will be busted next?

Fortunately, truth and our ability to discern it and believe it doesn't have anything to do with our ability to live up to it.

Re:That's pretty evil. (1)

Archangel Michael (180766) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289764)

FSM

It is cruelty to withhold spaghetti.

But that is my opinion.

Classified as a religion? (4, Insightful)

guruevi (827432) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289204)

Since they are classified as a religion (thanks to infiltration of CoS into the IRS) wouldn't his service be considered 'worship' and 'volunteering'. However it wouldn't surprise me if they actually were actually doing much worse than just killing people.

Re:Classified as a religion? (3, Insightful)

poetmatt (793785) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289230)

what do you mean? they already had some kind of formal document about shooting people when necessary, there isn't much more out there. CoS needs to be gone, period.

Re:Classified as a religion? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30289332)

Its called audit method R2-45. Two .45 cal slugs to the chest will release the thetans inhabiting even the most infected person.

Re:Classified as a religion? (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289532)

Its called audit method R2-45. Two .45 cal slugs to the chest will release the thetans inhabiting even the most infected person.

But only if both the pistol and the ammunition are purchased from a CoS-approved vendor!

Re:Classified as a religion? (5, Insightful)

Vindicator9000 (672761) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289612)

modded funny, but R2-45 is actually documented Scientology scripture, explained in exactly the same way as the parent post. It's funny because it's 100% true.

Re:Classified as a religion? (2, Funny)

LandDolphin (1202876) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289810)

Ha. Ha. It's funny because it's true.

I read it like that in the voice of the character from Family Guy. It gave me a good laugh.

Re:Classified as a religion? (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289402)

R2-45 (the document in question) was clearly a joke when it was made, and was simply used as an euphemism for murder in later contexts. While Scientology has lots of problems (suppression of information, extortion, slavery, etc), R2-45 is more of a joke than anything else and should be taken as such. It should be taken in the same vein of the Darwin Award.

Re:Classified as a religion? (1)

houstonbofh (602064) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289524)

Not that I agree with the Co$, but the Christians have a formal document abut killing people for lots of reasons... However, most of us do not take it literally, and those that do end up in prison or the loony bin.

Re:Classified as a religion? (4, Informative)

asdf7890 (1518587) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289400)

Since they are classified as a religion (thanks to infiltration of CoS into the IRS) wouldn't his service be considered 'worship' and 'volunteering'. However it wouldn't surprise me if they actually were actually doing much worse than just killing people.

It wasn't infiltration, though I'm not saying they didn't try that too. They basically said "give us religious status for tax purposes or we'll all misfile out forms and delay payments as long as possible, good luck finding the resources to pursue even a fraction of our members", and the IRS conceded that it would cost less to let them have their way than to try force them to behave.

Re:Classified as a religion? (1)

Minwee (522556) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289482)

However it wouldn't surprise me if they actually were actually doing much worse than just killing people.

What, like making them watch BloodRayne [livejournal.com] ?

Re:Classified as a religion? (1)

SnarfQuest (469614) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289504)

Since they are classified as a religion (thanks to infiltration of CoS into the IRS) wouldn't his service be considered 'worship' and 'volunteering'. However it wouldn't surprise me if they actually were actually doing much worse than just killing people.

Well, there is the annual reenactment, where they stack thousands of people on a volcano, then blow it up with a nuclear bomb.

Re:Classified as a religion? (2, Insightful)

houstonbofh (602064) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289554)

The key is consent... By your definition, they can make rape OK. Doesn't work for rape, and we have lots of case law supporting that. (Even if you are "married" to that 14 year old.)

obligatory (1)

Jeian (409916) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289216)

Anonymous is not a group, etc. etc.

Re:obligatory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30289268)

yeah I know... I'm an Anonymous Coward

Re:obligatory (1)

biryokumaru (822262) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289566)

It makes me wonder where they really get messages from "Anonymous." Do they troll /b/?

About damn time. (3, Interesting)

NotBornYesterday (1093817) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289250)

It looks like it's just a civil complaint, though. I'd love to see these guys brought up on criminal charges. If this suit makes any headway, I wonder if criminal charges will eventually follow? I can't imagine the DA would refuse to prosecute for slavery. It will be interesting to see what Scientology goodies come to light in the discovery process.

Re:About damn time. (3, Insightful)

Red Flayer (890720) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289326)

I can't imagine the DA would refuse to prosecute for slavery.

Are you kidding? What does a prosecutor have to gain from prosecuting CoS for slavery? A little publicity for prosecuting on hearsay? You think he'll get warrants to investigate the tight-as-a-witches-bum CoS? Likely to backfire.

What do they have to lose? Credibility? Their career? Personal safety?

Re:About damn time. (3, Informative)

Patch86 (1465427) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289464)

If the civil suit is successful, that implies that the plaintiff (who obviously shoulders the burden of proof) was able to convince a judge that a major American and multi-national organization illegally enslaved him in a secure compound for a decade and a half.

The DA might take an interest considering a lot of the leg work will already have been done for them.

Re:About damn time. (1)

Delwin (599872) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289788)

The burden of proof in a civil suit is much lighter than in a criminal suit.

Tom Cruise (1)

dakkon1024 (691790) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289252)

Really?I thought Tom Cruise would make more... I guess you really can't put a price on crazy though

How Is This Nerd News??!! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30289286)

Maybe slashdot should stick to its stated goal of news for nerds.

This simply isn't it. It has nothing to do with my rights online or anybody's rights online.

Please stop this Scientology bashing. We know its a kooky scam, but it sure as hell doesn't belong on this site.

Re:How Is This Nerd News??!! (3, Insightful)

Old97 (1341297) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289338)

Of course it belongs. Didn't you notice the reference to "science" in "scientology"? BTW, Scientology liberally uses lawyers and law suits to intimidate and silence its critics - including the on-line critics.

Re:How Is This Nerd News??!! (1)

confused one (671304) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289646)

So, what you're saying is this thread will be shut down an.....

Re:How Is This Nerd News??!! (5, Informative)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289350)

Scientology has become relevant to Slashdot and its readership ever since CoS removed content from Slashdot under DMCA [slashdot.org] . It's quote obviously News for Nerds now, and, noting the DMCA reference (and the fact that it's common CoS practice, not a single isolated case), definitely related to Your Rights Online. If it's still not clear, try posting OT-III materials in a /. comments and see how that goes.

Re:How Is This Nerd News??!! (1)

dirk (87083) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289542)

Well, if you are on Verizon FiOS [slashdot.org] , then your internet will get cut because it's off-topic!

Re:How Is This Nerd News??!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30289548)

Scientology has become relevant to Slashdot and its readership ever since CoS removed content from Slashdot under DMCA [slashdot.org] . It's quote obviously News for Nerds now, and, noting the DMCA reference (and the fact that it's common CoS practice, not a single isolated case), definitely related to Your Rights Online. If it's still not clear, try posting OT-III materials in a /. comments and see how that goes.

Off Topic level III?

ok (5, Informative)

JeanBaptiste (537955) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289626)

link 1 [88.80.16.63]
link 2 [wikileaks.fi]
link 3 [wikileaks.eu]

"If you want to control your child, simply break him into complete apathy and he'll be as obedient as any hypnotized half-wit. If you want to know how to control him, get a book on dog training, name the child Rex and teach him first to "fetch" and then to "sit up" and then to bark for his food. You can train a child that way. Sure you can. But it's your hard luck if he turns out to be a blood-letter. Only don't be half-hearted about it. Simply TRAIN him. "Speak, Roger!" "Lie down!" "Roll over!" Of course, you'll have a hard time of it. This - a slight oversight - is a human being. You'd better charge right in and do what you can to break him into apathy quickly. A club is best. Tying him in a closet without food for a few days is fairly successful. The best recommended tactic, however, is simply to use a straight jacket and muffs on him until he is docile and imbecilic. I'm warning you that it's going to be tough; it will be tough because Man became king of the beasts only because he couldn't as a species be licked. He doesn't easily go into an obedient apathy like dogs do. Men own dogs because men are self-determined and dogs aren't. --Official church documents

I got nothing better going on.

Re:How Is This Nerd News??!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30289362)

Why does it have to be about something online to be of relevance to nerds?

Re:How Is This Nerd News??!! (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30289616)

Why does it have to be about something online to be of relevance to nerds?

The war between Scientology vs. The Internet [wikipedia.org] has been going on pretty much since there was an Internet.

The Co$ practically invented the Hipcrime sporgery [wikipedia.org] attack technique that still plagues USENET to this day. It was directly responsible for taking down the world's first anonymous remailer [wikipedia.org] (anon.penet.fi) in 1996, and compromised every user of that service. Its shill legislator got his name stamped onto the Mickey Mouse Protection Act [wikipedia.org] in 1998.

It has been a consistent and implacable foe of the free exchange of information on the Internet for the better part of 20 years, and it will not stop until it - either the Cult or the Internet - ceases to exist in its current form. Anything that could deplete the cult's financial reserves is a priori a good thing for Your Rights Online, and anything that the cult wants is a priori a threat to Your Rights Online.

Asking "What does the Co$ have to do with YRO?" is like asking "What does NSA have to do with surveillance?" Both are threats to your ability to speak freely. NSA may break the law from time to time, but for all we bitch about it, at least it acknowledges the existence of legal restrictions on its ability to carry out its mission. Co$ doesn't even recognize the concept of law, except as a means of filing strategic lawsuits against public participation, or as a means to otherwise harass its critics.

Re:How Is This Nerd News??!! (3, Insightful)

multisync (218450) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289500)

Please stop this Scientology bashing. We know its a kooky scam, but it sure as hell doesn't belong on this site

Hmmm ...

You don't think a story about a religion that was founded by a science fiction writer, teaches that we are from some other planet and uses something called an "E-meter" to locate and eliminate "engrams" in its followers belongs on Slashdot?

I must be new here.

Re:How Is This Nerd News??!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30289688)

Why is it that everytime $cientology is posted on Slashdot, some dolt posts a derivation of :

Slashdot should stick to its stated goal of news for nerds. This simply isn't it. It has nothing to do with my rights online or anybody's rights online."

While with an minimum of research, it would be clear that $cientology is well know for DMCA abuses, including ones directed towards the very forum you are posting on?

Sweet Jesus, you are dumb enough to be a $cientologist!

In Later News... (1)

PirateBlis (1208936) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289330)

Authorities released a second statement saying "We're sorry for all the trouble we might have caused Tom Cruise. This was all a simple misunderstanding of the terms "Slave" and "Cult". ......All your base are belong to us."

Scientology as a force for good? (0, Flamebait)

relaxinparadise (943965) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289342)

I think the bad reputation marks against Scientology are getting a lot of press, but in defense of the poor guy getting beat up, are there any good things to say about Scientology?

Re:Scientology as a force for good? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30289398)

no.

Re:Scientology as a force for good? (1)

MooseMuffin (799896) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289408)

They take the money of the rich and stupid.

Re:Scientology as a force for good? (1)

natehoy (1608657) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289416)

It hasn't been around as long as some of the other religions, so its follower base is smaller, which somewhat limits the damage they can do?

The incredible amount of obvious attempts at secrecy and loud legal threats keeps them in the spotlight, keeping all but the most gullible and weak-willed from being stupid enough to join up?

Sorry, that's all I've got.

Re:Scientology as a force for good? (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289492)

Umm...

Hitler wasn't a scientologist?

Re:Scientology as a force for good? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30289736)

Correction: that's a good thing to say about Hitler. A person with twisted, perverted ideals who tries to mutilate the populous is better than a person who only needs money to do the same thing.

Re:Scientology as a force for good? (4, Insightful)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289628)

I think the bad reputation marks against Scientology are getting a lot of press, but in defense of the poor guy getting beat up, are there any good things to say about Scientology?

That's really hard, because the benefits of most religions are often highly subjective. The only defense I can think of is that they could be a lot worse (ie. Jonestown, Heaven's Gate), and they certainly aren't worse than the TV evangelist types who also rake in obscene amounts of money from the True Believers.

I remember one article I read on them stated that their biggest problem is their intense paranoia of the outside world. A lot of the reasons they've done some of the nasty things they've done (like infiltrating Ontario government offices in the 1970s) are ill-informed and misjudged attempts at security.

L. Ron Hubbard was most certainly a con artist, but he was also a bit of a paranoid type, not to mention the self-aggrandizing that he got out of a lot of the cloak-and-dagger bullshit. The problem for $cientologists after him is that I think a lot of them didn't get the joke. In short, their inheritors of L. Ron's madness, but in a more pure and fanatical form.

Charged or charging? (3, Funny)

vvaduva (859950) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289364)

I think the headline is wrong...they usually charge people for services, not vice versa! wtf?

Re:Charged or charging? (1)

natehoy (1608657) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289370)

"Charged" as in "Charged with a crime"

FLSA (2, Interesting)

Lord Ender (156273) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289366)

There is no law against working in a compound which has barbed wire. So that sounds like some crap to feed the media.

The $50/week pay could be grounds for him to sue them for back wages, supposing he has proof that he worked more than 10 hours per week and that they only paid him $50 during such weeks.

For the slavery charge, he would need to prove that he tried to quit/leave but was forcibly prevented from doing so. Did he call the police on such occasions?

I'm thinking he may have a hard time proving his case. Accusations alone won't do it; he'll need evidence.

Re:FLSA (1)

Iphtashu Fitz (263795) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289490)

Read the complaint (see my post below for a link to it). For a time it sounds like he was forced to live in a place described as similar to a prison camp, complete with guards, barbed-wire fences, search lights, etc. I seriously doubt they would have let him have access to a telephone in a place like that if his claims are valid.

Re:FLSA (2, Insightful)

LOLLinux (1682094) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289570)

For the slavery charge, he would need to prove that he tried to quit/leave but was forcibly prevented from doing so. Did he call the police on such occasions?

Yes because when you are held captive against your will somewhere the people holding you there will make sure you have ready access to phones so that you can call the police.

Re:FLSA (1)

Fulcrum of Evil (560260) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289720)

Armed guards, security posts and 3 roll calls per day, but you can just leave any time. Yeah, good luck finding a judge that buys that.

Ah My Homeland (4, Interesting)

BJ_Covert_Action (1499847) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289526)

As a Californian I wonder how much interest this is going to garner in my home state regarding the abuses of Scientology. On the one hand, my state is populated with pipe dreamers, smoked out idealists, flower children, hippy nutjobs, and all sorts of other forms of extreme liberalism. On the other hand, we have very rich communities like Hollywood, the OC, and Roseville. We also, apparently, have enough orthodox, classic right wingers that we voted down legalizing gay marriage recently. We have farmers. We have students. We have programmers. We have ranchers. We have movie stars. We have one of the most diverse culture mixtures in the world I bet. That's part of why I love it here...

Of course, along with that diversity is an unfathomable tolerance for some particularly poignant cases of stupidity...like our state budget. There is no doubt that the strong and vocal religious groups here in California would raise exception and a helluva kerfuffle over their church being towed to court for slavery. But I wonder if any of those groups see a case regarding Scientology as a threat. After all sometimes the most belligerent opposition to one religion comes from another religion. I have seen folks in Fawkes masks walking around my local famer's market protesting Scientology. However, I have also had Scientologists try to recruit me both in my home town and when I wander the rest of the state. So this will certainly be an interesting case to watch. I hope it garners some attention and noise in this state and, perhaps, even in our country. Exposing Scientology for the cult and crime syndicate it is certainly is, in my opinion, a righteous cause....

Well if there's one thing we Californians know how to do, its garner attention and make some noise. I'm gonna go pop some popcorn...

Geezz.. when will these attacks on (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30289564)

faith-based construction end!!

Umm... Age? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30289568)

What about child labor laws?

Wow, maybe there's hope... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30289586)

that they'll finally free Katie Holmes!

Welcome to the First Church of Appliantology! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30289634)

The WHITE ZONE is for loading and unloading only!

Don't you be Tarot-fied It's just a token of my extreme Don't you be Tarot-fied It's just a token of my extreme

Don't you never try to look behind my eyes You don't wanna know what they have seen Don't you never try to look behind my eyes You don't wanna know what they have seen

Some people think That if they go too far They'll never get back To where the rest of them are I might be crazy But there's one thing I know You might be surprised At what you find when ya go!

Oh oh oh Mystical Advisor What is my problem, tell me Can you see?

Well, you have nothing to fear, my son! You are a Latent Appliance Fetishist, It appears to me!

That all seems very, very strange I never craved a toaster Or a color T.V.

A Latent Appliance Fetishist Is a person who refuses to admit to his or herself That sexual gratification can only be achieved Through the use of
MACHINES...
Get the picture?

Are you telling me I should come out of the closet now Mr. Ron?

No, my son! You must go into THE CLOSET

What?

And you will have

Heh?

Hey! A lot of fun! That's where they all live So if you want an Appliance to love you You'll have to go in there 'N' get you one

Well...that seems simple enough...

Yes, but if you want a really GOOD one, You'll have to learn a foreign language...

German, for instance?

That's right... A lot of really cute ones come from over there!
(Fifty bucks, please)

If you been Mod-O-fied, It's an illusion, an yer in between Don't you be Tarot-fied, It's just a lot of nothin', So what can it mean?
If you been Mod-O-fied, It's an illusion, an yer in between Don't you be Tarot-fied, It's just a lot of nothin', So what can it mean?
If you been Mod-O-fied, It's an illusion, an yer in between...

Flash mob at the gold base? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30289658)

Gold Base would be a GREAT place for a flash mob. http://bit.ly/4ZyrZz [bit.ly] : Replies denote interest.

Gold Base (Gilman Springs, CA) (5, Informative)

Ohio Calvinist (895750) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289740)

I live near this facility (map/image [google.com] ) and it looks more like a gated-resort community than anything. I haven't seen any razor wire, but there are high fences and access is controlled through a gate, and there are cameras on the road and on the fence. For the interested, there is a wiki page [wikipedia.org] that strikes me as being pretty accurate and NPOV.

I haven't read the article... BUT... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30289756)

Christianity is superior to all other religions!

Evolution is an abnormal science!

Sieg heil, Jesus!

No difference than the Christian cult (5, Insightful)

mlawrence (1094477) | more than 4 years ago | (#30289806)

My parents forced me to go to church every week, then sunday school, and during the week I would be forced to work as an altar boy for no pay. All the time I was brainwashed with repetitive prayers and actions. A cult is a cult is a cult. It doesn't matter that here in North America we tend to be fond of a particular one.
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