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Linux Reaches 32% Netbook Market Share

kdawson posted more than 4 years ago | from the one-third-of-world-domination dept.

Portables 389

christian.einfeldt writes "Linux netbooks have captured 32% of the global netbook market, says Jeff Orr, an analyst with consumer computer research firm ABI Research. The largest share of netbook sales is in the Asia-Pacific region, including Japan, Australia, and New Zealand, according to Orr. ABI's latest figures align with a statement by Dell executives in February of this year, to the effect that Linux netbooks comprised about 33% of Dell shipments of Dell Inspiron mini 9s netbooks. These data points cast doubt on claims by Microsoft that Windows XP has captured 98% of the netbook market (a figure Microsoft later revised to 93%). In an interview with DesktopLinux.com, Orr made clear that the 32% Linux netbook market share did not include either user-installed Linux or dual-boot systems, but was confined to just pre-installed Linux shipments."

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Oblig Simpson Quote (4, Funny)

ZiakII (829432) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361102)

Oh, people can come up with statistics to prove anything, Kent. 14% of people know that.

Re:Oblig Simpson Quote (4, Funny)

skine (1524819) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361334)

Facts are meaningless. You could use facts to prove anything that's even remotely true!

Re:Oblig Simpson Quote (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30361674)

Facts are meaningless. You could use facts to prove anything that's even remotely true!

I am non-racist, well-adjusted, and think nigger jokes are very funny, at least most of them. What are your feelings about this?

Re:Oblig Simpson Quote (2, Funny)

aztracker1 (702135) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361338)

And 80% of those netbooks running pirated windows in 3...2......

Re:Oblig Simpson Quote (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30361488)

Sadly, yes. I got an Eeepc linux version, but the default linux was so bad and restrictive it was painful to use it. And I couldn't get the wireless to work on Ubuntu mixed and unmixed and some other version.

Re:Oblig Simpson Quote (1)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361634)

...you mean like the 900? Wifi works on mine with UNR 9.04 and 9.10 like a charm.

Re:Oblig Simpson Quote (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30361714)

If by "like a charm" you mean you have problems with WPA2 despite the fact that it's 2009, sure. Keep in mind you also still have an extremely unpolished (particularly with UNR) and sluggish interface, with hideous fonts and a substandard set of applications (other than the cross-platform ones, such as OpenOffice and Firefox, which are slower and crash more frequently than their Windows counterparts). It's okay though, because you can run xeyes!

Re:Oblig Simpson Quote (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30361744)

... 901 ... what's with all the dots?

Re:Oblig Simpson Quote (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30361622)

Why would someone purchase a linux based laptop at around equal price as a windows one to go through the extra steps to avoid paying $7 for a Windows XP Home License ?

Re:Oblig Simpson Quote (1, Offtopic)

von_rick (944421) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361690)

To have a cheap, low power, home server perhaps? Also with a little bit of precaution, Linux netbooks can enable you to skip having an anti-virus running, thus speeding things up a bit, as netbooks run on tiny processors.

Suck my cock (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30361346)

bitch

Re:Oblig Simpson Quote (1)

TheTrollToll (1545539) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361546)

its actually forFty percent... Homer: Aw, people can come up with statistics to prove anything, Kent. Forfty percent of all people know that. http://www.snpp.com/episodes/1F09.html [snpp.com]

Re:Oblig Simpson Quote (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30361672)

Turn in your geek card. Forthty percent of people know that quote.

A view from Asia-Pacific (5, Insightful)

Gadget_Guy (627405) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361108)

I live in Australia, and find it quite rare to find Linux based netbooks in shops. They are available, but mostly from the more specialist retailers. Even then they only have very low specs.

I just got back from Singapore, where I was hoping to pick up a cheap Linux netbook to use over there at a conference. Not only were prices similar to Australia for computer stuff, but virtually all the netbooks ran Windows. There were only a couple of places that I came across that offered Linux, and they were not cheap. They also seemed to be older models. I was disappointed.

That said, anyone who is really interested in Linux would not be satisfied with the simplified versions that come with netbooks. If you are going to wipe the OS to install your own distro, then it doesn't make a great deal of difference what the original operating system is. Any cost savings for having Linux seem to be offset by the premium of buying such a rare beast.

Re:A view from Asia-Pacific (1)

stoolpigeon (454276) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361242)

I was at the Sim Lim Square a couple weeks ago and enjoyed seeing all the hardware, but pretty much everything cost more than I could get at home in the U.S.A. So I didn't end up picking up anything while I was there beyond some tea mix friends had requested and souvenirs for my kids.

Re:A view from Asia-Pacific (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30361414)

Small world... I was there a couple weeks ago, too. I hope you got in as much fucking and sucking as I did! I took some herbal viagra shit... I think I had a hard-on the entire time I was there. Must have fucked 2 dozen small-dicked chinks. A I even let a girl suck me off. I paid her to eat out my asshole but after 20 minutes or so she worked her way up to my balls and cock. I hate vagina, but I'm not going to turn down a deep-throating!

Re:A view from Asia-Pacific (1)

MrNaz (730548) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361436)

Dude, I think you're on the wrong web site...

Re:A view from Asia-Pacific (5, Interesting)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361260)

Go to Officeworks, still half of their ASUS netbooks are Linux based. When the lovely sales assistant starts telling you about the evils of Linux, assure him you know what you're doing and head to the counter.

Even then they only have very low specs.

That's the point of a netbook.. and the reason why Linux is so popular on them.

Of course, you'll probably want to nuke the "linux" on them and put Ubuntu on it.

Re:A view from Asia-Pacific (1)

PenisLands (930247) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361402)

NO, I won't want to put Ubuntu on it. I'll want to put Debian or Arch Linux on it. We don't all use Ubuntu.

Re:A view from Asia-Pacific (2, Funny)

nhytefall (1415959) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361452)

Debian, Ubuntu... same difference anyway :)

obligatory, I use Ubuntu daily, and our shop is Debian...

Re:A view from Asia-Pacific (1)

PenisLands (930247) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361454)

By the way, I didn't mean to seem angry or rude in my response. I just wanted to seem firm. I think it's important that we don't confuse "Linux" with "Ubuntu". I'd like to apologize if I upset anyone.

Re:A view from Asia-Pacific (2, Insightful)

GF678 (1453005) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361514)

Even then they only have very low specs.

That's the point of a netbook.. and the reason why Linux is so popular on them.

Who said netbooks needed to be low spec? The same people who thought netbooks would only be used for browsing and light typing?

Netbooks are simply small computers. They should have the capability to do whatever we want with them - this argument that netbooks are destined to only be low spec is short-sighted.

Re:A view from Asia-Pacific (2, Insightful)

timeOday (582209) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361614)

Netbooks are nothing but the lowest end of laptops. Feel free to disagree, but please provide a link to a high-end "netbook" with it.

Re:A view from Asia-Pacific (1)

GF678 (1453005) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361670)

Feel free to disagree, but please provide a link to a high-end "netbook" with it.

I can't. Probably because anything I put forward will be disregarded as not being high-end enough (this is how Internet arguments work - you can't win).

What I was addressing was rather the perception that netbooks have to be low spec, that low spec is all they should be. Given the rate of technological improvements, I don't see it not being feasible for a netbook to house a decent 3D chipset and CPU to compete with mid-range laptops. Might suck up power moreso than other models, but that's a given with high-end equipment anyway.

Re:A view from Asia-Pacific (2, Informative)

rrohbeck (944847) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361784)

My Eee PC 1005HA has a slightly slower CPU but twice as much RAM and disk as my 4 year old Latitude D800 which was pretty high end back then. It runs three times as long on one battery charge. Firefox feels about the same (although the wireless driver still has hiccups in Karmic) and OpenOffice feels faster on the netbook than MS Office on the laptop although it takes longer to start. evince definitely feels snappier than Acrobat Reader under XP.
The display size is the only major drawback. A netbook with 1920x1024 would be cool although I'd need to have my glasses tuned up more often.

Re:A view from Asia-Pacific (4, Insightful)

GlassHeart (579618) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361616)

Who said netbooks needed to be low spec?

For now, physics. Small form factor means small battery, which means the CPU can't be too power hungry.

Re:A view from Asia-Pacific (4, Insightful)

Mr. DOS (1276020) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361640)

Who said netbooks needed to be low spec?

Microsoft. Who only licenses XP Home for use on machines below a certain screen size and spec. I think there may be some restriction on Windows 7 Starter Edition as well.

I know the conversation is "who needs Windows on netbooks?", but it's still at 68% :P

      --- Mr. DOS

Re:A view from Asia-Pacific (1)

Gadget_Guy (627405) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361552)

Go to Officeworks, still half of their ASUS netbooks are Linux based.

Thanks for that. Their website doesn't list them at all. I will go check out my local store later. I have found some of the staff in my local one to be surprisingly knowledgeable.

That's the point of a netbook.. and the reason why Linux is so popular on them.

Wow, good point. I hated the way the netbook morphed into the slightly larger subnotebook market. People didn't seem to understand point of the cheap, tiny computer. Now I find I have fallen into that trap myself! Still, 32GB SSD seems like a nice minimum point without going to a full hard drive.

Re:A view from Asia-Pacific (1)

ProzacPatient (915544) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361694)

Even then they only have very low specs.

... Of course, you'll probably want to nuke the "linux" on them and put Ubuntu on it.

Actually, if it has very low specs then Xubuntu or Damn Small Linux is what would probably fit the best.

Re:A view from Asia-Pacific (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30361276)

Sadly, I have to agree. Although a lot of places carried the original eee pc with Xandros and a few carried the Acer Aspire One with Linpus LINUX netbooks with LINUX are now impossible to find in Australia - even in Melbourne. I've asked lots of retailers and they all say that they can't obtain anything with LINUX.

FWIW, I find Australians don't like tinkering with technology and are bit insecure. They do love gadgets like iphones. In fact, where they do avoid MS they tend to go for Macs. I remember reading somewhere that Australians buy a larger per capita number of Macs than other countries and my informal personal observations align with this. :-(

Re:A view from Asia-Pacific (2, Informative)

MrNaz (730548) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361484)

FWIW, I find Australians don't like tinkering with technology and are bit insecure.

Have you actually been here or are you just speculating about foreign places out of your ass in typical American fashion?

I remember reading somewhere that Australians buy a larger per capita number of Macs than other countries and my informal personal observations align with this. :-(

Ah. I see it's the latter. Global market share for Mac is around 9.3%. In Australia its about 5.3% Here's a new tagline for a company you may have heard of:

"Google - Dispelling arsehole-originated facts since 1998."

Re:A view from Asia-Pacific (1, Funny)

linuxrocks123 (905424) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361604)

Global market share of Mac is just over 4%: http://www.appleinsider.com/articles/09/12/01/apples_iphone_halo_effect_again_carries_mac_sales_to_new_heights.html [appleinsider.com]

I think the 9% figure you quote is for the US, you jingoistic, narrow-minded American swine.

---linuxrocks123

Re:A view from Asia-Pacific (1)

Gadget_Guy (627405) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361668)

FWIW, I find Australians don't like tinkering with technology and are bit insecure.

I definitely would not agree with that. For a long time, I could not under stand why our US friends would complain about not being able to buy a computer without paying the Microsoft tax. Here in Australia it is trivial to go to a computer shop and get a system without any OS at all. Sure, the department stores don't do it, but the ubiquitous corner computer shop would have no problems with this.

There are places that mostly tend to sell the parts rather than complete systems. I have spent a lot of time in the rather long queues at one such place and watched a whole procession of people walking out with all the componants of a computer - just separately boxed. There are also the many markets and swap meets selling the latest grey imports from asia. We have quite a large culture of rolling your own computer system.

Re:A view from Asia-Pacific (1)

yoyhed (651244) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361770)

I think the loud minority of Slashdotters (who should be building their own non-laptop systems anyway) complaining about the "Windows tax" has improperly skewed your perception of US computer culture.

In the Twin Cities area (midwestern US), we have many smaller local shops, and at least one big one. At Micro Center (where I go to get parts for clients), I usually stand in a long line of people with their arms full of computer components.

There's also an annual "market/swap meet" type sale at the State Fairgrounds that has the cheap Asian imports.

This is just in one relatively small metropolitan area. I know Micro Center is nationwide, and I'm sure in larger cities there's even more smaller shops.

Don't underestimate us because a few zealots complain about the extra 30 dollars they pay when they choose to buy pre-made :-)

Re:A view from Asia-Pacific (4, Insightful)

bcrowell (177657) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361292)

If you are going to wipe the OS to install your own distro, then it doesn't make a great deal of difference what the original operating system is. Any cost savings for having Linux seem to be offset by the premium of buying such a rare beast.

I just don't want to put money in Microsoft's pocket for an OS that I have no intention of using. That would mean caving in to the worst kind of abusive monopoly.

Re:A view from Asia-Pacific (-1, Flamebait)

ClosedSource (238333) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361612)

I don't see how you buying something that you have no intention of using is anything but your own responsibility.

Re:A view from Asia-Pacific (-1, Offtopic)

asit (1694174) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361372)

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Re:A view from Asia-Pacific (5, Informative)

Cimexus (1355033) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361480)

Huh? That's weird...I also live in Australia and was going to post that I'm not surprised that APAC seems to be a successful market for these Linux netbooks. The Linux netbooks are displayed quite prominently (along with the Windows ones of course) in quite a few retailer. JB Hifi springs to mind ... the one near my place has the linux netbooks right there on the ends of the aisle ... actually ~more~ prominently placed than the Windows ones now that I think about it.

Must be one of those things that varies depending on the particular store and demographic. The area I live in is quite 'young and techy' so perhaps the Linux netbooks do well here compared to other places in Australia.

Re:A view from Asia-Pacific (1)

Cimexus (1355033) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361522)

Yeah replying to myself.

Just wanted to clarify that the 'linux' on these machines I'm talking about is some awful custom distro that noone in their right mind would keep. But the point is - they are in stores and you can just take them home, reformat, and install distro of your choice.

Re:A view from Asia-Pacific (2, Insightful)

DarkofPeace (1672314) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361610)

I agree with the low spec comment. When I was looking for a netbook, the only way to get the extra ram or larger harddrive was to buy the windows version. Just because I like linux does not mean I want it only on the cheapest hardware.

Re:A view from Asia-Pacific (2, Informative)

fyoder (857358) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361794)

That said, anyone who is really interested in Linux would not be satisfied with the simplified versions that come with netbooks.

That's true of the Aspire One anyway. The graphical environment that came with mine was a joke compared to even xfce. Prior to that I figured claims about people exchanging Linux netbooks on mass for XP were exaggerated, but on seeing it I had to wonder. If my only choice was that or XP, even I'd want XP, and I'm a registered fanatical Micro$oft basher. Fortunately it wasn't difficult to put xubuntu on it.

Microsoft not necessarily wrong (1, Interesting)

Psaakyrn (838406) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361110)

Alternatively, Linux netbook users could have converted their netbooks to dual-boot systems, hence still allowing the possibility of both to be true.

But hard to find in the US (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30361142)

Sitting here in the US, I pretty much only have Dell and System76 as a choice for netbooks. I'd really like to have more Linux based choices.

Put me down for 2 netbooks upgraded to linux. (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361152)

I bought an EEE pc 1005HAB and just put linux on it.

It was a better deal than dell who wanted to charge me more and were charging the same price as a machine that came with XP.

Re:Put me down for 2 netbooks upgraded to linux. (1)

Hadlock (143607) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361304)

I ended up installing UNR (ubuntu netbook remix) 9.10 on my hp mini 110; I needed it in a hurry for my trip so I had to buy it retail with XP. But apparently netbooks don't come with restore CDs so I've been hunting the torrent sites for a copy of Windows XP Home ULC (i.e. netbook edition) because HP wants $15 "shipping and handling" for the disc that should have come with the device in the first place =/
 
UNR 9.10 takes some getting used to, and I sorely miss the "switch to traditional desktop mode" of UNR 9.04... I really want to try out Moblin 2.1 but I don't have time to mess with it on the road for 4 weeks if something breaks. Perhaps when I get back.

Re:Put me down for 2 netbooks upgraded to linux. (1)

BetterSense (1398915) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361684)

When i bought my Aspire One, I couldn't get the big battery with linux. I'm typing this on an XP-sold machine, with Hardy Heron installed. Another stealth user.

I don't think this is the case in Australia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30361174)

I don't think this is the case in Australia at present.

I can't find a way to make Dell Australia ship a Linux-based netbook.

All netbooks I can find on sale in retail stores have Windows XP Home or Windows 7 Starter installed.

Thats not surprising! (0, Flamebait)

Murdoch5 (1563847) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361192)

Linux = preformance
Linux = stability
Linux = proper OS design
Linux is the right OS for any job period, windows is used when you want to play solitare or make a spread sheet or even when you want to see an OS crash.

Re:Thats not surprising! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30361212)

you're right! linux is fine if all you want to do is run the os but if you want to run apps you need windows. right on the money!

Oh really? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30361236)

Name me a Linux based professional audio workstation on par with Pro Tools, Cubase, Sonar, Logic, Mixcraft, Tracktion, Reaper, etc., and doesn't require me to spend DAYS trying to get low latency drivers to work.

If you mention Audacity, that shows how little you know about serious audio work, or how your audio editing needs are of elementary quality.

Re:Oh really? (3, Informative)

HeadSoft (147914) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361308)

Name me a Linux based professional audio workstation on par with Pro Tools, Cubase, Sonar, Logic, Mixcraft, Tracktion, Reaper, etc., and doesn't require me to spend DAYS trying to get low latency drivers to work.

If you mention Audacity, that shows how little you know about serious audio work, or how your audio editing needs are of elementary quality.

I run FL Studio 9 in Wine and it works fine. Perhaps you could get Pro Tools, Cubase, etc. working this way as well, and spend the extra $100 you saved on new gear for your studio.

Re:Oh really? (1, Troll)

icegreentea (974342) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361746)

The requirements to run FL Studio compared to Pro Tools or Cubase is huuge. It's like saying SketchUp for hobby stuff works fine, therefore 3ds Max to create models for a hollywood movie will work fine as well (yes, I know Blender etc etc are available on Linux). When you're dealing with serious audio work, you're talking about layers and layers of synths and DSPs running. You NEED every bit of performance out of your machine. Emulation just isn't going to cut it.

You can get Linux to work for a lot of audio work. Ardor is passable/usable for many basic, and some advance stuff. But for truly high-end stuff, nothing comes even close to the commercial programs out on Windows and OSX.

Re:Oh really? (4, Informative)

Mprx (82435) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361318)

Ardour [ardour.org] is the only Free software DAW suitable for any serious work. It uses JACK [jackaudio.org] , which is an excellent low-latency audio routing system, but actual audio playback on Linux depends on the ALSA backend, which varies in quality depending on your hardware. Check the Alsa SoundCard Matrix [alsa-project.org] for details. Recent Linux kernels have reasonably low latency by default, but for very tight latency requirements you might need a custom kernel configuration or patches.

Ardour? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30361716)

Holy shit, have I been asleep for 20 years?

Re:Oh really? (3, Insightful)

techno-vampire (666512) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361326)

And you think that lack of a professional audio workstation proves that Linux isn't ready for the desktop? If so, I've got some late-breaking news for you: only a vanishingly small percentage of computer users need something like that. I'm sure that if enough people needed something like that there'd be a developer working on it.

I can't count how many times I've seen opposition to Linux from short-sighted, narrow-minded people like you who think that their tiny little niche is the be-all and end-all of computers and any OS that doesn't revolve around whatever specialist program they need is out and out trash.

Re:Oh really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30361544)

Way to not read the post he was responding to, which said that "Linux is the right OS for any job period". I'll even quote it in full for you, since Slashdot apparently thinks I'm a cowboy.

Linux = preformance
Linux = stability
Linux = proper OS design
Linux is the right OS for any job period, windows is used when you want to play solitare or make a spread sheet or even when you want to see an OS crash.

Re:Oh really? (3, Funny)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361660)

Windows: Because a Netbook was made for running Cubase!

That giggling sound is the average Windows laughing at you. Although they aren't sure why they're laughing because they don't really know what you're talking about.

Re:Thats not surprising! (-1, Flamebait)

ClosedSource (238333) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361654)

"Linux = proper OS design"

What do you base this on? Just because Linux isn't Windows doesn't mean it's the poster boy for "proper OS design".

This Just In: (1, Insightful)

nrozema (317031) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361200)

"31% of Netbooks Running Pirated Windows"

Re:This Just In: (1)

digitalunity (19107) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361320)

Whats the point?

A netbook with linux isn't that much cheaper. I really think Windows piracy on desktops is quite a lot more prevalent then on netbooks.

Re:This Just In: (4, Informative)

pecosdave (536896) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361360)

In my case it's not paying the money, it's who the money goes to. I don't want Microsoft taxing computers - it's philosophical.

Another reason I want to find a system with Linux pre-installed is when I wipe it and put my distro of choice on there, if it was sold with Linux chances are I can make all of it work with Linux. There's still a lot of crappy software based hardware out there that practically requires Windows to work, or requires so much effort and maintenance to work/keep working in Linux it's not worth messing with.

Re:This Just In: (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30361476)

You're responding to the wrong post. GP is asking why anybody would bother buying a Linux netbook and then pirate Windows onto it when the Windows netbooks aren't any more expensive to start with.

Re:This Just In: (1)

LinuxIsGarbage (1658307) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361540)

In the developed world, yeah sure.

But consider there's billions of customers in other countries that are both poorer and less stringent with intellectual property. Countries where computers from big brands (HP, Acer, etc) ship with a "free open source operating system", FreeDOS. Do you really think these machines run FreeDOS for the long haul? Heck no. They are wiped and a pirated copy of Windows is put on in short order. But why look at the whole world when you can just focus at what's sold at Best Buy?

Re:This Just In: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30361774)

Maybe because of different specs? The Xandros version of my Eee 900 had a 16 GB SSD instead of 8 in the Windows version.

Re:This Just In: (2, Insightful)

bcrowell (177657) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361464)

"31% of Netbooks Running Pirated Windows"

TFA claims: "In many of these markets, the $15 to $25 price differential compared to Windows XP makes all the difference." I have a really hard time believing that anyone who has the $400 to buy a netbook will decide to save $20 by buying one without Linux and then installing a pirated copy of Windows. Installing any OS on a laptop is a total pain, and often results in a system with all kinds of problems, like power management and sound that don't work. This is completely different from the situation we used to have about 4 years ago when Fry's was selling desktop Linux boxes for $200, while the cheapest Windows box they sold was $450. Sure, for a 55% discount, a lot of people are going to be willing to do their own install of a pirated OS. A ton of that definitely happened back then, and AFAICT that's actually why Fry's stopped selling cheap Linux machines; people would botch the Windows install and then try to return the computer.

If I was really going to believe this article, I'd need to know what the country is that is bringing the average up to 32% -- by buying significantly *more* than 32% of their netbooks with Linux. TFA says it isn't China. Several Australian slashdotters says it's not Australia. Are there massive Linux sales in India, for example? Seems unlikely, given that most of the Indian tech support people I've talked to don't even seem to understand what Linux is.

Another thing I'd need to see in order to believe this article is independent confirmation of the price differential in this mystery country. It's very rare in in the US for Linux machines to sell for significantly less than comparable Windows machines. This is partly because OEMs get huge amounts of money from software houses for loading their crapware onto Windows boxes, and this offsets most or all of the cost of Windows.

Whilst I'd love this to be true ... (3, Insightful)

baileydau (1037622) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361208)

Here in Australia you are quite hard pressed to purchase a netbook with Linux pre-installed.

I got my original eeePC 701 with Linux, but my newer S101 *had* to come with Windows. At the time the only machine I could find with Linux was a single Acer Aspire One unit. However my wife had her heart set on the S101 ...

It now has openSUSE (currently 11.2) installed and everything Just Worked (TM), but that wouldn't be included in anyone's statistics (except mine).

Speaking of statistics, I RTFM, and I couldn't actually see where / how they came up with this statistic. Did I miss something??

Re:Whilst I'd love this to be true ... (1)

confused one (671304) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361248)

no, you didn't miss anything. They did not provide any data to back the claim(s).

I'm having trouble with this number. (3, Interesting)

pecosdave (536896) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361222)

I've tried and I've tried to find an Athlon Neo system WITHOUT Windows and I flat can't do it. Sure, a lot of the Intel ones have Linux, but even most of those have Windows on them. Seriously, if I can't find an Athlon Neo system without Windows it's not telling me people want to buy the Linux versions, it's telling me they "settle" for Linux, and I don't like that.

Hard to find Linux Netbooks in Japan (2, Informative)

putaro (235078) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361250)

All the ones I see in the shops are running Windows. I've even tried asking and got a blank look. Rinikusu? Nan desu ka (what's that)?

Re:Hard to find Linux Netbooks in Japan (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30361572)

naan [wikipedia.org] desu

Re:Hard to find Linux Netbooks in Japan (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30361782)

I saw the Sharp NetWalker just last month while in Akihabara, that is definitely running a version of Japanese Ubuntu.

http://www.engadget.com/2009/08/27/sharps-5-inch-pc-z1-netwalker-honors-the-zaurus-legacy/

The dpi on that screen is absolutely astounding! 1024 x 600 on 5-inchs! for a pixel density fiend like myself I was drooling all over but sadly I already bought a netbook two months prior so couldn't justify getting another one...

Casts doubt on Microsoft? (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361256)

I'd love for this to be true - but frankly, I think this casts more doubt on the veracity of Mr. Orr. This really is a ridiculous number.

EeePC 701 (0, Flamebait)

LinuxIsGarbage (1658307) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361266)

I bought an EeePC 701 that came preinstalled with Xandros. Within an hour of bringing it home I started installing WindowsXP. Been a satisfied XP Netbook user ever since.

Re:EeePC 701 (1)

pecosdave (536896) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361290)

I got a eeePC for my kid, it came preinstalled with Xandros. Xandros looks like it started out on the right page, but then ASUS had to mess it up for them. My six year old kid is now running eeeBuntu NBE and is quite happpy with it.

other flaw (0, Redundant)

gmhowell (26755) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361270)

Orr made clear that the 32% Linux netbook market share did not include either user-installed Linux or dual-boot systems, but was confined to just pre-installed Linux shipments

Did Orr also make it clear that that figure did not include people who slapped on a copy of XP from a torrent?

*BSD is Dying (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30361272)

It is now official. Netcraft confirms: *BSD is dying

One more crippling bombshell hit the already beleaguered *BSD community when IDC confirmed that *BSD market share has dropped yet again, now down to less than a fraction of 1 percent of all servers. Coming on the heels of a recent Netcraft survey which plainly states that *BSD has lost more market share, this news serves to reinforce what we've known all along. *BSD is collapsing in complete disarray, as fittingly exemplified by failing dead last [samag.com] in the recent Sys Admin comprehensive networking test.

You don't need to be the Amazing Kreskin [amazingkreskin.com] to predict *BSD's future. The hand writing is on the wall: *BSD faces a bleak future. In fact there won't be any future at all for *BSD because *BSD is dying. Things are looking very bad for *BSD. As many of us are already aware, *BSD continues to lose market share. Red ink flows like a river of blood.

FreeBSD is the most endangered of them all, having lost 93% of its core developers. The sudden and unpleasant departures of long time FreeBSD developers Jordan Hubbard and Mike Smith only serve to underscore the point more clearly. There can no longer be any doubt: FreeBSD is dying.

Let's keep to the facts and look at the numbers.

OpenBSD leader Theo states that there are 7000 users of OpenBSD. How many users of NetBSD are there? Let's see. The number of OpenBSD versus NetBSD posts on Usenet is roughly in ratio of 5 to 1. Therefore there are about 7000/5 = 1400 NetBSD users. BSD/OS posts on Usenet are about half of the volume of NetBSD posts. Therefore there are about 700 users of BSD/OS. A recent article put FreeBSD at about 80 percent of the *BSD market. Therefore there are (7000+1400+700)*4 = 36400 FreeBSD users. This is consistent with the number of FreeBSD Usenet posts.

Due to the troubles of Walnut Creek, abysmal sales and so on, FreeBSD went out of business and was taken over by BSDI who sell another troubled OS. Now BSDI is also dead, its corpse turned over to yet another charnel house.

All major surveys show that *BSD has steadily declined in market share. *BSD is very sick and its long term survival prospects are very dim. If *BSD is to survive at all it will be among OS dilettante dabblers. *BSD continues to decay. Nothing short of a miracle could save it at this point in time. For all practical purposes, *BSD is dead.

Fact: *BSD is dying

Real meaning (1)

Sarten-X (1102295) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361284)

32% of netbook buyers have at least seen the name Linux, and probably are even being exposed to the fact that it's an alternative to Windows. That's far more than the desktop market.

I wonder if many install Windows themselves (5, Insightful)

RichardDeVries (961583) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361296)

I'm a Linux user myself, but I just installed XP on a common desktop box tonight and it was painful. Wifi, sound didn't work out of the box, you have to wait ages for all of the updates and SP's to download and install, reboot far too many times and then you have a empty OS almost without useful apps. Some things were hard to get working (Radeon driver installer throwing errors, Wifi driver refusing to work).
I wonder how many 'average' users would get XP, Vista or 7 working on a desktop, let alone a netbook.

Re:I wonder if many install Windows themselves (0)

onefriedrice (1171917) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361388)

I wonder how many 'average' users would get XP, Vista or 7 working on a desktop, let alone a netbook.

Presumably 7 would be more manageable for common users to install on recent hardware than an OS that's eight years old. It doesn't really matter though--it's clear to most people that Linux netbook market share is definitely not even close to approaching 32%, and most netbooks come with some form of Windows pre-installed.

As a Linux user, I think it'd be grand if that statistic were true, but there is no way...

Re:I wonder if many install Windows themselves (3, Interesting)

RichardDeVries (961583) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361512)

Presumably 7 would be more manageable for common users to install on recent hardware than an OS that's eight years old.

If true (and I think it is), great! Still, why isn't there any research on this? If I were a netbook manufacturer, Microsoft, Apple or Mark Shuttleworth I would be VERY interested to learn how many of those who purchased my computer or OS are sticking with the default setup. Win7 might be easier to install, but I still don't see my dad buying or pirating a Windows disk and installing it himself. Do netbook buyers give Ubuntu a try before changing to Windows? What makes them decide to keep or ditch it?

Re:I wonder if many install Windows themselves (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30361408)

Windows 7 installs just great on most netbooks. I put it on both Dell entries, the Mini 9 and 10v, without even needing to download anything from Dell to recognize all the built in hardware.

Re:I wonder if many install Windows themselves (4, Interesting)

whoever57 (658626) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361738)

I'm a Linux user myself, but I just installed XP on a common desktop box tonight and it was painful.

I totally agree with this. I have done a number of installations on hardware that pre-dated XP-SP3 using an XP disk with SP3 streamed in. Lots of hardware is not supported. I have even come across a laptop where the standard sound driver from the chipset manufacturer will work -- as long as you don't want to use the built-in speakers. The last install I did left me with a system with no working NICs. I ended up booting into Linux so that I could download the Windows network drivers onto the system.

After installing XP, you then have to install some applications, update it multiple times to get all the updates. Most Linux installs are way easier.

I have a linux netbook... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30361302)

but I immediately formatted the hard drive and installed a pirated copy of Windows XP.

2009 the Year of the Linux Desktop (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30361316)

Finally 2010, The Year of The Linux Netbook !

definitions? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30361324)

"Nearly one-third of the 35 million netbooks on track to ship this year will come with some variant of the free, open-source operating system, ABI Research said."

"In a statement, Microsoft maintained that "over 93% of worldwide small notebook PCs run Windows today."

1/3 of netbooks

93% of small notebook PCs.

Does "small notebook PCs" include every 13 or 15" laptop on the planet?

statistics, statistics, statistics...

interesting they would pick the dell mini 9... Arr (4, Interesting)

bombastinator (812664) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361342)

Funny that their favorite computer is the Dell Mini 9. It's not a very advanced machine, to the point that it een got discontinued once.
They brought it back though because it is very popular for the single reason that it has a reputation as being the most hackintoshable netbook there is. This implies that a lot of these netbooks are running more MacOS than linux.

How many wiped, XP installed? (-1, Flamebait)

daBass (56811) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361348)

So how many of these (usually slightly cheaper) Linux netbooks are wiped the moment they get home and an illegal copy of XP put on?

Or after trying for a while the owner (who had the best intentions) decides they don't like Linux and put an illegal copy of XP on?

Just sayin'...

Re:How many wiped, XP installed? (1)

tftp (111690) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361742)

So how many of these (usually slightly cheaper) Linux netbooks are wiped the moment they get home and an illegal copy of XP put on?

Zero, since Linux netbooks are more expensive (as other posters pointed out) and hard to find.

the owner [...] decides they don't like Linux and put an illegal copy of XP on?

a) It's hard to imagine an owner who specifically orders a Linux netbook without first learning what Linux is, and most importantly what applications he will have available.

b) Why must that copy of XP be illegal? TigerDirect has XP Home and Pro in stock ($90 and $140 as of now.)

Dell Mini 9 (2, Interesting)

dancingmad (128588) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361364)

How many of those Mini 9s ended up getting OS X installed on them? That was the only reason I was planning on getting a 9 and since the Windows version costs more, the Linux version is a no-brainer.

Being sold on the machine and being kept on the machine are two different things.

My experiences (4, Interesting)

GF678 (1453005) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361384)

Some people say "Yay! Linux on netbooks means more mainstream acceptance!" From what I've seen however, this isn't the case. Linux netbooks, from what I've encountered, are

* Generally more expensive than their Windows counterparts (with identical specs)
* Running some dodgy Linux distro that does nothing to help sell the benefits of running Linux and only provides headaches
* Often simply not available

With this being the current situation, I don't see there being anything to be proud of. Yes, it's better than several years ago when Linux wasn't available anywhere mainstream. That doesn't mean things are going well either.

What KIND of Linux? (2, Insightful)

srothroc (733160) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361440)

From the article: "Nearly one-third of the 35 million netbooks on track to ship this year will come with some variant of the free, open-source operating system"

That's pretty vague. Are they including those pre-boot/fast-boot linux distros that seem to be all the rage? I'd hardly count that as a "linux netbook" since the primary OS is still Windows.

Re:What KIND of Linux? (4, Informative)

Gudeldar (705128) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361628)

I realize I'm posing on Slashdot but I thought we at least read TFS here.

In an interview with DesktopLinux.com, Orr made clear that the 32% Linux netbook market share did not include either user-installed Linux or dual-boot systems, but was confined to just pre-installed Linux shipments

Just to clarify in case that isn't clear it DOES NOT include pre/fast boot installs (which would be dual boot systems).

98% of Statistics are lies (2, Insightful)

slater86 (1154729) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361516)

One would assume that 32% of Dell's sales does not equal 32% of the Market or is that an inconvenient truth for the story

With Google Chrome, that goes up (1)

TheModelEskimo (968202) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361532)

Chrome is going to run on top of Linux...makes me wonder what Malware looks like in the cloud *snicker*

I tribble boot, but prefer Ubuntu currently. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30361534)

I bought my mini-9 to hackintosh, and actually have it triple booting now Win7, OSX10.6.2, Ubuntu9.10, and find myself spending 90% of the time in Ubuntu -- that being said I'm starting to use Win7 more, only because it's the only OS that plays Hulu and Youtube cleanly without massive undertaking. It can be made to work under Unbuntu9.10, but it will take about 2-5 hours of work from what I can see -- the problem is because both Adobe and Intel leave linux on the back burner and worry about every else first when it comes to bug fixing, and there are problems with both the Intel GMA 950 drivers, and naturally Flash is a buggy mess, but The win7 solution is almost finished, whereas they are barely started on the OS X and Linux bugfixes.

So, Linux has an 8% overall share? (1)

cyberjessy (444290) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361632)

The numbers don't add up.

About 35 million netbooks [xbitlabs.com] are on track to be shipped in 2009.

That's about 20% of all shipments.

If linux is a third of netbook volume, overall linux market share (through netbook sales alone) is about 6%.
Add 2% for Linux on regular desktops and notebooks.

Linux share @ 8% of all new PCs shipped calls for celebration. But I doubt it.

So, there is no magical wish granting pony? (1)

SlappyBastard (961143) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361700)

Because I think the big flaw with the methodology behind the 30+% figure for Linux netbooks is that it ignores the fact that Microsoft Wish Granting Pony .NET 2008 is an inustry gold standard application for measuring market penetration.

Yeah sure, they're running Linux (0, Redundant)

lseltzer (311306) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361732)

I'm sure all of them end up with a pirated copy of XP before too long.

The problem here for 90% of linux netbook users (1)

wintermute000 (928348) | more than 4 years ago | (#30361740)

is that full screen flash + GMA950 + intel linux driver + crappy adobe linux flash = FAIL

aside from that, Ubuntu Netbook Remix is mighty impressive,

93% Netbook Share for WinXP (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30361772)

Um, that would be 9.3% . . .

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