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Disaster Recovery For Haiti's Cell Phone Networks

CmdrTaco posted more than 4 years ago | from the what-the-world-needs-now dept.

Communications 139

spun writes "A disaster recovery team from Trilogy International Partners, LLC was among the first responders to arrive after the quake in Haiti. After seeing to the safety of their staff, they worked quickly to bring up emergency generators and restore service to the devastated country. Winners of a State Department medal for their previous work in Haiti, the company appears to be a model not only for proper disaster recovery response, but also for ethical corporate behavior. Their quick action has no doubt saved thousands of lives, but Haiti still needs our help." Keith Calder, who used to work on Slashdot ad stuff before we had big corporate owners, is now a film producer of last summer's Battle for Terra. They are giving away signed copies of the DVD to the first 100 people who make $25+ red cross donations. It would be cool to see generous Slashdot Sci-Fi fans make a difference. If you are curious or voyeuristic about the devastation, Google Maps has satellite photos.

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Better yet! (-1)

Yamata no Orochi (1626135) | more than 4 years ago | (#30766434)

Alternately, they could donate the DVDs to the devestated people of Haiti, skipping the middlemen entirely!

Too soon?

Re:Better yet! (2, Insightful)

Zedrick (764028) | more than 4 years ago | (#30766614)

Yes, much too soon. I enjoy tasteless jokes, but people are still dying over there.

Re:Better yet! (1)

davester666 (731373) | more than 4 years ago | (#30766852)

People are dying everywhere. Stop giving away the DVD's until EVERYBODY stops dying.

Re:Better yet! (1)

BisexualPuppy (914772) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767766)

There are people dying everywhere every single second, so I fail to see how the hell you can "enjoy tasteless jokes". Jokes are, to my knowledge, always focusing on someone's situation.

Re:Better yet! (1)

MathiasRav (1210872) | more than 4 years ago | (#30770334)

Yes, much too soon. I enjoy tasteless jokes, but I don't enjoy tasteless jokes.

FTFY. Some people like talking about the issues but keeping it funky; some people are having a hard time understanding this but can relate to it more easily by way of humor. You may not like it, the mods may not like it and I will be modded down, but that's just how I and my friend Anonymous Coward feels.

Re:Better yet! (1)

Yamata no Orochi (1626135) | more than 4 years ago | (#30770718)

As you can see, it unfortunately looks like some uptight gentleman wanted rid of all his points and has already ransacked this whole thread with troll mods.

Re:Better yet! (1)

MathiasRav (1210872) | more than 4 years ago | (#30770790)

Good for us.

Re:Better yet! (0, Troll)

cpghost (719344) | more than 4 years ago | (#30766664)

Alternately, they could donate the DVDs to the devestated people of Haiti, skipping the middlemen entirely!

What good are DVDs in a ravaged country without food, water, electricity, houses, and DVD players/TV sets to view them? To decorate their new makeshift shanty towns with those funny little shiny silver discs?

Re:Better yet! (0, Troll)

Yamata no Orochi (1626135) | more than 4 years ago | (#30766952)

Alternately, they could donate the DVDs to the devestated people of Haiti, skipping the middlemen entirely!

What good are DVDs in a ravaged country without food, water, electricity, houses, and DVD players/TV sets to view them? To decorate their new makeshift shanty towns with those funny little shiny silver discs?

I'm pleased to have to explain this to you: it was a joke. Donating DVDs of a mediocre movie as an incentive to give money to a charity organization, where, presumably, those DVDs cost someone money to make that would've better been spent on the charity itself. The joke was one that suggested such, except still in the form of DVDs, rather than the money used to create them.

And it was all for the sake of getting a rise out of people anyway.

Re:Better yet! (2, Insightful)

Jeng (926980) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767330)

If the DVD's were going to get tossed, then using them to obtain disaster support sounds like a good use of the resources.

Re:Better yet! (1)

Itninja (937614) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767342)

whoosh!

Re:Better yet! (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 4 years ago | (#30770598)

You can use them for signalling. Heliograph, I think is the technical term (JGBFTPACBATLIU).

Re:Better yet! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30766728)

These dirty, devil worshiping niggers have cell phones?

Re:Better yet! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30766734)

You are a sick, funny individual.

Re:Better yet! (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 4 years ago | (#30766818)

Given that it isn't a very good joke, probably.

Goatse (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30766438)

Frosty piss [goatse.fr]

Many Avenues to Help (4, Informative)

stoolpigeon (454276) | more than 4 years ago | (#30766504)

I wrote a journal entry earlier today about some of what the organization I work for is doing in Haiti [slashdot.org] . There are a lot of others in play too and some great ways to help. Hopefully after this stops being the story of the hour, the assistance will continue so that country can come out of this with some kind of up side to it all.
 
  The Navy is on the way [neptunuslex.com] and as a former sailor I'm pretty proud to see them rushing to help as they so often do. Helicopters are going to be key for quite a while I think.
 
We'll see the world step up in a big way here I think, and once again we'll see one of the nicer sides of America and how this country can be very generous in times of crisis - not just our government but in the direct giving and participation of the citizenry.

Re:Many Avenues to Help (3, Interesting)

jgtg32a (1173373) | more than 4 years ago | (#30766690)

Aircraft Carriers are very nice in these kind of situations, a clear airfield and IIRC those things can produce a lot of fresh water.

Re:Many Avenues to Help (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#30766908)

Speaking of fresh water, I'm sure some of

these [ted.com]

could help

Re:Many Avenues to Help (3, Interesting)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767968)

Maybe so but one of these http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Carl_Vinson_(CVN-70) [wikipedia.org] can make 100,000 gallons of fresh water a day, has a hospital, and a bunch of helicopters. It can also provide communications and ATC services.
Of course this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USNS_Comfort_(T-AH-20)#2010_Haitian_Earthquake [wikipedia.org] will also be a big help as will.
Actually what they need is money. If everybody in the US just gave $5 it would be a huge amount of money. Just be sure you give to a real charity. The SCUM of the earth are already setting up fake donation websites.
If in doubt the Red Cross, Doctors without Boarders, and Catholic Charities all have a good track record and I believe are all already "in country".

Re:Many Avenues to Help (5, Informative)

spun (1352) | more than 4 years ago | (#30766890)

The hospital ship Comfort is on the way and so is the supercarrier Carl Vinson, which can provide power and over 100,000 gallons of desalinated water per day. The problems facing Haiti were severe even before this disaster, but afterwords, what little government they did have has, quite literally, collapsed. In other recent disasters, there has at least been continuity of civil government and some kind of coordinated response from within the country. That is simply not possible in this case. Even the UN headquarters there has collapsed.

One of the first things our military did was to get air traffic control up and functioning. The control tower at the airport had collapsed, and there is simply no power in Port-au-Prince. The US cutter Forward was among the first on the scene, and began directing flights into the country. U.S. Southern Command dispatched a team of 30 engineers, planners and a command and control group to Haiti on a Puerto Rico Air National Guard C-130 Hercules, which arrived soon afterwords and took over this vital function.

The biggest problem is going to be getting things out of the airport and to the people that need it. Reports indicate that the harbor is badly damaged and supplies will need to be trans-shipped through the Dominican Republic and driven into Haiti. This seems to me to be a job for the Seabees [wikipedia.org] . Does anyone know if the Nimitz class supercarriers like the Carl Vinson carry LCACs [wikipedia.org] ?

Re:Many Avenues to Help (1)

stoolpigeon (454276) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767024)

No - a cvn can't support landing craft like that - but the gator navy stuff will. The USS Bataan is an amphib - the USS Fort McHenry and USS Carter Hall are dock landing ships. They'll be able to get significant equipment and material to land. And I'm sure the airforce will be bringing heavy lifters in to the airport.

Re:Many Avenues to Help (1)

spun (1352) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767150)

The airport is badly backed up at the moment. I'm amazed that as much material made it onto the runway as it did. Pilots on the ground were performing rough traffic control from their cockpits. Although the roads are not too badly damaged, the problem is really a lack of vehicles. Getting supplies off the planes, onto some kind of vehicles, and out to refuge camps will take some planning and coordination.

This kind of projection of US power does worlds of good for our public image around the world. Haiti is right in our back yard. Let's show the world what the US can do when disaster strikes.

Re:Many Avenues to Help (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767640)

"This kind of projection of US power does worlds of good for our public image around the world. Haiti is right in our back yard. Let's show the world what the US can do when disaster strikes."
As a US citizen I dare the rest of the world to try and make us look bad. Let's you put in more help than the US and do it faster!

Honestly I don't care what the rest of the world thinks of the US. I just want as much help there as fast as it can get there so try and show us up.

Re:Many Avenues to Help (2, Interesting)

spun (1352) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767716)

I just want as much help there as fast as it can get there so try and show us up.

Sure, as do I. But it is important to note that there are other avenues of diplomacy than guns. If you want to get as much help there (and to the next place) as fast as possible, support a political party that actually funds the USAID. [usaid.gov] It will do more for our national security than any amount of purely military funding.

Re:Many Avenues to Help (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 4 years ago | (#30768264)

I don't give a rats ass about politics. And now is not the time to say this party is better than that.
They all suck!
So shut up and give some money to the Red Cross or the charity of your choice.

Re:Many Avenues to Help (1)

spun (1352) | more than 4 years ago | (#30768488)

I'm studiously NOT saying one party is better than another. I'm saying, make sure whatever party you DO support, supports USAID. Don't let anyone try to tell you it's a waste of money.

I've donated $100 already, and am researching which charities to give more to.

Re:Many Avenues to Help (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 4 years ago | (#30769174)

Red Cross, Doctors without Borders, and Catholic Charities are all good choices. They are in country and all have a good rep for getting help to the people that need it.

Re:Many Avenues to Help (2, Insightful)

edittard (805475) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767706)

Getting supplies off the planes, onto some kind of vehicles, and out to refuge camps will take some planning and coordination.

How about mules? Bonus - they're edible!

Re:Many Avenues to Help (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30767724)

Let's show the world what the US can do when disaster strikes.

Yes.. let's

disaster [wordpress.com] - result [iraqbodycount.org]

disaster [nydailynews.com] - result [wordpress.com]

disaster [umn.edu] - result? Still waitin' on that one.

As for Haiti? Look at who's been meddling all this time.

Re:Many Avenues to Help (1)

spun (1352) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767764)

Let's show the world what the US can do when disaster strikes.

Yes.. let's

disaster [wordpress.com] - result [iraqbodycount.org]

disaster [nydailynews.com] - result [wordpress.com]

disaster [umn.edu] - result? Still waitin' on that one.

As for Haiti? Look at who's been meddling all this time.

Us. We've been meddling, and not in a good way. We can't change the past, all we can do is try harder to do the right thing in the future.

Re:Many Avenues to Help (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30767116)

Carriers don't.. but any number of the LHD's or LHA's in and around the area could accomodate.. I'm sure..

Re:Many Avenues to Help (2, Interesting)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#30768726)

Man, these are the moments, where I am proud to be human. There may be much evil going on. But sometimes we just seem to switch to another mode. Where we work together and act for the good of us all.

Maybe we humans just have too comfortable lives. Cavemen were small groups who had to work in that mode, to survive.
Like the Hadza [nationalgeographic.com] for example.
I’m of course not saying that I want more catastrophes. Just more of that outside-normal-rules teamwork.
We would already be much further in evolution...

Re:Many Avenues to Help (1)

MartyBorg (1209490) | more than 4 years ago | (#30769042)

50,000+ dead... wait, don't a lot of people practice Voodo in Haiti? ... and Pat Robertson says they have a pact with the devil ... hang on... Sweet Jumping Jehoshaphat! It's happening! WWZ! No wonder we're sending a carrier.

Re:Many Avenues to Help (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30767402)

Yeah, I totally agree with you, catastrophe brings out what is the best in the American people. We are always out to reach out to help other people in distress. However, for the first time I am worried for the future of our country. Did you see the many pathetic jokes and tasteless comments we have here in Slashdot? It is not MySpace where you shall expect that as their audience are a bunch of Hispanic trash ghetto illegal immigrants, and their descendants, so they came from the trash bin of the world and you shall expect them to keep doing their illiterate thing that is destroying America: prostitution, permissibility, broken families, women living on abusive relationships, kids being born in drug and alcohol drowned households and all the other things we see in the Hispanic Cuban, Mexican, Dominican, Puerto Rican and other kind of ghettos that are destroying our country.
But now, you see this very same kind of comment between the brightest here in Slashdot. So that makes me worry that our country inner heart is forever corrupted by this heartless Hispanic cancer.
Anyways, we real Americans will be reaching to those people in Haiti and helping them to rebuild their country, while supporting our heroic ICE in their fight to get America rid of the Hispanic contamination.

Not so fast down the memory hole... (3, Interesting)

copponex (13876) | more than 4 years ago | (#30769036)

The reason Haiti is in the shithole is because it's been occupied and abused by foreign powers. We've been involved since the end of the 19th Century, when legendary Marine Smedley Butler, in his own words, "was a racketeer, a gangster for capitalism... I helped make Haiti and Cuba a decent place for the National City Bank boys to collect revenues in."

Haiti was occupied by the United States from 1915-1934. Since then, marines have been sent to Haiti numerous times. The CIA played both sides of Duvalier while his paramilitary force, the Tonton Macoute, assassinated dissidents and anyone who dared oppose Papa Doc. In a final embarrassment to the Haitian people and to the very idea of democracy itself, the Bush Administration sent the Marines to help finalize the coup in 2004 by kidnapping Aristide and sending him to Africa, once again throwing the nation into chaos.

It's good that the US Government is assisting the Haitian people during the disaster, and I never discount the generosity of the American public. Just don't be surprised if they don't treat us like friends.

A new book on the subject, Damming the Flood: Haiti, Aristide and the Politics of Containment by Peter Hallward, scrupulously documents the events leading up to February 29, 2004, and concludes that what occurred during the "rebellion" was in fact a modern coup d'état, financed and orchestrated by forces allied with the US government. Hallward provides extensive documentation for his claims in interviews he has given on the subject. -Wikipedia

Thanks for pointing that out (2, Insightful)

spun (1352) | more than 4 years ago | (#30769252)

I'm sure a lot of people don't realize just how culpable we are in Haiti's misery. We can't change the past, but we can do better in the future.

Digicel still working (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30766506)

"Caribbean mobile operator Digicel Group Ltd. said Wednesday that its network in Haiti is still providing domestic and international phone service after a major earthquake devastated the country."
Digicel have also gotten their network in Haiti back working again. http://online.wsj.com/article/BT-CO-20100113-709435.html?mod=WSJ_latestheadlines

Re:Digicel still working (1)

spun (1352) | more than 4 years ago | (#30769454)

Digicel has also donated $5,000,000 in cash to Haiti. To put that in perspective, Chase Manhattan donated $1,000,000, less than a single one of their executives made in bonuses this year.

Re:Digicel still working (2, Interesting)

grcumb (781340) | more than 4 years ago | (#30770516)

Digicel has also donated $5,000,000 in cash to Haiti. To put that in perspective, Chase Manhattan donated $1,000,000, less than a single one of their executives made in bonuses this year.

I organised a bit of emergency aid delivery with some folks from Digicel Pacific in the days following the Samoan tsunami that left thousands of people homeless. Not only are they very good at logistics, they also actually care about the people they serve. With their assistance, we were able to deliver solar/wind-up radios to affected families quickly and efficiently. Digicel shipped them for free and even paid for a bunch of them themselves.

This is due in no small part to the fact that Digicel is privately owned by Denis O'Brien. For all his faults (and he has a few), he genuinely cares about things like this and he insists that his people do too. I suspect that publicly owned corps just don't have the freedom to actually express humanitarian interest the way a private corp would.

Digicel are more or less the McDonald's of cell phone carriers in numerous developing nations in the Caribbean and the Pacific: They offer cheap, reliable service with few frills. Their Internet service (where I live, at least) is expensive but available, which is more than can be said about the situation before they arrived on the scene. It's no accident, therefore, that during rioting some years ago in Haiti, people actively defended the towers and buildings owned by Digicel. They were too valuable to burn.

For my part, I take significant comfort from the knowledge that they recovered from utter disaster so quickly. My country receives on average 1.5 hurricanes every year, and sits squarely on the Pacific ring of fire. We've had two 7+ earthquakes already in the last year and we've got a warning level two volcano boiling away in the north. Happily, we're not so crowded and impoverished as Haiti, so our buildings have (so far) staid intact.

last summer? (-1, Offtopic)

iamhassi (659463) | more than 4 years ago | (#30766616)

Battle for Terra came out in 2007 [imdb.com] , hardly last summer.

Speaking of Battle for Terra, did anyone else think Avatar was a rip-off of Battle for Terra? [rottentomatoes.com] Humans try to destroy nature-loving aliens, only to fail, despite over-whelming firepower?

Re:last summer? (0, Offtopic)

jwinster (1620555) | more than 4 years ago | (#30766720)

Battle for Terra came out in 2007 [imdb.com] , hardly last summer. Speaking of Battle for Terra, did anyone else think Avatar was a rip-off of Battle for Terra? [rottentomatoes.com] Humans try to destroy nature-loving aliens, only to fail, despite over-whelming firepower?

With an environmental message undoubtedly borrowed from FernGully.

Re:last summer? (1)

bluefoxlucid (723572) | more than 4 years ago | (#30766820)

I wish I was fairy-sized just so I could bang whats-her-face and her sister whose-her-name...

Re:last summer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30770320)

> I wish I was fairy-sized Then your cock wouldn't be out of proportion.

Re:last summer? (0, Offtopic)

jgtg32a (1173373) | more than 4 years ago | (#30766862)

Eh I lean a bit more towards the Fern Gully camp, I'm still waiting for it to show up through Netflix.
 
The humans in the movie barely lost when it comes down to it. Their combat effectiveness was cut drastically because of the amount of jamming, they were horribly outnumbered, IIRC there were 200 humans fighting and there were something like 2k Na'Vi. Even then they only lost because of a Deus Ex. I'm actually very interested to see how it plays out in future movies, because as far as I can tell the Na'Vi have zero chance in any real conflict.

Re:last summer? (1)

operagost (62405) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767158)

They lost because you don't send in troops until you have air superiority.

Re:last summer? (1)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 4 years ago | (#30769696)

They sure seemed to have an inadequate number of aircraft. Not the first time overconfidence has cost an occupier, but at the same time, in a realistic military situation, only a moron would have gone after the Na'vi with limited air support. In a proper situation, I would have been radioing home, asking for a goddamned airforce, and I would pretty much have bombed the living crap out of all the tribal homelands/trees/whatever.

As it stands now, the only way the Na'vi are going to be able to hold out is if they start rapidly modernizing, or at least getting their god there to beef things up considerably. They need to start by basically mining orbit, so that when the Terrans come back (and they will if this unobtainium is super valuable) that you soften them up. It also means you're going to have to get a lot more in the air that pterodactyls.

All in all, this is a classic situation where survival is only going to happen if they take the Meiji route, use some of their wealth in unobtainium to build up their own military power at least to the point where the other guys see the potential for losses to be too great to try any further military ventures.

Re:last summer? ****** SPOILER ********* (1)

Boronx (228853) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767162)

I haven't seen Avatar yet, but battle for Terra was really good in a way that I doubt Avatar was:

***** SPOILER ALERT for Battle of Terra and Saving Private Ryan (??)*****

The Terrans (aliens) actually have advanced technology, but the Humans still wipe the floor with them after an initial hard fought battle. The swinging trees don't beat the storm troopers on Terra.

The stakes are extinction for both sides, so when characters you've grown to like have to kill each other, you believe their motives. Lots of movies have made me sense the evils of war by showing me its affects on those who fought and those just caught up in it. Battle for Terra is the first I've seen where the evilness hits home during the thrill ride that is on screen sci-fi combat.

There's a scene in "Saving Private Ryan" where a wall collapses. An American squad and a German squad find themselves suddenly face to face with each other. As an action scene, it's as tense as anything on film. But imagine the emotional impact if Spielberg had spent the previous hour getting you to know and like both squads. This is what Battle for Terra achieves and then some.

For what seemed like a kids movie at first, Battle for Terra didn't pull many punches.

*********** end spoiler *************

Re:last summer? (1)

iamhassi (659463) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767998)

how is this off-topic? Says in the description the movie was released last summer. I'm discussing the description, doesn't get more on-topic than that.

Cellphone yet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30766802)

In order to have disaster recovery for an infrastructure, you must, in first place, have had this infrastructure in place before the disaster. I didn't know that there was a cellphone network in Haiti BEFORE the disaster... Otherwise, it's not DR, it's INSTALLATION.

Re:Cellphone yet? (1)

Yamata no Orochi (1626135) | more than 4 years ago | (#30766900)

The article certainly makes it sound like they offered service there prior. What with the part about their, "State Department medal for their previous work in Haiti," which is in the SUMMARY, even.

Re:Cellphone yet? (2, Interesting)

stoolpigeon (454276) | more than 4 years ago | (#30766924)

mobile is almost everywhere and will effectively be everywhere soon. it's actually a key ingredient to solving some of the challenges present in the developing world. FOSS is a big part too - such as the Ushahidi folks [ushahidi.com] who are helping out in numerous ways with the situation in Haiti - from their base of operations in Nairobi.

Re:Cellphone yet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30767248)

No, it won't effectively be everywhere very soon. for example, I live in a city in California of about 110,000 people. For most of the city, coverage is wonderful. However in the older downtown section (where my daughter has music lessons) - no coverage. No 3G, no 1X, no edge, no voice. If we can't get cell coverage to fully cover cities of 100,000 plus in CALIFORNIA, then it isn't going to be everywhere any time soon.

Re:Cellphone yet? (2, Interesting)

compro01 (777531) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767518)

Covering a large but sparsely built up area perfectly is a lot easier than covering a small, but heavily built up area perfectly. Big buildings of radio-unfriendly materials like steel and concrete make a mess of things, requiring many more cells in unusual configurations, whereas coverage in open air is completely consistent and you can just throw down towers in a simple grid.

Re:Cellphone yet? (1)

Jeng (926980) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767612)

Do a little research.

Cell phone coverage is far easier to set up in the third world than it is to set up land lines.

There might be local blight laws or some such that may restrict the building of cell phone towers in your California town of 100k. No such restrictions in the third world.

Cellphones ONLY (4, Interesting)

spun (1352) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767040)

Haiti has nearly no land lines. Cell phone networks are cheaper to deploy than land lines. If you had bothered to read the summary, you would have read that this company was down there before the earthquake, and had won a medal from the State Department for their work building communications infrastructure in Haiti.

Re:Cellphone yet? (2, Informative)

jank1887 (815982) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767322)

many developing countries are skipping the wired infrastructure altogether. It's generally easier/faster to set up a mobile network. It can also be more resilient, adaptable to change, etc.

Re:Cellphone yet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30767380)

"I didn't know that there was a cellphone network in Haiti BEFORE the disaster... Otherwise, it's not DR, it's INSTALLATION."

Despite your costs as a consumer on a first world's nation, cellphone is orders of magnitude cheaper than landlines. In third world countries you won't find landlines but you'll certainly find mobiles.

And in growing countries (like those in far east) you bet their cell system is quite better than the USA one.

Re:Cellphone yet? (1)

edittard (805475) | more than 4 years ago | (#30770542)

I didn't know that there was a cellphone network in Haiti BEFORE the disaster... Otherwise, it's not DR, it's INSTALLATION.

It'd be a pretty pointless installation absent a large number of handsets in circulation.

One must therefore presume that:
    1) there were the aforementioned handsets already in circulation;
    2) therefore, there was already a supporting infrastructure (or nobody would've bought the handsets);
    3) Out of you and Trilogy International, exactly one has the IQ of a drunken marmoset;

and last but not least:
    4) the entity referred to in 3) above isn't Trilogy International.

enforcement of engineering code (2, Insightful)

fermion (181285) | more than 4 years ago | (#30766850)

There are many complaints about government interference in free enterprise, but I think the financial crisis, in which banks loaned money to people with no income with the assumption that they would flip these properties, or cash out the equity as the property appreciated, and therefore the knowledge that the buyers had no stake in the property, and this crisis in Hatia, pretty much shows that one function of government is to develop and enforce proper standards to insure the security of the country.

The reports indicate that Hatia has received significant financial support from the international community in the past. The reports indicate that the government has not used this money wisely, i.e. to develop infrastructure and insure safety. The reports indicate that money existed to make at least some building and some private dwelling safe, but such a thing was never done. We had people paying for modern building that would survive anything but earthquakes. At least the resources should have been put into place to make building that did not immediately kill the occupants. I understand that money was not widely available, and Hatia barely has a government, but I think we can take some lessons on what the minimum responsibility of a government must be from this example.

Re:enforcement of engineering code (-1, Troll)

operagost (62405) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767122)

Banks made loans to those people because they were minorities and refusing to do so would have gotten them in trouble. I have an article right over my desk from 1999 that explains how the Clinton admin pressured the FMs and the banks to make these loans, and the entire industry warned then that this could cause a collapse. Barney Frank then spent nine years saying that everything was fine. THE DEBATE IS OVER.

Re:enforcement of engineering code (0, Offtopic)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767236)

This is just bogus racist nonsense.

The Clinton administration did not pressure any bank into making bad loans. Banks will more
than willing to make bad loans to a wide array of people that were generally neither black
nor buying in traditionally redlined neighborhoods.

Banks were driven by greed and a loan resale system that allows people writing loans to have
little or no stake in the solvency of the customer.

Re:enforcement of engineering code (1)

Yamata no Orochi (1626135) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767216)

Yeah, we're talking about Haiti [wikipedia.org] here, not Hatia [wikipedia.org] .

Re:enforcement of engineering code (4, Insightful)

istartedi (132515) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767934)

I always think about this during disasters too. Yes, complaining about the permitting process is a favorite sport. When 50,000 die someplace else and fewer than 100 die here in a similar event, then you understand what it's all about. OTOH, how many deaths are caused because people are homeless and/or don't have health care because permitted structures are more expensive? Death due to disaster is easily measured so the permitting process looks like a winner. Deaths due to opportunity cost are more difficult to measure, so we just don't know.

Unfortunately, this is Haiti. The point is moot. They've had a hard enough time keeping a stable government and figuring out how to deal with their limited resources. They should be so lucky someday, to get to the point where they are complaining about the permitting process.

Re:enforcement of engineering code (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30768002)

the financial crisis, in which banks loaned money to people with no income with the assumption that they would flip these properties, or cash out the equity as the property appreciated, and therefore the knowledge that the buyers had no stake in the property

What the hell are you talking about?

And what does this have to do with Haiti?

hatisucks (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30766860)

sry already pirated it ill save my 25 bucks for popcorn and soda

Pictures from the ground in Haiti... (3, Informative)

daveschroeder (516195) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767022)

Devastating... [boston.com]

Re:Pictures from the ground in Haiti... (0)

CorporateSuit (1319461) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767866)

The saddest part of it all is you see greed shining through many of the relief organizations. They're asking for money instead of supplies. [cnn.com] I didn't realize that Haitians thrive on eating dollar bills, and repair the damaged buildings using nothing but quarters. I know that those organizations don't already have enough EMERGENCY-USEFUL supplies stockpiled, and the money isn't going directly into transporting and distributing those supplies, so the answer is: they're all taking advantage of this disaster.

You don't want a truck, full of food, to send directly to Haiti, but you want the MONEY to BUY a truck, full of food, to send to Haiti? I hear the same thing from homeless guys who tell me that they promise to buy a hamburger if I give them a dollar to do it. I wouldn't be so miffed about it if I didn't already contribute a lot to these organizations only to see them pulling this stunt in the name of a disaster.

Haitians don't need money right now. They need things to eat. They need clean water to drink. They need medical supplies, clothes, and building supplies. If an 8.0 earthquake struck Los Angeles, the very last thing people on the street need is lots of Yen -- with nowhere to exchange it and nothing to buy it with. If you send money, it will be skimmed and you will be taken advantage of. If you send supplies, much less so.

Re:Pictures from the ground in Haiti... (1)

compro01 (777531) | more than 4 years ago | (#30768732)

Buying power. They can get a lot more supplies per dollar than you can.

For example, the local food bank here can purchase about $1.50 worth of food for every $1.00 of donations as they buy in bulk and can purchase further up the supply chain.

Re:Pictures from the ground in Haiti... (4, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 4 years ago | (#30769268)

I'm sure that they'd be more than happy to talk to somebody with the right supplies.

The trouble is, if you ask for in-kind donations, you are liable to get everybody's expired canned fruitcake and the contents of their secondary sock drawer. At best, that requires a lot of sorting. At worst, you have to pay to dispose of somebody else's trash, while they pat themselves on the back. I'm sure that if somebody who actually knows something about what sorts of supplies are useful called up and offered a pallet of them, the answer would be yes.

It's like computers. If you are operating on any scale, ad-hoc donations of everybody's random emachines would be worse than useless. Unless you have massive amounts of free labor, and a lot of time, you'd be stuck in driver hell until the sun burns out. So, you are much better off with cash, which can easily be converted into pallets of identical machines in known shape. This doesn't mean, of course, that you would say no to somebody offering a pallet of identical hardware; but you'd be an idiot to tell the public that they could dump anything old and computer shaped on you and then feel warm and fuzzy about it.

Less ironic than before (-1, Troll)

Trails (629752) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767046)

Obama was heard to remark "Heck of a job, Triley".

Re:Less ironic than before (3, Insightful)

spun (1352) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767300)

Much less ironic. This actually was and is a heck of a job. First rate response on our part. I don't want to make this political, though. In some ways, we are better prepared to deal with international emergencies than internal ones. But this type of preparedness and international developmental and emergency aid was a major plank of Obama's platform, so I'm glad to see him actually living up to a promise.

Re:Less ironic than before (1)

funwithBSD (245349) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767924)

Posse Comitatus is one of those reasons it is easier to respond to foreign crisis vrs local crisis. Much of the foreign aid is provided by the military

While it does not hamper efforts to do some types of domestic disaster relief it does prevent the military from securing their operations themselves as they would be acting as a "police force" inside US borders.

I do not suggest we erode the law to make disaster relief easier. Last thing the US needs is a metaphorical Ceaser crossing the Rubicon to save Rome from a flood.

Re:Less ironic than before (1)

snmpkid (93151) | more than 4 years ago | (#30769210)

I am waiting on Kanye to have a telethon telling us that Obama hates haitians and that is why he allowed the quake to hit there

Kanye West on Haiti (1)

spun (1352) | more than 4 years ago | (#30769366)

"Yo, Haiti, I'm hella sad for you, and Ima let you finish, but Indonesia had one of the worst disasters of all time. Of all time!" --Kanye West

So where are the hams? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30767266)

Where are the hams, the famous emergency prepared folks that interfere with my electronics and keep us from deploying broadband over power lines, who have huge ranges of valuable spectrum set aside for their use in disasters such as this? Oh that's right, they're NOT HELPING because THEY can't do anything without ELECTRICITY! So much for all that disaster BS! Not ONE news outlet mentioned anything about ham radio helping this disaster in any way shape or form! Where's all the generators and bullshit, you lying assholes? Where's all the field day crap? NOWHERE!

This should prove to everyone beyond a shadow of a doubt how worthless the ham radio is and why we should shut it down and force all those luddites into the modern era.

Re:So where are the hams? (1)

MattSausage (940218) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767430)

You have serious issues that I suspect have little to do with ham operators or the radios they use.

Re:So where are the hams? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30767566)

That does not change the facts.

Re:So where are the hams? (1)

spun (1352) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767786)

Look one post above your first one, idiot.

Re:So where are the hams? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30767950)

Since when is some ham radio site the real news, idiot? No mention in REAL media means it DID NOT HAPPEN!

Re:So where are the hams? (1)

spun (1352) | more than 4 years ago | (#30768076)

Prove it.

Yo (1)

zogger (617870) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767818)

I just posted, immediately before you up above, the link to the arrl coverage. They gave freqs for monitoring, and some contact has been established via batteries with hams in haiti, and they had updates on other forms of emergency support which is ongoing. US HAMS..uhh..they are HERE not in Haiti you moron.. How the heck are us based people supposed to help out over there besides monitoring and relaying any info they might receive? They are very good HERE where they live, they have solar power, charged batteries, generators, etc, but that only works HERE where their stuff is, capeche? Haiti is poor, and it has just been wiped out, it has collapsed, heck, there are probably any number of radio operator there now who can't communicate because they are freaking dead, inside collapsed buildings. Or if alive, maybe their equipment got smashed and is still under rubble, who knows. HAM gear is expensive, no one expects the poorest nation this side of the globe to have as many radio hobbyists as there are in the US or wealthier western nations. Their equivalent of the freekin whitehouse is partially collapsed. A lot of smashed stuff, get it?

Re:So where are the hams? (1)

Yamata no Orochi (1626135) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767904)

Go ahead and rattle off some of his perceived issues, then. It's offtopic, but you did little to invalidate his claims in a rational and meaningful way.

Industrial Strength MagicJack? (2, Interesting)

assemblyronin (1719578) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767268)

What about an air-droppable military grade (i.e., MIL-STD) device with a generator/battery/solar power source that sets up a cellular phone hot spot, and can link with the national carrier?

There are plenty of technical hurdles to overcome, but if they're recoverable and 'inexpesive' enough to deploy on a one-to-two week bases. It would allow for rapid dissemination of communication signals across a disaster area while the more permanent infrastructure is brought back online.

Internet infastructure still there (1)

MickyTheIdiot (1032226) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767328)

Based on the media I have seen, Haiti's cell and land line phone infrastructure went down as well as all their other media with the exception of many Internet Protocol connections. Almost all the communications we are seeing in the media are internet media.

It reminds me of the old joke that the whole airplane should be made of the same material as the black box recorder. What is the difference between their Internet infrastructure and all their other communications? Maybe they ought to rebuild their new communications in the same way?

Re:Internet infastructure still there (1)

spun (1352) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767662)

Quick question, how do you suppose the IP connections are carried? What you are seeing are almost communications done over cell phone networks, either before they lost power, or after it was brought back up. I mean, think about it. No land lines. No cell phones. What is carrying the Internet connections, satellite? What is providing the power? Yeah, nothing. It's ALL cell phones.

sat terminals (2, Informative)

zogger (617870) | more than 4 years ago | (#30768340)

40 sat terminals are being established, along with 60 broadband terminals, from the ITU. A lot of stuff has to be moved in, because so much was destroyed

http://www.itu.int/newsroom/press_releases/2010/02.html [itu.int]

I was looking at various pics of the destruction, and it is trite and often used, but it looks like a major giant airforce just carpet bombed the place.

I have never been there, but based on other articles I have read about real poor areas with cellphones, a lot of the people depend on charging kiosks / local services to recharge their phones, because domestic electricity is so rare. I would imagine most of those facilities are now smashed as well.

Re:Internet infastructure still there (1)

mikem170 (698970) | more than 4 years ago | (#30767936)

Perhaps it is satellite based internet, running off generators...?

Re:Internet infastructure still there (1)

compro01 (777531) | more than 4 years ago | (#30768048)

Text requires ridiculously little bandwidth compared to voice traffic, so it can tolerate a lot more degradation of service.

With the amount of bandwidth-time required for 3 seconds of GSM voice traffic, you could send an entire novel worth of text.

If you want to help, you can donate here: (1)

RandyOo (61821) | more than 4 years ago | (#30768034)

My brother pilots a DC-3 for Missionary Flights International [missionaryflights.org] out of Fort Pierce, Florida, and recently posted this status update on Facebook:

Many people have been asking how to help with the relief work in Haiti...we've been directing people to the MFI website www.missionaryflights.org The website gives a donation needs list as well as an online donation link for a Disaster Relief fund. We flew to Haiti with relief supplies today and I get to go tomorrow...

The relevant link is here [missionaryflights.org] , but it looks like supply donations have to be dropped off locally, so that may only make sense for people who live in the area. I'm sure monetary donations would be happily accepted from everyone, though, regardless of where you live!

Re:If you want to help, you can donate here: (1)

spun (1352) | more than 4 years ago | (#30768422)

From the link:

A survey team and several hundred water purification kits were on board.

Good job, getting people out of the rubble is obviously first priority, but many thousands more will die unless clean water is provided within a few days.

Although I'm agnostic myself, I have to commend the Christians of the world for their quick response. Except for Pat Robertson, who's quick response [go.com] was, 'Haiti made a pact with the devil when they revolted against French rule, therefore, this is God's punishment." But then, that's what he always says, isn't it?

Haiti the manmade disaster - debt crisis (3, Informative)

RichMan (8097) | more than 4 years ago | (#30768210)

Checkout http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/External_debt_of_Haiti
And a few of the external links.

This has been a man made disaster for 200 years. We should also respond to the man made act as well.

you fAil it (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30768394)

While we're busy pimping Haitian charity options (1)

Akoman (559057) | more than 4 years ago | (#30768480)

"We have a relationship with one organization, Batay Ouvriye, and are putting our resources and time into helping Batay Ouvriye to help rebuild from the catastrophe and maintain the struggle for a better Haiti and a better world. Batay Ouvriye is a combative grassroots worker and peasant?s organization in Haiti with workers organized all over Haiti, especially in the Industrial sweatshops and Free Trade Zones. We have set up a means to send money to Batay Ourviye. If others wish to send money to Batay Ouvriye, please email miamiautonomyandsolidarity@yahoo.com

The Batay Ouvriye Haiti Solidarity Network is calling on all Progressives to join us in the aftermath of the Earthquake Disaster to help us organize support for the various Workers” Unions, Peasant Associations, Toilers’ Associations in the Batay Ouvriye Movement in Haiti."

http://miamiautonomyandsolidarity.wordpress.com/2010/01/14/call-for-solidarity-and-funds-for-the-working-people-of-haiti/ [wordpress.com]

More info on the Batay Ouvriye from the Industrial Workers of the World trip: http://iwwinhaiti.blogspot.com/2008/04/blog-post.html [blogspot.com]

Re:While we're busy pimping Haitian charity option (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30769658)

Batay Ouvriye is a combative grassroots worker and peasant?s organization
Industrial Workers of the World
elp us organize support for the various Workers" Unions, Peasant Associations, Toilers' Associations Haiti is already fucked up enough without adding Communism to their woes.

Thousands of lives? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30768860)

Do you have any facts that back up the assertion that they've saved thousands of lives? Seems to be a pretty dramatic statement. No doubt that having proper communications infrastructure will help to save lives, but to assert that it has already happened seems silly.

Doctors Without Borders (1)

Spewns (1599743) | more than 4 years ago | (#30768942)

"[Doctors Without Borders] has already treated more than 1,000 people on the ground in Haiti following Tuesday's earthquake, but the needs are huge. An inflatable hospital with operating theatres is expected to arrive in the next 24 hours." https://donate.doctorswithoutborders.org/ [doctorswit...orders.org]

Re:Doctors Without Borders (1)

NeoSkandranon (515696) | more than 4 years ago | (#30770214)

http://www.chezrougie.com/ [chezrougie.com] and http://www.blogschu.com/ [blogschu.com] are both having "de-lurk" day and donating to Doctors without borders for each comment posted today-- have at it Slashdot.

Better Slashdot department name (1)

Singularity42 (1658297) | more than 4 years ago | (#30770260)

"what-the-world-needs-now" is better than the "twist-and-shout" attached to the Chinese earthquake. "Funny-not-appropriate" can be used as well.

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