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Shuttleworth To Step Down As Canonical CEO In 2010

timothy posted more than 4 years ago | from the orderly-transition dept.

Debian 163

LinuxScribe writes "In a blog announcement today, Canonical Founder and CEO Mark Shuttleworth revealed he will be stepping down from his CEO role to be replaced by current COO Jane Silber. Both execs do not see major strategic changes on the horizon. Silber's official blog and Linux.com each have more details on how the change will be implemented."

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Thanks Mark (5, Insightful)

Abreu (173023) | more than 4 years ago | (#30478306)

Linux operating systems are better thanks to you and your contributions.

Re:Thanks Mark (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30478338)

By making a piece of shit OS that breaks every 6 months? By applying massive amounts of shit quality patches to upstream apps?

Re:Thanks Mark (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30478452)

And yet everything but Ubuntu sucks even worse. I mean, if you're looking for something that doesn't require manual configuration of everything. Gentoo and its ilk are the best thing around if you 1) know what you're doing, and 2) have time to read docs and fiddle with things. If you just want a fucking OS that gets out of the way and lets you do your work...well, my recent experience with OpenSUSE and Fedora has been that they're horrendously broken. Debian's package manager is incredibly annoying if you've used something nice like Portage or Paludis. Ubuntu typically works, does WiFi networking the way it fucking obviously should be done, and allows easy addition of third-party package repositories.

There are plenty of idiot devs and stupid decisions to go around in all major open source projects, but Ubuntu has managed to scrape together something that I can install on my laptop and quickly set up as a platform for Android development. Which, sadly, is a hell of a lot more than you can say about other distros.

Re:Thanks Mark (5, Insightful)

jim_v2000 (818799) | more than 4 years ago | (#30478796)

> I mean, if you're looking for something that doesn't require manual configuration of everything.

OpenSUSE? Mandriva? PCLinuxOS?

Re:Thanks Mark (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30479140)

> I mean, if you're looking for something that doesn't require manual configuration of everything.

OpenSUSE? Mandriva? PCLinuxOS?

Sucks, used to not suck, and really sucks

Re:Thanks Mark (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30480816)

Funny, that the above 3 distros use the same opensource stuff. The difference are minor details, which Ubunutu has chosen the path for easy end-user usage, but for a developer, I can check development suite at the OpenSuse install, where as on Ubunutu, I have to install it, then what, run apt-get to even get g++!
Don't even ask me about ubuntu's way of /etc/init.d and no /srv (which EVERY other distro has).

OpenSUSE? Mandriva? PCLinuxOS? Ubuntu 9.10?

Sucks, used to not suck, and really sucks and now sucks

Re:Thanks Mark (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30479282)

He just said Gentoo was "the best thing around," why are you asking his opinions on linux distros? Clearly this one is broken.

Re:Thanks Mark (2, Informative)

HarrySquatter (1698416) | more than 4 years ago | (#30479396)

He said it was the "best thing around" if

1) know what you're doing, and 2) have time to read docs and fiddle with things.

Nice quote mining attempt though.

Re:Thanks Mark (0, Flamebait)

daveime (1253762) | more than 4 years ago | (#30478812)

and allows easy addition of third-party package repositories containing virus-laden screensavers amongst other goodies. FTFY.

Wasn't the whole point of the "secure" package repositories that not just any old schmo could operate one. If so, how is Ubuntu anymore secure than Windows where you can download any old crap from any website ?

Re:Thanks Mark (4, Insightful)

ChrisMP1 (1130781) | more than 4 years ago | (#30478856)

No, the secure repos are to make sure the packages are coming from where you think they are from. Ubuntu is still an operating system - it operates. If the user tells it to do something, such as download from an alternate repository, it can and should.

Re:Thanks Mark (1)

daveime (1253762) | more than 4 years ago | (#30479532)

No, the secure repos are to make sure the packages are coming from where you think they are from

Funnily enough, a URL serves much the same purpose. Unless I'm not actually downloading HTML content from Slashdot, and this is all a Microsoft conspiracy to infect me with the latest virus.

Re:Thanks Mark (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30479688)

No, the secure repos are to make sure the packages are coming from where you think they are from

Funnily enough, a URL serves much the same purpose.

No. That's the purpose of an SSL certificate. URLs serve as a means to request information from a known source. They do nothing to verify where it's from.

Re:Thanks Mark (2, Informative)

petermgreen (876956) | more than 4 years ago | (#30480830)

No. That's the purpose of an SSL certificate. URLs serve as a means to request information from a known source. They do nothing to verify where it's from.
However in the case of repositries for a distribution SSL is a suboptimal soloution for two main reasons.

Firstly implementing SSL creates a LOT of extra work for the server. That means either more processing power on the servers or special SSL accelerators either of which means a substantial increase in cost for mirror operators.

Secondly most users (at least on debian which is where secure apt originated from, I don't use ubuntu but I expect things are the same on that side of the fence) get thier distribution package from third party mirrors. If the mirror you use becomes malicious (either through being hacked or through a malicious admin) then ssl doesn't really help you.

With secure apt compromising the mirror is not sufficient, they actually have to compromise the master keys used to sign the package lists.

Re:Thanks Mark (1)

selven (1556643) | more than 4 years ago | (#30482172)

And they're be there to be simple and convenient, and in this regard they blow conventional Windows-style installation out of the water.

Re:Thanks Mark (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30478850)

A lot of the problems would go away if they just ditched GNOME.

KDE 4.x has matured quite a bit by now. After being a staunch GNOME supporter for many years, I installed KDE 4.3.4 recently, and am very glad that I did! It's a much nicer environment than GNOME currently is.

The integration between the apps is really good. It's almost better than Windows and Mac OS X, and is a lot better than GNOME. The KDE apps all work seamlessly with one another.

It feels really responsive, too. I think this has to do with Qt. It's just a better toolkit than GTK+ is.

After using KDE for a couple of weeks, I don't think that I can go back to GNOME again. GNOME just has too many bugs, not enough integration between the apps, and just plain feels sloppy these days.

Re:Thanks Mark (0)

DeadRat4life (1638391) | more than 4 years ago | (#30478996)

i agree. gnome feels ancient compared to KDE.

Re:Thanks Mark (1)

clang_jangle (975789) | more than 4 years ago | (#30479040)

You must not be using it for anything but web browsing and email. I regularly test new versions of ubuntu, kubuntu, and xubuntu for some users I have to support. Kubuntu is still utter krap! I found it to be literally unusable on my test machine (Dell inspiron e1505 laptop).

Re:Thanks Mark (0)

BassMan449 (1356143) | more than 4 years ago | (#30479210)

I have no doubt that Kubuntu truly is crap, but that is only because Kubuntu is easily the worst KDE distribution in existence. Please try something like openSuse or even Fedora with KDE and your experience will be fare superior.

Re:Thanks Mark (1)

master5o1 (1068594) | more than 4 years ago | (#30479302)

I did exactly the same thing after hearing that the ugly gnome-shell will or might be default on Gnome 3.0. I initially installed KDE 4.3.x to get used to kde so that when gnome-shell was default I didn't have to then. Just the other day did I reinstall with Kubuntu to keep my system client -- no gnome for me anymore.

Re:Thanks Mark (4, Funny)

kuzb (724081) | more than 4 years ago | (#30480260)

A lot of the problems would go away people just ditched KDE GNOME has matured quite a bit by now. After being a staunch KDE supporter for many years, I installed GNOME recently, and am very glad that I did! It's a much nicer environment than KDE currently is. The integration between the apps is really good. It's almost better than Windows and Mac OS X, and is a lot better than KDE. The GNOME apps all work seamlessly with one another. It feels really responsive, too. I think this has to do with GTK+. It's just a better toolkit than Qt is. After using GNOME for a couple of weeks, I don't think that I can go back to KDE again. KDE just has too many bugs, not enough integration between the apps, and just plain feels sloppy these days. --- DID YOU SEE WHAT I DID THERE?

Re:Thanks Mark (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30480478)

The OP represented reality, and you made up some bullshit fantasy world where GNOME isn't the steaming pile of horse turds that it actually is. That's what you did. I see it now. You're a master of fiction!

Re:Thanks Mark (3, Insightful)

armanox (826486) | more than 4 years ago | (#30479838)

Guess you should thank Red Hat and Feodra for that WiFi manager, they wrote it afterall....

Re:Thanks Mark (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30480180)

True that.

Mod parent up!

Re:Thanks Mark (3, Interesting)

JSG (82708) | more than 4 years ago | (#30481132)

Nonsense. This is the state of IT. A machine needs configuring. Just works - pah, it does not happen because no application can "just work" for everyone.

I'm happy with my WiFi config - I just edit /etc/wpa_supplicant/wpa_supplicant.conf and add another stanza (I use Gentoo) but I'm also happy with the Network Manager way of doing things - [K]Ubuntu, *SuSE et al. You have the choice but it still needs configuring. On Windows, you have a fight between the OS management or the rather large vendor provided widget - hillarious.

Package management - I can't describe any package manager as brain dead. They all work pretty well. I like Portage but I also have to wedge on eix to make it usable. I have used rug 'n' zypper and various other RPM based things and they work. *buntu seems to also just work as well. So what is the problem? If you don't like a package manager then don't use it. I don't like MSI or indeed any Windows package manager and hence I don't use them, except under duress 8)

I like choice.

"1) know what you are doing" - if you don't then you should stick to crayons.
"2) have time to read docs..." - go on a course or read up on it - you can't use the Force with any application, regardless of OS or complexity. You need to learn about it somehow.

Re:Thanks Mark (3, Funny)

JackieBrown (987087) | more than 4 years ago | (#30481334)

Debian's package manager is incredibly annoying if you've used something nice like Portage or Paludis.

I don't believe Ubuntu has strayed to the point of having a different package manager

Re:Thanks Mark (1)

Penguinclaw (1541129) | more than 4 years ago | (#30482178)

Boring.... Nothing to do AT ALL with the post. You are just trying to incite arguments...

Re:Thanks Mark (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30478826)

typical Linux elitism. ooohhh good for you, you run a distro thats 4x harder to install and keep running, especially for noobz. Ubuntu is the best hope for Linux to make a dent in the home market. just cause youre super cool and run gentoo doesnt mean that Ubuntu is shit.

Re:Thanks Mark (3, Insightful)

clang_jangle (975789) | more than 4 years ago | (#30479224)

I wouldn't be so fast to cry "elitism". Those of us who already know our way around *nix and have tried Ubuntu (or openSuse, PCBSD, etc) have been struck by how crappy our fave OS is once it gets dumbed down with automatic everything. Perhaps it's unavoidable.
I'd rather see my non-geek associates using dumbed-down, buggy ubuntu than windows, but let's face it -- those of us who use and love Debian, FreeBSD, etc just can't help but feel disappointed by the fact that we can't share our experience of vastly superior performance via these distros aimed at non-geeks. And it's a shame that for a lot of users there is no compelling argument to switch from windows. From their perspective, "it ain't broke, why fix it?".

I know, I know... "-1, Uncomfortable Truth"

Re:Thanks Mark (2, Insightful)

HarrySquatter (1698416) | more than 4 years ago | (#30479450)

And it's a shame that for a lot of users there is no compelling argument to switch from windows. From their perspective, "it ain't broke, why fix it?".

Why is that a shame? Why can't they just use the OS they want rather than being told that they must use something else?

Re:Thanks Mark (1)

clang_jangle (975789) | more than 4 years ago | (#30479560)

Because it means I have to support windows, and it means that those of us who live far from Silicone Valley will probably always have day jobs forcing us to support windows. Of course OTOH, so long as windows is the de facto standard OS it also means there's a lot more work, so it does have it's plus and minus sides. :P

Re:Thanks Mark (1)

HarrySquatter (1698416) | more than 4 years ago | (#30479594)

So they should switch their OS to make your life easier? That's rather asinine.

Re:Thanks Mark (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30479666)

Duh. "The should witch their OS" to make their lives easier. Better productivity + better security + better performance = better life.

Re:Thanks Mark (1)

HarrySquatter (1698416) | more than 4 years ago | (#30480076)

Except he already said they were perfectly fine with the system as it was.

Re:Thanks Mark (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30480156)

No, they just think they are. That's what the GPP is saying, "From their perspective", i.e. the perspective of people who've never known security, performance, and productivity. You know, like poor people think McD's is ok food? They don't know better.

Re:Thanks Mark (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30481204)

If they were fine, they wouldn't need his support.

Re:Thanks Mark (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30481308)

Exactly. They're not "fine", they're lazy and arrogant. They learned all they ever plan to learn years ago and now if their sorry little bag of tricks doesn't work it's "the damn computer is acting up again", and "where's that damn IT dork when I need him?" We are the janitors of the white collar world, and making us deal with windows is just adding insult to injury. Yet most of us truly love working with computers, so like battered women we stick with it.

Re:Thanks Mark (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30480214)

Um, you've never actually had to support users in a corporate or academic environment, right?
I thought not.

Re:Thanks Mark (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30480338)

They use the same OS when they run Ubuntu, Fedora, Mandriva or any other distribution of Linux. Okay, not _exactly_ same, the OS might be 2.6.30 or 2.6.31 and other different release. But it is same Linux on all of them. Of course they can go and change the OS to Hurd if wanted. But who would want it?

Re:Thanks Mark (4, Informative)

cptnapalm (120276) | more than 4 years ago | (#30479660)

Ubuntu works really well for what it is designed to do: be an easy to setup and use Linux system.

I've got it on my desktop and laptop currently. On the laptop, I was going to go with FreeBSD, but it wouldn't install properly. I then tried to install Arch; it was a no go. Gentoo? Nope. Sabayon sounded interesting but unfortunately the installer crapped out. Ubuntu? After a simple, easy install, it works like a charm.

There are annoyances, like having no luck getting wireless networking going strictly from a command line which I had no problem with on my late, lamented UltraSparc laptop with OpenBSD.

But Ubuntu is the only one that would install without any problems.

Re:Thanks Mark (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30480052)

so again because you can compile all the shit you need to make Debian run like a champ means ubuntu sucks? not buying it. thats wonderful that you are that good with linux, but most people arent. Ubuntu works great for most people, i rarely hear anyone complaining about it except people like you who want credit for using debian and being smarter than all the morons using the only user friendly distro. call me a noob all you want, i like that i can pop a Linux Mint CD into a new piece of hardware and have it just work.

Re:Thanks Mark (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30480342)

Good for you. Obviously you don't need your machine to do any "heavy lifting", so you can use Ubuntu and not notice how broken it is. Those of us who use our computers for serious work have to use serious distros. It isn't about ego -- though yours has certainly shown it's remarkable frailty, so maybe for you it is -- but for us it's about functionality (and I don't mean pointy-clicky wifi access). :)

Re:Thanks Mark (1)

couchslug (175151) | more than 4 years ago | (#30482156)

"I'd rather see my non-geek associates using dumbed-down, buggy ubuntu than windows, but let's face it -- those of us who use and love Debian, FreeBSD, etc just can't help but feel disappointed by the fact that we can't share our experience of vastly superior performance via these distros aimed at non-geeks."

There is a point of diminishing returns.

Ubuntu works far better than Windows for what I want, is lighter, faster, and easier to install than Windows, and if it fails to serve me I'll install something different. The "dumb" bits are easily dealt with. making Ubuntu a convenient way to get Debianesque goodness without the hassle of a traditional Debian installation and configuration.

Re:Thanks Mark (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30479358)

I don't use Loonix you mongoloid piece of shit. The people who wank about their LFS or gentoo boxes are wastes of space. Ubuntu is still a piece of shit, regardless.

Re:Thanks Mark (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30479652)

sad but so incredibly true .. you (as i) even have to write as AC to avoid being stalked by retarded zealots and stallmanistas ... its very very sad the negative influence these fuckheads exert over what could otherwise have been a great revolution of desktop ecosystem

Re:Thanks Mark (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30479854)

exactly. its those fuckheads that drive people away from linux.

Re:Thanks Mark (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30480092)

Let me give an example of what the AC is talking about.

I have a type P vaio notebook - it's great (or at least the screen and keyboard are), but it's infected with the terrible Intel GMA500 ("Poulsbo") video chip.

Ubuntu never quite properly supported the video, but it got close, and with a few minor tweaks to an 8.1 release, anyone with a poulsbo-infected notebook could be up and running quite happily. Great so far - other than fedora, there's no other distro I'm aware of whose support for people with poulsbo-ridden notebooks comes close. I got about 3 or 4 months of reasonably good use out of my notebook thanks to ubuntu 8.1.

So the other day I was hearing my friends talk about some nice changes in Ubuntu 9, and I thought "ok, why not" and hit the big shiny upgrade button. Surely if Canonical went to all the effort (and it was considerable) to get any kind of poulsbo support in the first place, they'd at least get it going for their current release at some point, if not immediately? (There's always slow-but-sure VESA video in the meantime...)

Big mistake. Needless to say, Ubuntu decided to drop support for the poulsbo chip with 9. Any announcement in the v9 release notes? Nope. Any warning by the upgrade utility that 'hey, this package doesn't exist any more, are you sure you want to proceed?' No. And last but not least: any way to downgrade? Nope.

Were it only the video broken I'd probably just hobble along with the VESA driver, but the wireless ethernet also stopped working for no apparent reason.

While this Vaio P marks my first and last foray into the ubuntu world, I really see where AC is coming from, at least as far as 'piece of shit OS that breaks every 6 months' goes.

Re:Thanks Mark (1)

Delkster (820935) | more than 4 years ago | (#30480196)

Apparently Ubuntu's focus towards ease of use has been good enough to add competition and drive other distributions to change their thinking and design towards something friendlier to a non-technical user (and, I dare claim, without sacrificing friendliness towards technical users). That way Ubuntu has, at least indirectly, made Linux desktop/laptop systems better.

Not using an Ubuntu logo? (1, Insightful)

WinterSolstice (223271) | more than 4 years ago | (#30478352)

Why a Debian logo instead of the Ubuntu logo?

Re:Not using an Ubuntu logo? (3, Informative)

MonsterTrimble (1205334) | more than 4 years ago | (#30478578)

Because slashdot hasn't done a logo for them yet. It's only been 5 years after all...

Re:Not using an Ubuntu logo? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30478698)

Why a Debian logo instead of the Ubuntu logo?

Only niggers are legally able to use the Ubuntu logo.

Re:Not using an Ubuntu logo? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30478884)

Because it's Debian's retarded love-child conceived after a drunken bender and unprotected sex with a mongoloid [wikipedia.org] ?

Re:Not using an Ubuntu logo? (2, Insightful)

mister_playboy (1474163) | more than 4 years ago | (#30479900)

it's a lame attempt at being retro-cool, just like the retention of the Gates Borg icon for Microsoft.

They can screw with the slow-as-molasses Web 2.0 Javascript on a weekly basis, but downloading a icon from Wikipedia to use for Ubuntu would be too much work.

tag: giveubuntuanicon

Re:Not using an Ubuntu logo? (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 4 years ago | (#30480798)

Why a Debian logo instead of the Ubuntu logo?

Did you buy that uid because I'd normally say "you must be new here"...

Re:Not using an Ubuntu logo? (1)

gringer (252588) | more than 4 years ago | (#30480892)

Did you buy that uid because I'd normally say "you must be new here"...

Anyone with a 6-figure UID is "new" on /.

Re:Not using an Ubuntu logo? (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 4 years ago | (#30481774)

Anyone with a 6-figure UID is "new" on /.

But Ubuntu is "newer" so my point was he's been here ever since it became possible to raise that question.

Re:Not using an Ubuntu logo? (1)

WinterSolstice (223271) | more than 4 years ago | (#30481924)

LOL - I had just foolishly *assumed* that by now Slashdot would get their stuff together.

And sadly no, I'm not that new. I started in 2000 or so, finally registered when it became too hard to track my posts :) I'm just naive enough to think they will eventually figure it out :D

What are they up to now, 7 digits?

So uhm... (0)

V!NCENT (1105021) | more than 4 years ago | (#30478430)

Self Appointed Distator For Life? SADU2010?

Re:So uhm... (1)

rattaroaz (1491445) | more than 4 years ago | (#30478660)

I think this is a joke, but just in case, he is stepping down as CEO of Cannonical, not as SABDL of Ubuntu. So far, it looks like he will remain self appointed benevolent dictator for life, as he has made no announcements to the contrary that I saw.

Re:So uhm... (1)

V!NCENT (1105021) | more than 4 years ago | (#30479862)

It was a joke ;)

Thanks for the information though.

Huh, didn't know... (3, Funny)

RobertB-DC (622190) | more than 4 years ago | (#30478450)

And all this time I thought that the "canonical" executive for any open-source project was "Ty Coon, President of Vice".

Re:Huh, didn't know... (1)

julesh (229690) | more than 4 years ago | (#30479352)

And all this time I thought that the "canonical" executive for any open-source project was "Ty Coon, President of Vice".

So is Shuttleworth now a non-canonical CEO?

Re:Huh, didn't know... (1)

yahwotqa (817672) | more than 4 years ago | (#30480430)

Offtopic? Mods should really read GPL - I for one thought this post was funny.

Re:Huh, didn't know... (1)

buttle2000 (1041826) | more than 4 years ago | (#30481078)

so do I

Not leaving the project (5, Informative)

Meshach (578918) | more than 4 years ago | (#30478504)

From the article he is not leaving the project (as the Summary sort of implies). He is switching his focus to product design, partnerships and customers.

Re:Not leaving the project (1)

Locutus (9039) | more than 4 years ago | (#30479104)

thanks for summarizing and it sounds like a good move for the project.

LoB

So this slashdot article... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30478654)

is or isn't about space exploration? i am confused

a woman in charge? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30478774)

Oh great, that means Ubuntu will move to a predominantly pink theme, and once a month will crash and behave erratically for about 4-5 days.

Thank you (3, Interesting)

Saija (1114681) | more than 4 years ago | (#30478912)

Mark for making possible a linux distro usable, friendly, and gather mainstream and users around the world, but i wonder if the poor quality of the late ubuntu incarnations(karmic, jaunty and that PulseAudio affair, i'm looking at you!) was something Mark was responsible(of some sorts), or at least, know of it, and i'm saying this as a former Ubuntu lover, i just loved and liked to polish, tune and debug to some extents some issues with this distro, but the adittion of that PulseAudio and the almost impossible task of remove it for the system make me switch, now i'm a OpenSuse user and i liked, now i can listen to amarok and youtube videos at the same time without the need to kill -9 some of them.
Again, thank you very much Mark for the past 3 years and i hope your new roles make this great distro return to his old quality.
</rant>

Re:Thank you (1)

PPalmgren (1009823) | more than 4 years ago | (#30479326)

If your writing style is any indication of your age, your enlightenment-era lawn might be the oldest on slashdot. I'll keep my distance.

Re:Thank you (1)

Cougar Town (1669754) | more than 4 years ago | (#30480030)

I wish people would give the whole PulseAudio issue a rest, for fuck sakes. This issue has been run-over like interstate road-kill.

The reasons that Ubuntu decided to go with PulseAudio have been clearly stated (see http://ossguy.com/?p=347 [ossguy.com] and the Ubuntu wiki entry it links to). I don't doubt that some users are having problems, but with any OS there are bound to be users who have problems with one thing or another. I have run Ubuntu Desktop on a wide variety of hardware and sound has just worked for me... I'm not really sure what I'm doing differently than anyone else.

Re:Thank you (1)

Saija (1114681) | more than 4 years ago | (#30480362)

I'm not a native english speaker by any means, as you could see, but i try to do my best with the few english skills i have, if that deserves to become me some kind of "keep him at distance" guy so be it.

Re:Thank you (1)

dmbasso (1052166) | more than 4 years ago | (#30481246)

These people that complain about form/syntax, disregarding completely the meaning/semantics, are pretty useless. But don't worry, the intended audience of your message was reached.

Btw, I very nice book recommendation involving this context (the superficiality of your critic): Zen & The Art of Bicycle Maintenance (odd title, but very nice book).

Re:Thank you (1)

PPalmgren (1009823) | more than 4 years ago | (#30481856)

It was a joke. In the colonization & US revolution era, englishman used a ton of commas and it made it very hard to read and follow by today's standards. It is uncommon to see more than two or three commas in a sentence in english today, and you used 14. I was saying I'll stay away from your lawn b/c you write like a dinosaur ("get off my lawn" joke). Apparently it failed.

Re:Thank you (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30479644)

You sure don't like pulseaudio.

Re:Thank you (1)

message144 (1246846) | more than 4 years ago | (#30479970)

To be fair, a lot of the problems you mentioned were the result of upgrades, not clean installs.

Re:Thank you (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30480118)

removing pulseaudio? try "sudo apt-get purge pulsaudio". done. I've been doing this since hardy, and finally now in Karmic everything just works, and I've actually gone and re-installed it!

Re:Thank you (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30480492)

It is just sad fact for Ubuntu fans that Mark Shuttleworth did not do Linux system usable. Mandriva and OpenSUSE had done that long time ago. Ubuntu just came out on just correct time being a new face on the streets and new users picked it up. When you now compare Ubuntu to Mandriva and OpenSUSE. They both are again a head of Ubuntu when it comes to style, usability and easy to use and learn curves.

But hey, Ubuntu has nice idea "Linux for Human beings" while they do not even follow it themself but trash the other distributions laughing.

Re:Thank you (1)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 4 years ago | (#30481638)

didn't notice audio problems in my Ubuntu machines. ha, some of us are more focused on tasks to not be running two multimedia apps at once. were you playing WoW at the same time too? kids these days.

..do not see major strategic changes.. (3, Funny)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 4 years ago | (#30478992)

Famous last words we have all heard before.

Re: ..do not see major strategic changes.. (1)

brainpicnic (1418037) | more than 4 years ago | (#30480528)

...but better than "he is leaving his position to spend more time with family and friends"...

Re: ..do not see major strategic changes.. (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 4 years ago | (#30481010)

So what's the worst that could happen? They could start to suck... or go pay only like Red Hat did (yes, I know about Fedora but the earliest versions were nothing like RHL). At which point I'll check out Debian and OpenSuse and Mandriva and Fedora and maybe a few more and choose whichever sucks the least. The good stuff either comes from upstream or gets picked up by other distros, the distro is mostly who has the most polish right now, Linus and Gnome and KDE and OpenOffice and Firefox and whatnot will keep pushing out new releases regardless. If you're not committed, why worry about what might happen in the future? It works for me now, it probably will in the future but if it doesn't I'll handle it then, not now.

He is switching to customers and OEMs... (2, Informative)

Pecisk (688001) | more than 4 years ago | (#30479008)

...which is all good and great, because he cares about end users - which matters most for Ubuntu Linux to succeed.

Jane Silber? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30479176)

Jane is a guy's name in South Africa?

Re:Jane Silber? (1)

Delkster (820935) | more than 4 years ago | (#30480302)

Why would it be a guy's name? Haven't you heard of female CEOs?

Also, a Canonical blog post [canonical.com] regarding the change says she's American.

Re:Jane Silber? (2, Informative)

Nefarious Wheel (628136) | more than 4 years ago | (#30482166)

Jane is a guy's name in South Africa?

"Since Jane joined the company, she and I have shared the load of coordinating between the leaders of all the key teams that make up Canonical."

Ooh, to be sure to be sure, there's a clue in that statement like it or not.

Soo..... (5, Funny)

crazyvas (853396) | more than 4 years ago | (#30479650)

Will this event be labeled a "COO d'état" ?

Oww, ouch, OWW, stop the beating!

Re:Soo..... (1)

grcumb (781340) | more than 4 years ago | (#30480114)

Will this event be labeled a "COO d'état" ?

No, not "a COO d'état," it will be "the COO d'état."

It is Canonical, after all.

Re:Soo..... (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 4 years ago | (#30481048)

No, not "a COO d'état," it will be "the COO d'état."

It is Canonical, after all.

I hereby promote you to bureaucrat grade 13.

Canonical still hasn't turned a profit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30479918)

Shuttleworth has been losing money nonstop on Ubuntu. This change in CEO won't stop that.

I ask on behalf of everyone here... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30479962)

Is she hot?

Hirez proof plz.

Re:I ask on behalf of everyone here... (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30480862)

No [flickr.com] .

Sounds familiar (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30479982)

How good is Jane Silber at throwing chairs?

Finally, a woman in charge (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30480064)

And this just after I read on Slashdot that there are too many men in IT! Mark this one as "one down"!

Good (3, Interesting)

Norsefire (1494323) | more than 4 years ago | (#30480652)

Shuttleworth is one of the biggest problems with Ubuntu. His focus on "usability" has left the OS in complete disarray; while the developers are busy fixing 100 little papercuts they're shipping a release with broken DNS resolving [launchpad.net] . What is less user-friendly: a poorly labeled checkbox in the installation screen or "breaking the internet"? Canonical and Ubuntu were good in the beginning, they righted the wrongs of Debian, brought Linux closer to the desktop and then threw all that away with some really bad decisions (update notifier popup, software update policy, shipping releases with very serious bugs). Hopefully with someone new in charge Ubuntu can try and become what it used to be, given that Shuttleworth's hubris seems to be the most major bug in Ubuntu at the moment.

Maybe Jane will understand (2, Informative)

TheDarkener (198348) | more than 4 years ago | (#30480744)

that shipping an LTS (Long Term Support) release doesn't mean "This release is just as buggy as all of the other releases were when they shipped, but we'll be updating security issues for longer". :) Don't get me wrong, I 3 Ubuntu more than most people, but this is just something that always irked me (especially since I run multiple production terminal server environments with Ubuntu LTS & LTSP)

Re:Maybe Jane will understand (1)

gringer (252588) | more than 4 years ago | (#30480938)

Don't get me wrong, I 3 Ubuntu more than most people

You what Ubuntu? I'm all for Ubuntu when introducing people to Linux, (and 4 > 3) but I think I'll stick to Debian.

Re:Maybe Jane will understand (2, Insightful)

ZosX (517789) | more than 4 years ago | (#30481882)

Why not just run debian? I don't think a production server needs to be on the bleeding edge.....

Re:Maybe Jane will understand (1)

TheDarkener (198348) | more than 4 years ago | (#30482092)

Debian stable and Ubuntu LTS are still years apart from each other as far as desktop usability goes, or at least the last time I checked that was the case..

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