Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

IDEs With VIM Text Editing Capability?

timothy posted more than 4 years ago | from the one-keybinding-to-rule-them-all dept.

GUI 193

An anonymous reader writes "I am currently looking to move from text editing with vim to a full fledged IDE with gdb integration, integrated command line, etc. Extending VIM with these capabilities is a mortal sin, so I am looking for a linux based GUI IDE. I do not want to give up the efficient text editing capabilities of VIM though. How do I have my cake and eat it too?"

cancel ×

193 comments

Netbeans ( or others ) (5, Informative)

stoolpigeon (454276) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598246)

Netbeans [netbeans.org] with the Vi Vim for netbeans [sourceforge.net] plugin.
 
Netbeans is FOSS, runs on Windows, Linux and OS X. It handles Java, C/C++, PHP, Python, Ruby, Groovy and does a bunch of other stuff.
 
There is the viPlugin [viplugin.com] for Eclipse [eclipse.org] as well - I just happen to like Netbeans better.
 
The ActiveState folks list VI key bindings as a feature for their Komodo [activestate.com] and Komodo Edit products. These are closed source though Komodo Edit is free as in beer. It is cross platform - covering the win/lin/mac world.
 
I'm sure there are other options but those are the largest projects I know of that do what you want.

Re:Netbeans ( or others ) (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30598334)

On the eclipse side, there's also a plugin to embed VIM into Eclipse [vimplugin.org] and even a plugin to embed Eclipse into VIM [eclim.org] .

Re:Netbeans ( or others ) (4, Interesting)

TheCarp (96830) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598924)

I tried eclim and found, pretty quickly, that I reverted to the eclipse built in editor.

The problem that I had was that well, it didn't add the capabilities to vim, as much as add vim to the IDE.

I love vim, but, the ability to highlight individual lines and give me specific errors, especially as I am new to java and tend to make silly errors still. More than that, just the ability to have it cleanly (mostly, I have issues with eclipse's built in editor too) pop up a list of what methods are available on an object as I go serves both to help me refer to docs less, but also to remind me of what I am doing.

Overall, I do prefer vim because I am so used to it. The ability to switch modes, and run a quick regex over a whole document, or do it from here to the end of file, or just do it on the next 10 lines... so handy! I really wish I could get the best of both worlds, but, for now... I need the other features more.

Re:Netbeans ( or others ) (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30599906)

For highlighting current lines and specific errors (Assuming you mean compile time errors), read up on quickfix (:help quickfix). It's more for C apps, but I've found a few references for getting it to work with java (in the help file even!)

For the pop up list of methods, look into autocomplete (:help i_CTRL_X You may have to download the javacomplete.vim file, search vim.org for it) and possibly ctags (:help ctags) (or :help jtags for a java specific version of ctags) Your distribution probably already has ctags on it, if not get Exuberant ctags from http://ctags.sourceforge.net

 

Re:Netbeans ( or others ) (2, Informative)

bongey (974911) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599964)

I must ask when did your try eclim? Because the features you like that are in eclipse are in eclim. I use eclim in mostly headless mode. It provides auto complete for java, ant, c++. Ctrl+X Ctrl+U . I changed the key bindings to have window next match the vim bindings. The latest versions also fill the quickfix list. So you clist, can cn cn cn to all your compile errors. I also use ctags along with eclim, ctags gives you the jump to declarations. Omni complete plugin I have tried eclim, visual slickedit , pida, vim plugin for eclipse and I find eclim to be the best for vim+IDE for java at least. C/C++ would be great if the dam indexer work better in eclipse , it just blows for c/c++ Only ding is debugging doesn't really work with eclim and the outline doesn't load for the current buffer you are using.

Re:Netbeans ( or others ) (1)

bongey (974911) | more than 4 years ago | (#30600006)

Wow hate when I post to quickly. The grammar nazis are going to break down my door any minute.

Re:Netbeans ( or others ) (1)

stoolpigeon (454276) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598376)

Re-reading that and realize that it says Komodo Edit is closed source. That's not right, realized it after I hit submit. Komodo Edit is FOSS. Komodo IDE is closed.

Re:Netbeans ( or others ) (1)

Draek (916851) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598392)

Actually, Komodo Edit was open-sourced a while ago, only the Komodo IDE continues being closed-source (and commercial as well). However, one of the features missing from Edit is debugger integration so it probably won't satisfy the original poster's criteria.

Also, I'm pretty sure there are ways to use ViM as the editing component in VisualStudio as well, but I've never tried them so I don't know how they work.

Re:Netbeans ( or others ) (5, Informative)

iMaple (769378) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598452)

And if you want to use Visual Studio then visit the main download page
http://www.vim.org/download.php [vim.org] and get:
ftp://ftp.vim.org/pub/vim/pc/gvim72ole.zip [vim.org]
(OLE GUI executable, A GUI version with OLE support. This offers a few extra features, such as integration with Visual Developer Studio. But it uses quite a bit more memory.)

And you can safely disregard the more memory part, if you are already using visual studio :D

http://vim.wikia.com/wiki/Integrate_gvim_with_Visual_Studio [wikia.com] for tips if you need help setting it up.

Re:Netbeans ( or others ) (3, Funny)

stoolpigeon (454276) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598494)

I don't think VS runs on Linux.

Re:Netbeans ( or others ) (4, Informative)

schnablebg (678930) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599784)

This is not informative to anyone who wants to use a recent version of Visual Studio (ie, anything since VS2003) because it does not work. There is a lame workaround to open the file externally in vim and save it back. You need to use ViEmu [viemu.com] if you want a vi mode in VS. It is commercial software, but worth it. If you are stuck on VS5 or 6, god help you; a vi mode is not going to save you.

In any case, what the OP is looking for is actually just vim and the knowledge to use it to its full potential. Extending vim is not a "mortal sin," it is very useful and done all the time. There are plugins and examples for everything the OP wants to do, and if he likes vim he will probably like these better than clicky IDE.

Re:Netbeans ( or others ) (1)

schnablebg (678930) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599860)

Also, make sure you are using a build of gVim for your window manager of choice. I see so many people using regular vim in a terminal. It is much more useful to use a GUI build as you get much nicer tabbed files and OS integration. It does not turn vim into a GUI app; it just wraps it up nice so your window manager can deal with it as a first class application.

Re:Netbeans ( or others ) (1)

poached (1123673) | more than 4 years ago | (#30600092)

according to the wikia page for vim ole:

"Disclaimer: This is NOT a tip on how to get Vim to run inside of MS Visual Studio .NET. I have not yet found anyone who can make that work, so this is the next best thing. VisVim.dll seems to only work with VS6."

And that had been my experience as well - it is not possible to "embed" vim into the editor window like I had thought and wanted. It is not possible at the moment. The best I did was the create an external tools shortcut to vim and had a hot key assigned to it but I quickly found that to be more counter productive than helpful.

I also tried the Komodo editor the grandparent mentioned and the vim mode is a bastardized version of vim. It is basically so stripped down that you only have the very basic like jklh working and i mode. Really not worth the effort.

Re:Netbeans ( or others ) (1)

BrianRoach (614397) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598726)

+1 for netbeans with the plug-ins you want.

For years I kept trying IDEs ... and hating them. It always seemed like they got in the way more than they helped.

I started using netbeans for some Java work I was doing when it was called the "Java One Studio" or something like that ... really liked it. Since then it's only gotten better and I pretty much use it for everything that isn't a 5 minute job.

Blasphemy! (1, Flamebait)

Neuroelectronic (643221) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598872)

Vim emulation for Microsoft Visual Studio:

http://www.viemu.com/ [viemu.com]

Re:Blasphemy! (1)

localman57 (1340533) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599010)

I have been using this for years. Very nice plug in for Visual Studio. Note that you need the full version of Visual Studio, though, not the free-as-in-beer Express versions, as the Express versions don't support plug-ins.

Re:Netbeans ( or others ) (3, Informative)

oren (78897) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599334)

There's also http://www.viemu.com/ [viemu.com] (it costs $$$, but if you are forced to use VisualStudio...) and http://ideavim.sourceforge.net/ [sourceforge.net] (free plug-in for IntelliJ IDEA). And for people who use EMACS as their IDE, there's http://www.emacswiki.org/emacs/ViperMode [emacswiki.org] :-)

Re:Netbeans ( or others ) (1)

Thinboy00 (1190815) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599776)

viPlugin isn't free as in speech or free as in beer either. :(

Emacs! (5, Funny)

Saint Aardvark (159009) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598320)

Is there anything Emacs can't do [emacswiki.org] ? :-)

Re:Emacs! (4, Funny)

rainmaestro (996549) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598558)

Yeah, it's a great operating system. If only it had a decent text editor =)

Re:Emacs! (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30598678)

But you can run Vi in it, can't you?

Re:Emacs! (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30598764)

Old joke. Stop using it. Now.

Re:Emacs! (1)

Gerzel (240421) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599756)

Its not a joke, you can run vi in it.

Re:Emacs! (1)

Splab (574204) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599322)

Well since it supports VI binding I guess it has a decent editor.

Re:Emacs! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30599612)

It does... just run this command inside emacs:
M-x term;vim

or, for the more adventurous: http://billharlan.com/pub/emacs/

Re:Emacs! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30598584)

If you want tomake it more useful and include the editing capabilities of VIM and not just VI, install the vimpulse package, too. I've been happily using Emacs as my IDE of choice ever since siwthcing to REPLy things like Lisp gave me the impetus to look into it, but I'd be completely lost without viper and vimpulse.

Re:Emacs! (0, Offtopic)

AlexLibman (785653) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599030)

Emacs can't do one very important thing -- stop relying on government force [freestateproject.org] -- the rest is irrelevant to me!

Re:Emacs! (0, Troll)

fermion (181285) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599472)

Exactly, Emacs is the answer to everything.

That said, there does appear to be a VIM plugin for eclipse.

Duh... (1)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598326)

I think there's an app for that on the Emacs operating system.

Qt Creator (2, Interesting)

vbraga (228124) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598330)

Qt Creator [nokia.com] has Vim bindings. It's possible to create non Qt applications messing with settings on the .pro file.

Re:Qt Creator (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30598404)

Not only bindings, but Qt Creator has a built-in vi emulation mode.

I really like Qt Creator, I just wish it wasn't so tuned for only creating Qt applications. It can be used for other apps but they don't make it easy because it assumes you're using Qt.

Re:Qt Creator (3, Interesting)

StackedCrooked (1204878) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599178)

Qt Creator's Vim bindings are not complete yet. For example keystrokes like yiw or diw don't work. Recording macro's (which for me is Vim's killer feature) also doesn't work. That aside it's a great piece of software. Actually, it is the only IDE that I find usable on Linux.

Re:Qt Creator (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30599580)

I just recently discovered Creator myself... it quickly became the only IDE I use now. Windows, Linux, Mac... I develop for all three platforms... and can use this IDE in each... and on each, it runs faster than anything else I've played with or even used for years.

You can tell there's much to come from Nokia/Troll Tech on this... as it's obviously not complete... but it's extensions are easy to understand, so you can build you're own if you're impatient. I've been digging through the code on it lately to do just this, and I can see where a lot of time and thought was put into Creator, and I expect to see it go far in the next couple years.

As much as I like the _idea_ of Eclipse... it's just too damn slow for much of anything practical.

Why not extend vim? (2, Insightful)

Paradigm_Complex (968558) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598336)

Could anyone explain the reason why simply extending vim is being ruled out? Why is it considered a "mortal sin"?

Re:Why not extend vim? (1, Flamebait)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598370)

Because vim is supposed to be nice, lean and fast. Basically, this person wants emacs but doesn't want to admit it because he thinks that emacs is too bloated.

Re:Why not extend vim? (4, Insightful)

Subliminalbits (998434) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598570)

The poster probably doesn't want to have to learn keybindings for a new editor. He may even already know them but just prefers vim keybindings. What he really probably wants is the luxuries of of a full IDE without having to give up the editing flexibility and familiarity he has with vim.

Re:Why not extend vim? (1)

just_another_sean (919159) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599542)

Doesn't emacs have a vi mode? IMHO that would provide both the full IDE and the familiarity of vi. I personally feel, as other posters have mentioned, that vi/shell/compiler/debugger are enough of an IDE but to each his own. What is that old saying? Unix doesn't need an IDE, it *is* an IDE. Or something like that.

Re:Why not extend vim? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30598890)

As the OP, I definitely do not want to learn the EMACS keystrokes. I admit I don't want emacs because it is an essentially an operating system, not a method of inputting text. EMACS developing interests are concerned with it making it larger and putting its name on totally unrelated widgets. vim is more concerned with text editing.

Re:Why not extend vim? (1)

joshbosh (814376) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599802)

> vim is more concerned with text editing.

Vim users often state this, but when I last compared Vim and Emacs, the latter was vastly superior for editing plain text lists [1] and tables [2], which are used extensively in my notes and other non-code documents.

With the exception of Vim being arguably more ergonomic, in what way is Vim superior to Emacs for editing text?

[1] http://orgmode.org/manual/Plain-lists.html [orgmode.org]
[2] http://orgmode.org/worg/org-tutorials/tables.php [orgmode.org]

Re:Why not extend vim? (3, Funny)

frank_adrian314159 (469671) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598542)

Because, if you allow vim to be extended, it may accidentally become an operating system [wordaligned.org] .

Re:Why not extend vim? (1)

stilldead (233429) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599500)

For the record, unless your monkey is washing its hands between throws, you will probably end up with crap on your candy.

KDevelop4 (3, Informative)

DMiax (915735) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598382)

I know it's not out yet, but the katepart (the editor widget) already has a VI mode that supports most of the original commands and modal editing. Worth giving a try: the betas are getting better and better...

Eclipse plugins? (1)

HenryKoren (735064) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598418)

what about GVIM? (stupid answer)

Here are some VIM eclipse plugins:

http://vimplugin.org/ [vimplugin.org]
http://eclim.org/ [eclim.org]

Though I tend not to like these since the native plugins for whatever you might be developing inside eclipse tend to be more complete.

Re:Eclipse plugins? (2, Informative)

SirPrize (590850) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598608)

After having tried vimplugin and not being happy with it, I'm now trying out vrapper: http://vrapper.sourceforge.net/home/ [sourceforge.net] and having a better experience with it.

Emacs (1)

negrace (984807) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598450)

Sounds like you are ready for Emacs, son.

Vim has integration already (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30598458)

Umm vim supports plugins, and there is of course a GDB one.

Also there is an integrated command line called :!
or if you want to get more fancy you can open multiple buffers and :%!whatever to replace it with output

Vim easily integrates with the shell. You just have to know how to use both.

Re:Vim has integration already (2, Interesting)

Abcd1234 (188840) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599734)

Umm vim supports plugins, and there is of course a GDB one.

Sorry, no. I absolutely adore Vim and use it as my primary editor, but when it comes to debugger integration, Vim sucks. Hard. Decent GDB integration with Vim requires patching Vim. Why? Because Vim has *terrible* support for multiplexing interaction between the user and external processes (well, unless you're willing to settle with gvim, in which case clewn can use the NetBeans interface). ie, Vim is simply not architected to properly handle the idea of managing an on-going, externally running application, instead only really supporting the idea of a command starting, then completing (:! works exactly that way).

No, if there's one thing I desperately miss from Emacs, it's the more solid approach to handling external processes (and the better extension language... vimscript works, but, ugh, who wants to learn a new, special extension language when so many perfectly find embeddable languages are available?). Which is why you'll never see, say, embedded shell support in Vim: It's just not designed to be able to do that sort of thing.

IDEs With VIM Text Editing Capability? (2, Interesting)

omar.sahal (687649) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598462)

Will this [pida.co.uk] do.
I'm not entirely sure of not extending vim but "not wanting to give up the efficient text editing capabilities of VIM" could mean.

PIDA is an IDE (integrated development environment). PIDA is different from other IDEs in that it will use the tools you already have available rather than attempting to reinvent each one. PIDA is written in Python with the PyGTK toolkit, and although is designed to be used to program in any language, PIDA has fancy Python IDE features.

Its, a IDE and will allow you to use vim as well.

First?! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30598466)

very sick and its With process and become obsessed right now. I tried, series of internal during which I or a public club, it has to be fun play parties the work that you maggot, vomit, shit parts. The current slings are limited, what we've known bottoms butt. Wipe support GNAA, all along. *BSD [idge.net] Wash off hands market. Therefore BSD sux0rs. WhUat OF AMERICA) is the milestones, telling it has to be fun achieve any of the if you don't worthwhile. So I Asshole to others for the project. And promotes our Love of two is already aware, *BSD revel in our gay parts. The current recent Sys Admin WHICH DON'T USE THE 80s, DARPA saw BSD

ViEmu + Visual Studio (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30598472)

Normally, I'm a vim+make guy, but I occasionally have to use Visual Studio. The ViEmu [viemu.com] plugin was the best $99 I've ever spent on windows software. Doesn't embed vim, but it does support all of the vim extensions I use on a regular basis. It's actually pretty impressive how much of vi/vim they manage to implement - you quickly forget that you're not in the "real thing".

They also have plugins for Word,Outlook,etc but I don't use those programs so I haven't tried their plugins.

One minus: I don't think it works on the free version of VS (which I believe lacks plugin support in general) so this only applies if you have the full VS distro.

As a UNIX partisan, I can't recommend VS as your primary environment (so I guess I'm not answering the posters question, really) but if you're like me and just need a windows environment occasionally, I highly recommend checking it out.

Re:ViEmu + Visual Studio (1)

Joseph Lam (61951) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598648)

Normally, I'm a vim+make guy, but I occasionally have to use Visual Studio. The ViEmu [viemu.com] plugin was the best $99 I've ever spent on windows software.

The OP explicitly asked for linux based IDE.

Re:ViEmu + Visual Studio (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30599340)

OK, I missed that, although from context I had already assumed a windows-only solution would probably be a non-starter anyway.

Hopefully the link will be useful to some other vim-using readers, which is why I posted.

Re:ViEmu + Visual Studio (1)

Bigjeff5 (1143585) | more than 4 years ago | (#30600252)

Read much? He mentions that.

Komodo IDE (1)

Utoxin (26011) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598480)

I haven't tested it thoroughly, so I don't know how much of the VI command set it implements, but Komodo IDE has a 'vi' mode, and I believe it would fulfill your other requirements as well. (As a plus, it's fully cross platform, so you can use it everywhere)

At the risk of starting a flame war (5, Insightful)

dkleinsc (563838) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598510)

Try Emacs.

Seriously. The integration with gdb, gcc, etc is where Emacs really shines. Yes, the Control-Meta-cokebottle commands are a bit annoying, but there's worthwhile tradeoffs there.

The first post was also quite useful. And to be fair, I like vim too.

Moving in the wrong direction (2, Funny)

testostertwo (1203692) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598894)

Real men (still) use ed:

http://www.gnu.org/fun/jokes/ed.msg.htm [gnu.org]

Re:Moving in the wrong direction (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30599130)

dead link. put an 'l' at the end, like thisl.

Re:At the risk of starting a flame war (2, Insightful)

Fujisawa Sensei (207127) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599284)

Try Emacs.

Seriously. The integration with gdb, gcc, etc is where Emacs really shines. Yes, the Control-Meta-cokebottle commands are a bit annoying, but there's worthwhile tradeoffs there.

The first post was also quite useful. And to be fair, I like vim too.

Been there, done that, emacs, x-emacs, emacs with the GTK stuff. Am sticking with vim. I've been using vim since 1992-1993, back on my Amiga.

Re:At the risk of starting a flame war (3, Insightful)

Splab (574204) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599352)

I've only been using VI for 10 years, but still is almost impossible for me to work in any editor now where there aren't modes.

What made me choose VI over Emacs back in the day [tm] was the fact that my hands aren't build for the ctrl voodoo used in Emacs.

screen ftw? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30598512)

How about using screen? You can have a command line, gdb, vim, $foo... and it's resource friendly as well!

Re:screen ftw? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30598868)

Indeed. But I would prefer to use it in tandem with dvtm [brain-dump.org] .

Gvim (4, Insightful)

theinvisibleguy (982464) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598536)

Gvim is pretty good, it might still be too lean for what you are asking for, I would say it's more an intermediary step between vim and a big gui ide.

Extending Vim is a mortal sin? What? (2, Informative)

diablo-d3 (175104) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598560)

A lot of people use stuff like MiniBufExplorer or Taglist or Vim 7's built in OmniComplete. Everything an IDE can do, Vim itself can do a lot better.

Re:Extending Vim is a mortal sin? What? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30598684)

Extending vim is a mortal sin because the core code would be corrupted to serve the interests for which it was never intended.

EMACS .. (2, Informative)

deego (587575) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598590)

EMACS with viper mode :)

EMACS! (0, Redundant)

PedroKiefer (188614) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598622)

Use EMACS!

Expensive cake, but you can eat it (0)

assertation (1255714) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598672)

Buy a copy of Visual Slick Edit for Linux.

Re:Expensive cake, but you can eat it (2, Informative)

MadKatAlpha (1393157) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598730)

Buy a copy of Visual Slick Edit for Linux.

Great piece of software. But yes, quite expensive cake. http://www.slickedit.com/ [slickedit.com]

old school command line IDE (1, Interesting)

fred fleenblat (463628) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598716)

when i get tired of typing i'll do a command line like

    vi +100 program.c ; make; ./program arg1 arg2 etc

and then use command history (up arrow+return) to repeat it

it ends up being as fast as an IDE and it's much more flexible.
most importantly to me it works inside an ssh or telnet session with any old unix box.

Re:old school command line IDE (1, Flamebait)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599044)

it ends up being as fast as an IDE and it's much more flexible.

A modern IDE isn't the same thing as "editor with a single button to build project". It also has things such as code reformatting, refactoring, integrated debugging, code completion...

Using Vim to edit code today is like using ed to interactively edit text.

Re:old school command line IDE (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30599648)

Why is this modded flamebait? He's right. I'd call it informative.

Re:old school command line IDE (1)

geohump (782273) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599908)

its probably modded flamebait because he's not right. There is some support for each of those areas in vim, possibly excepting integrated debugging (depending on how you define integrated debugging, that is :) )

Re:old school command line IDE (1)

gdw2 (1460859) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599936)

I've found it easier to make vim a good IDE than to try to make an existing IDE more vim-like. Vim has a great :make command which will compile your program and jump to any lines with errors. It's great. If you want to run the program after a build, just put that in the Makefile too, or create a "make run".

Switching TO Vim (2, Interesting)

apharmdq (219181) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598746)

I'm currently working on switching away from my IDE to vim. There are plenty of plugins to put it on par with most IDEs, and honestly, a lot of the stuff in modern IDEs is just fluff. As for loading down Vim with all the extra stuff, I don't have the plugins autoload, but rather load after I run a script to transition it to my own "IDE Mode." This keeps Vim small and fast when I'm doing ordinary editing. I'm still in the transition phase, so I may not have seen all the disadvantages yet, but as far as I can see, the advantages outweigh them.

I'm also aware that Emacs does it quite well, but I'm more of a Vim user, so I'll stick with that unless I run into a wall and have to use Emacs in Viper Mode instead.

Extend Vim (3, Insightful)

Finder83 (829130) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598760)

Mortal sin? First, get over your ridiculous predisposition against extending vim. Vim is built to be extended, and extending it can make it much more useful as a tool and not just an editor. If you're good enough in Vim to prefer it as a text editor, then make it comfortable as an environment. There are some amazing extensions for vim, that for me at least, make me much more productive than using an "IDE". Fuzzy file finder, exuberant ctags with taglist, minibufexplorer...

Re:Extend Vim (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30598862)

Mortal sin? First, get over your ridiculous predisposition against extending vim. Vim is built to be extended, and extending it can make it much more useful as a tool and not just an editor. If you're good enough in Vim to prefer it as a text editor, then make it comfortable as an environment. There are some amazing extensions for vim, that for me at least, make me much more productive than using an "IDE". Fuzzy file finder, exuberant ctags with taglist, minibufexplorer...

sounds like emas to me

Re:Extend Vim (1)

Finder83 (829130) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599102)

Oh no, and as a vim user, I can't have anything like emacs. Thank you for pointing me to the error of my ways, I'll resume to prejudice against emacs and go back to basic vim. Thank you.

I use vim because I like it, not to look cool and l33t and fight against emacs users. ;) There's nothing wrong with making yourself more productive, and sticking to the tools you enjoy while doing it.

Sin (1)

fm6 (162816) | more than 4 years ago | (#30598802)

Extending VIM with these capabilities is a mortal sin

Then the worst sinners are the vim maintainers themselves. Even with just the default config, vim is full of IDE features.

Palo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30598828)

Eclipse with VIM http://eclim.org/ . It can do what VIM is doing plus all what Eclipse can. Integrated debugger is just basics.

Either VIM or an IDE (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30598858)

IMHO, vim is not ideal to use in any IDE.

Graphical IDEs like eclipse or netbeans are all about having nice clicki-like interfaces. That's the direct opposite of the vim interface, which is very flexible and heavily optimized for keyboard-only use.

At the moment, I have to use eclipse for work and for me as a vim user, I think it's a PITA. Even with all the nice features and key bindings it has, I tend to be a lot slower when using eclipse - it's kind of frustrating.

I tried the vim plugins for eclipse but then I realized that it was not what I expected it to be. If you use vim in an IDE, you loose many of the actual advantages of the IDE since its default editor is usually much better integrated. I'd be happy if there was a nice IDE which has vim as its default editor and integrates it well. But at the moment, I don't think there is one which could give you any benefit.

You're probably better off just using all the tools individually, each in an seperate xterm, along with a decent window manager (like i.e. fluxbox) which lets you define some useful key bindings.

vimjuta (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30598900)

There was a project to bring vim into anjuta. Though, I'm not sure if it was any successful.

ed is the one true editor - use it instead! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30598996)

From: patl@athena.mit.edu (Patrick J. LoPresti?)
    Message-ID:
    Sender: news@athena.mit.edu (News system)
    Subject: The True Path (long)
    Date: 11 Jul 91 03:17:31 GMT
    Path: ai-lab!mintaka!olivea!samsung!zaphod.mps.ohio-state.edu!think.com!snorkelwacker.mit.edu!bloom-picayune.mit.edu!athena.mit.edu!patl
    Newsgroups: alt.religion.emacs,alt.slack
    Organization: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    Lines: 95
    Xref: ai-lab alt.religion.emacs:244 alt.slack:1935

    When I log into my Xenix system with my 110 baud teletype, both vi
    *and* Emacs are just too damn slow. They print useless messages like,
    'C-h for help' and '"foo" File is read only'. So I use the editor
    that doesn't waste my VALUABLE time.

    Ed, man! !man ed

    ED(1) UNIX Programmer's Manual ED(1)

    NAME
        ed - text editor

    SYNOPSIS
        ed [ - ] [ -x ] [ name ]
    DESCRIPTION
        Ed is the standard text editor.
    ---

    Computer Scientists love ed, not just because it comes first
    alphabetically, but because it's the standard. Everyone else loves ed
    because it's ED!

    "Ed is the standard text editor."

    And ed doesn't waste space on my Timex Sinclair. Just look:

    -rwxr-xr-x 1 root 24 Oct 29 1929 /bin/ed
    -rwxr-xr-t 4 root 1310720 Jan 1 1970 /usr/ucb/vi
    -rwxr-xr-x 1 root 5.89824e37 Oct 22 1990 /usr/bin/emacs

    Of course, on the system *I* administrate, vi is symlinked to ed.
    Emacs has been replaced by a shell script which 1) Generates a syslog
    message at level LOG_EMERG; 2) reduces the user's disk quota by 100K;
    and 3) RUNS ED!!!!!!

    "Ed is the standard text editor."

    Let's look at a typical novice's session with the mighty ed:

    golem> ed

    ?
    help
    ?
    ?
    ?
    quit
    ?
    exit
    ?
    bye
    ?
    hello?
    ?
    eat flaming death
    ?
    ^C
    ?
    ^C
    ?
    ^D
    ?

    ---
    Note the consistent user interface and error reportage. Ed is
    generous enough to flag errors, yet prudent enough not to overwhelm
    the novice with verbosity.

    "Ed is the standard text editor."

    Ed, the greatest WYGIWYG editor of all.

    ED IS THE TRUE PATH TO NIRVANA! ED HAS BEEN THE CHOICE OF EDUCATED
    AND IGNORANT ALIKE FOR CENTURIES! ED WILL NOT CORRUPT YOUR PRECIOUS
    BODILY FLUIDS!! ED IS THE STANDARD TEXT EDITOR! ED MAKES THE SUN
    SHINE AND THE BIRDS SING AND THE GRASS GREEN!!

    When I use an editor, I don't want eight extra KILOBYTES of worthless
    help screens and cursor positioning code! I just want an EDitor!!
    Not a "viitor". Not a "emacsitor". Those aren't even WORDS!!!! ED!
    ED! ED IS THE STANDARD!!!

    TEXT EDITOR.

    When IBM, in its ever-present omnipotence, needed to base their
    "edlin" on a UNIX standard, did they mimic vi? No. Emacs? Surely
    you jest. They chose the most karmic editor of all. The standard.

    Ed is for those who can *remember* what they are working on. If you
    are an idiot, you should use Emacs. If you are an Emacs, you should
    not be vi. If you use ED, you are on THE PATH TO REDEMPTION. THE
    SO-CALLED "VISUAL" EDITORS HAVE BEEN PLACED HERE BY ED TO TEMPT THE
    FAITHLESS. DO NOT GIVE IN!!! THE MIGHTY ED HAS SPOKEN!!!

    ?

Use Vim Existing Plugins (1)

thePsychologist (1062886) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599006)

You don't have to extend VIM yourself. What's wrong with using plugins? There are many interfaces for debuggers and other things on the VIM website. Extending with plugins might just be easier.

intellij has a nice vim plugin (1)

ndunn (171784) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599122)

intellij has a nice vim plugin that I have been using since 7.

Supports all of the modes, search / replace, etc.

The only thing I miss is the fancy window-editing, but that is more the fault of intellij than the plugin author.

vim addict searching ide drug upgrade (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30599148)

give anjuta[1] a try, last i peeked it could embed and use both vim and emacs as editing components

[1] http://projects.gnome.org/anjuta/index.shtml [gnome.org]

pico! (1)

nomadic (141991) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599180)

pico!

Vim as an External Editor (1)

penguin359 (763783) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599206)

I use Vim with a large variety of small speciality IDEs and find that most IDEs properly detect changes made outside them and reload the file. While I am running a debugger, I am not modifying code and use the built-in debugger interface. When I need to make a change, I just hit Alt-Tab, modify the file and save, and hit Alt-Tab and the files reloaded in the IDE.

Emacs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30599262)

Vim is so 1995

Project Pane (1)

rawg (23000) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599466)

I would be happy with just a project pane, like Textmate has, that doesn't look like ass. I love VIM, but that's pretty much the only thing holding me back from dropping Textmate.

Wing IDE (2, Informative)

SkelVA (1055970) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599520)

If you're doing web work, primarily python, Wing IDE [wingide.com] has great VIM support. It supports custom vim configurations and all of the good stuff. It has a free version, but I threw down some cash (d to get a sweet integrated debugger and test-running capabilities. I found it superior to both Netbeans and pydev on Eclipse, but both of those also support VIM text editing (with plugins). Basically, pretty much every decent python editor I've tried has supported vim either natively or via plugins.

KDevelop (1)

tajmorton (806296) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599560)

KDevelop has a VIM mode for its text editor, I believe. Under Settings|Editor|Text Editor. Or at least it used to, a long time ago. You might need to install it as a separate package, or your distro might not package it (silly thing).

KILL THE HERETIC !! (1)

wmbetts (1306001) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599726)

KILL THE HERETIC !!

Re:KILL THE HERETIC !! (2, Funny)

Narcocide (102829) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599810)

Seriously! Why re-invent a wheel just to put it around your old wheel. EMACS already does everything and even comes with a psychotherapist plugin to help you cope with the debilitating side effects of C-x 2 C-x o C-u 25 C-x ^ syndrome.

Re:KILL THE HERETIC !! (0)

FeatherBoa (469218) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599862)

I know -- IDEs suck. I just do everything directly from VI -- shell out to various tools, pipe output back into a VI buffer to look at it. It really does all anyone could need.

GNU Screen and vim is all you need (2, Informative)

patrikas (1704126) | more than 4 years ago | (#30599918)

Vim has so many IDE features (autocompletion, ctags, syntax), hundreds of plugins that let you customize your environment.. snippets, Doxygen, debugging, compiling.. I'll only suggest you one thing: better concentrate on improving your Vim environment than searching for any other tool that embeds it. Use Vim with GNU Screen after all, that'll give you true IDE experience.

Not necessarily the silver bullet however... (1)

icepick72 (834363) | more than 4 years ago | (#30600024)

Edit your files with VIM as per usual. Also keep them open in your GUI IDE of choice. Most IDEs detect file changes and will either ask you to reload the files or you can sometimes set options to automatically reload. Now you have the best of both worlds on top of the same source code files - you have all the features of each solution. Also set up your GUI IDE to launch VIM on a source file using a keystroke.

well (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30600254)

I'm pretty sure emacs can do this!

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...