Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Israeli Knesset Approves Biometric Database Law

timothy posted more than 4 years ago | from the and-who-will-you-be-visiting? dept.

Government 303

Lord Duran writes "The Israeli Knesset approved a bill that will require every Israeli citizen to submit a visual scan of their face and a biometric scan of their fingerprints to a national database. I, for one, fail to see how this is anything but evil. TFA mentions the Israeli census was breached — I'd like to point out, for comparison, that it's still freely available on your peer-to-peer file sharing network of choice."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Mark of the beast (3, Funny)

timeOday (582209) | more than 4 years ago | (#30365656)

...except without the mark!

Oh, wait, that's New Testament anyways, isn't it? Nevermind...

Re:Mark of the beast (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30366098)

Mod me down if you think CmdrTaco and kdawson are fags with micropeens.

Makes sense. (0, Flamebait)

Kill all Muslims (845937) | more than 4 years ago | (#30365658)

Jews did WTC, so hopefully this system will prevent future terrorist attacks.

It's Israel (0, Flamebait)

Philip K Dickhead (906971) | more than 4 years ago | (#30365660)

Everything they do is evil.

Re:It's Israel (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30365676)

You have a really good username. Especially the dickhead part.

Re:It's Israel (4, Insightful)

BadAnalogyGuy (945258) | more than 4 years ago | (#30365776)

While their actions and policies towards the Palestinians are pretty heinous, you can't just paint the whole society as evil. They have developed a verymodern society in the midst of their enemies and excel at many fields of science and literature.

You can blame the Jews for persecuting the Palestinians, but you can't say that everything they do is evil.

Re:It's Israel (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30365950)

This is modded Troll? Wow.

Re:It's Israel (0, Offtopic)

ground.zero.612 (1563557) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366064)

So... offering the people a place to stay was heinous? You do know that those people left on their own free will, they were not forced out, and in fact they were invited back several times, don't you?

I guess you consider it heinous to defend your sovereignty? You now there is no sovereign nation called Palestine? There is however a large group of nomads that chose to be led by a well known terrorist organization .

I blame Hamas for persecuting the Jews.

Re:It's Israel (3, Informative)

MrNaz (730548) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366784)

So... offering the people a place to stay was heinous?

They were not offered a place to stay, Palenstinian land and buildings are usurped using the progressive tactic of:

1. Build border settlements
2. Whine about rocket attacks
3. Move border out of range of rockets

Wash, rinse, repeat. This is why the illegal settlements are such a sore point in the issue; they are the mechanism by which Israel is stealing the entire area that was the Palestinian state. Just look at a map from 1948 and a map from today. If you have time, check the map every decade between, you'll see Israel increasing steadily in area.

I guess you consider it heinous to defend your sovereignty?

That's just it; the Palenstinians contend that Israel is not only violating their sovereignty, but displacing it physically by pushing their country into a smaller and smaller area. Gaza and the West Bank are becoming more and more overpopulated as the Palestinian lands shrink, effectively making them concentration camps.

There is however a large group of nomads that chose to be led by a well known terrorist organization .

Say what you want about Hamas. They were elected fairly, in elections overseen by Jimmy Carter. Whatever you, the UN or your government may think of them, they are the democratically elected party, and they were elected mainly because the previous group who did not support direct violence fell out of favour because Israel refused to negotiate with them. This fuelled support for Hamas. Now that Hamas are in Israel strangely wants to talk to Fatah again.

Smells like Israel just wants a belligerent neighbor so they can keep pointing at them and playing victim all the while dredging military aid from the US by the billions.

Re:It's Israel (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30366916)

Hi! I'm going to move into your house, and offer you a place to stay. Sound good to you?

Re:It's Israel (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30366102)

You can blame the Jews for persecuting the Palestinians

Is that like being an apologist for terrorists, and then blaming the victims when they try to defend themselves? Wait, that's not a bad analogy, it's just what you're doing. You can't blame the Jews for persecuting the Palestinians, because they haven't been. They actually get better treatment is Israel than in any other country in the Middle East. If the Palestinians don't like the defensive measures Israel takes, then they should stop attacking Israel.

Here's an analogy for you- What do you think would happen if the Mexican government started sending rockets and mortars into El Paso because they wanted to take Texas back? What would happen if snipers from Mexico started shooting farmers in Arizona? If they blew up crowds of shoppers in San Diego? And the Mexican government refused to stop? I think the US would start carpet bombing in about 2 seconds. Does that analogy work for you?

Re:It's Israel (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30366692)

What do you think would happen if the Mexican government started sending rockets and mortars into El Paso because they wanted to take Texas back?

What do you think would happen if America drove a bunch of bulldozers through Mexico and paid Americans to build houses and live there?

Re:It's Israel (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30366814)

Well, if Mexico had tried to invade the U.S., and lost badly, and had a bunch of their land taken away for starting a war against the U.S., I would say too bad for Mexico.

Good quote (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30365666)

FTA: "...that the system would be kept as confidential as any banking website"

Why does that not make me feel better about this?

How do you change your password? (4, Insightful)

harl (84412) | more than 4 years ago | (#30365674)

Same problem with all biometrics.

What happens when the system is compromised? How do I change my password?

Re:How do you change your password? (5, Funny)

daid303 (843777) | more than 4 years ago | (#30365734)

How do I change my password?

Knifes and fire work.

Re:How do you change your password? (1)

Rik Sweeney (471717) | more than 4 years ago | (#30365746)

Like this [slashdot.org]

Re:How do you change your password? (1)

harl (84412) | more than 4 years ago | (#30365872)

That method has a finite number of possible passwords. Prolongs the time until failure state but does not prevent failure state.

Re:How do you change your password? (5, Insightful)

NoYob (1630681) | more than 4 years ago | (#30365852)

Same problem with all biometrics.

What happens when the system is compromised? How do I change my password?

Or worse, what if Osama Bin Laden (or any other terorist) get's to insert his bio information into an Israeli citizen's profile? Now, Bin Laden has a valid Bio-Informatic ID in Israel. If he shaved off his beard, I couldn't tell him apart. It's been years since I've seen a photo of him. He'd get away with being Bernie Horowitz.

Re:How do you change your password? (4, Funny)

VShael (62735) | more than 4 years ago | (#30365882)

Bizarrely, I think he'd rather die than pass himself off as a Jew. Or shave his beard.

Re:How do you change your password? (1)

Yamata no Orochi (1626135) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366068)

The troll mods in this thread are getting out of hand. How do this many people not know what a troll is?

Re:How do you change your password? (1)

Idiomatick (976696) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366192)

I've seen this Vshael guy, he really is 7' tall green and adorned with tusks.

Re:How do you change your password? (1)

VShael (62735) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366550)

"I've seen this Vshael guy, he really is 7' tall green and adorned with tusks."

My evil twin.

I'm blue and cuddly, like Skull Theodore Troll.

Re:How do you change your password? (1)

VShael (62735) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366470)

I have no idea. But I suspected a personal vendetta at one point.

I'm more interested in why meta-moderation doesn't appear to be addressing the problem. Oh well.

Re:How do you change your password? (1)

Nathrael (1251426) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366894)

Because meta-moderation has shifted away from moderating moderation, instead being about promoting or demoting unmoderated posts.

Parent rather insightful (3, Informative)

NoYob (1630681) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366798)

Consider this - for those of you modded parent "Troll" or "Funny":

Bin Laden, is what Donald Trump calls "a member of the lucky sperm club" (Trump himself is a member) - someone who was born into a very rich family. Now, I don't know about you folks, but if I were born into a rich family I'd get into the family business, become a full-time Linux hacker, do charity work - like help Palesinians maybe?, or even try being a jet set playboy. NOT killing civilians to get the Satan out of the Holy Land.

Bin Laden is so full of hate that he can't think clearly - he's basically insane with rage. He could have channeled that into a productive rage - use his resources to show American and Israeli injustices towards the Palestinians and Arab injustices towards the Palestinians. He could have been the World's greatest peaceful champion of Islam and shown the World what Islam is about.

But he didn't.

He turned to violence and hate.

The US turned him into that one might say. I'd like to point out that he's a grown man and can think for himself. Blaming the US is complete horseshit.

Re:How do you change your password? (1)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 4 years ago | (#30365890)

What happens when the system is compromised? How do I change my password?

You don't. You get that face changing surgery and spend the rest of your life looking like John Travolta or Nicolas Cage.

Re:How do you change your password? (1)

mea37 (1201159) | more than 4 years ago | (#30365946)

Depends how the information is to be used. I don't have, and never had, any input into the information on my passport, so how do I "change my password" when it comes to my passport?

Someone could misuse the ubiquity of this information by trying to make it a "password"; and if so, that's a technical flaw in their security. As for the ID database program in general, the obvious flaws are based in privacy, not technology.

Re:How do you change your password? (1)

harl (84412) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366606)

I don't understand the problem. What info are you looking to put on your passport? You want to change your birthday? Your location of birth? You get to select the picture. You can change your name. There's no other information on there.

Regardless passports can be rendered invalid and reissued. How do you do that with bone structure?

Re:How do you change your password? (1)

timeOday (582209) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366352)

How do I change my password?

Identification isn't the same thing as a password; not being able to make up new identities willy-nilly is the whole point.

Re:How do you change your password? (1)

harl (84412) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366460)

You use different words but the problem is still the same. I'll speak in generic terms.

What happens when the system is compromised and someone else can identify as me? How do I again secure my identity? What do I change? How do I change it?

Re:How do you change your password? (1)

dkf (304284) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366572)

You use different words but the problem is still the same. I'll speak in generic terms.

What happens when the system is compromised and someone else can identify as me? How do I again secure my identity? What do I change? How do I change it?

What happens if someone breaks into the database and swaps around the biometric parts of the records for politicians and known terrorists?

Re:How do you change your password? (1)

harl (84412) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366742)

The visual scan won't match.

Re:How do you change your password? (2, Interesting)

sakdoctor (1087155) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366812)

...looked from politician to terrorist, and from terrorist to politician, and from politician to terrorist again; but already it was impossible to say which was which.

Why so serious ? (1)

CharlyFoxtrot (1607527) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366498)

What happens when the system is compromised? How do I change my password?

Well, you look nervous. Is it the scars? You want to know how I got 'em?

Every ID card? (3, Insightful)

TheMeuge (645043) | more than 4 years ago | (#30365680)

What is a "biometric visual scan of their face"? A photograph?

Every country does that. It's called an ID card. As far as fingerprints, I've had to submit my fingerprints like 10 times for various services, clearances, not to mention immigration documents.

This isn't really news. Even if it's a 3D laser-scan, that's really not different from a photograph nowadays.

As much as it bothers me to have centralized databases of ANYTHING, if there is anything that needs a centralized database, it's identification. I'm a privacy freak and I am not sure that this bothers me, especially in the context of a country that can claim the dubious honor of being the most likely terrorist target in the industrialized world.

Re:Every ID card? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30365766)

I'm a privacy freak

I've had to submit my fingerprints like 10 times for various services

You are not a privacy freak, not until you change your behaviour.

Re:Every ID card? (1)

TheMeuge (645043) | more than 4 years ago | (#30365902)

I also like eating, sleeping in a warm bed, driving a decent car, and being able to afford to take a vacation once in a while.

Re:Every ID card? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30365982)

Exactly. You value money above a philosophy. You are not a privacy freak.

Re:Every ID card? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30365986)

But all that makes you normal, with a merely healthy attitude toward privacy. To be a privacy "freak" you'd need to want to pass on all that in the name of privacy.

Re:Every ID card? (4, Funny)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 4 years ago | (#30365848)

What is a "biometric visual scan of their face"?

I heard the "Hot Or Not" website folks are consulting.

Re:Every ID card? (1)

Presto Vivace (882157) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366004)

Well, the process would condition the population to accept any invasive procedure. Maybe that is the plan. This is what decades of living in fear will do to a population. The more the citizens are afraid, the more power they give to the government. Why would a government make peace under such circumstances?

Re:Every ID card? (1)

mea37 (1201159) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366228)

Not sure what the face scan is; I'd guess it's somehow meant to be more computer-readable than a typical photo, but who knows.

I don't think capturing the data and putting it on the card is so much the problem, as keeping it in a central database.

Also, having a mandatory national ID is a bit much.

You've asserted that identify is one thing that needs a central database. Maybe that's true or maybe it's not, but if you accept it as a premise then you are not a "privacy freak".

Re:Every ID card? (1)

BobMcD (601576) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366458)

As much as it bothers me to have centralized databases of ANYTHING, if there is anything that needs a centralized database, it's identification. I'm a privacy freak and I am not sure that this bothers me, especially in the context of a country that can claim the dubious honor of being the most likely terrorist target in the industrialized world.

Why?

Under what circumstances would a "SELECT * from PEOPLE where EYES = 'blue'" actually lower terrorism target vectors?

"Show me your papers" has worked just fine for every repressive regime to date. I fail to see any need to centralize this information, particularly when you can attach arbitrary penalties to lack of said ID. So it isn't as if ID will magically become unnecessary. You'll still have to have it, and it will still get used. And this data will ALSO get used. Now we get to ask, in what way?

Re:Every ID card? (2, Insightful)

dkf (304284) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366588)

What is a "biometric visual scan of their face"? A photograph?

Every country does that.

No, they don't. Yet.

Re:Every ID card? (3, Insightful)

ovanklot (715633) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366592)

What is a "biometric visual scan of their face"? A photograph?

It is the mathematical function that identifies your facial features as your own to a very high degree of probability.

Every country does that. It's called an ID card. As far as fingerprints, I've had to submit my fingerprints like 10 times for various services, clearances, not to mention immigration documents.

Your fingerprints are not in one big database that can be hacked (as others have been hacked before) along with the rest of your entire country. If you've given your fingerprints 10 times, I hope you're sure you gave them to people who can keep them a secret. You can't really change them later.

As much as it bothers me to have centralized databases of ANYTHING, if there is anything that needs a centralized database, it's identification. I'm a privacy freak and I am not sure that this bothers me, especially in the context of a country that can claim the dubious honor of being the most likely terrorist target in the industrialized world.

Think of someone using this database, along with live CCTV footage from a railway station (say, a public online webcam), singling out the Israelis in the crowd. When they see a large group of Israelis coming by, a suicide bomber comes along and explodes next to them. You don't have to be a privacy freak to shudder at that thought.

Re:Every ID card? (1)

harl (84412) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366796)

What is a "biometric visual scan of their face"? A photograph?

Something that doesn't exist in the article. A quote you are making up.

The two items being stored are a visual scan and fingerprints.

What could possibly go wrong? (5, Interesting)

Richard W.M. Jones (591125) | more than 4 years ago | (#30365682)

All citizens of a country which isn't exactly liked by its neighbours are placed on a single database. Database leaks. Any future authority which doesn't like Israelis for any reason can now reliably identify them at crossing points, when travelling, after an invasion, etc.

The Uzi aimed at you identifies them too. (1)

crovira (10242) | more than 4 years ago | (#30365892)

The only reason for not being identifiable is because you're dead. Lets make identifying the remains easier.

The rest is conjecture and lies people tell each other.

Personally, I'd like to have offensive weapons keyed into the biometrics of the person they're meant for so they wouldn't kill me. A smart gun that would only shoot the person its supposed to.

Re:What could possibly go wrong? (2, Informative)

poetmatt (793785) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366058)

In case you're wondering, this isn't a whole lot different than a driver's license database. There are *some*, but the wording is slashdot hype here.

Slashdot "Hype" (1)

pavon (30274) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366710)

You are right, it is only a step beyond a driver's license database - which is a bad idea to begin with. When the US introduced a national driver's license database with the REAL ID Act, the reaction here was just as negative, so don't pretend that we are being hypocritical.

Speaking of which, starting January first I have to get a passport to travel within the US (by plane), because my state has not yet met the requirements of the REAL ID Act (and good for them even if it was for the wrong reasons). If the federal government is going to act like fascists I'd prefer they do it out in the open.

Re:What could possibly go wrong? (1)

SharpFang (651121) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366162)

Just imagine if IIWW started now.
The database would be the first thing Nazis would get.

We can do it! (4, Funny)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 4 years ago | (#30365722)

We can construct a topic that will generate the lowest signal to noise ratio EVER! Proceed, gentlemen, proceed!

Re:We can do it! (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366062)

Nowhere in the summary does it mention either Bush or Obama, so probably not.

Re:We can do it! (1)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366170)

Can I please get a car analogy?

Re:We can do it! (1)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366298)

Now, now! We want controversy, not a singularity.

Re:We can do it! (1)

ground.zero.612 (1563557) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366254)

We can construct a topic that will generate the lowest signal to noise ratio EVER! Proceed, gentlemen, proceed!

I think someone already beat us to market: xkcd.com [xkcd.com]

Old news (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30365728)

Biometric passports are established throughout Europe since years back. Biometric passports are absurd if there is no central database where your biometric facial information is stored.

Although the fingerprints is a new one.

Re:Old news (3, Informative)

VShael (62735) | more than 4 years ago | (#30365920)

"Biometric passports are established throughout Europe since years back."

As an Irish citizen currently living in Belgium, I have to say I don't think this is true. I don't know a single person in either country with a biometric passport.

Re:Old news (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30366482)

The European "biometric" is just your passport photo computerised.

Re:Old news (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30366774)

You can infer the usage of biometrics from the unavailability of longer term passports such as a ten year one.

Re:Old news (2, Informative)

ovanklot (715633) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366486)

You don't need a central database to have biometric passports/id cards. All you need is to store their hashes on the card and that would be compared to the person in question.
This is the only thing required of a biometric card.

Ironic (0, Flamebait)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | more than 4 years ago | (#30365808)

I wonder if the next step will be to require Palestinians to were a yellow star-and-moon on their clothes.

Re:Ironic (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30365856)

Don't be silly. It will be green.

Re:Ironic (0, Troll)

alinuxguruofyore (1117973) | more than 4 years ago | (#30365862)

How does this not get a Troll rating?

Re:Ironic (1)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366722)

FWIW, I don't think your post deserved the "Troll" rating. Your question was fair.

Ironic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30365904)

Damn who told you? You must have terrorist associations and will be collected in time for the train departing the station.

Evil? (1, Informative)

EMG at MU (1194965) | more than 4 years ago | (#30365888)

In the USA the local police department usually sponsors a fingerprint drive where elementary age kids get a coloring book or something for surrendering their fingerprints. Those records are kept in a central location. Moreover, to get any job with a state or federal employer, you must submit to digital fingerprinting. To get a drivers license you get your picture taken. All those biometrics are stored in a central location. Israel is just being smart about it and storing everything in a digital format. Less secure, maybe, but way easier to search through than a pile of papers in some filing cabinet.

So its really not that bad, unless you really want to live off the grid or something.

Re:Evil? (3, Informative)

sconeu (64226) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366088)

What central location?

We did that for our kids.

The central location? The file cabinet in my home office. They only made one fingerprint card per kid, which they gave to us.
Remember, this was in the early '90s, at the tail end of the child abduction hysteria (yeah, it's still around but not as strong).

We were told to keep the card, and put a small clip of the kids' hair into a mini-ziploc, and store it with the card.

Re:Evil? (1)

selven (1556643) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366220)

Just because something is already done doesn't make it acceptable. Political corruption is the norm, but you don't see people not affected by it supporting it.

Re:Evil? (1)

cdrguru (88047) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366562)

No, for the most part you see people affected by political corruption supporting it. Every time you submit to any bureaucratic nonsense in a US State, like getting a driver's license, you are contributing to political corruption.

Ohio is one of my favorite examples. You need to pay (bribe) state legislators to be designated as a representative of the state so that you can pass out license plates and such. The job comes with some title like Deputy Bursar or some such - but it is by political appointment and very, very lucrative.

You don't have any choice in the matter, really. You want license plates for your car, because if you don't get them you will be endlessly harrassed by the police. So you go and get them and the money you pay funds the bribe to keep that office in business for the next year.

For the most part, everyone is contributing to political corruption. It is a requirement that they do so. It is part of the corrupt system itself.

A Great Idea (0, Flamebait)

iviagnus (854023) | more than 4 years ago | (#30365914)

Every human being on the planet should be fingerprinted, retinal scanned and DNA sampled. If they've nothing to hide why should they object? Only scumbags with something to hide would want to remain in the shadows. Also, only those who have served their country in the military should have citizenship status and get the priviledges that offers (business and home ownership, drivers license, social security at retirement, etc). And automobiles should be required to have an alcohol detector so that they cannot be started if the driver has been drinking.

Re:A Great Idea (1)

JustNiz (692889) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366070)

Why did you stop there? lets have the government tell us when we can meet our friends, what we must eat, what music we must listen to. Lets also burn any books with dangerous ideas in. Lets remove the word 'freedom' from the language and make it illegal to say it, that way people wont get dangerous ideas.

Re:A Great Idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30366104)

Every human being on the planet should be fingerprinted, retinal scanned and DNA sampled. If they've nothing to hide why should they object? Only scumbags with something to hide would want to remain in the shadows. Also, only those who have served their country in the military should have citizenship status and get the priviledges that offers (business and home ownership, drivers license, social security at retirement, etc). And automobiles should be required to have an alcohol detector so that they cannot be started if the driver has been drinking.

I really hope you're joking, and if you aren't then you are a complete moron.

When I was born (3, Interesting)

JerryLove (1158461) | more than 4 years ago | (#30365932)

When I was born, my foot prints were put on the birth certificate, which is on file, for identification (my social security card validates against it). When I got my state ID, that had my picture. When I got my SBU clearance, my fingerprints and photo went on record.

It seems to me that the line in question is fictitious. The only question is the efficiency of the ID method, and the security of the database.

Re:When I was born (1)

BobMcD (601576) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366514)

...and the need to centralize it.

Having to go to the agency in question and file a request adds a barrier to the data that hopefully means it is only accessed when it is actually required. Having it all 'at your fingertips' means lots of unnecessary and/or unwanted access, at least potentially.

State drivers license pics (1)

scrout (814004) | more than 4 years ago | (#30365994)

You do know most states do this with your drivers license pic, right? oregon does.

Why? (1)

findoutmoretoday (1475299) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366132)

I am curious why they approved it, felt the need, etc. .  And most probably I won't like the answer. 

The only thing evil (1)

thelonious (233200) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366160)

...about biometric data is when people convince themselves that they now have a tamper proof system.

Self UN-Fulfilling (MotB) prophecy! (0, Flamebait)

starglider29a (719559) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366204)

In 1994, a card-carrying skeptic told me that any "Mark of the Beast" (MotB) technology would NEVER come to pass because of the outcry that it was MotB Technology. His logic was that since everyone could see the prophecy of this type of people-control technology, including a unique database identity key and other well-known (now) DBA actions, that people would RESIST the fulfillment of the prophecy. Thus, the prophecy would be annulled by the fact that it was foreknown by a casual reader.

Ok, so... Where is it? Where is the outcry? With the potential for abuse reaching BIBLICAL proportions, who is resisting? The Wacko Christian Right (Of which you would consider me). It seems that the prophecy which this parallels would (if fulfilled) impact the Israelis the most. So, why are they doing it? Peace and Security? Oh, that's in the prophecy as well.

Look, I'm not saying this is Revelation 13:18 per se. It could be, it could NOT be. Who can know? IF IT IS... where is the outcry? All of us database/hAx0r/geek types can see this is a "bad" idea in and of its own merits. But if you tack on the potential to fulfill the best known end-times/Antichrist prophecy, shouldn't the world be shuddering in its collective shoes?

Are we?

Re:Self UN-Fulfilling (MotB) prophecy! (1)

gtall (79522) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366528)

Uh, you may have noticed that the country is Israel and, well, y'know, most of the Israelis are Jews and Muslims, very few whacko Christians except among the tourists.

Re:Self UN-Fulfilling (MotB) prophecy! (1)

VShael (62735) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366686)

One possible answer to your question, is that there is no shortage of people who genuinely want to live in the "end times". There are several reasons why this is so, but I tend to think it's because their faith is particularly weak, and a big visible Revelations style conflict would go a long way to strengthening their faith.

Now, I'm not saying that you're one of these nuts. But if you move in "Wacko Christian Right" circles (your phrase, not mine) then it's possible you've met some people who think like this.

A representative sampling can be found in the collected posts of fundamentalists, which can be found at www.fstdt.com
  (e.g. Quote# 67376)

Re:Self UN-Fulfilling (MotB) prophecy! (1)

starglider29a (719559) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366828)

But if you move in "Wacko Christian Right" circles (your phrase, not mine)

I moved out of those circles, but I still visit once in a while. The food is tasty!

I'm sure you are correct for a portion of the populace of faith who "want to live in the end times".

But I think an overwhelming preponderance is that they/we perceive that many of the element necessary to fulfill an "end times" are in place. Conversely, the elements in place are not sustainable, and anything which is not sustainable eventually ends. Who was the Great Prophet who said "Everything that has a beginning has an end." Oh, wait, that was one of the Matrix movies. sorry :">

This biometric database, be it MotB or not, is similar to what end timers expect. And they may be right. Time will tell, only too late.

You really must forgive Israel... (1)

TrebleJunkie (208060) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366224)

... for you see, Revelations isn't a chapter in the Torah.

Different country, different tradeoffs (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30366238)

Every country strikes its between the privacy of its citizens and the security of its citizens. In Israel, due to its circumstances, the balance is more heavily tilted toward security over privacy. In every country of which I am aware, military service involves sacrificing some level of freedom and privacy. In Israel, almost every non-Arab citizen of the country serves in the army, and of course that service requires photographs, fingerprints, DNA sampling, etc. already. So this is not much different than status quo in Israel, and I would not call it "evil."

Godwin in 3... 2... 1... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30366258)

So much for "never again".

Godwin's Law? (4, Insightful)

Comatose51 (687974) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366266)

There's a bit of irony here because a little man in Germany fifty years ago did something very similar in categorizing and identifying Jews. It was not benign.

Re:Godwin's Law? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30366536)

I don't remember that. What happened in Germany in 1959?

(West) Germany, 50 years ago (1)

BancBoy (578080) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366804)

I don't remember that. What happened in Germany in 1959?

Tom Dooley, by the Kingston Trio, was the number one hit in Germany for 12 weeks! I thought everyone knew this. It was in all the papers at the time...

Re:Godwin's Law? (2, Insightful)

MiniMike (234881) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366702)

a little man in Germany fifty years ago did something very similar

You're posting from 1987? And not claiming first post?

Since you have 22 years to think about it, please elaborate on how signing people up for drivers licenses and passports is similar to burning and looting their property, murdering them in the streets, and then rounding up the rest and sending them to concentration camps? I don't think that's what the Israeli government plans. If you don't like biometric databases that's fine, but at least add something intelligent to the discussion.

The Israeli census (1)

Fuzzzy (967665) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366316)

The Israeli census is freely available everywhere [filespump.com] ... It's a shame that the same people who are in charged for the census fiasco, are those are will be in charged for securing the biometric database.

Why "evil"? (1)

mi (197448) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366322)

I, for one, fail to see how this is anything but evil.

We may argue, whether this will work or not, but why is it "evil"? Is it the fear, the impersonators will now be ripping faces off people to pretend to be them?

We Will Fight This! (1)

ovanklot (715633) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366442)

There's been a long struggle against this biometric database and we may have lost the battle, but we will win the war. There are still ways to bury this database and all will be pursued, whether they're appealing to the Israeli High Court of Justice (Bagatz), convincing the Ministry of Treasury to keep it outside the budget (It is estimated at over US$100,000,000 to implement), etc.

The law was introduced by MK Shirtrit who I personally suspect has ulterior motives for his overzealous support of the bill and the way he rallied both the coalition and opposition to the cause. The finger has already been pointed at lobbyists from Hewlett Packard. The government bowed to pressure and shady deals were made - we knew it was going to be passed even before they started deliberating.

There's only one finger that I'll be showing MK Shitrit and his biometric database.

Picture being taken for a drivers license (1)

Stan92057 (737634) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366574)

Scan of face = Picture being taken for a drivers license,doesn't every state in the USA require a picture in the drivers license? Finger printing? don't we all get foot printed when were born. Why is this a shock to anyone?

Let's Make Our Own Database (1)

IronSilk (947869) | more than 4 years ago | (#30366596)

I propose we create the Human Citizenship Database, an open-source identification system that lets anyone identify themselves, and identifies every person as a person independently of their government.

People could register themselves and their property in countries where personhood and property are not always well-respected, for instance, Zimbabwe, Cameroon and the USA.

Problem with face (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30366748)

What if I have a problem with my face...

Benefits of this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30366890)

With all the paranoid words put up you would think that the whole audience is hooked on cocaine.
If anyone has ever walked through airport security by scanning a fingerprint while watching people wait hours on line to check passports they would see that there is at least some benefit for this.

Big deal ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30366928)

Almost every citizen in Israel has served in the army, where more than just face and fingerprints are scanned.
I'm sure this information is kept "confidential and safe".

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?