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EU Demands Canada Rework Its Copyright, Patent Law

kdawson posted more than 4 years ago | from the beyond-acta dept.

Patents 271

An anonymous reader writes "The draft intellectual property text of the EU - Canada Trade Agreement has leaked, with news that the EU is demanding that Canada fundamentally alter copyright, patent, and trademark law. The laundry list of demands includes copyright term extension, WIPO ratification, DMCA-style legislation, resale rights, new enforcement provisions, and following patent, trademark, and design law treaties. The net result is that when combined with the ACTA requirements, Canadian copyright law may cease to be Canadian." Reader TheTurtlesMoves stresses the "first sale doctrine" aspect of the Canada - EU negotiations. Once an artist sells a creative work, should she get a cut of any future resales of that same work? The EU says yes at least for some types of works, and it wants Canada to see things its way. "Europe's Directive 2001/84/EC says that the right covers only 'works of graphic or plastic art such as pictures, collages, paintings, drawings, engravings, prints, lithographs, sculptures, tapestries, ceramics, glassware and photographs, provided they are made by the artist himself or are copies considered to be original works of art.'"

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EU demands that CmdrTaco get a penis extension (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30488160)

The draft text says that CmdrTaco's 2 inch baby dick needs to be lengthened and widened because it is massively undersized and pathetic.

Oh no! (0)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488166)

I was going to make a "Milk Comes in bags!" Joke, but it turns out that joke is now copyrighted!

Cue the apologists... (5, Interesting)

HarrySquatter (1698416) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488176)

Aren't we constantly told that the EU is so much better in regards to patents and copyrights and it's only the big bad US that is constantly trying to push all this stuff on people?

Re:Cue the apologists... (2, Insightful)

RobVB (1566105) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488284)

I might be paranoid, but I don't believe the US had nothing to do with this. The dollar might not be as strong as the euro right now, but enough of them will still buy you plenty of politicians.

Re:Cue the apologists... (4, Insightful)

HarrySquatter (1698416) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488344)

I might be paranoid, but I don't believe the US had nothing to do with this.

Because otherwise the EU wouldn't be pushing for this? Are you joking? The EU hardly is a utopia when it comes to copyrights.

Re:Cue the apologists... (4, Insightful)

OrangeTide (124937) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488502)

US politicians are simply cheaper to bribe than EU politicians due to the weak dollar.

I won't worry about America until our politicians start only accepting bribes in Euros.

Re:Cue the apologists... (1)

Shakrai (717556) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488330)

Aren't we constantly told that the EU is so much better in regards to patents and copyrights and it's only the big bad US that is constantly trying to push all this stuff on people?

I would argue that big Government is the problem here. If you take an individual country the size of Sweden or Canada it's more probable that it will be responsive to the concerns and needs of it's citizens. Take a large bloated government like the US Federal Government or EU and it seems to be more probable that it gets bought off by a combination of machine politics and special interests.

Re:Cue the apologists... (1)

HarrySquatter (1698416) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488402)

So then how do you explain Spain implementing the EU Copyright Directive? It's not much bigger than Canada. Or how the Czech Republic and Finland have also implemented portions of it.

Re:Cue the apologists... (1)

PIBM (588930) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488476)

Maybe because they are much closer to them ?

Re:Cue the apologists... (4, Informative)

FuckingNickName (1362625) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488700)

Honestly? Speaking as a Spaniard, I see the official and populist line in Spain is that the EU is A Great Thing. Why?

(1) After Franco, Spain was way behind the rest of Western Europe in terms of infrastructure and social justice. When it joined the EU (then EC) in 1986, it received huge sums for investment in large scale programmes. Before this time, the big money had often come from US private investment (Spaniards were cheap labour!), which certainly provided jobs but wasn't going to build roads and railways or take care of the very sick. ...queue a couple decades of investment and the rising middle classes...

(2) Then after Aznar's monumentally stupid blaming of the local terr'ist group, ETA, for bombings in Madrid the day before the election, the pendulum swung from pro-US back to anti-US sentiment. The prevailing impression in Spain still seems to be that the EU stands as some great body to counter US influence, even though it's by and large motivated by special interests which often lie in common with the special interests of the US elite.

(3) (perhaps slightly prejudiced) Spaniards like patriarchal government. The legacy of Franco is still there, obviously. They're obsessed with a veneer of political correctness, still compensating for their once genuinely macho culture, but ultimately they don't like the idea of a nation of independent individuals, preferring a very detailed, united conception of morality and society. This sentiment is easy to take advantage of.

Re:Cue the apologists... (1)

ultranova (717540) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488812)

So then how do you explain Spain implementing the EU Copyright Directive? It's not much bigger than Canada. Or how the Czech Republic and Finland have also implemented portions of it.

Dunno about the rest of them, but Finnish politicians have been searching for someone to bend the country over for ever since the Soviet Union fell. That's why they implement anything that Brussels, Washington and Moscow care to demand, the more harmful to the country the better, since that lets them show what good team players they are while making the ordinary citizens suffer the consequences.

Re:Cue the apologists... (3, Insightful)

Guspaz (556486) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488864)

I realize that it's a common mistake, but Canada is not, in fact, in Europe.

Spain, the Czech Republic, and Finland are all members of the European Union. And in Europe.

Re:Cue the apologists... (1)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 4 years ago | (#30489080)

Maybe because Spain and Finland are parts of the EU, while Canada is not.

Re:Cue the apologists... (1)

sznupi (719324) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488720)

Sweden holds the Presidency of the Council of the EU for the last half year.

Re:Cue the apologists... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30489048)

"If you take an individual country the size of Sweden or Canada..."

I take it you are not from around here. Around here being the planet earth.

The approximate size of Canada 3.855 million mi^2. Compare this to Sweden at 173732 mi^2.

If we consider one of the largest countries in the world, indeed bigger than some continents, and a country less than 1/22 the size of said country than... what?

Re:Cue the apologists... (4, Interesting)

Colonel Korn (1258968) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488420)

Aren't we constantly told that the EU is so much better in regards to patents and copyrights and it's only the big bad US that is constantly trying to push all this stuff on people?

No, we're not. The EU is the hot spot for three strikes laws. If anything, it's usually shown as an example of a dark possible future for the US.

Re:Cue the apologists... (3, Insightful)

NatasRevol (731260) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488712)

I thought the dark possible future of the US was the current UK?

Re:Cue the apologists... (1)

Captain Splendid (673276) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488478)

You haven't spent a lot of time on Slashdot lately. Or you fail at strawman arguments. Pick one.

Re:Cue the apologists... (4, Interesting)

NotBornYesterday (1093817) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488518)

AFAICT, we are constantly told that the EU is so much better in regards to medical care, social programs in general, environmental laws, gun laws, architecture, culture, art, world peace, sexual repression, drug laws, and trading value of the Euro vs. the dollar among other things, much of which is debatable, but hardly relevant here. In general, the world's most developed countries are realizing that more and more of what they ("we", I suppose, since I''m in the US) have to trade on internationally is IP rather than physical goods, which can usually be made cheaper elsewhere. If the developed countries want to keep their riches, they have to keep their IP secure. I think the drive to implement (or "impose", depending on how you look at it) oppressive international IP agreements draws more fire when the US does it because at home and abroad the US is often perceived as an aggressive superpower exporting cultural imperialism. On the other hand, when the EU does it, they are beneficently supporting artists' rights.

OK, this is getting old (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30488578)

I guess it is to be expected for every /. article to spiral into at least one anti-American diatribe, but even this one is a stretch. Mod topic -1 offtopic.

Re:OK, this is getting old (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30488758)

I guess it is to be expected for every /. article to spiral into at least one anti-American diatribe, but even this one is a stretch. Mod topic -1 offtopic.

It's not really "Anti American" (some of us still like individual Americans) -- it's "Anti export of American laws to the rest of the world".

It is entirely American companies who have been pushing to have the DMCA exported, who are responsible for including it in that secretive ACTA treaty they're not allowed to tell us the details of, and it's American intellectual property stakeholders who are trying to push this on everyone else.

The goal is seemingly to try to export laws to the rest of the world that makes all laws and technologies subservient to the wishes of content and media companies. Sadly, we can't even accuse America of colonialism in this case -- it's more like oligarchy.

As far as changing the right of first sale so that the artist gets a cut every time the piece is sold -- I say horseshit. That makes no sense.

Sadly, I fear that soon most nations will get swept up in this stupidity and before long we'll only be able to do what the media companies tell us we're allowed to. If they get this enshrined into every country's laws, before long, they'll be able to dictate how technology works so guarantee that nothing which they don't want us to have (and for which they can't continue to bill us) is allowed.

Time to start voting from the rooftops.

Re:OK, this is getting old (1)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488900)

-It is entirely American companies who have been pushing to have the DMCA exported, who are responsible for including it in that secretive ACTA treaty they're not allowed to tell us the details of, and it's American intellectual property stakeholders who are trying to push this on everyone else.

Sony is an American company?

I'm surprised (1)

Lord Lode (1290856) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488184)

I'm European myself and I didn't even know we had DMCA style legislation here, and also not that the EU would demand something from Canada. Now this article combines both. How is this possible?

Re:I'm surprised (2, Interesting)

HarrySquatter (1698416) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488242)

Europe isn't a utopia when it comes to copyrights. Everyone made a big deal about that copyright term extension act that was proposed by Sonny Bono, and while it was a heinous bill at least it didn't revive expired copyrights like the copyright extension legislation in the EU did.

Re:I'm surprised (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488598)

Any such bill would probably be found to be against the U.S. Constitution (which has a broader prohibition against ex post facto laws than most other legal frameworks, which generally have statements specifically about criminal laws, rather than the general statement in the Constitution).

Re:I'm surprised (2, Informative)

H.G.Blob (1550325) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488274)

The summary is terrible, there is no DMCA style legislation in the EU. The article says:

The U.S. has proposed provisions that would mandate a DMCA-style implementation for the WIPO Internet treaties and encourage the adoption of a three-strikes and you're out system to cut off access where there are repeated allegations of infringement.

Re:I'm surprised (4, Informative)

HarrySquatter (1698416) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488328)

Actually a few countries in the EU have passed DMCA-like legislation. But from the article:

Anti-circumvention provisions. The EU is demanding that Canada implement anti-circumvention provisions that include a ban on the distribution of circumvention devices. There is no such requirement in the WIPO Internet treaties.

This sounds pretty much like wanting DMCA-style legislation.

Re:I'm surprised (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488376)

and also not that the EU would demand something from Canada.

I also find that a bit odd. I'm wondering what effects this could have with our Ties in the US. I mean the states secretly want to assimilate us. On occaison a president will ask us to do something, and we'll oblige (Afghanistan) and other times we won't (Iraq).

So, what would The States think about this proposal, and how will that effect Canada's decision?

And Canada is... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30488190)

And Canada is in the European Union?

Re:And Canada is... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30488492)

Even the French-Canadians don't want anything to do with Europe.

Re:And Canada is... (1)

sznupi (719324) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488958)

Hm, they still want to have something to do with the Queen, it would seem.

And are much closer to full memberstate of ESA that my country, supposedly European one.

I hope Canada stands up to this and says NO: (4, Insightful)

pecosdave (536896) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488192)

They have enough asinine copyright laws as it is. Seriously? An extra charge on blank optical and tape media because it "might" be used to pirate? Does this go for hard drives and bandwidth? I'm with the current US and Canada system. The artist don't benefit much, it's the royalty houses are the ones that really benefit. Don't they get enough from performance, broadcast, sales, etc..? Artist can go broke trying to collect their money.

Re:I hope Canada stands up to this and says NO: (5, Insightful)

Capt.DrumkenBum (1173011) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488396)

An extra charge on blank optical and tape media because it "might" be used to pirate?

I actually like this system, because it gives me implied governmental approval to copy as I see fit.

Re:I hope Canada stands up to this and says NO: (1)

Old97 (1341297) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488876)

Your post was modded as funny, but I think a lot of people think that way. I'd at least feel less guilty pirating - if I would ever do such a thing - if I knew they were getting paid even when I wasn't.

Re:I hope Canada stands up to this and says NO: (1)

jeti (105266) | more than 4 years ago | (#30489022)

I actually like this system, because it gives me implied governmental approval to copy as I see fit.

... unless the original is copy protected or from an obviously illegal source.

No problem (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30488200)

So long as it's the Europeans bending them over the kitchen table and not the Americans, the Canadians will be perfectly happy.

Re:No problem (1)

OrangeTide (124937) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488594)

Well sometimes you get tired of being raped by the same person every day and appreciate a little change.

Well that's it for that then (3, Insightful)

oldspewey (1303305) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488212)

Since our current conservative party government thinks leadership is waiting to be told what to do by other countries, I guess Canada can expect EU-style copyright laws shortly.

Just as a Matter of Principal (5, Insightful)

sycodon (149926) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488224)

Just as a matter of principal, Canada should give them a nice hearty "F**k you, eh!"
 

Re:Just as a Matter of Principal (2, Insightful)

couchslug (175151) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488400)

International law itself is a surrender of sovereignty and should be viewed as such.

It's a way for outsiders to govern your country without your country having a national referendum on the law in question.

Re:Just as a Matter of Principal (1, Insightful)

Archangel Michael (180766) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488614)

Yes, exactly.

There was this little rift in 1775-1776 over just this in the British Colonies. They called it "Taxation without representation".

Now take a look at the whole Kyoto/Copenhagen scare tactics going on over the whole "climate change" fraud. It isn't about "climate change" at all, it is about Socialism and World Government.

And do you REALLY think that all those "elitists" have YOUR interest in mind? May I sell you bridge I have?

Re:Just as a Matter of Principal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30488674)

How about a big fuck you to you too then?

International law exists for common goals. Has nothing to do with taxation of your colonies.

Cheers.

What a load of crap (5, Insightful)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488650)

That is not what international law is at all. International law is the stuff that happens in The Hague and it has been around a long time and is desperately needed. It governs such silly every day things as trade. If you trade between countries (between sets of laws) which one goes? Well, that is what international law is for.

And it is in Holland because Holland was ONCE a world-power (yes really) but lost that status but still had a need to maintain its trading empire. So while the british and other powers settled trade disputes with the law of the biggest gun(boat) Holland needed something more.

International law is an entirely different beast then this, what we are talking about here are treaties. It may look the same, but it is fundementally different.

In fact, the current system is so wrong because it seeks to bypass laws altogether. The media companies are waging a very complex war against basic law by trying to get a new set of laws introduced by means that were never intended. Trade treaties were supposed to be "We sell you X and you don't charge for it and we allow you sell us Y without charging tariffs on it". Not "you will subject your citizens to our laws".

Re:Just as a Matter of Principal (1)

ThatsNotFunny (775189) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488836)

You're not my buddy, fwend.

This is a real threat. (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30488842)

Forget about the small ragtag bands of Middle Eastern terrorists. They aren't a real threat to freedom and democracy.

Legislation like this, pushed by supranational organizations, is. It is a far, far bigger threat to everybody's freedom and the democracy of Western nations than any terrorist organization.

Re:Just as a Matter of Principal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30489002)

It'll be interesting to see just what the Canadian government does with this. On the one hand, our current government loves to suck the industry's cock. On the other hand, our current government hates being told by "outsiders" what to do.

Time to get some popcorn.

Re:Just as a Matter of Principal (1)

ganktor (1448127) | more than 4 years ago | (#30489262)

I completely agree. or like the Mckenzie Bros. [wikipedia.org] - "Take off eh, you hosers!"

O Canada (4, Interesting)

RobVB (1566105) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488254)

Please tell the EU to go fuck itself and/or adapt its copyright and patent law to the Canadian model.

And possibly to close Disneyland Paris, stop accepting money from **AA and start developing some common sense.

Crap, I think I overdid it with that last part. They are, after all, politicians. But if they're supposed to represent the European population, let me be the first to say this isn't what all of the population wants.

Re:O Canada (1)

tdobson (1391501) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488386)

Please tell the EU to go fuck itself and/or adapt its copyright and patent law to the Canadian model.

Canadians, please do as he says.
I'm European.

Re:O Canada (4, Funny)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488466)

Please tell the EU to go fuck itself and/or adapt its copyright and patent law to the Canadian model.

Canadians, please do as he says.
I'm European.

Alright, as a Canadian, I kindly ask you to go fuck yourself and/or adapt your copyright and patent laws to the Canadian Model.

Re:O Canada (1)

Archangel Michael (180766) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488666)

NO

Canada, Demand that all EU countries adopt YOUR copyright and patent laws.

See how they like it.

Re:O Canada (1)

tdobson (1391501) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488760)

As GP suggested, and I agreed, that's what I'd prefer.

Re:O Canada (2, Insightful)

ubergeek65536 (862868) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488454)

I wish I could mod you up. The Canadian people are supposed to make our laws. If we don't want your copyright laws too bad for you. I'd rather live without even seeing another European book or movie in my life then have them make my laws. Mr. PM are you listening?

Re:O Canada (1)

ubercam (1025540) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488590)

I don't think Stephen Harper reads Slashdot, but one can always hope...

Re:O Canada (1)

UnexplodedNT (534042) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488726)

Corrected: "I don't think Stephen Harper reads, but one can always hope..."

Re:O Canada (1)

StripedCow (776465) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488764)

The Canadian people are supposed to make our laws.

Actually, after this [wikipedia.org] shouldn't the EU take a more humble standpoint?

(You may say that this is an outdated argument, but in any case, it was less than 70 years ago, which is the minimum duration of copyright.)

Re:O Canada (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30489126)

Yes I am, but I haven't yet made up my mind.

Re:O Canada (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30488692)

As an EU citizen, I completely agree.

It's bad enough that nothing we do over here seems to be able to stop our politicians from creating increasingly crazy laws, we shouldn't allow them to mess up Canada as well.

Jesus H Christ... (-1, Redundant)

grub (11606) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488258)


I'm so fucking mad, I just dropped my bag of milk and it burst all over my fucking keyboard.

Will be writing my MP immediately.

As a Canadian... (5, Insightful)

whisper_jeff (680366) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488264)

As a Canadian, to all foreign powers who demand we change our laws to match yours, I say fuck you. Get your house in order before you tell us how to get ours in order.

Re:As a Canadian... (2)

RobVB (1566105) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488348)

As a European, I say thank you.

Re:As a Canadian... (3, Insightful)

wannabegeek2 (1137333) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488374)

I'm an American, and you cannot conceive of how much I agree with your position!

Best of luck!

(Expose and excise Corporatism. Businesses are NOT a component of "The People", at least as the US founding Fathers meant.)

Re:As a Canadian... (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488770)

(Expose and excise Corporatism. Businesses are NOT a component of "The People", at least as the US founding Fathers meant.)

Sure they were. A lot of the founders ran successful businesses. Some of the powers like the US government's ability to regulate interstate commerce were obviously put in there for business. Finally, since it needs to be said again, businesses are made of people. The business executes the wishes of those people. When you shaft a business under the pretext that it isn't a "component of 'The People'", you are shafting the people who make up that business. Those people are "The People".

Re:As a Canadian... (1)

CrimsonAvenger (580665) | more than 4 years ago | (#30489012)

Some of the powers like the US government's ability to regulate interstate commerce were obviously put in there for business.

No, actually that was put in to prevent States from imposing tariffs on the products of other States.

Re:As a Canadian... (2, Insightful)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488408)

You know, if that comment had been made by an American, it would have attracted at least three angry comments before it was modded down to -1. Instead it's +3 and rising. What happened to unilateralism being bad? The idea that a nation should act selfishly in its own national interest, with no thought as to how its actions will be perceived internationally? Parent is an outright rejection, complete with profanity! I'm really puzzled...honest question, not a flame.

Re:As a Canadian... (5, Informative)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488620)

The reason it would have been modded down if it were by an American is that the American Government is over there mucking about in other people's Countries before getting its house in order, making the statement completely hypocritical.

Canadians on the other hand, do very little besides peacekeeping, and combing the hills of Afghanistan.

Re:As a Canadian... (1)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488750)

You miss the point, sir. The point was, unilateralism is bad, mmmkay? I have heard this point thousands of times. Either unilateralism is bad, or it's not. What I'm hearing is when they do it, it's bad, but when we do it, it's good. If that ain't hypocrisy then I don't know what is.

Re:As a Canadian... (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#30489162)

But Canada's not being Unilateral in this case.

So where are Canadians being Unilateral? Besides stationing our citizens inside warzones, we haven't imposed our beliefs on anyone but those inside our country.

Re:As a Canadian... (1)

bmearns (1691628) | more than 4 years ago | (#30489220)

Without agreeing or disagreeing, let me just point out that some double standards are appropriate.

Re:As a Canadian... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30488628)

It's jealousy.

No one is jealous of Canada, so there's no reason to hate on them.

Re:As a Canadian... (1)

Idiomatick (976696) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488656)

The US is side pushing laws on others... /. sides with sovereign decisions. Canada is the little guy and likely to lose, /. sides with the little guys. And Canada is on the side of less copyright law /. generally sides with sane laws.

Re:As a Canadian... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30488486)

So is that the fault of Americans or the rest of the world?

Re:As a Canadian... (1)

couchslug (175151) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488564)

"Get your house in order before you tell us how to get ours in order."

Don't confuse law with order, or order with any desirable state.

Re:As a Canadian... (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488640)

And we here in Europe. We the actual people. We are on your side.

If only you had the war power of the US. Then I would ask you to free us from the oppressive and illegal “government” that is the EU body. Come here. Wreck shit! You are welcome. :)

As a Canadian (2, Informative)

Bullfish (858648) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488266)

I politely say, "that's nice". Please take a seat there by the Americans who have made the same demands. we'll see you after them. They've been waiting a few years, so you make want to bring a lunch and something to read. Really, the government is in a minority position (has been for a few years) and has plenty of real trouble to deal with... they also want to be elected with a majority some day so they are not apt to piss off the population too much.

Re:As a Canadian (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30488596)

Yep ... you seem Canadian. I'm not, but I do love that polite understated Canadian-ness in your response.

My all-time favorite embodiment of this is "United Breaks Guitars" ... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5YGc4zOqozo

Keep it up! :)

Sorry, no dice (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30488294)

I like you europeans, but no freaking way!

Hey, trade is good, but not when it comes with such sweeping legal changes.

I will let my MP know that agreeing to this treaty is basically letting foreigners decide on our laws.

No amount of trade is worth my rights.

I will stand up and I will say no.

Why not real art? (2, Interesting)

tutori (821667) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488314)

What is the fundamental difference between physical art and digital art such that the digital art shouldn't be covered by the first sale doctrine? As far as I can tell, the only difference is the presence of a lobby...

EU??? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30488316)

The last time I checked Canada wasn't in Europe. Let's hope our politicians realize that.

Gotta say it... (1)

LynnwoodRooster (966895) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488416)

BLAME CANADA!

Welcome back in the fold, eh? (0, Troll)

Bearhouse (1034238) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488418)

Well, it will be interesting to see how this plays out...
Even though the English and French lost their footholds in Canada a long time ago, they still lovedto play games, viz. De Gaulle's "Vive le Quebec Libre" speech.
The spiritual successors to the former European empire-builders are the EU civil servants, determined to prove that they, and 'Europe' exist as an entity and are important.
Pretty-much blackmailing small states, such as the Baltics, into accepting terms of admission - that the larger states ignore - has worked well until now.
It would seem less certain to work with Canada, which does the vast majority of its trade with...the USA under NAFTA.
I reckon isohunt.com is safe for a while...

International Bullying (4, Insightful)

Adrian Lopez (2615) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488432)

Canada should not allow itself to be bullied into adopting bad copyright law. While the European Union appears quite eager to be as bad (or worse) than the United States in terms of harmful copyright legislation, I sincerely hope Canada will put its citizens interests above those of copyright holders. I'm not against globalization, but countries must sometimes defend their sovereignty for the sake of their citizens.

Disgusting... (5, Interesting)

Synchis (191050) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488458)

This type of news is disgusting to me as a Canadian.

Throughout the summer, Canada held an enormous copyright consultation in which large corporations expressed an interest in these types of changes, and artists, creators and citizens expressed an interest in the exact opposite direction to this.

Michael Geist [michaelgeist.ca] usually carries all the latest news about this topic.

At the same time, I think we have nothing to worry about. In a country that shows a 30% voter turnout (at best), that makes 6.9 million voters. Historically, over 500000 canadians joined the protest against the last attempt to bring laws like this. Thats a 7% swing in the vote towards the party that will stand up against this type of law making. Thats enough to win an election in Canada.

With all this hype over copyright and trademark law, I expect it to be a hot topic in the next election, and with us running under a minority gov't, we could end up with an election at any time.

Re:Disgusting... (4, Interesting)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488696)

I've always been a little wishy washy when it comes to voting, I mean both Liberals and Conservatives end up making good points, and I always end up voting for whoever sounds like less of a douche at the debates, despite if their policy actually makes sense or not.

However, this is something that concerns me a bit more. Usually everything breaks down into what will cost us the most tax dollars versus the benefit it brings us. I go along and pay my taxes no matter how much they demand (which is quite ludicrous right now actually, we're taxed something like 40% after GST, PST, Income and other taxes, and don't have half the services of some european countries).

But this is another issue altogether. This could effect the way I do things, punishable by the law. So - yeah, I want to see who supports what in this whole debacle.

Re:Disgusting... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30488886)

Hmm .... I think we have a Pirate Party in Canada now? I'm not way older than their demographic, but they could well get my vote

Re:Disgusting... (1)

omega6 (1072658) | more than 4 years ago | (#30489092)

IF I were you, I double check your sources... Reuters on the last federal election: "Canada voter turnout lowest on record" with a turn out of 59.1. http://ca.reuters.com/article/domesticNews/idCATRE49E9BO20081015 [reuters.com] You may be referring a city of some sort, but in Canada, copyright law is not a city responsibility.

Re:Disgusting... (2, Informative)

ubercam (1025540) | more than 4 years ago | (#30489204)

The only way it would affect anything is if these particular 7% of voters were concentrated only in the swing ridings, where the races are within a couple votes. If they were evenly distributed across the country, since we have the first past the post system, I doubt it would affect much.

In my neck of the woods, in the Taché riding in SE Manitoba, no matter who you vote for, the Conservatives win, because their candidate, Vic Toews, is a senior cabinet member. He was the Justice Minister for a while, but I think he's head of the Treasury Board now. People like that. They want their local MP to be an important person. No one has ever heard of any of the other candidates on the ballot. The Greens got like 200 votes last time around, Liberals a couple thousand, NDP less, but Toews takes the cake every time (he had something like 12,000-15,000 votes). AFAIK the majority of the population in Taché are Mennonites and they usually always stick to their kind in business, pleasure and politics, so Toews winning every time is no surprise at all. Hell, the guy had an affair publicly disclosed and it still didn't affect his popularity at all, and that's a VERY BIG no-no for a Mennonite, let me tell you. A 7% increase in Liberal votes wouldn't even dent Toews' lead, which is usually at least double what the next best candidate gets.

But yeah, like you said, with this minority government, where an election could be called at any time over any issue at all, even copyright, all it takes is a couple seats in the election for the opposition to get enough of them to be able to force the hand of the ruling party and make sure everyone works together for a consensus. They've been fairly successful at this the last couple times around, with a few exceptions, but they need to get their acts together. IMHO, the NDP need new leadership, and the Liberals need to figure out what the hell they're doing too in that area, and the Greens really need to step up their campaign and advertise just as much as the big 3. They were pretty quiet last time, but I was happy to see Elizabeth May in the CBC debate, that was really good.

Anyway, I think all of our governments should minorities really, since they actually have to work together and agree to get anything done, and coming to an agreement means they (should) have to take the views of the entire population into account. I also wish they, and every other government around the world, would stop using emotionally charged issues, such as kiddie porn, to pass crappy laws no one would even consider if it didn't have that label attached to it. Oh, we're still allowed to dream right?

Canadians speak up! (5, Informative)

ubergeek65536 (862868) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488586)

If you are as pissed off about other countries trying to write our laws write your MP and the following Ministers.

Tony Clement
Minister of Industry
http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/ic1.nsf/eng/00093.html [ic.gc.ca]
minister.industry@ic.gc.ca

Bev Oda
Minister of International Cooperation
http://www.bevoda.ca/ [bevoda.ca]
Oda.B@parl.gc.ca

Re:Canadians speak up! (2, Informative)

roju (193642) | more than 4 years ago | (#30489142)

Don't forget the minister whose department is actually negotiating these things:

Stockwell Day
Minister of International Trade
House of Commons
Ottawa, ON K1A 0A6
Phone: 613.995.1702
Fax: 613.995.1154
Web: http://www.stockwellday.com/EN/4984/ [stockwellday.com]
Email: DayS@parl.gc.ca

As someone from Europe, I say to all Canadians: (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488600)

FUCK THE EU!

Tell them to GTFO your laws.

They can’d demand shit from you anyway. :)

Also, be aware, that the EU “government” is not the people that live in the countries that it thinks it has control over. It’s actually pretty much the opposite. They are enemies. A treasonous conspiracy (not in the weirdo meaning, but in the legal meaning), and illegal in pretty much every country, if it weren’t for changes in laws that nobody got asked for and nobody wanted.

There goes moving to Canada (1)

wadeal (884828) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488636)

Was planning to move there from Australia to avoid this soughta shit thats coming in.

Damn EU (1)

BluenoseJake (944685) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488728)

They can just fuck right off, I like my country the way it is, thank you very much

wow... (2, Insightful)

pak9rabid (1011935) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488744)

Is it just me or is the EU starting to sound like the US?

I'm sure... (1)

hazydave (96747) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488772)

.. as soon as all of Europe has switched to drinking Blue, eating backbacon, wearing BC Dinner Jackets, Kodiaks, and a toque (particularly the French), and playing Hockey (a real sport) rather than "football", maybe the Canadians would once again take up the issue of copyright law :-) Oh yeah, no more speaking French (outside of Quebec), they must pronounce the work "out" as "oooot", and they have to get some Timmy's opened. And Universal Healthcare... oh wait, it the USA that still needs that. And Timmy's...

Pathetic (1)

lonestarw (1391573) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488796)

Why? I miss the old liberal government for one and only on reason, They told of the American Ambassador Public over trying to influence us they need to say the same thing here. I understand that this goes on in the world with Iran and climate change and other topics but I enjoy our copyright laws. I guess we (Canadians) need to examine our copyright laws and ask who do they serve? and who do they protect? and where would all the money go to? and last is this going to promote business or make it a legal bog!

Who's going to keep track of these sales? (1)

Anita Coney (648748) | more than 4 years ago | (#30488820)

Who in the frick will keep track of all these transactions?!

I'm imagining yet another collection society which will collect transaction fees for each resale. Of course the society will keep a portion for itself, to cover costs and salaries, right?

A mandatory system will need to be setup for the reselling of art pieces. So it will be a felony for any Canadian to sell or buy art outside the system.

Small time artists will not be paid out what is collected by the society, in the same way that small time song writers are not paid. They will be told that in order to collect they must become famous artists first. Defeating the entire purpose of the law in the first place: to protect small time artists.

And of course it will be only a matter of time before schools, hotels, and individuals will be sued by the collection society for displaying art without paying. The burden will be on the accused to prove that they are in fact paid up. Police powers will have to be given to the society so it can send agents into homes and businesses to ensure compliance. A telephone hotline will be setup so that employees can rat out their bosses for hanging art without an approved society license.

contact them! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30489044)

let them know!

Delegation of the European Union to Canada

            150 Metcalfe Street, Suite 1900
            Ottawa, Ontario
            Canada K2P 1P1

            Tel: 613-238-6464
            Fax: 613-238-5191

            E-mail: Delegation-Canada@ec.europa.eu

I am ashamed to be European (1)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 4 years ago | (#30489056)

Sorry for the asshattery.

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