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Ubuntu "Memberships" Questioned

CmdrTaco posted more than 4 years ago | from the member-is-a-funny-word dept.

Linux 210

mxh83 writes "Apparently if you have 'sustained' and 'significant' contributions to Ubuntu, you can become a 'Ubuntu Member' and get some freebies. 'While there is no precise period that we look for, it is rare for applications to be accepted from people contributing for less than 6 months. It is vital to be well prepared for the meeting. You need to convince the membership board that you have contributed to Ubuntu.' Have they thought this incentive through? What about recognition for smaller contributors? And who judged what is a 'significant' contribution to a community project?" Update: 01/06 20:33 GMT by S : Changed the title to reflect the fact that Ubuntu memberships have actually been around for a few years now.

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Let me translate (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30670550)

"You've contributed many manweeks of your life improving code. We're here to determine whether you might be worthy of receiving a free t-shirt."

Re:Let me translate (4, Insightful)

xtracto (837672) | more than 4 years ago | (#30670754)

Well duh, you are supposed to contribute because you like to do it. Whatever they give you back is a plus.

As for who is going to judge what is a significat contribution... I guess whoever is giving you the free T-Shirt (Shuttleworth?)

Re:Let me translate (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30670902)

Is Ubuntu racist if none of the contributors are niggers?

Re:Let me translate (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30671762)

much less than you are, I dare say.

PulseAudio (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30671098)

And even then, who can say if the judges are capable? Are these the same people that deemed PulseAudio ready for default inclusion? This doesn't bode well. Not well at all...

Re:PulseAudio (1)

crimsun (4771) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671512)

No, they aren't the same people. And please, let's stop beating this silly dead PA horse already. It's in upstream GNOME; a decision was made to follow upstream.

Re:PulseAudio (3, Insightful)

geminidomino (614729) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671610)

And the decision to use a BETA of Grub2 that even the developers say isn't ready for production use? Was that upstream at gnome too?

Re:PulseAudio (1)

MrNaz (730548) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671580)

I know, they could end up giving free t-shirts to the wrong people. Who knows where it could end?! Those t-shirts could end up in the hands of... terrorists! Then what?! The Ubuntu team must be warned! Their actions could destroy us all!

Re:Let me translate (4, Interesting)

lymond01 (314120) | more than 4 years ago | (#30670918)

We're here to determine whether you might be worthy of receiving a free t-shirt.

I hear you get access to the Ubuntu Awards First Class Download area -- no bandwidth throttling for members!

Honestly, I think it's a good idea to give back to the people who have contributed. It's a little bit like Heinlein's Starship Troopers (the movie does not exist) where you're only allowed to vote if you've served in the military. In Ubuntu's case, you're only allowed to be a member, therefore having access to a long list of very lucrative opportunities and items (kidding), if you've contributed. You don't just pay a fee, but you actually help. It's like working in the soup kitchen versus giving money to the homeless shelter.

Re:Let me translate (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30670966)

military != politics

You should only be allowed to vote if you pass a test with questions about political issues.

Re:Let me translate (1)

CyberNigma (878283) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671088)

Being smart and informed doesn't != caring about the issues, selfless enough to deal with them appropriately, or responsible enough to deal with them at all.

Re:Let me translate (1)

CyberNigma (878283) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671120)

in fact I'd go further and say that being smart and informed without showing responsibility and selflessness is even worse than being dumb and uninformed. Dictators are built of that kind of stuff.

Of course in any group you have your 10% shit birds. History has shown that true in all groups (including those that have served).

Re:Let me translate (1)

CyberNigma (878283) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671264)

bad wording.. that is the stuff of Tyrannies is what I should have said.

Re:Let me translate (1)

H0p313ss (811249) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671094)

You should only be allowed to vote if you pass a test with questions about political issues.

Absolutely. If you'd read the book, you'd know that the military in Starship Troopers had extensive and fairly balanced civic and political education. I don't agree with Heinlein about everything but, having read almost everything he's written, I'd definitely say he's worth reading.

Hmmm... it just occurred to me that I could probably write the first draft of doctoral dissertation on Heinlein's work without pausing to breath...

Re:Let me translate (3, Informative)

CyberNigma (878283) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671326)

Also, if you read any of Heinlein's interviews, you will find that his intention was not that only military service earned citizenship, but ANY federal service, military or not earned citizenship. He did admit that he didn't convey that too well in the book like he had in his mind. Of course the movie, being a bug hunt movie that was converted to Starship Troopers near the end conveys none of that.

Re:Let me translate (1)

Chris Mattern (191822) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671328)

Absolutely. If you'd read the book, you'd know that the military in Starship Troopers had extensive and fairly balanced civic and political education.

I wonder if *you've* read the book. In the book a course in the "extensive and fairly balanced civic and political education" (called "Moral Philosophy") was required in high school as part of universal public education--*everybody* took the course...but they didn't have to pass it. Military *officer candidates* had to take a much heavier-duty version of it and could get bounced if they were unsatisfactory in it. But the enlisted men did *not* get their own course in it, and they still got to vote when they were honorably discharged. Enlisted men in the MI were 90% of the force.

Re: Moral Philosophy (1)

jimwelch (309748) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671560)

I've forgotten most of the book. Did he elaborate on how they dealt with divergent views on politics, morals, philosophy? How do you deal with stagnation (one world view) vs change (anarchy)? All of these "sciences" are opinion based and have change over time. For example, "God chose the king" changes to democracy.

Re:Let me translate (1)

H0p313ss (811249) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671608)

I contemplated attempting to explain those subtleties... but I just sighed deeply and hit submit instead. I think you explained it well. (Or at least better than I would have...)

Re:Let me translate (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30672210)

Plato came up with those ideas, not Heinlein. And the movie was a critique of Heinlein's cretinous ideas for social engineering. Maybe you could get that into your doctoral thesis.

Re:Let me translate (1)

EastCoastSurfer (310758) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671384)

military != politics

You should only be allowed to vote if you pass a test with questions about political issues.

While I agree that simply being in the military doesn't mean you know how to vote, don't forget the military (and police to a lesser extent) is the enforcement arm of politics. Someone who was/is in the military will have a different perspective on war and its consequences that may be helpful in making a political decision about the military.

Re:Let me translate (1)

CRCulver (715279) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671348)

You don't just pay a fee, but you actually help. It's like working in the soup kitchen versus giving money to the homeless shelter.

People with two strong hands to work are a dime a dozen. People with the skills to generate capital are sadly not so common. The person paying money to a charity so that it can hire employees to carry out charitable activities is just as important as those employees themselves. In today's European welfare states, governments carefully manage the economy to ensure that people can still make a lot of money and thus continue to pay high taxes to maintain services.

Working in certain jobs is helpful, but it's more self-help as you learn values like humility and patience. In you are talking about actual results, professionals are more effective than simple volunteers (notice the most productive kernel hackers are salaried now).

Re:Let me translate (1, Flamebait)

Yvanhoe (564877) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671408)

"Which is more than what you were supposed to received by volunteering your time."
A T-shirt is surely a laughable salary, unless you look at it from two other possible point of views :
- This is getting better. It was zero a few days ago. Going from zero to something is encouraging.
- This is not a t-shirt, this is a business card and a huge point on your CV. Wearing such a t-shirt at a convention or on a job interview (no, suits are not always mandatory) says "I was recognized for my skill in the Ubuntu project" and that, is worth quite a lot. But this is reputation money, not cash. Some people, however, long for this.

Re:Let me translate (0)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671524)

Let me see if I can get this meme anywhere close to right.

"I'm a 49 year old grandmother, coder, and contributor, and I've not given Ubuntu one single MAN-hour in my life!! What's wrong with WOMAN-hours? Quite frankly, I'm offended that those sexist pigs are overlooking some of their most valuable contributors. How about an award for WOMAN-hours? I could use a new maidenform, or a g-string, or just some FLOWERS! I don't want no stinkin' sweaty t-shirt, that probably only comes in one size - "Obese MoFO". See if I write another line of code for Canonical!"

What about money contribution? (1)

B00KER (1359329) | more than 4 years ago | (#30670572)

What about money contribution?

Re:What about money contribution? (3, Funny)

symes (835608) | more than 4 years ago | (#30670708)

What about money contribution?

Sorry but no - protestantism allows you to buy your way to heaven, not FOSS

Re:What about money contribution? (5, Funny)

Kell Bengal (711123) | more than 4 years ago | (#30670812)

I thought it was scientology where you had to buy upgrades.

Re:What about money contribution? (4, Funny)

Praeluceo (528253) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671068)

I thought it was Catholicism where you had to buy indulgences?

Re:What about money contribution? (3, Interesting)

SterlingSylver (1122973) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671540)

They retconned that. Now you're just supposed to give money if you want your church to stay open.

Re:What about money contribution? (1)

jacksinn (1136829) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671976)

Scientology is so first decade. Dahn Yoga is the cult du jour.

Re:What about money contribution? (3, Informative)

Attila Dimedici (1036002) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671150)

What about money contribution?

Sorry but no - protestantism allows you to buy your way to heaven, not FOSS

Actually, indulgences (buying your way into heaven)was one of the practices of the Roman Catholic CHurch that the Protestants were protesting.

Re:What about money contribution? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30671254)

That's catholicism, and they're called 'indulgences'

Re:What about money contribution? (0, Troll)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671418)

I though the Catholic church was king of buying your way to heaven.....

Want a papal blessing? only a few gold pieces.......

Re:What about money contribution? (2, Informative)

CannonballHead (842625) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671530)

I've heard this touted many times, and that Catholicism was non-works-based and Protestantism changed all that with the Reformation, turned it into a money thing, etc. Don't you guys read history?

The major reason for the Reformation... Martin Luther could not stand indulgences. That was a major player in it. And he didn't think salvation, as laid out in the Bible, is based on human effort - as he was taught as a monk. And tried to accomplish.

Protestantism's very start was because of the corruption of the Catholic church and them trying to sell the way to heaven, not vice versa....

(Note: Protestant denominations today may or may not reflect Protestantism of the 16th century. :) )

Re:What about money contribution? (1)

davester666 (731373) | more than 4 years ago | (#30672172)

Who says the Pope doesn't have a good PR department... :-)

Exclusivity for envy. (3, Interesting)

brycethorup (1682864) | more than 4 years ago | (#30670582)

I think this is a good move on Ubuntu's part. It should create envy in those who don't meet the criteria to contribute more and work towards a goal. I think this may help increase interest in wanting to contribute. I know it has for me.

Re:Exclusivity for envy. (3, Insightful)

Scopeuk (915859) | more than 4 years ago | (#30670670)

or drive away people that feel that they're being unfairly excluded from the program despite making only a marginally different contribution to those accepted or worse yet, seeing that their area of contribution seams to be less credited that other "pet areas", all in all a great way to drive a deep wedge into the community.

Re:Exclusivity for envy. (1)

Kell Bengal (711123) | more than 4 years ago | (#30670856)

Effectively classism in a classless society. I can easily see something like this being based on lines of code submitted, or number of updates posted. Exactly the sort of thing that discriminates againsty competent people who write terse code that's right the first time.

Re:Exclusivity for envy. (1)

markkezner (1209776) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671364)

You have a point. "Motivations" such as this can actually hurt morale and lead to in-fighting and nasty politics. Mary Poppendieck wrote a great essay [poppendieck.com] on this subject [Warning: PDF]. It's more geared towards corporate environments but a lot of the same principles still apply.

Re:Exclusivity for envy. (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 4 years ago | (#30672166)

Mary Poppendieck

No, a spoonful of sugar won't make the divvying up of bonus go down.

Re:Exclusivity for envy. (1)

brycethorup (1682864) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671460)

It won't drive away people as long as it is maintained that it is something that anyone who sets to it can achieve it. Honestly, I dispise the attitude that says that just because there is an achievement that anyone can achieve, but that people complain about it simply because they don't feel like they want to is pretty shallow. That is like complaining that no one deserves an A on a test simply because you aren't willing to put forth the effort to achieve one yourself.

Re:Exclusivity for envy. (1)

ghetto2ivy (1228580) | more than 4 years ago | (#30672054)

or drive away experts because the rewards are menial. Want to lose volunteers? Pay them. It insults the value of their time and makes it work.

Re:Exclusivity for envy. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30671456)

I think this is a good move on Ubuntu's part. It should create envy in those who don't meet the criteria to contribute more and work towards a goal. I think this may help increase interest in wanting to contribute. I know it has for me.

I'm not so sure about that. On a forum I help to moderate one of the most common questions from newbies is "So what do I have to do to become a Mod around here?".

They don't want to moderate because they want to help out, they want to moderate because they think being someone with a special badge on their favourite band's forum is awesome. In the end the forum Admin decided that people couldn't do anything to be a mod: when she thought more were needed they'd be chosen by the current mods.

I'm sure it will encourage some people to try to help out, but if the summary is right and "You need to convince the membership board that you have contributed to Ubuntu" then I'd say this will just end up with the current community being swamped by a lot of "Am I there yet? Am I there yet? Gimme my freebies!" people that just want the status.

Re:Exclusivity for envy. (1)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671866)

Maybe you're too young to remember when Red Hat had their IPO and reserved a block of stock for some open source contributors they deemed worthy. It managed to piss off people, both those included and those excluded.

LOL. (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30670586)

Which marketing department dipshit thought this stupid idea up?

Re:LOL. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30672124)

Apparently Ubuntu's

Wow.... things have *really* gone downhill (5, Insightful)

schon (31600) | more than 4 years ago | (#30670604)

You need to convince the membership board [...] And who judged what is a 'significant' contribution

This is amazing... we've gone from people not reading the articles, to not reading the *summaries*, to the *submitters* not reading what they themselves wrote!

CmdrTaco, I know it's tradition for editors not to read the summaries, but isn't it taking it a bit far to not read ones you wrote yourself?!?!?

Re:Wow.... things have *really* gone downhill (1)

mxh83 (1607017) | more than 4 years ago | (#30670662)

What are you pointing out exactly? Some part of it is a quote from the website.

Re:Wow.... things have *really* gone downhill (1)

schon (31600) | more than 4 years ago | (#30670860)

What are you pointing out exactly?

He's asking who determines who decides what is "significant", and the answer was two sencences earlier - the membership board.

Some part of it is a quote from the website.

Exactly - he quoted the answer, then asked the question.

Re:Wow.... things have *really* gone downhill (1)

Anonymous Cowpat (788193) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671286)

Perhaps he wanted to know who would be on the board. Shuttleworth? Markting drones? The existing members? Users? Me?

Re:Wow.... things have *really* gone downhill (1)

Kryis (947024) | more than 4 years ago | (#30672140)

There are different boards for different regions of the world, to allow for decent timezone coverage; Americas, EMEA and Austrilasia.

I believe that the people who make up the membership boards are appointed by the Ubuntu Community Council.

The members of the Ubuntu CC are appointed by Mark Shuttleworth, and "confirmed" by a vote by people that currently hold "Ubuntu Member" status.

Re:Wow.... things have *really* gone downhill (1)

RicardoGCE (1173519) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671434)

He wants to know WHO is on this "membership board" and what their credentials are for judging a contributor's worth.

differences (1)

SuperBanana (662181) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671156)

There's difference between "who decided what a significant contribution is defined as", "what a significant contribution is", and "who decides if you meet that criteria."

It's a perfectly fair question. The membership board needs to have defined standards; if they're just willy-nilly casting votes yes/no, and they're "members", then the membership is almost certainly going to consist of a very small group of people who hold the same opinions (or are friends / business partners.)

They also should be held responsible to someone. Otherwise, they can do whatever the hell they want, including ignore guidelines given to them.

This may come as a shock to some of the younger (in terms of age/maturity) members of slashdot, but corporate governance is complicated, and little things matter. Just like with civil and criminal law. Think of that the next time Slashdot posts a "some judge did X" story and you all pile on the "how stupid" bandwagon.

Re:Wow.... things have *really* gone downhill (1)

ThirdPrize (938147) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671232)

I think CmdrTaco was asking who gets to be on the board rather than what is the comittee structure going to be like. Does the Board consist of Linus and a few cronies? How much do you have to contribute to get on the board?

What? (2, Insightful)

symes (835608) | more than 4 years ago | (#30670618)

It sounds like one of those dreadful golf clubs - surely there is a better way of recognising significant contributions without the potential for "membership commiittees" screwing things up?

Re:What? (4, Funny)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | more than 4 years ago | (#30670756)

It sounds like one of those dreadful golf clubs

sounds like you've done driver development, before..

Re:What? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30671318)

You must feel chippy, putting it that way. Personally, I don't think it's a fair way, and I'm a bit teed off.

Re:What? (1)

Arthur Grumbine (1086397) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671556)

Well played. Well played. But what if someone finds a security hole-in-one of the contributions of a member? Will the member lose their membership, or are those kinds of mistakes considered par for the course?

House Party Redux (1)

alinuxguruofyore (1117973) | more than 4 years ago | (#30670630)

At least I received a free copy of Windows 7 for having a Windows 7 house party.

Re:House Party Redux (0, Flamebait)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 4 years ago | (#30670816)

[joke]But was the party fun enough that you need to install windows 7 as penance?[/joke]

Windows 7 isn't too bad though, especially because it was free for me (it would not be worth the $200+ price tag). I spend a little less than half my computer time in each of win7 and ubuntu at the moment.

I wouldn't want to be part of any club... (2, Funny)

filesiteguy (695431) | more than 4 years ago | (#30670660)

...that would have me as a member. :)

I like the quote in the article, "Instead, people should set a goal of making substantial and sustained contributions to Ubuntu. By doing this, the focus shifts from working hard in order to get one of the Membership benefits to working hard in order to make Ubuntu a greater distribution and improve the community,"

You know, people are going to want the benefits.

I wonder if bitching about the GUI or how I don't get to sync my blackberry using a GUI I like counts.

Is there a suggestion box? (1, Funny)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 4 years ago | (#30670688)

Do I get to complain about lame mono apps being included in favor of better gtk or KDE ones.

Re:Is there a suggestion box? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30670926)

The mono apps are GTK idiot.

Re:Is there a suggestion box? (1)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671424)

No they aren't.

They pull in a whole load of their own mono specific crap that a system would not otherwise need.

They aren't just "gtk apps".

More importantly, they are still LAME.

That has been the key problem that tends to get missed in all of the anti-patent and
anti-microsoft paranoia that tends to erupt every time that mono is mentioned. The
stuff that's been built with it so far just isn't terribly compelling. Just on a pure
"features" or "requirements" basis it doesn't impress anyone without an axe to grind.

One simply doesn't need to cite ideological grounds to reject mono.

Re:Is there a suggestion box? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30671938)

Not believing it doesn't make it not true.

See: apt-cache show libmono-addins-gui0.2-cil

I'm sorry that you don't like that Microsoft wrote C# but you stupid anti-microsoft-everything are the primary reason that I use Mono.

I'd rather not have jackasses like you use my shit anyway.

Re:Is there a suggestion box? (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671130)

If they are not in the repository yes.
If they not in the install no. Just create your own distro or use another one.
Well yea you can complain anyway but are the gtk and KDE apps really better or just not mono?

Re:Is there a suggestion box? (1)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671534)

> Well yea you can complain anyway but are the gtk and KDE apps really better or just not mono?

      If I want a small quick tool to easily manipulate an image then yes.

      I am actually better off with a old copy of xv that hasn't been maintained in years.

Re:Is there a suggestion box? (2, Informative)

DragonWriter (970822) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671458)

Do I get to complain about lame mono apps being included in favor of better gtk or KDE ones.

If you want Ubuntu with KDE environment and apps as "standard", Canonical has a distribution for that [kubuntu.org] .

Why not? (4, Informative)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 4 years ago | (#30670696)

You already have to [digitally] sign a document and agree to a code of conduct in order to become an "Ubuntero", which among other minor benefits is necessary in order to get access to the PPA system. This is just another layer of evaluation for another icon next to your name on Ubuntu sites and... whatever it was they're giving you. In return, they give you the right to represent yourself as a "member" of Ubuntu, kind of like an employee except you don't get paid :)

Re:Why not? (1)

knarf (34928) | more than 4 years ago | (#30670868)

Well, there used to be a problem in the Ubuntu Code of Conduct in that it contained some guff about Shuttleworth (or 'SABDFL') always being right and such. That made me, even though I am quite active in Ubuntu, refuse to sign the Code. Most of those references have been taken but it still refers to SABDFL as being perfect. Come on, Ubuntu project, this is not a religion. Remember, No kings, no queens but rough concensus and running code (to roughly paraphrase IETF's original credo)...

Remove the last reference to the Self-Appointed Benevolent Dictator For Life and I will reconsider. Until that time I will continue to contribute as long as I agree to the course the project takes but I will not sign any declaration of conformity.

Re:Why not? (1)

Nimey (114278) | more than 4 years ago | (#30670906)

If you don't have /somebody/ with final say, you'll end up with another Debian that doesn't have any sort of release schedule or anything to distinguish itself.

Besides, Shuttleworth's financing the distro.

Re:Why not? (1)

knarf (34928) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671162)

What does it matter that Shuttleworth finances the distro? He does not finance me, nor any of the other volunteers. Counted in hours*$ their contribution is bigger than Shuttleworth's but they (rightfully) do not get an exception in the Code. Neither should Shuttleworth or anyone else. Having a leader does not mean that person is infallible.

Developers are a picky and meticulous lot. This joke in the Code does not fall well with many, just search the web for "ubuntu code of conduct sabdfl". There is even a bug out on it:

https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu-codeofconduct/+bug/53843 [launchpad.net]
https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu-codeofconduct/+bug/53843/comments/11 [launchpad.net]

Re:Why not? (1)

Nimey (114278) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671220)

Quit taking yourself so seriously, snowflake.

Re:Why not? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30671354)

Releases which are stable and are not shipped in a broken state would seem to distinguish Debian from Ubuntu rather clearly.

On a broader level to say Debian doesn't have anything to distinguish itself is foolish. It runs a Linux kernel on at least 11 different architectures and can also run a FreeBSD kernel on i386 and amd64. Debian is the origin of the APT package management tools widely used by derivatives and others. It has a Social Contract. Etc. etc. etc. To see it as undistinguished or having nothing to distinguish it says more about of the person making the comment than it does about the object of his/her derision.

Re:Why not? (1)

knarf (34928) | more than 4 years ago | (#30670964)

There is actually a difference between the Code of Conduct you read on the website (http://www.ubuntu.com/community/conduct) and the one you are supposed to sign (https://launchpad.net/codeofconduct/1.0.1). The former does not refer to Shuttleworth as being any different from anyone else - it actually does not refer to him at all. That is just as well as he plans to step down next year...

I guess they forgot to update the version you are supposed to sign?

Reminds me (1, Offtopic)

gmuslera (3436) | more than 4 years ago | (#30670742)

Ads Disabled x
Thanks again for helping make Slashdot great!

Re:Reminds me (2, Funny)

Kell Bengal (711123) | more than 4 years ago | (#30670894)

Well played, sir. Well played.

Re:Reminds me (2, Informative)

Itninja (937614) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671036)

I don't know if I have ever 'made Slashdot great' or whatever. But NoScript and ABP give me the same result.

Re:Reminds me (1)

nine-times (778537) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671734)

Personally I think stuff like that is pretty good. If you want to motivate people to work hard, sometimes you just have to show them that their work is appreciated. There are a wide variety of ways to show it, so pick one. Showing your appreciation becomes all the more important in these sorts of collaborative efforts where contributors aren't being paid.

Not news (5, Informative)

flimm (1626043) | more than 4 years ago | (#30670762)

Ubuntu membership has not been introduced recently, it has been around from before I started Ubuntu (2006), at least. This is not news. The title needs changing.

Ubuntu members get @ubuntu.com addresses, their blogs syndicated on planet.ubuntu.com, a free subscription to LWN, and they vote for certain things.

Re:Not news (1)

Nasser (80677) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671070)

agreed. The title should be changed. When i read the title i thought Ubuntu created different membership levels or something. I'm an Ubuntu Member myself and it wasnt hard to get. Its not really a big deal you get a few small perks like the @ubuntu.com email address (which just forwards to your launchpad email account) and the right to use the ubuntu logo on your resume or business cards. sometimes they let Ubuntu Members test stuff before its released to the public like UbuntuOne (just like dropbox).

Re:Not news (1)

2muchcoffeeman (573484) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671166)

Ubuntu membership has not been introduced recently, it has been around from before I started Ubuntu (2006), at least. This is not news. The title needs changing.

Which could have been determined by Taco with just a little basic research. An e-mail. A text message. Anything.

I'm trying to decide whose failure was more epic: Taco (lack of fact-checking) or mxh83 (lack of knowledge). Leaning towards Taco as the "winner." Any thoughts, folks?

Re:Not news (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30671640)

Taco and the rest of the staff are suppose to act as gatekeepers for what appears on Slashdot. It's there job to determine what's new news or out of date news, so the blame lies with them.

Re:Not news (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30672096)

Agreed. I've been a member since 2005.

What about indirect contributions? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30670840)

What if I was out drinking (heavily) one night with Mark Shuttleworth and I told him about this crazy computer idea I had.

Who knows, maybe Ubuntu was a direct result of me processing tequilla shots!

This is nothing new (1)

akeyes (720106) | more than 4 years ago | (#30670842)

This has existed for a number of years now...

Exclusivity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30671000)

This seems to represent exactly what the open source world needs less of: exclusivity reasons for people to gloat and act superior.

Blast from the past (0, Troll)

hwyhobo (1420503) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671032)

(and one of the benefits of the membership is

Voting privileges to confirm Ubuntu Community Council nominations

Wow. Just like voting in the former Soviet Union. Glad somebody is keeping old traditions alive.

Re:Blast from the past (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30671410)

Yeah. Just like voting in USA. Glad somebody is keeping true old traditions alive. FLOSS = REAL DEMOCRACY AND TRANSPARENCY.

DD (2, Interesting)

bfree (113420) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671046)

I wonder if a Debian Developer who has uploaded a new package version to unstable since Ubuntu first forked would be approved? Or upstream developers? I presume not and this is just about recognising contributions exclusively for the benefit of Ubuntu.

I'll resist a rant and simply offer a link to Greg Kroah-Hartman's speach at the 2008 linux plumbers conference to show why I for one value contributions to Ubuntu as next to worthless http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=3385088017824733336 [google.com]

Re:DD (or rant without guilt) (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30671516)

Why not? Ubuntu *has* DDs as members; conversely, Debian has DDs that started at Ubuntu. Also for upstream. You presume wrong. If you had a bit of interest you could have checked, but your (almost religious) prejudice (from Latin, "pre-judge", literally) seems to block the possibility of enlightenment. I am not saying Ubuntu is always right, as I am not saying your (and other DDs) position is always wrong.

This is no news, by the way (both the article and your position -- and Greg K-H' s). And both are wrong, although Greg H-K is _less_ wrong, since he only cares about contributions to the kernel.

...chewie (5, Funny)

boyko.at.netqos (1024767) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671124)

I wouldn't worry too much about that.

Like, okay, you know in Star Wars, when Leia hands out medals to Luke and Han, but Chewie's just standing there on the podium - he doesn't get a medal?

Well, here's the thing, if you're an Ubuntu contributor and you're chosen for membership, it's like getting those medals. But if you're an Ubuntu contributor, and you're not chosen for membership, you're like Chewie - no medal. But that's not a bad thing, because, you know what? Chewie is standing up there on the podium too, and you know what, it doesn't matter if he gets a medal - because Chewie is a frickin' bad ass, and Chewie knows it.

Hell, the only reason Chewie doesn't get a medal is cause he's got like 20 or so of his own from back in the day. Let the noobs have some fun, you know? Besides, if he wanted too, he could take that medal from whiny-boy or smirk-merc. Lightsabers? Blasters? They're no use when you fuggin' rip their arms out of their sockets.

Re:...chewie (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30672058)

Que?? I think I need car analogy.

openSUSE members (3, Insightful)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671474)

openSUSE has had a very similar program for some time.

http://en.opensuse.org/Members [opensuse.org]

Members get to vote on the board, and get a free boxed/retail copy of each openSUSE release.

Re:openSUSE members (1)

sjbcfh (611594) | more than 4 years ago | (#30672240)

Members get to vote on the board

Yes.

and get a free boxed/retail copy of each openSUSE release.

No. I've been a member since the first day applications for membership were accepted and have never received a free box. Those normally go to people who make contributions to the distribution or community (consistently good bug reports, heavy involvement in the development cycle via bug reports and feedback, quality packaging, translations, advocacy, community involvement, etc.) above and beyond the usual, and not just to members but to non-members, as well.

I'm not much of a joiner (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30671520)

There's something about Ubuntu's approach to community wrangling that's a little off putting. It's not fair to call them cult-like, but there's still a faint odor of that sort of doubleplusgood groupthink going on.

"Ubuntu Membership itself is a lot less important than what it represents. People often set a goal of becoming an Ubuntu Member because they want one of the many benefits that goes along with it. Instead, people should set a goal of making substantial and sustained contributions to Ubuntu. By doing this, the focus shifts from working hard in order to get one of the Membership benefits to working hard in order to make Ubuntu a greater distribution and improve the community, which is a lot more important than being recognized as an Ubuntu Member."

They're not just telling us what we ought to be doing, they're telling us what our motivation should be. It's not enough to do the work, you have to have the proper mindset.

Other distros are better with the engineering, and not as creepy.

Business Cards. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30671526)

I can see it now.

you: Let me leave a business card.
other person: You work at Ubuntu?
you: No, but I made 10,000 posts in the forums (insert "no, but stayed at Holiday Inn" joke here)

Uh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30671550)

Ubuntu Memberships are not "new" by any means - they have been around for _AGES_ - so to imply they have been "introduced" is sloppy reporting outright.

Ubuntu is NOT how one uses open source (1)

CheshireFerk-o (412142) | more than 4 years ago | (#30671630)

yeah, i cannot imagine there are many slashdot users that condone Ubuntu over Debian, tis utter blasphemey, either run the real deal or get in line with the other morons who cant get past a GUI.

Animal Farm Meets Revenge of The Nerds (1, Troll)

mpapet (761907) | more than 4 years ago | (#30672044)

This project is well on its way to becoming a kleptocracy. While there are many moribund software projects, this one is destined to become an organization filled with status/power seeking individuals vying for trinkets and icons with the persons responsible for distributing the trinkets surrounded by yes-geeks while the amount of giving back to the broader community continues to decline.

Chances are excellent the project will take on much of the Miguel De Icaza weirdness. An example would be seeking approval from an organization that has nothing but contempt for the Mono project at C-level.

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