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Iran Slows Internet Access Before Student Protests

timothy posted more than 4 years ago | from the oh-y'know-the-usual dept.

Censorship 289

RiffRafff writes "Iran is at it again, pre-emptively slowing or cutting Internet access before anticipated student protests." From the article: "Seeking to deny the protesters a chance to reassert their voice, authorities slowed Internet connections to a crawl in the capital, Tehran. For some periods on Sunday, Web access was completely shut down — a tactic that was also used before last month's demonstration. The government has not publicly acknowledged it is behind the outages, but Iran's Internet service providers say the problem is not on their end and is not a technical glitch."

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289 comments

Have they gotten to /.? (3, Funny)

bucketoftruth (583696) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347288)

Clearly if I'm getting a frist psot on /. then they've gotten to us to!

Re:Have they gotten to /.? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30347586)

Important to remember: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30347992)

Civil disobedience is STILL disobedience!!

Re:Important to remember: (1)

lastgoodnickname (1438821) | more than 4 years ago | (#30348138)

but at least it's civil.

Re:Important to remember: (2, Funny)

MrNaz (730548) | more than 4 years ago | (#30348398)

Yea, but then what would you call a revolution? Putting down your teacup with a clatter, standing up abruptly, saying in a stern voice "Good DAY to you sir!" and storming out?

Re:Have they gotten to /.? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30347684)

Where are all the articles denouncing the American government for supporting Israel's incursion into the occupied territories for all these years? Where are those which denounce them for invading Iraq or Afghanistan? Why do you ppl insist on mirroring 'traditional media' by following the propaganda offered by your own government.

Maybe I'm not being fair - maybe you don't realise what's actually happening in the world - noone could blame you as you are within the shroud of a media blackout.

Offtopic/Troll/Flamebait in 3, 2, 1...

Re:Have they gotten to /.? (0, Troll)

jellyfrog (1645619) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347966)

You know, writing that you expect people to mod you offtopic/troll/flamebait doesn't necessarily make you not any of those things...

Re:Have they gotten to /.? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30348312)

Government propaganda? I get my new from google, and slashdot... which one of those is tied to the US government?

There are lots of people who here don't think we should be in Iraq or Afghanistan... maybe you need to stop listening to your own propaganda that says the US is a bunch of warmongers.

Re:Have they gotten to /.? (1)

MrNaz (730548) | more than 4 years ago | (#30348440)

"which one of those is tied to the US government?"

If you consider the comments on /. to be part of the news (and really, they are if you use them as a meter of public opinion) then if Fox News watchers make up the majority, guess what? You're watching the views of Fox News.

It kind of like passive smoking.

The Grotesquely Ugly Truth (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30348212)

In the absence of an external interfering force (e. g., the army of the Soviet Union), the fate of a nation is determined by its people. Period.

After the Kremlin exited Eastern Europe, the peoples of each nation in Eastern Europe rapidly established a genuine democracy and a free market. Except for Romania (where its people killed their dictator), there was no violence.

In Iran (and many other failed states), no external force is imposing the current brutal government on the Iranians. The folks running the government are Iranian. The president is Iranian. The secret police are Iranian. The thugs who will torture and kill democracy advocates are Iranian.

If the democracy advocates attempt to establish a genuine democracy in Iran, violence will occur. Why? A large percentage of the population supports the brutal government and will kill the democracy advocates.

Let us not merely condemn the Iranian government. We must condemn Iranian culture. Its product is the authoritarian state.

We should not intervene in the current crisis in Iran. If the overwhelming majority of Iranians (like the overwhelming majority of Poles) truly support democracy, human rights, and peace with Israel, then a liberal Western democracy will arise -- without any violence. Right now, the overwhelming majority clearly oppose the creation of a liberal Western democracy. The Iranians love a brutal Islamic theocracy.

The Iranians created this horrible society. It is none of our business unless they attempt to develop nuclear weapons. We in the West are morally justified in destroying the nuclear-weapons facilities.

Note that, 40 years ago, Vietnam suffered a worse fate (than the Iranians) at the hands of the Americans. They doused large areas of Vietnam with agent orange, poisoning both the land and the people. Yet, the Vietnamese do not channel their energies into seeking revenge (by, e. g., building a nuclear bomb) against the West. Rather, the Vietnamese are diligently modernizing their society. They will reach 1st-world status long before the Iranians.

Cultures are different. Vietnamese culture and Iranian culture are different. The Iranians bear 100% of the blame for the existence of a tyrannical government in Iran. We should condemn Iranian culture and its people.

Re:The Grotesquely Ugly Truth (2, Insightful)

MrNaz (730548) | more than 4 years ago | (#30348456)

Actually, the Iranian regime is Shia, not mainstream Muslim. Shia represent a minority (estimates vary from 5% to 15%) of the worldwide Muslim population that the Western media lumps together. Mainstream Islam (Sunni, counting for between 805 to 90%) is hugely different from Shia, although the Shia people are allowed into Sunni countries freely and without incident (roughly 100,000 enter Saudi Arabia annually to perform the Hajj to Mecca, without incident).

In Iran, Shia are a majority, the only country in which this is the case. They are going after the traditional Muslims, who are contending that the brutality of the regime is not consistent with Sharia law, which has very clear principles. Ironically, the Western media is pointing to the Iranian regime and blaming its adherence to Sharia as the cause for the unrest there.

Sharia law is not counter to human rights, Sharia law resulted in a 1,400 year long reign over the middle east which was described by Jewish historian Bernard Lewis as the only time man has achieved true social harmony. It's a pity that the Western media has absolutely no idea what Sharia is, but bashes it based on a few clips from some village of some woman being whipped, regardless of the fact that Sharia had no part in such instances and does not condone violence against anyone, man, woman, Muslim or otherwise. Sharia law worked for 1,400 years in the middle east, and only fell when World War 1, a European war, spilled over into the region.

Sharia law causing global instability indeed.

Re:The Grotesquely Ugly Truth (1, Redundant)

smitty777 (1612557) | more than 4 years ago | (#30348460)

Hey Anonymous Coward - if you're going to write something, at least don't cut and paste from your previous post (...your post from Iranian Crackdowns yesterday):

In the absence of an external interfering force (e. g., the army of the Soviet Union), the fate of a nation is determined by its people. Period.

After the Kremlin exited Eastern Europe, the peoples of each nation in Eastern Europe rapidly established a genuine democracy and a free market. Except for Romania (where its people killed their dictator), there was no violence.

In Iran (and many other failed states), no external force is imposing the current brutal government on the Iranians. The folks running the government are Iranian. The president is Iranian. The secret police are Iranian. The thugs who will torture and kill democracy advocates are Iranian.

If the democracy advocates attempt to establish a genuine democracy in Iran, violence will occur. Why? A large percentage of the population supports the brutal government and will kill the democracy advocates.

Let us not merely condemn the Iranian government. We must condemn Iranian culture. Its product is the authoritarian state.

We should not intervene in the current crisis in Iran. If the overwhelming majority of Iranians (like the overwhelming majority of Poles) truly support democracy, human rights, and peace with Israel, then a liberal Western democracy will arise -- without any violence. Right now, the overwhelming majority clearly oppose the creation of a liberal Western democracy. The Iranians love a brutal Islamic theocracy.

The Iranians created this horrible society. It is none of our business unless they attempt to develop nuclear weapons. We in the West are morally justified in destroying the nuclear-weapons facilities.

Note that, 40 years ago, Vietnam suffered a worse fate (than the Iranians) at the hands of the Americans. They doused large areas of Vietnam with agent orange, poisoning both the land and the people. Yet, the Vietnamese do not channel their energies into seeking revenge (by, e. g., building a nuclear bomb) against the West. Rather, the Vietnamese are diligently modernizing their society. They will reach 1st-world status long before the Iranians.

Cultures are different. Vietnamese culture and Iranian culture are different. The Iranians bear 100% of the blame for the existence of a tyrannical government in Iran. We should condemn Iranian culture and its people.

Proxification? (4, Interesting)

skuzzlebutt (177224) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347292)

Anyone hosting tor ports to assist? I considered, but I'm nervous about having some /b/onehead abuse my address.

Re:Proxification? (1)

ickleberry (864871) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347472)

As long as its your own dynamic IP I wouldn't be too worried about it. By running a tor node you are helping your own cause as well - the disassociation between user and IP. If anyone ever gives you any hassle just say "I'm running a tor node, the abuse has nothing to do with me, please fuck off". I believe the people behind tor have a selection sample letters of this sort on their site (but somewhat more polite)

Re:Proxification? (1)

palegray.net (1195047) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347504)

I bed to differ. If you're running a Tor node, you're responsible for the traffic leaving it. I honestly don't care what you think the law has to say about it, but in the U.S. it's very clear. The letter you're referencing is worthless.

Re:Proxification? (3, Insightful)

ickleberry (864871) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347536)

Has anyone ever got into trouble for running a tor node? Also, not everyone lives in the US, with the level of 'freedom' over there it seems like you guys should be the ones using the tor nodes, not running them

Re:Proxification? (4, Funny)

Loomismeister (1589505) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347620)

Um... living in the US is fantastic and we enjoy more freedom than most of the world.

Re:Proxification? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30347678)

Yep - we're free to face jail time for taking a 4 minute video with a copyrighted movie in the background, for instance. Taste that freedom!

Re:Proxification? (2, Interesting)

calmofthestorm (1344385) | more than 4 years ago | (#30348450)

Free to go to jail for unwillingly/unknowingly receiving a picture of a child.
Free to go to jail for someone else pirating something and clumsy morons tracing it back to us.
Free to go to jail for exercising the right of free use.
Free to be exploited first by corporate monopolies, then the government, then both at the same time.

That said, we're also:

Free to deny the holocaust or make "hateful" racist statements
Free to insult Turkishness
Free to insult the Thai monarch
Free to call for the overthrow of the government by non-violent means
Free to campaign for a change to the laws (and be ignored, but still)
Free to play video games with blood and gore
Free from that many spy cameras placed at every angle everywhere
Free to use cryptography and refuse to disclose the passphrase under the 5th amendment.
Until quite recently, free to peaceably assemble. Now we have to use Intel's assembler.

I'm not saying things are exactly peachy here in the US, but I don't see a lot of countries that are freer. Scandinavia comes to mind. What's most troubling in the US is not that we're not free, we're pretty good, it's how incredibly quickly we're losing rights.

Re:Proxification? (1, Flamebait)

easyTree (1042254) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347718)

living in the US is fantastic and we enjoy more freedom than most of the world.

Mainly because you're {carpet bombing / have invaded / are occupying / are paying a terrorist state to occupy/invade/carpet bomb} every other country but your own.

Re:Proxification? (2, Funny)

tuxgeek (872962) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347990)

Aw, come on man, carpet bombing is good clean fun

Right up there with dropping a nuke on someone else's city

Re:Proxification? (1)

easyTree (1042254) | more than 4 years ago | (#30348036)

Condoleezza, is that you?

Re:Proxification? (0)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 4 years ago | (#30348170)

In the history of the world, only one man has ever ordered the use of nuclear weapons on a populated city. Guess which party he was from.

Re:Proxification? (2, Insightful)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 4 years ago | (#30348228)

And which country was he a party member from? Oh I'm sorry, didn't mean to get in the way of partisan bullshit.

Re:Proxification? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30348458)

The winning one?

Re:Proxification? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30348204)

Um... living in the US is fantastic and we enjoy more freedom than most of the world.

Freedom? Come on that's no freedom. You live in an extremist christian country.
Check M. Moore's films out. If only 10% on that is true then it still is disgusting.

Real freedom is in Western Europe dude.

Re:Proxification? (2, Interesting)

palegray.net (1195047) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347810)

I should add some more supporting details. Organizations can, in fact, be held legally liable for abuse of Tor nodes operating on their networks. There's a bit of a catch to this, though. If you're operating in relay mode, there's virtually no way to determine the contents of the traffic. If you're operating as an exit node, that's not the case. People are responsible for the bits exiting their network interface to the public at large.

I routinely handle DMCA complaints related to Tor node abuse. My standard line is basically "we don't actively monitor your connection for abuse, but if we're notified of it we have to act on it." The EFF loves to run the "DMCA safe harbor" argument up the flagpole, but service providers lose that protection if they routinely allow abuse on their networks. Of course, the EFF isn't going to make that a talking point.

Re:Proxification? (5, Insightful)

techno-vampire (666512) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347604)

And how do you think this is going to help in the slightest? If all Internet traffic in and out of Iran is being slowed down, running through a proxy outside of Iran won't help because traffic to and from it will be affected just as much as everything else.

Re:Proxification? (1)

lannocc (568669) | more than 4 years ago | (#30348018)

If all Internet traffic in and out of Iran is being slowed down, running through a proxy outside of Iran won't help because traffic to and from it will be affected just as much as everything else.

Not necessarily. That is, if the proxy did something like convert rich media to simple ASCII art it would provide a bandwidth savings and perhaps be useful.

Re:Proxification? (1)

Hadlock (143607) | more than 4 years ago | (#30348282)

I'm kind of curious how many more situations like this will occur before people develop point to point 3G networks using old, root'd G1s and directional dishes. With the ability to just turn off the internet at will, eventually someone will develop a tethered G1 that can talk to other tethered G1s in a point to point situation. I think packet HAM radio does this to an extent already, but you should be able to push 10mb/s easy across p2p 3G packet radio, which then interfaces with a building's internal network. A primitive, 1980's DARPA internet via packet radio for the 21st century :)
 
With both a laptop and the cell phone being battery powered, such a situation should allow for interrupted power for an hour or more.

Slow? (3, Interesting)

jspenguin1 (883588) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347298)

How much will this really affect communication? If I recall, the last wave of protests mostly used Twitter, which doesn't exactly use a whole heap of bandwith? I could see this affecting Youtube, but it won't stop communication.

Re:Slow? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30347364)

depends on how many advertisements are on the pages of the sites they goto. they are generally the biggest parts of most webpages and the slowest to load anyhow.

Let's do it right this time. (3, Insightful)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347318)

I hope the protest succeeds for many reasons, one of which is to show that regime change can be beneficial and effective without overt American influence. The Iranians are tough people with long memories, and they will be as resistant to American meddling as they are to the Ayatollah.

They're one of the few countries without McDonald's' and I'd like to see them stay that way.

Re:Let's do it right this time. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30347332)

What's wrong with them having McDonald's?

Re:Let's do it right this time. (2, Funny)

MRe_nl (306212) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347526)

http://www.whatwouldsatando.com/Newpages/rants/mcshit.html [whatwouldsatando.com]
Above: Authorities take Ronald McDonald away after they find evidence of his crimes against humanity. Crimes including. Hitler-esque, ritualistic slaughter of millions of animals, Subliminally tricking parents into feeding absolute garbage to their children, and posing as someone who gives a fuck about anything other that "a few billion more sold."

In short,
BurgerKing FTW!;)

Re:Let's do it right this time. (1)

easyTree (1042254) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347886)

Don't forget:
  * Dressing like a paedophile
  * Cynically attempting to capture children's minds (happy meal etc) as a precursor to a lifetime of their unthinking patronage.

Re:Let's do it right this time. (2, Insightful)

sakdoctor (1087155) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347412)

Your sentimentalism sickens me.
How can your anti-globalization sentiment outweigh the fact that Iran is a highly oppressive, human rights abusing theocracy?

You wouldn't be able to set foot there to enjoy the McDonalds free streets, before being tortured, and used as a political bargaining chip.

Re:Let's do it right this time. (4, Interesting)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 4 years ago | (#30348056)

Your sentimentalism sickens me.

Yeah, emotions. Why can't we all be robots?!!!!!!!!

How can your anti-globalization sentiment outweigh the fact that Iran is a highly oppressive, human rights abusing theocracy?

Read the post again. I want what the people want. They don't want a 14-th century theocracy and they don't want a bunch of greedy American meddlers entrenching themselves into the political infrastructure, exploiting the people, and cheapening a proud culture.

As the song goes, "Meet the new boss, same as the old boss". The Iranians are trying to prevent that vicious cycle, unlike the apathetic Americans who encourage it.

Re:Let's do it right this time. (4, Insightful)

Tezcat (927703) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347436)

If the regime controls the media well enough, any problems or threats can be described as American-sponsered.

And if any change does occur, it'd not stop sympathetic conspiracists from blaming the downfall of an Islamic state on whoever they damn well wish: The US, the UK, or a sinister cabal of Zionists.

Of course, this is discounting the major problem the anti-government Iranian students are facing; that those they oppose were revolutionary students once, ruthless ones at that, and know a few of the tricks.

Re:Let's do it right this time. (3, Insightful)

easyTree (1042254) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347904)

If the regime controls the media well enough, any problems or threats can be described as ...

Most don't seem to comprehend that this is exactly what happens in the US.

Re:Let's do it right this time. (2, Interesting)

palegray.net (1195047) | more than 4 years ago | (#30348436)

I won't argue that the media here in the U.S. isn't heavily influenced by the government. That said, I'm still free to publish views that directly conflict with those in government without fear of being locked up. That is not the case in Iran. Now, I frankly don't think it's any of our business that their citizens have to live like that; if they decide they want change, they'll do what it takes to effect it. Until then, they get what they deserve.

Re:Let's do it right this time. (0, Flamebait)

easyTree (1042254) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347864)

Maybe if the Americans stopped breaking International Law - the Iranians could be left in peace - there'd be no need for wave after wave of propaganda to set public opinion before the clearly-approaching action against Iran.

Iran has every right to pursue its interests - it's signed the non-proliferation treaty (unlike Israel which has masses of US nuclear weapons on its soil, again, against International Law).

Stop 'buying into' this shit as you guys say.

kthx.

America is sowing the seeds of terrorism in every country around the world - clearly this includes non-muslim/-arab states - where would you be if even 1% of the horrors you've committed/sponsored against the rest of the world came back to you? hint: horrors beyond your imagining; hundreds/thousands of times worse than 911, again and again. For fuck's sake - stop reading your government-controlled propaganda - New York Times etc and start controlling your 'leaders'.

Re:Let's do it right this time. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30348118)

For fuck's sake - stop reading your government-controlled propaganda - New York Times etc and start controlling your 'leaders'.

Yes, by all means... let's start reading your propaganda instead.

Re:Let's do it right this time. (1)

vxice (1690200) | more than 4 years ago | (#30348298)

"regime change can be beneficial and effective" how well did that regime change go for them last time?

Re:Let's do it right this time. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30348348)

Yeah, but they have McDonald knock-offs; MaxBurger, Boof, etc..

its basically kabob in bun.. pretty funny actually

How long can they make it last? (3, Interesting)

techno-vampire (666512) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347324)

How long do the authorities in Iran think they can keep this Internet slowdown going? Sooner or later, they'll have to let up, and when they do, there's going to be a flood of blog posts and website updates about the latest protests. Unless they cut off all Internet access forever, they can't stop it from happening, they can only delay it, and the longer they do, the worse it looks.

Re:How long can they make it last? (5, Insightful)

bram (490) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347538)

The problem is that it doesn't matter how it looks.

Re:How long can they make it last? (3, Insightful)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347848)

Yeah, if they're willing to gun down citizens in the street for protesting a bogus election, then I don't see how anyone could think they'd care at all about how they look for restricting bandwidth on the internet.

Re:How long can they make it last? (1)

hemp (36945) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347578)

They will continue as long as Nokia, Vodafone, and Siemans continue work with the Iranian government.

Re:How long can they make it last? (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347610)

I think it is more about taking away the tactical organization of the protesters. I wonder if you could build a true P2P communication app to run on phones. Servers inside Iran would be vulnerable to police action and servers outside Iran can obviously be filtered. Something like each node (phone, laptop, etc) keeps a list of the IP addresses of other phones in the mesh. New members can join by manually typing in the IP address of a friends phone. IP addresses in the mesh are distrbuted through the network.

But that gets me thinking about The Moon is a harsh Mistress and the cell of three rule. Keep the mesh but allow each client to only talk to two other phones. Only one phone in the cell has the address of another cell. In effect, cells are members of cells but nobody had more then three IP addresses in memory.

This avoids having big vulnerable databases which the cops can grab. It will be called MYCROFTXXX of course.

Re:How long can they make it last? (1)

Osinoche (769786) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347640)

I doubt that mate. Most Iranians are fine with the status quo.

Re:How long can they make it last? (2, Interesting)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | more than 4 years ago | (#30348274)

Actually, the ones that aren't fine with the status quo no longer live in Iran. My co-worker left as soon as he could; so did a previous co-worker. They have families, and they don't want to have them grabbed or imprisoned just for saying, "this is bullshit!". (A right that we have in the West, but one that sadly, is not conferred to the rest of the world.)

They're both Engineers -- Iran's loss, our gain. At the rate they're going, they won't have anyone left in the country smart enough to change a light bulb in a few years. Then they can sit in the dark with no Internet and complain how Britain and the US are evil.

The short-lived power of twitter? (1)

genericcitizen (1480425) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347326)

From slow tweet to no tweet? Guess this might be the end of twitter as an organizing tool in Iran.

Re:The short-lived power of twitter? (2, Insightful)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347866)

I got modded a troll yesterday (which I probably deserved for my dismissive tone) making a point similar to this.

The revolution will not be tweeted.

The "twitter revolution" that many people cheered about went no where, and the Iranian government used those tweets to put people in jail. If the Iranians are going to have a revolution, it isn't going to happen on social networking sites. They aren't even good to organize with, because the government can easily put out disinformation, and see where, and when, people are planning to demonstrate.

"Not on their end and not a technical glitch" (3, Insightful)

JoshuaZ (1134087) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347330)

Well, that really doesn't leave much. I give the Iranian government credit though, this is a much more subtle way of handling things and potentially more effective than more blatant crackdowns. However, I don't think this will matter much for certain types of channels. A lot of the channels used in previous protests to communicate (such as Twitter and text messages) have extremely low bandwiths. So slowing down the internet shouldn't do much. And large scale cutting will lose the more subtle element. Of course, this sort of repeated behavior should make it clear to anyone in doubt that the current Iranian government really isn't popular with the people. If they were genuinely popular, they'd have little need to try to control communication like this. The government probably remembers that the last time there was an extremely unpopular government was the Shah's regime and that was brought down by what started as student protests.

Re:"Not on their end and not a technical glitch" (1)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347378)

Streamed video is another cornerstone of fast distribution of information, though. Twitter, text messages and Facebook were essential, but it were the Youtube videos that really let the world watch the protests.

Re:"Not on their end and not a technical glitch" (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30347614)

Well, that really doesn't leave much. I give the Iranian government credit though, this is a much more subtle way of handling things and potentially more effective than more blatant crackdowns. However, I don't think this will matter much for certain types of channels. A lot of the channels used in previous protests to communicate (such as Twitter and text messages) have extremely low bandwiths. So slowing down the internet shouldn't do much. And large scale cutting will lose the more subtle element. Of course, this sort of repeated behavior should make it clear to anyone in doubt that the current Iranian government really isn't popular with the people. If they were genuinely popular, they'd have little need to try to control communication like this. The government probably remembers that the last time there was an extremely unpopular government was the Shah's regime and that was brought down by what started as student protests.

Been there, done that with the so-called 'revolutions'.

The last time they got themselves a real progressive force (Mr Mohammed Mossadeq), the CIA killed him and installed their guy, the Shah. It's what come to be known as the 'Roosevelt doct

Then we got another revolt after that (the Islamic Revolution), with Zibgniew Brzezinski selling guns to the Iranians under Khomeini's watch (AKA what people think Iran-Contra was all about) and playing them against Iraq.

I'm getting sick of the naive childlike view portrayed on this forum and others. In your 'analysis', you exclude the fact that the US government and its alphabet soup HAS, and never ceased to meddle in foreign governments' affairs. This is part of the historical record, yet it always conveniently gets 'omitted'.

Just more war propaganda, just more apologists from an 'empire' that ironically is very much in its death throes itself. But what I'm really sick of is this American naval-gazing - this apathetic, moral righteousness where none is due.

Re:"Not on their end and not a technical glitch" (1)

JoshuaZ (1134087) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347702)

Um, what? Nothing we were discussing had anything to do with the American end of things. I didn't even mention the United States and you think that there is a problem with "American naval-gazing"? Moreover, you seem to be a bit confused about the history. The US supported the Shah and the Iranian revolution happened anyways. Iran-Contra was years later when certain parts of the US government make backroom deals with the new Iranian regime. If anything, this history shows how democracy won in Iran out despite US involvement. I suspect that in the long-run something similar will be true here: the current government will either be thrown out or radically changed more or less independently of what the United States does.

(I'm incidentally assuming that you mean "American navel-gazing" because looking at ships really doesn't make much sense in this context).

Re:"Not on their end and not a technical glitch" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30347768)

You are aware that the US has been running terror attacks inside Iran ever since the Bush administration, right?

As for your insinuation that I'm a bit confused about Iran-Contra - no, it's because you follow an orthodox version of history that isn't meant to make a whole lot of sense. Iran-Contra was used by Zbigniew Brzezinski and Robert Gates to smuggle weapons in and outside Iran - primarily to use them as a continental dagger against Iraq, and secondarily to smuggle those weapons inside Afghanistan - you know, the other 'proxy war' the US had provoked between the Soviet Union and the Mujahideen 'Freedom Fighters' - what later became the CIA Arab Legion - ie Al-Qaeda.

As for your little quip about democracy - oh please. Democracy has never existed - it doesn't exist in the current regime you're living in anyway. It's 2009 already - you have been fingerprinted, datamined and facescanned all without the vote of the populace - it all went by treaties struck by NGOs that were then passed down to the government. You don't decide zilch anymore.

But nice to see the majority on Slashdot are still horribly naive of the world they're living in. It figures.

Re:"Not on their end and not a technical glitch" (3, Funny)

khallow (566160) | more than 4 years ago | (#30348294)

You are aware that the US has been running terror attacks inside Iran ever since the Bush administration, right?

No, we are not aware of this. I suspect after you enlighten us, we will find that you aren't aware of any such attacks either.

Re:"Not on their end and not a technical glitch" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30348454)

I suggest you start enlightening yourself for a start then - it's pretty useless to argue the existence of a program that has been part of the public record since at least 2006/2007 by now. Especially with someone whose personal predisposition tells me he would rather want to feign ignorance of its existence altogether.

Re:"Not on their end and not a technical glitch" (1)

easyTree (1042254) | more than 4 years ago | (#30348092)

Nice to see someone who's awake, AC.

Re:"Not on their end and not a technical glitch" (1)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 4 years ago | (#30348136)

You should observe how AC handled it, and learn from it. Using facts to make your arguments, is much better than hyperbole.

More protesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30347338)

Doesn't this just give the students more reason to protest, starting right now? I'd be even more pissed if the internet we shut down on top of the political turmoil.

Hub and spoke control (2, Interesting)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347342)

How long before the Iranian government lays all new fiber to a central military facility and then disable the now-current fiber links? The idea being total central control to turn off the internet connection entirely or by segments from one physical location.

Hey, if they have the money to build another 20 nuclear reprocessing sites, they damn well have the funds to pull something off like this!

Re:Hub and spoke control (4, Informative)

grcumb (781340) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347422)

How long before the Iranian government lays all new fiber to a central military facility and then disable the now-current fiber links? The idea being total central control to turn off the internet connection entirely or by segments from one physical location.

What makes you think they don't route everything through a central location already?

Here's an analysis of the outage immediately following the presidential election [renesys.com]. I'll let you draw your own conclusions.

Everybody needs a little revolution now & agai (3, Interesting)

7213 (122294) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347398)

Bah,

Last death throws of a failing regime. I feel horrible for the Iranian people right now, but thank god they don't seem to be taking this lying down.

It's like the 1960's over there, a huge boom of 'youth' and a repressive establishment to fight. Here's hoping the result of this revolution is a bit more friendly then the last, but more importantly that it treats it's people better.

Re:Everybody needs a little revolution now & a (3, Informative)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 4 years ago | (#30348012)

Sorry to disappoint you, but the "revolutionaries" are mostly urban youth (a lot of students there, obviously, which is why you often see those). However, that's not what the majority of Iran's population is - that comes from the countryside, rural agrarian folk, and they're rather happy about mullahs and Ahmadinejad. So at worst this won't be a revolution, this will be a civil war, and if the "more democracy" side wins, it will do so against the will of the majority (can you count the bodies it takes, already?).

I very much wish for a democratic Iran, but at this point it looks as unlikely as ever.

Re:Everybody needs a little revolution now & a (1)

Yergle143 (848772) | more than 4 years ago | (#30348198)

If your analogy holds true we should see some real changes in say 30 years.

As I watch the situation I look for only one barometer of popular dissent:
when I hear about a police and/or military mutiny. That's when things
are cooking.

537

Bandwidth-wasting social sites (1)

ickleberry (864871) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347444)

If they were all using IRC/Jabber and regular POP3/SMTP email (with encryption/one-time pads) or something more decentralised and robust altogether the effects of 'slowing down the internet' would hardly be felt, since these protocols use so little bandwidth anyway. In this case anyway relying on 'De Cloud' ie. a couple of supermassive foreign social networking sites does not seem like the best course of action

Re:Bandwidth-wasting social sites (1)

techno-vampire (666512) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347650)

If they really want a decentralized, low-bandwidth protocol, they already have it. It's called "Usenet."

Re:Bandwidth-wasting social sites (3, Interesting)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347774)

If Iranian ISPs are anything like the ones here in the U.S., then that means they don't have access to usenet, unless they pay a subscription for it.

Maybe it isn't the government... (1)

GhostGuy (708750) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347570)

Maybe everyone was just blogging and tweeting about how awesome the protests were going to be, and it clogged up the tubes.

What's their downside? (5, Interesting)

Ritz_Just_Ritz (883997) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347672)

The same thing happens when China "cracks down." The media whines and opines for a while, but at the end of the day the rest of the world is powerless to stop these boneheads from abusing their own people. I feel for those affected, but at some point the people inside the Matrix need to do more to help themselves. Having the people outside complain really doesn't do a whole lot to make it better.

So if I'm a thug government, I know I can pretty much do what I want, especially if I have something the world wants (cheap labor/oil/etc).

Re:What's their downside? (3, Insightful)

couchslug (175151) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347980)

"I feel for those affected, but at some point the people inside the Matrix need to do more to help themselves."

They are too comfortable for violent revolt, or they would violently revolt.
They aren't fighting Islam, which is the root source of all their problems, they are merely wanting their piece of the Iranian pie.

I'll be impressed when they have the balls to fight like the Jihadists they face, and wear IEDs into Republican Guard facilities.

In Australia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30347832)

In Australia you need permission from the Government to stage a protest. How is this any different?

Re:In Australia (2, Informative)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347964)

The same is true here in the U.S. if you are planning on organizing a demonstration on public property such as a park, or street. You have to get permits to do it.

Re:In Australia (0, Troll)

cryfreedomlove (929828) | more than 4 years ago | (#30348078)

The same is true here in the U.S. if you are planning on organizing a demonstration on public property such as a park, or street. You have to get permits to do it.

No, sorry, your analogy does not begin to hold water. Are protesters within the USA held indefinitely without charges and tortured? I don't think so. Bush tortured foreign terrorists and a free American people in a legitimate democratic election rejected that world view and elected Barack Obama. Do you think that could happen in Iran today? No, be honest, no.

Re:In Australia (1)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 4 years ago | (#30348098)

I wasn't commenting on Iran at all, I was merely stating the fact that in the U.S. you need a permit to legally do a large demonstration.

In fact there wasn't an analogy in my statement at all, so are you just responding to the wrong person, or what?

Re:In Australia (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30348316)

'in a legitimate democratic election rejected that world view and elected Barack Obama'

The sad part is that you actually believe this with a honest-to-God conviction. Please wake up and smell the coffee - Barack Obama has been a complete and utter fraud - period.

Re:In Australia (1)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 4 years ago | (#30348340)

If you think the 2008 election was a fraud, then you are a moron. Period.

Re:In Australia (1)

chill (34294) | more than 4 years ago | (#30348406)

Not the election, just the candidates. ALL of 'em, except Sarah Palin. I don't think she has enough active braincells to be a fraud.

Re:In Australia (0)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 4 years ago | (#30348442)

We only have politicians as good as our citizenry.

Garbage in, garbage out. The way our electoral process goes, the people that are truly qualified for the job are too smart to want it.

Tick-tock... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30347838)

It's only a matter of time now...

As opposed to the U.S. where you just go to jail (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30347842)

At least they can have protests. In the United States, you would be put in a "free speech zone" and have your picture taken by the FBI. Or in the case of the GOP convention last year, they just lock you up for violating a "fire code" and hold you 72 hours without charge and let you go after the convention is over.

Re:As opposed to the U.S. where you just go to jai (1)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 4 years ago | (#30347912)

I'm not in any way defending the absurd "free speech zones", but I also don't think you can really say Iranians are free to protest.

At least here in the U.S. they don't gun you down in the street, as they did in Iran after the election.

Where have you been? (1)

vxice (1690200) | more than 4 years ago | (#30348376)

"At least here in the U.S. they don't gun you down in the street, as they did in Iran after the election." Where were you in the 60's and 70's? Write off Kent State as a one off mistake but then what about the civil rights movement? Hurts when you fall off that high horse doesn't it?

Re:Where have you been? (1)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 4 years ago | (#30348418)

Ok if we build a time machine and go back 40 years you have a point. You got me. I don't deny that our hands aren't clean here, and we've done some pretty crappy things to our own citizens.

However, during 8 years of the inept Bush administration, even he never had anyone shot in the street for protesting. (His VP may have shot someone in the face, but that's a whole other subject!) The point I was trying to make, was by comparing it to recent history. If we want to go back to Kent State, or the civil rights movement, or even the labor movement; then yes, you do have a valid point, and I concede that it's a bit hypocritical to lecture Iran about it, given our history.

"bread and circuses" - encourage p2p use! (3, Funny)

plasmacutter (901737) | more than 4 years ago | (#30348072)

They're doing it wrong.

they should encourage p2p software use, increase the bandwidth, then everyone will stay home watching lost or house.

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