×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Google Launches Public DNS Resolver

timothy posted more than 4 years ago | from the their-interest-is-understandable dept.

Google 540

AdmiralXyz writes "Google has announced the launch of their free DNS resolution service, called Google Public DNS. According to their blog post, Google Public DNS uses continuous record prefetching to avoid cache misses — hopefully making the service faster — and implements a variety of techniques to block spoofing attempts. They also say that (unlike an increasing number of ISPs), Google Public DNS behaves exactly according to the DNS standard, and will not redirect you to advertising in the event of a failed lookup. Very cool, but of course there are questions about Google's true motivations behind knowing every site you visit."

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

540 comments

I guess it is good news... (4, Interesting)

ls671 (1122017) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314340)

> They also say that (unlike an increasing number of ISPs), Google Public DNS behaves exactly according to the DNS standard.

Congratulations, this would then be the first free service that I know of which doesn't do redirect ! ;-)

I setup my own DNS but I guess it is a little overkill for the common every day user. Setting your own DNS means you have to go to the network (e.g. internet) less often because your locally hosted DNS caches the already visited sites for a TTL period of time. This is especially true if you have several computers and that they tend to visit the same sites.

Let me add that if your ISP or firewall intercepts requests to port 53, you will still be stuck with it ;-(

Re:I guess it is good news... (5, Insightful)

sopssa (1498795) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314470)

Congratulations, this would then be the first free service that I know of which doesn't do redirect ! ;-)

I guess they're using that as a selling point and to come of "nicer". If they're just after datamining the DNS requests, this service can happily run on negative income, because it improves Google's other things and provides them even more data.

Google is datamining everywhere and everything already.

Re:I guess it is good news... (2, Interesting)

Jophish (1489121) | more than 4 years ago | (#30315054)

Oh boo hoo. I know I am going to get modded down for this, but: I don't mind Google knowing this, or knowing what sites I visit, if it means that they can deliver more relevant ads to me, cater more to my needs. This is a good think, kudos too Google, Inventing a business model that makes everybody happy.

Why not do both? (4, Insightful)

FranTaylor (164577) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314696)

Set up your own DNS server and point it at google's.

Then you can take advantage of your cache and their cache.

google could do us a great service by also making it available on some other port, that way we can get around the ISP interception of DNS requests.

Re:Why not do both? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30314844)

We put a cache in your cache so you can browse while you browse.

DDoS attacks (3, Interesting)

avij (105924) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314350)

But I thought open recursive DNS servers were bad -- haven't you heard of DNS DDoS amplification attacks? Why would Google's open recursive DNS service be any better in this regard?

Re:DDoS attacks (1)

sopssa (1498795) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314422)

That only applies to consumer lines. I doubt Google is running their DNS server on one of their workers basement.

Re:DDoS attacks (2, Informative)

mea37 (1201159) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314934)

I'm no expert on DNS DDoS amplification attacks, but reading up on them (including what Google has to say about them) I don't know what makes you say they only apply to consumer lines.

First of all, even if it were impossible to overwhelm Google's bandwidth, that wouldn't stop an attacker from using Google's open resolver in an amplification attack against some other target; in that regard, it woudl be better if Google were running it from an employee's basement.

Besides, it appears this type of attack has been used to create orders of mangitude more traffic than would be needed to just flood a consumer line.

According to Google's site, they recognize this as a problem and have mitigation strategies in place; the most relevant one seems to be throttles on sending of response packets to any given target.

Re:DDoS attacks (1)

neoform (551705) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314522)

I suspect Google is adept enough to know how to handle malicious recursive queries..

Re:DDoS attacks (1)

bschorr (1316501) | more than 4 years ago | (#30315070)

You would think so but they've made mistakes with security before. http://www.techcrunch.com/2009/03/26/more-security-loopholes-found-in-google-docs/

Re:DDoS attacks (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30314598)

http://code.google.com/speed/public-dns/faq.html#issues

Re:DDoS attacks (1)

svtdragon (917476) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314950)

This [pcmag.com] article explicitly says that it can prevent amplification attacks, though it makes no mention of how.

At least they have a clear privacy policy (5, Informative)

Edgewize (262271) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314390)

They state very bluntly that IP addresses are expunged from the logs after 48 hours, and that no data is shared with Google Accounts or other Google services. They still get to play with a lot of aggregated data, but this seems like a fairly non-evil way to do it. Good for them. http://code.google.com/speed/public-dns/faq.html#privacy [google.com]

Re:At least they have a clear privacy policy (1)

GweeDo (127172) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314476)

Actually they purge your IP address in only 24 hours and this data is in no way attached to what they store in regards to your Google Account.

Re:At least they have a clear privacy policy (1, Offtopic)

Ziekheid (1427027) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314754)

Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?

Re:At least they have a clear privacy policy (1)

Hijacked Public (999535) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314946)

Since it can't be proven that they won't violate their own policies, there are going to be people who refuse to use the service regardless of what Google says they'll do with the data.

But if you believe the above I think it pretty generous. I don't see any reason Google (or any other for profit company) would offer a service like this and say that they will never ever look at any of the data. They can't effectively sell ads with it if it follows the DNS standard. They can't drive traffic to their other properties.

And, to be honest, I have no idea what my ISP's policy is regarding DNS lookups. If they have one I suspect it allows them much more latitude than Google's.

Re:At least they have a clear privacy policy (2, Insightful)

Z00L00K (682162) | more than 4 years ago | (#30315012)

Add to that the fact that some IP addresses are shared by a lot of virtual sites which makes statistics about as precise as the slashdot polls.

Don't get me wrong, I love Google. (4, Interesting)

olsmeister (1488789) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314392)

But it sure seems like they're getting more and more of my personal information lately. What I search for, where I surf to, with my Droid where I navigate to, my e-mails, my documents. WOW.

so? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30314504)

But it sure seems like they're getting more and more of my personal information lately. What I search for, where I surf to, with my Droid where I navigate to, my e-mails, my documents. WOW.

fEEL FREE TO OPT OUT AT ANY TIME.

Re:so? (5, Funny)

metamechanical (545566) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314564)

fEEL FREE TO OPT OUT AT ANY TIME.

They have a great program [theonion.com] for that!

Re:so? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30314812)

fEEL FREE TO OPT OUT AT ANY TIME.

They have a great program [theonion.com] for that!

I'd watch that Flash video but I'm on Linux.

Re:so? (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30315064)

I'm on Linux, and I can watch that Flash video. Why can't you?

Re:Don't get me wrong, I love Google. (3, Funny)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314686)

Yeah, Google knows everything about me... except who I am!

Re:Don't get me wrong, I love Google. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30314694)

with my Droid where I navigate to, my e-mails, my documents. WOW.

How'd you get world of warcraft running on your phone?!

Re:Don't get me wrong, I love Google. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30314846)

with my Droid where I navigate to, my e-mails, my documents. WOW.

How'd you get world of warcraft running on your phone?!

WoW running in phone [youtube.com]

Re:Don't get me wrong, I love Google. (5, Insightful)

TrippTDF (513419) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314796)

I'm not fearful of the current Google, I'm fearful of the Google when we're three generations of leadership down the road and someone with fewer scruples is at the helm. What we need now more than ever is rock-solid privacy laws in this country that put looking at someone's data on par with searching their home... it can be done, but you need to get warrants and have a damn good reason to be doing it.

There is a lot of amazing advantages to having your data aggregated the way that Google has it, and it's not rocket science to manage the downsides.

Re:Don't get me wrong, I love Google. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30314958)

And exactly who is forcing you to use all these services they provide, and that allow them to collect your data?

Why? (4, Insightful)

sopssa (1498795) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314394)

But why would one change to use Google's DNS? If you're technical enough and care about such, you're way better off setting up your own recursive DNS server.

Google is just datamining from DNS requests here, it's another source of information. At least with your own ISP you can reasonably think that theres no datamining going on (excluding US ISP's, of course, who serve ads on non-existing domains for their users anyway)

Re:Why? (3, Insightful)

slashkitty (21637) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314456)

Uh, yeah. Comcast switched ads on non domains.. and i'm sure they are datamining it too. Unfortunately, I trust google more than comcast more than some independent group with open dns.

Re:Why? (4, Insightful)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314862)

You know what? If I did what comcast has done with intercepting DNS requests and corrupting DNS responses, I would be committing 2 or more federal felonies, for profit no less. I would like some justice.

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30314644)

Actually, you're not better off. DNS request times improve if the request was already made. By increasing the number of people using the service, you increase the local cache size and increase the speed of the lookup. It's one of the principles behind opendns. Plus this way you don't have to worry about securing a basic DNS resolver and can concentrate on more important things.

Re:Why? (2, Insightful)

zunger (17731) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314682)

Because setting up and maintaining your own recursive DNS server is a pain in the ass? (Especially compared to the workload of "here, just change this one setting and it will go faster")

Re:Why? (2, Interesting)

ickleberry (864871) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314904)

I hear this excuse about every type of service. "Look change to to our wonderful new cloud based data mining/advertising supported service and let us do all the work for you"

But really, I have been running servers of all sorts for years now and the only ones that require any significant amount of maintenance are the HTTP ones due to their content going stagnant (gopher does not count here as its OK to have stagnant content, makes it look more 'nostalgic' if it hasn't been updated in years I suppose)

A DNS server is pretty much set and forget, to the point where most consumer grade routers have one built in. Yeah sure its not the latest DNSSeC doohickey but i'm sure the next generation will have that

Re:Why? (0, Flamebait)

ModMeFlamebait (781879) | more than 4 years ago | (#30315002)

Because setting up and maintaining your own recursive DNS server is a pain in the ass?

apt-get install pdns-recursor
echo 'nameserver 127.0.0.1' > /etc/resolv.conf

Was that so bad?

Re:Why? (1)

rpp3po (641313) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314722)

Recursive lookup from by asking the root servers is pretty slow compared to a prefetching resolver, like in the order of at least times 5 to 10. If you never browse new pages it won't make a difference (you'll hit your home server's cache). At least 30% of my daily browsing are new sites found via Google. For those a fast prefetching resolver can really make a difference. And you very probably don't have a prefetching resolver at home, both RAM and bandwidth needed are usually out of reach for home use.

Actually, I was pretty surprised how good Google's offering sounds. I stopped using about every service except their search due to privacy concerns, but this really sounds quite appealing to me this time:

In the permanent logs, we don't keep personally identifiable information or IP information. We do keep some location information (at the city/metro level) so that we can conduct debugging, analyze abuse phenomena and improve the Google Public DNS prefetching feature. We don't correlate or combine your information from these logs with any other log data that Google might have about your use of other services, such as data from Web Search and data from advertising on the Google content network. After keeping this data for two weeks, we randomly sample a small subset for permanent storage.

Re:Why? (1)

grasshoppa (657393) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314738)

I know this is slashdot and it's assumed that datamining is bad...but why is it bad? I agree it's wrong when we don't know it's going on, but that's not the case here. Even if google wasn't up front about it, it's google; it's understood that's what they do.

Why is datamining in this case a bad thing?

Re:Why? (1)

oh_my_080980980 (773867) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314864)

"At least with your own ISP you can reasonably think that theres no datamining going"

W-h-y....seriously if you think a business is not going to collect all the information they can about their customers, you are quite deluded.

Re:Why? (1)

neoform (551705) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314896)

So all a technical person needs is knowhow? If you set up your own dns server, it still has to query another server for it's info..

Better than Rogers (1)

56 (527333) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314400)

I'd definitely consider switching to this. Better to have Google know all of the sites I visit than to be constantly redirected to Rogers advertising when I mistype a URL.

Re:Better than Rogers (1)

Lieutenant_Dan (583843) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314642)

That's exactly what I thought when I saw it. I'm changing my systems at home or try to figure to set this at the router level.

Give it some time, and Rogers will probably block it due to security reasons.

and there's the other motive for Google. (3, Insightful)

FooAtWFU (699187) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314736)

If you're on $garbage_DNS and you're served an advertisement/search page instead of NXDOMAIN, you (or your browser's auto-search) won't search Google. For that matter, just having something like this around will discourage $garbage_DNS.

Google cares about the Internet. It's where they make their money.

8.8.8.8/4 (3, Insightful)

Xacid (560407) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314414)

"To try it out:

Configure your network settings to use the IP addresses 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 as your DNS servers..."

Simple enough to remember which is great. Also - could this be used to circumvent some of the internet security at some workplaces where they seem to run a blacklist of specific sites?

Re:8.8.8.8/4 (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30314448)

4.2.2.2 and 4.2.2.1 as well.

High level DNS servers > google

Re:8.8.8.8/4 (4, Funny)

sopssa (1498795) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314524)

Would be interesting to know how much Google paid for those two 256 ranges to Level 3. One would think simple ip's like 8.8.8.8 would cost some nice amount too.

Or maybe they should had used the coolest ip on the net, aka

> host 69.69.69.69
69.69.69.69.in-addr.arpa domain name pointer the-coolest-ip-on-the-net.com.

Re:8.8.8.8/4 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30314706)

"To try it out:

Configure your network settings to use the IP addresses 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 as your DNS servers..."

Simple enough to remember which is great. Also - could this be used to circumvent some of the internet security at some workplaces where they seem to run a blacklist of specific sites?

Not if they dont grant you admin priveleges.

Re:8.8.8.8/4 (3, Informative)

dave562 (969951) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314922)

Anyone running Windows Server as their internal DNS server is probably forwarding DNS requests to an external name server. The workstation DNS settings are most likely controlled with DHCP, and if the admin has half a brain (I know, that's a big assumption), the users don't have rights to change the network settings.

Most internet security applications are usually proxy servers, or something like a Websense box. Those filter all traffic regardless of where the name resolution takes place. In fact, Websense can be configured to block DNS requests to non-approved / external servers (as can any firewall, etc).

Do your network admins a favor and use your work computer for work. Don't try to get around their access controls. Most of the time they'd love to give you free access to the internet, but the reality is that they are responsible for keeping Windows boxes secure. That isn't an easy job. What you might perceive as network admin Nazi behaviors is really just them protecting you from yourself... or your co-workers from themselves, etc.

Yet another privacy risking tool I won't mind usin (1)

Zerth (26112) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314428)

But I doubt it'll be as memorable as 4.2.2.2 for those emergency DNS outages.

Re:Yet another privacy risking tool I won't mind u (3, Informative)

FooAtWFU (699187) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314458)

But I doubt it'll be as memorable as 4.2.2.2 for those emergency DNS outages.

8.8.8.8, 8.8.4.4.

Re:Yet another privacy risking tool I won't mind u (2, Interesting)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314708)

So not only as memorizable, but explicitly public, whereas 4.2.2.2 and 4.2.2.1 are both technically being abused when you do that.

Re:Yet another privacy risking tool I won't mind u (1)

Zerth (26112) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314890)

I wonder how they got that nice legacy IP

It's their logical next step (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30314454)

They were limited to knowing only about the sites you searched for, can't have that, bad for business. Now they can track all of the sites you visit. Since Google is our warm fuzzy giant corporation that we can trust, there is no problem.

SPDNSY (-1, Troll)

bmearns (1691628) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314468)

They forgot to mention it requires TLS encryption and authentication, bzip3 compression, base64 encoding, little-endian representation, rot13 transcription, and UATE (universal anagram transliteration encryption).

Oh, and everything resolves to Google's proxies.

Re:SPDNSY (5, Informative)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314788)

everything resolves to Google's proxies.

Really?

$ host slashdot.org
slashdot.org has address 216.34.181.45
slashdot.org mail is handled by 10 mx.corp.sourceforge.com.
$ host slashdot.org 8.8.8.8
Using domain server:
Name: 8.8.8.8
Address: 8.8.8.8#53
Aliases:
 
slashdot.org has address 216.34.181.45
$ host 216.34.181.45
45.181.34.216.in-addr.arpa domain name pointer slashdot.org

You, sir, are a liar.

Cue *whoosh* in 3..2.. actually, I still don't get it. Either you're trolling because you hate Google, or there's some obscure joke that I still don't understand. I really don't get how your list of crap it requires (most of which doesn't exist or doesn't apply to DNS) is funny -- are Google known for requiring random stuff like that?

I mean, they don't even touch NX:

$ host aoeusnth.com
Host aoeusnth.com not found: 3(NXDOMAIN)
$ host aoeusnth.com 8.8.8.8
Using domain server:
Name: 8.8.8.8
Address: 8.8.8.8#53
Aliases:
 
Host aoeusnth.com not found: 3(NXDOMAIN)

That's more than you can say for most ISP-level resolvers.

trying it... (1, Informative)

hey (83763) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314484)

# nslookup
> server 8.8.8.8
Default server: 8.8.8.8
Address: 8.8.8.8#53
> slashdot.org
Server: 8.8.8.8
Address: 8.8.8.8#53

Non-authoritative answer:
Name: slashdot.org
Address: 216.34.181.45

Questions? (4, Insightful)

whisper_jeff (680366) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314518)

...but of course there are questions about Google's true motivations behind knowing every site you visit.

No there aren't. You'd have to have been living under a rock for the past decade to have any questions about their motives. It's dead simple - they want to know what people are looking at so that they can better target people with advertising thereby increasing the value of their service. In return for offering various free services, all they ask for is some information on you so that they can better target advertising that interests _YOU_. It's not rocket science - it's just incredibly effective marketing.

Re:Questions? (2, Informative)

SKPhoton (683703) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314716)

You can view the Google Public DNS privacy and logging policies here [google.com]. (It's nice and relatively short. Very un-EULA-ish.)

From the page:

We don't correlate or combine your information from these logs with any other log data that Google might have about your use of other services, such as data from Web Search and data from advertising on the Google content network.

Re:Questions? (1)

bkpark (1253468) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314748)

In return for offering various free services, all they ask for is some information on you so that they can better target advertising that interests _YOU_. It's not rocket science - it's just incredibly effective marketing.

The question is, is there anything that might go beyond marketing?

To a marketer, my search queries are little more than statistics and I am little more than a statistical point among millions of people. To my enemies and opponents, however, my DNS queries and more traditional Google searches are, well, a gold mine for dirt.

Will Google stay in marketing or will it, shall we say, expand into "consulting service" for my enemies?

Re:Questions? (4, Informative)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314828)

Except in this case, they claim your IP will be gone from their logs in 24 hours, and it'll never be associated with anything else you do at Google.

My guess is, they want broad statistics like the most popular domains visited, maybe even traffic patterns of which domains people tend to go to after which other domains.

So you're right, the motives are quite transparent. Except in this case, I have no idea why I wouldn't want to participate. It's likely to be a hell of a lot more responsive than my ISP's DNS.

Re:Questions? (1)

nine-times (778537) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314888)

It's dead simple - they want to know what people are looking at so that they can better target people with advertising thereby increasing the value of their service.

Well it's slightly more complicated than that. They already know what you're looking at and can target advertising. Sometimes they're just working on improving your experience of the Internet so you'll use it more and use it for more things.

For as long as Google owns the search engine market, increased activity and reliance on the Internet is good for them. They don't need to do excessive data mining on each service in order for the service to be worthwhile for them. They just need a reason to believe that it will somehow drive more traffic to one of their services that include ads, even if it's achieved in a roundabout way.

Re:Questions? (5, Insightful)

nine-times (778537) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314964)

And sorry, but just to complete the thought, there's a very good reason why Google would want to do this even if they don't get any data mining or ad revenue in any direct way: Think about all the other services (OpenDNS or ISPs) that redirect failed searches to their own search page. Every time that happens, that's a search that doesn't go through Google. As far as Google is concerned, you getting a proper response of "This page doesn't exist" is good for them, because they know your next stop will be Google.com.

Re:Questions? (1)

Zatar (131299) | more than 4 years ago | (#30315028)

People keep saying "Google wants" like Google is made up of a bunch of drones who were all brainwashed to think alike. Google has hired some of the smartest programmers in the world. Do you think they all just get hired and then go "yes master, I will try to increase Google's advertising capability"?

Yes, advertising is the core of Google's success but the majority of their services are created by geeks who just want to do something cool and found a job at a company that lets them do cool things without requiring everything to have an ROI. Many of their programs don't have any use to their advertising business. People keep asking themselves "why is Google doing this?" and since advertising is how Google makes money they always seem to come to the conclusion that whatever they are doing must boost advertising somehow. For the most part Google does stuff because the people working at Google sat down and thought "wouldn't it be cool if someone did this?"

The DNS service explicitly states that they are keeping information around on a short term basis just for debugging, performance optimization and spoof detection purposes and they are not sharing the data with the advertising team or any other Google program. This isn't making them money.

Google was going to hire DJB to make this work (5, Funny)

fotoguzzi (230256) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314550)

but they didn't want too much brilliance all in one place.

Why all the paranoia over Google? (3, Interesting)

Fished (574624) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314570)

Very cool, but of course there are questions about Google's true motivations behind knowing every site you visit.

Look.. Google's in the advertising and data aggregation business, yes. But ... there is a level of suspicion and fear directed at Google that just seems extreme. Has Google actually done something "Evil" that I missed? Or it is just paranoia? I personally think that it's much more likely that OpenDNS or my ISP would do something crazy with this sort of information than Google.

Re:Why all the paranoia over Google? (1)

MozeeToby (1163751) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314764)

For me, it isn't so much what Google might or might not do, but rather a question of what Google might be ordered to do. I can hope that given a court order of questionable legality the people at Google will do the right thing and fight it but I have no gaurantee that they will win. They have a lot of data on a lot of people, how long before some government office gets the idea in their heads of demanding a list of every IP/Username that ever searched for the words 'child porn', 'how to make a bomb', or 'how biological weapons work'.

Re:Why all the paranoia over Google? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30314876)

Google may be the biggest NSA front ever.

The motivation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30314582)

OpenDNS is hurting them for some reason.

From que FAQ: "Google Public DNS never blocks, filters, or redirects users, unlike some open resolvers and ISPs"

What's their motivation? (1)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314590)

Other than discovering new sites for their spiders to crawl and index, what's in it for Google??

Re:What's their motivation? (1)

natehoy (1608657) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314678)

Knowing every DNS lookup you do from your computer, along with your originating IP address so they can tie it to a Google account the first time you log in.

It's like marketing GOLD, baby!

Re:What's their motivation? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30314800)

Actually they have a perfectly valid reason for doing this, the same reason they developed google gears, chrome, and now chrome OS; to better the internet. Read through the old comics of when chrome was just announced, read about chrome OS, read about google gears and the recent decision to end it now that HTML5 support has improved (and HTML5 has improved), the common theme here is that they're trying to improve the internet. They're an online entity, they thrive on the internet, what is a better motivation to fix something up than the fact that it's directly related to your own well-being?

Re:What's their motivation? (4, Informative)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314898)

RTFA [google.com]:

Google Public DNS stores two sets of logs: temporary and permanent. The temporary logs store the full IP address of the machine you're using. We have to do this so that we can spot potentially bad things like DDoS attacks and so we can fix problems, such as particular domains not showing up for specific users.

We delete these temporary logs within 24 to 48 hours.

In the permanent logs, we don't keep personally identifiable information or IP information. We do keep some location information (at the city/metro level) so that we can conduct debugging, analyze abuse phenomena and improve the Google Public DNS prefetching feature. We don't correlate or combine your information from these logs with any other log data that Google might have about your use of other services, such as data from Web Search and data from advertising on the Google content network. After keeping this data for two weeks, we randomly sample a small subset for permanent storage.

So in other words, for less than two days, their DNS log, and nothing else, will know that a particular request was made from a particular IP. Other than that, they'll know that someone from your ISP, or perhaps from your whole fscking city, made that request -- maybe. I'm guessing they'll be looking at overall trends.

Re:What's their motivation? (1)

Edgewize (262271) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314774)

A competitor to OpenDNS that doesn't hijack the google.com domain results and redirect users to a private server, for one.

Also they get plenty of high-level aggregate data on website popularity from bookmarks and so forth, which they can't capture from search data alone.

Ignore the trolls who will spin conspiracy theories about logging individual behavior and tying it to accounts, they expressly deny it in the FAQ and it would open them to so many international lawsuits that they'd have to fire all their engineers and replace them with lawyers.

Benefit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30314680)

What would be the benefit of this as opposed to using the Level3 DNS servers?

NTP pool & GeoIP (4, Informative)

avij (105924) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314688)

The NTP pool [ntp.org] (which probably needs even more NTP servers, btw) was recently changed so that the project's DNS servers return a list of nearest available NTP servers when queried. If you change your settings to use Google's DNS servers, the pool will now respond with a list of NTP servers close to Google's DNS servers, which may not be what you wanted.

Re:NTP pool & GeoIP (1)

robmv (855035) | more than 4 years ago | (#30315000)

then change your ntp configuration to use your country server pool: <country-code>.pool.ntp.org

If you have more then one client to configure, you must be running a local ntp server already, then change that one

OpenDNS and DynDNS offer more features (1)

EsJay (879629) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314692)

The Google is not providing malware & phishing blocks and parental/SFW controls.
DynDNS's redirects are honest searches, not ad-choked.
https://www.dyndns.com/services/dynguide/ [dyndns.com]
http://www.opendns.com/ [opendns.com]

Re:OpenDNS and DynDNS offer more features (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 4 years ago | (#30315036)

Next up you can pimp a car with convenient impaling spikes on the steering wheel.

Latency: most ISPs should win hands down (2, Informative)

olden (772043) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314718)

RTT to my own resolver: microseconds
RTT to my ISP's resolver (Speakeasy = no redirect and such): ~21ms
RTT to Google's: 80+ms
No-brainer for me.

end game in sight (2, Interesting)

MrDoh! (71235) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314766)

So...
Google voice first for voice. Last week Gizmo5 for voip and now rolling out their own DNS?

Looks like all the infrastructure pieces are in place for the mass change of how cell phones are going to work.

For years I've wondered why we still have phone numbers. With address books stored on the phones to map names (hosts) to phone numbers (ip's).
With all the phones these days having decent data connections as standard, looks like we're going to get a central way of handling this.
So my phone contact will be 'Fred@Domain.com' If I send an email with that address, it gets sent to their mail. If I make a call to that address, does the DNS lookup, finds out their phone number (that we can re-configure our end to handle calling home phone or cell phone, and with location based rules on an android phone, you'd be able to automate it as you left your house, it lets the phone DNS know to call the cell phone, then as you get to your desk location, remap to office phone for non-personal calls). All possible as standard.

We're not going to get phone and choose to have a dataplan, we're going to have phones + dataplans and that's it.
telcoms industry HAVE to know this surely?

(personal wish, as calls are made to someone, there's a quick lookup for capabilities of the device you're calling, then popup the choices to make normal call, send a text, allow the webcam to work, or most importantly, present a URL to an MP3 that's YOUR ringtone, so you can set up a theme tune and as you call people, they hear your tune (as long as they've not turned that off))

Meet the new Borg... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30314816)

...same as the old Borg?

News at 10:00 - Gates to come out of retirement (1)

filesiteguy (695431) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314818)

I'll bet he's re-thinking the concept of writing an OS vs. doing a massive search engine. (Not calling it bing - maybe Life the Universe and Everything.)

ping time still bad.... (1)

datapharmer (1099455) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314854)

Well the ping times are still almost twice what they are for the old GTE/Verizon 4.2.2.1 4.2.2.2 and 4.2.2.3

Support for RFC 4398? (1)

Hasai (131313) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314886)

I don't suppose their DNS supports RFC 4398: Storing Certificates in the Domain Name System?

I'd would *really* like to see Little Billy's stranglehold on SSL broken....

OpenNIC has been offering this for years now... (0, Troll)

pongo000 (97357) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314902)

...and OpenNIC [opennicproject.org] has no interest in maintaining records of your visits.

Google is beginning to get scary.

Nixo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30314914)

GOOGLE IS SKYNET!

TorDNS works for me! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30314948)

Why me worry with OpenDNS or GoogleDNS or sumudduh DNS, when I can use TorDNS!

The tor network is far better than any public DNS.

of course there are questions about Google's true (1)

sofar (317980) | more than 4 years ago | (#30314994)

I can think of one: it allows them to see which websites are popular?

Or another one: it allows them to match & check advertisement click throughs?

there's a huge source of information in DNS lookups. The CIA and NSA wants you to use *their* DNS server too.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...