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Skydiving Accident Leaves Security Guru Cedric 'Sid' Blancher Dead At 37

timothy posted about 9 months ago | from the regards-to-his-friends-and-family dept.

Security 332

An anonymous reader points out The Register's report that Wi-Fi security expert Cédric 'Sid' Blancher has died as the result of a skydiving accident. "Among other things, the 37-year-old Blancher was a sought-after speaker on WiFi security, and in 2005 published a Python-based WiFi traffic injection tool called Wifitap. In 2006, while working for the EADS Corporate Research centre, he also put together a paper on how to exploit Skype to act as a botnet." Some of Blancher's skydiving videos are posted to Vimeo; clearly, it's something he was passionate about.

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look out below ! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45450941)

splat !

Re: look out below ! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451107)

At least he died doing what he loved!

Re:look out below ! (2, Insightful)

IANAAC (692242) | about 9 months ago | (#45451199)

splat !

Your comment pretty mirrors the (currently) 19 comments on the reg site.

I suppose a lot of people deal with tragedy through humor, but I sure wouldn't want to be a surviving family member and read some of the comments posted so far.

At least you did it anoncowardly.

Re:look out below ! (5, Funny)

bitt3n (941736) | about 9 months ago | (#45451221)

I suppose a lot of people deal with tragedy through humor, but I sure wouldn't want to be a surviving family member and read some of the comments posted so far.

Seriously, it amazes me how people can fail to understand the gravity of this kind of situation.

Re:look out below ! (1)

msauve (701917) | about 9 months ago | (#45451275)

The opposite of gravity is comedy. That's why there's so much black humor.

Re:look out below ! (1)

Chris Mattern (191822) | about 9 months ago | (#45451349)

The opposite of gravity is comedy. That's why there's so much black humor.

But if the opposite of gravity is comedy, then surely black holes must be the least funny things in the universe.

Re:look out below ! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451507)

At the end, gravity is what killed him...

Re:look out below ! (3, Insightful)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 9 months ago | (#45451357)

Someone dying by definition cannot be a tragedy to the rest of the word. Tragedy implies not just life as usual.

Though some philosophers maintain that life is a tragedy, so I guess they would disagree.
Personally, I love Seneca's sentiment: “What need is there to weep over parts of life? The whole of it calls for tears.”

Besides that is a pretty epic way to die.

Re:look out below ! (4, Interesting)

Rob the Bold (788862) | about 9 months ago | (#45451543)

Personally, I love Seneca's sentiment: “What need is there to weep over parts of life? The whole of it calls for tears.”

Besides that is a pretty epic way to die.

I'm more of a Mel Brooks guy:

"Tragedy is when I cut my finger. Comedy is when you fall into an open sewer and die."

Or maybe Hemmingway:

" . . . all stories, if continued far enough, end in death . . ."

Re:look out below ! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451365)

Goodby Security Guru, like a roman candle in the wind
never knowing when gravity kicked in
the NSA would have like to know you better but fate stepped in

Security 101 (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45450947)

Secure your common sense. Don't skydive.

Re: Security 101 (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451103)

How many people die while skydiving compared to driving?

Re: Security 101 (5, Informative)

WWJohnBrowningDo (2792397) | about 9 months ago | (#45451177)

Skydiving is 7 micromorts per jump. That's equivalent to travlling 1600 miles by car.

Source [wikipedia.org]

Re: Security 101 (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451251)

Skydiving is 7 microsofts per jump. That's equivalent to Windows Vista running on the firmware of your car.

Source [microsoft.com]

FTFY.

Re: Security 101 (1)

greenbird (859670) | about 9 months ago | (#45451325)

Skydiving is 7 micromorts per jump. That's equivalent to travlling 1600 miles by car.

That's really a distortion of how dangerous skydiving is. The vast majority of skydiving deaths aren't really accidents but rather someone doing something stupid under a perfectly good canopy. If you don't do hook turns on a 3:1 loaded canopy you're much less likely to get killed.

Hmmm...thinking about I guess you can say the same thing about driving also. With the caveat that a collision driving is much more likely to gather in someone not doing something stupid than in skydiving.

Re: Security 101 (4, Insightful)

Jeremi (14640) | about 9 months ago | (#45451479)

That's really a distortion of how dangerous skydiving is. The vast majority of skydiving deaths aren't really accidents but rather someone doing something stupid under a perfectly good canopy.

I don't see the distortion -- deaths caused by stupidity are just a real as any other kind of death. In that case, the risk is that you'll make a bad decision, rather than a risk of equipment failure, but it's still a risk.

Re: Security 101 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451551)

So accidents are only things that can't be forseen with enough knowledge?

So basically, there are absolutely no accidents. Hindenburg, Titanic, etc... all not accidents. Pretty much everything you do is some level of stupid.

Re: Security 101 (1)

viperidaenz (2515578) | about 9 months ago | (#45451561)

If you don't do something stupid, like drive while tired or intoxicated, your chances of a car crash a lowered too.
What's your point?

Re: Security 101 (2)

Creepy (93888) | about 9 months ago | (#45451477)

While that may be a useful measurement for scientists, it isn't a very useful measurement for humans - a better one is about 1 in 142000 jumps (2010 numbers).

This is probably why one of my life insurance specifically prohibits skydiving and hang gliding (my work one has no prohibitions, but pays less money). It also prohibits SCUBA diving over (under?) 150ft, but I only recreational dive (less than 110ft).

Re: Security 101 (1)

DexterIsADog (2954149) | about 9 months ago | (#45451577)

Your insurance probably doesn't *forbid* you to skydive, do deep SCUBA dives, or ride sports motorcycles, it just says if you die while doing one of those things they won't pay, right?

Like my father said, while I was in college - if I go skydiving, I'm risking his investment, and he'd cut me off from the portion I was borrowing from him. He was an engineer, designing systems for the nuclear missile throwing subs, with a deeply ingrained habit of weighing cost/benefit.

Re: Security 101 (1)

viperidaenz (2515578) | about 9 months ago | (#45451583)

7 micromorts = 7/1000000 change of mortality = 1 in 142,857.

Same number, different unit.

Re: Security 101 (1)

rubycodez (864176) | about 9 months ago | (#45451185)

the correct question would be how many people die while skydiving compared to those who jump out of their vehicle at 120 MPH?

Re: Security 101 (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451381)

They typically don't die while skydiving. It's right after they stop skydiving.

Re: Security 101 (1)

viperidaenz (2515578) | about 9 months ago | (#45451573)

Perhaps they should call it "Ground Splatting" instead.

Re:Security 101 (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451575)

I've been a skydiving instructor for 17 years. No accidents involving me or anyone under me.

Life without a little danger isn't a life at all.

Guru at 37? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45450949)

I don't think so. I won't contest his experience, but "guru" status doesn't happen that quickly. We are too ageist in this society.

Re:Guru at 37? (2)

SternisheFan (2529412) | about 9 months ago | (#45450981)

Re:Guru at 37? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451183)

Jesus Christ do all tech-geeks have to look like that?

Re:Guru at 37? (0)

Joining Yet Again (2992179) | about 9 months ago | (#45451009)

Mod parent to heaven.

Young people do things quickly. Older people tend to do things well.

Re:Guru at 37? (1)

theshowmecanuck (703852) | about 9 months ago | (#45451523)

No Bull [quora.com]

Re:Guru at 37? (1)

Hentes (2461350) | about 9 months ago | (#45451057)

And the notion that young people can't have routine isn't ageism?

That's a shame (4, Interesting)

msobkow (48369) | about 9 months ago | (#45450959)

That's a shame. To go so young.

But I never have understood the sanity behind jumping out of a perfectly good plane. :(

A friend of mine was into sky diving years ago. Everyone warned him he was taking crazy risks and he'd die some time.

But in the end, he died flat on his back under a car that slipped from the jacks. Life can be so ironic...

Re:That's a shame (2)

Joining Yet Again (2992179) | about 9 months ago | (#45451001)

Perhaps if you survive things which are perceived as very dangerous, your risk awareness is skewed?

Re:That's a shame (5, Interesting)

FlyHelicopters (1540845) | about 9 months ago | (#45451013)

I've been skydiving exactly once...

It was on my bucket list, wanted to try it to see what all the fuss was about.

I've had many amazing experiences in life. Getting married, the birth of my children, flying solo for the first time (in a helicopter with the doors off, quite an experience!).

About the only thing that compares... the birth of my first child... that is first on the list, skydiving would be second... above everything else...

There is simply nothing I can say to anyone who hasn't done it... stepping out of an airplane at 13,500 feet above the ground, parachute on your back, nothing but you, the sky, and God.

Well, ok, the pair of instructors with you, one per side. I did the accelerated free fall option, so I had my own chute, they fall with you to 5,000 ft, then you open and spend about 4 minutes by yourself under canopy (they fall another 1,000 ft to make sure your chute opens cleanly, then they open their own.)

I understand it, it is amazing, and I never need to do it again. :)

Re:That's a shame (3, Insightful)

Joining Yet Again (2992179) | about 9 months ago | (#45451037)

I expect it depends a lot on your physiology/psychology. I don't really get any kick at all out of extreme physical experiences, or anything material - and I've had lots of opportunity.

Solving a complex mathematical problem is an immense thrill for me, however. Or figuring out a clever algorithm.

Why yes, I am a nerd and a geek.

World's good with all different sorts, though :).

Re:That's a shame (4, Insightful)

cold fjord (826450) | about 9 months ago | (#45451087)

I've had lots of opportunity.

The question is, did you act on the opportunity? Did you really climb, jump, shoot the rapids, or whatever the opportunity was for? Many people have opportunities, not all take them. Besides ...

Nothing says a nerd and a geek
can't also be an adrenaline freak.

There are pleasures to be had from both intellectual achievement and testing one's physical courage.

“There is nothing more exhilarating than to be shot at with no result.” -- Winston Churchill

Re:That's a shame (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451163)

I agree with the asshole above - if you're no living life to the extreme you're a waste of space ... no fear!

Re:That's a shame (1)

tftp (111690) | about 9 months ago | (#45451471)

if you're no living life to the extreme you're a waste of space

As matter of fact, most geniuses, scientists, professors are pretty rational, and they don't do anything stupid. Most of those who do are lightweights in the department of value to humankind. It's news (like this article) when these groups overlap.

I, personally, despise thrill - I have no use for risk. I have better things to do.

Re:That's a shame (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451205)

You're a depressed virgin, aren't you?

Re:That's a shame (1)

gavron (1300111) | about 9 months ago | (#45451171)

I fly helicopters. With the doors off when it's hot. The first solo was... terrifying :)
Now it's the greatest thrill in my life.

Great post comparing the things that matter,

E

Re:That's a shame (1)

thewolfkin (2790519) | about 9 months ago | (#45451427)

I could maybe do a helicopter doors off if I was strapped in... heavily.

Re:That's a shame (1)

theshowmecanuck (703852) | about 9 months ago | (#45451549)

There are two types of helicopters. Those that have crashed and those that are going to. I have flown in a bunch of helicopters, often with the doors open. I like it. :)

Re:That's a shame (1)

braindrainbahrain (874202) | about 9 months ago | (#45451553)

There is simply nothing I can say to anyone who hasn't done it...

I've made several hundred jumps myself. When asked to explain it, I refer to Charles Lindbergh who put it into words better than I ever could:

"...when I decided that I too must pass through the experience of a parachute jump, life rose to a higher level, to a sort of exhilarated calmness. The thought of crawling out onto the struts and wires hundreds of feet above the earth, and then giving up even that tenuous hold of safety and of substance, left me a feeling of anticipation mixed with dread, of confidence restrained by caution, of courage salted through with fear. How tightly should one hold onto life? How loosely give it rein? What gain was there for such a risk? I would have to pay in money for hurling my body into space. There would be no crowd to watch and applaud my landing. Nor was there any scientific objective to be gained. No, there was deeper reason for wanting to jump, a desire I could not explain.

It was that quality that led me into aviation in the first place — it was a love of the air and sky and flying, the lure of adventure, the appreciation of beauty. It lay beyond the descriptive words of man — where immortality is touched through danger, where life meets death on equal plane; where man is more than man, and existence both supreme and valueless at the same instant."
Charles A. Lindbergh, 'The Spirit of St Louis,' 1953

Re:That's a shame (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451053)

A friend of mine was into sky diving years ago. Everyone warned him he was taking crazy risks and he'd die some time.

But in the end, he died flat on his back under a car that slipped from the jacks. Life can be so ironic...

Steve Irving (aka the crocodile hunter) always said "if I ever die during recording something then people will just laugh and say "the crocs finally got him"". In the end he died during recording due to a freak accident involving a stingray. Supposedly they just bumped into each other by accident and the tail went strait though his chest. Life is neither fair or predictable.

Re:That's a shame (0)

Adult film producer (866485) | about 9 months ago | (#45451313)

This is a troll? I don't know the circumstances of his death but hardly worth that rating if it's true.

Re:That's a shame (3, Informative)

tftp (111690) | about 9 months ago | (#45451497)

This is a troll? I don't know the circumstances of his death

As far as I recall, this is exactly what killed him.

Re: That's a shame (2)

snowsnoot (3389789) | about 9 months ago | (#45451567)

Its Irwin not Irving you twadwaffle.. and yes he suffered one of the only ever recorded deaths caused by a sting ray ever. If it was going to happen to anyone it was gonna be him. A national hero and a pretty decent surfer too, zoo keeper uniform and all.

Re:That's a shame (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451081)

Former long time skydiver, former engineer and now a physician. Skydiving appears to be relatively dangerous and has a great range of risk profiles from about as safe as the average car ride to very dangerous (I looked the stats up before taking up the sport). From Blancher's videos, he appeared to have a relatively safer approach to the sport. The overwhelming risk is an collision with another jumper or against an object on the ground after a successful parachute deployment. Double parachute malfunctions are much 10^-6.

Regarding perfectly good airplanes, I have never jumped out of one of those. They were usually pretty beat up...

Blue skies, black death.

Re:That's a shame (1)

Mitchell314 (1576581) | about 9 months ago | (#45451331)

You're off to meet your maker?

Re:That's a shame (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451395)

Jump or DIE!

Re: That's a shame (1)

alen (225700) | about 9 months ago | (#45451109)

I went to airborne school in the us army
Jumping out of an airplane is safer than driving

Re: That's a shame (1)

rubycodez (864176) | about 9 months ago | (#45451213)

no, not if you count the number of deaths per 1000 trips.

Re: That's a shame (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451413)

I went to airborne school in the us army. Jumping out of an airplane is safer than driving

no, not if you count the number of deaths per 1000 trips.

The mortality rate in skydiving is 1 in 150,000 jumps. The mortality rate in driving is 1 in 100,000,000 miles traveled.

The average driver does about 12,000 miles per year. So over a 50 year driving career that is (12,000 * 50) / 100,000,000 = 0.006 probability of accidental death?

Lets assume a person goes skydiving once a month and makes 2 jumps per outing. So over a 50 year skydiving career that is (2 * 12 * 50) / 150,000 = 1,200 / 150,000 = 0.008 probability of accidental death?

So probabilities of 0.006 for driving and 0.008 for skydiving, and that is comparing an average amount of driving with a ridiculously high number of jumps (1,200) assumed. I think I'll go with the professionally trained former paratrooper regarding safety as opposed to the random internet commentator.

Re: That's a shame (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451219)

People don't understand that most fatalities from skydiving involve stunts of some sort: hook turns, base jumping, wingsuits. The translation from the French article isn't all that great, but it looks like he was attempting a hook turn and didn't judge the distance well.

People who just jump out of a plane, open their chute, and drift to the ground rarely perish.

Re:That's a shame (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451129)

Had a jack break on me once, that was a close one and scary! Always use jack stands

Re:That's a shame (1)

Deadstick (535032) | about 9 months ago | (#45451145)

Everyone warned him he was taking crazy risks and he'd die some time.

Wonder what percentage of them were smokers...

Re:That's a shame (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451249)

But I never have understood the sanity behind jumping out of a perfectly good plane.

The way a great uncle explained it, although the airplane he and his buddies were riding in was completely airworthy and operating perfectly, they suddenly had an overwhelming fear of just being up in the air and desperately wanted to be on the ground as quickly as possible. He and his buddies made a bunch of jumps but only experienced this intense fear of being in an airplane on this one occasion, Normandy 1944.

Re:That's a shame (1)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 9 months ago | (#45451363)

Probably not that ironic, he probably took stupid risks in the rest of his life as well, including how he set up those jacks.

Re:That's a shame (1)

TrekkieGod (627867) | about 9 months ago | (#45451545)

Probably not that ironic, he probably took stupid risks in the rest of his life as well, including how he set up those jacks.

Hello. Newly licensed n00b skydiver here.

Non-skydivers tend to overestimate the risks associated with skydiving. It's certainly an activity that deserves respect. You can't ignore procedures, and you must pay attention to what you're doing. The same thing can be said for lots of things people do every day, such as driving a car. Get distracted by something that places your attention somewhere other than the road, and you can get you and others killed.

Last year there were an estimated 3.1 million jumps in the US. Total number of fatalities was 19. I'm finding it kind of hard to get statistics on the number of deaths due to slipping jacks, but I wouldn't at all be surprised to find that the risk is comparable, if not higher. Or you can drive for ~1500 miles (not all at once), and you've just matched the death risk for one skydive.

Re:That's a shame (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451415)

"he died flat on his back under a car that slipped from the jacks."

Isn't getting under a jacked car considered stupid if not crazy? I was taught to only go under a car on ramps or a lift, not even those little tripod thingies are acceptable (why do they even make those?).

Re:That's a shame (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451475)

Because you can't put a car on ramps if you need to have the wheels off.

Because it's difficult to get a car up on ramps if it's not running.

Lifts cost a lot of money. If you can afford a lift, you can afford to have someone else just do the work for you in the first place.

Is getting under a car on jackstands ideal? No. Is it often the best you can do? Yes.

Re:That's a shame (1)

Flere Imsaho (786612) | about 9 months ago | (#45451453)

As Thom York said, "... gravity always wins".

Re:That's a shame (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451499)

Most die of good'ol heart congestion anyway. Nothing more tragic than a slow wasting self-inflicted disease... but we don't see it that way.

It's a reproduction strategy (1)

Okian Warrior (537106) | about 9 months ago | (#45451511)

But I never have understood the sanity behind jumping out of a perfectly good plane. :(

Women bear the economic price of childbirth. As a consequence, they tend to be conservative and choosy in picking mates and men have to compete for access. In order to succeed, men have evolved to take risks - we see this when comparing the bell curves of women versus men: women tend to have lower standard deviations than men. More women are of average height for women, men tend to have more varied heights. More men are born than women because over the course of their maturity, more men will die from taking risks.

Woman tend to choose men who are successful at taking risks, because those men show capability over other men.

Men tend to get elated by risky activities. It's an emotional cue for a reproduction strategy.

(I'm sorry - were you asking a rhetorical question?)

feeling paranoid? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45450961)

yeah, me too.

RIP (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45450965)

RIP

Re:RIP (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451399)

CORD!

Dumb ass (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45450987)

Too bad the poofter croaked himself. It's sad, but so many brilliant minds lack one iota of common sense. He should have known better than to tempt fate. Hopefully he found Jesus before he died and turned his life over to his Lord and Savior.

Re:Dumb ass (0)

Joining Yet Again (2992179) | about 9 months ago | (#45451005)

*Saviour.

If you're going to write derivatives of traditional fictional works, at least use traditional spellings.

Re:Dumb ass (1)

drater (806171) | about 9 months ago | (#45451017)

*blink*

Re:Dumb ass (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451091)

If he did as you hope then he would be a dumb ass indeed.

If at first you don't succeed... (4, Funny)

Shoten (260439) | about 9 months ago | (#45450989)

...skydiving is not for you.

Where did they bury the survivors? (0)

sandbagger (654585) | about 9 months ago | (#45450995)

Just wondering.

Re:Where did they bury the survivors? (0)

Mitchell314 (1576581) | about 9 months ago | (#45451015)

Not near the smart asses.

well... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451041)

chute! this is a tragedy!

BSBD (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451077)

BSBD. Fly Free my friend

Quite an awkward headline (1)

haruchai (17472) | about 9 months ago | (#45451137)

although I've seen this style used many times.

Why the anthropomorphism for a type of accident?

"Hi, my name is Skydiving Accident, but you can call me Skyak because it's like paddling upstream without a canoe, or a paddle, or even water and you're jumping from the top of the falls.
  So, who wants to be left dead or disabled today??"

Re:Quite an awkward headline (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451217)

How is the title "anthropomorphism," i.e. applying human characteristics to skydiving accidents? All the title does is use "skydiving accident" as the subject of a sentence --- are only human beings capable of being sentence subjects? Is ability to "do" anything, without implication of will or intent, itself a solely human trait? Can a train not leave a station, or a wound not leave a scar, without usurping some vital spark of human agency?

Re:Quite an awkward headline (1)

haruchai (17472) | about 9 months ago | (#45451283)

By replying, would I be applying human characteristics to an AC?

Re:Quite an awkward headline (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451311)

On the internet, nobody knows you are a dog --- they are expecting something far less dignified.

Re:Quite an awkward headline (1)

haruchai (17472) | about 9 months ago | (#45451389)

Like an AC??

Re:Quite an awkward headline (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451529)

At best; other options include the lower forms who waste time replying to ACs (and still haven't answered the original question, about why they aren't a pretentious idiot who flings around long words without apparently caring what they mean).

Accident? (1, Interesting)

Trogre (513942) | about 9 months ago | (#45451161)

Call me paranoid, but these people who appear "inconvenient" to the establishment seem to keep running into accidents, don't they?

Re:Accident? (1)

Deadstick (535032) | about 9 months ago | (#45451191)

Call me paranoid

OK.

Re:Accident? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451233)

Ok, hi paranoid! He did a hook turn all by himself into the ground. He looks like he was a pretty good flyer, but hook turns kill - they are VERY unforgiving

Re:Accident? (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451319)

http://www.skydivekansas.com/upjumpers/hookturns.shtml

Re:Accident? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451385)

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=6ef_1173838399

Re:Accident? (1)

cpghost (719344) | about 9 months ago | (#45451367)

On first thought, yes that's paranoid. On second thought... not so much anymore. The only question is: how could the NSA have done it? With remote SIGINT? Or do they muddle with HUMINT nowadays?

Re:Accident? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451473)

ya, but this guy wasn't a democrat senator or governor with eyes at a possible presidential bid.

Low turns (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451169)

Low turn incidents are usually either a botched high performance landing or a panic move to avoid an obstacle. Sounds like this is the first case.

security researchers need to stop doing risky shit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451193)

if you're a "security researcher" you really shouldn't do anything that could result in your death because when you research the wrong thing it will!

NSA Conspiracy? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451285)

It makes sense to me.

Nope. Don't care. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451323)

You jumped out of a perfectly good plane. You get no sympathy at all dude.

Re:Nope. Don't care. (1)

Deadstick (535032) | about 9 months ago | (#45451387)

You jumped out of a perfectly good plane.

Translation: Hey, I'm just smarter than he was. It's not because I don't have any balls. Honest.

Re:Nope. Don't care. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45451519)

Translation: Hey, I'm just smarter than he was. It's not because I don't have any balls. Honest.

But certainly better common sense.

I guess it does hurt when you fall from heaven. (1)

Cammi (1956130) | about 9 months ago | (#45451461)

I guess it does hurt when you fall from heaven.

Hook turn maneuver (5, Informative)

ciurana (2603) | about 9 months ago | (#45451527)

From the report, it sounds like Cédric performed a maneuver called "hook turn" -- it's a high speed turn in your final approach, 100' or less from the ground, considered deadly and stupid by USPA, the French Federation of Parachutism, and pretty much anyone who's been jumping for a while.

The rate of descent increased as a parachute (square, ram air canopy) banks. The sharper the turn, the faster the descent. The hook turn swings the jumper fast, like a pendulum, and an experienced jumper will guesstimate ending the swing at about the same time as his or her feet would touch the ground. The margin of error for a hook turn, by an experienced jumper riding a small canopy (the more experience the smaller the canopy), is between 5' and 10'.

Start the turn too soon, and you'll end up 3' to 10' above the ground, with a stalled parachute, falling straight down. On a good day, a few bruises or a parachute landing fall, a dirty jump suit, and teasing from your pals. On a bad day, a twisted or broken ankle, yet survivable.

Start the turn too late, and you'll slam the ground with enough force to kill you. And remember: too late is a difference of only about 5'.

Even if the turn starts fine, and the jumper is the king of experienced up jumpers, other factors may come into play. A little thermal near the ground may force the canopy up or sideways near the ground. Or a cold air pocket (e.g. flying over a small puddle, or a dark patch on the ground) may drop the canopy a few feet faster.

Most if not all drop zones since at least 1994 ban people caught doing hook turns because of the danger they present to the jumpers doing them and others around them. Every once in a while some hot shot with a few thousand jumps thinks he's above physics and chance, and does a bandit turn if nobody is watching.

Maybe Cédric ran out of air on final and thought that hooking the turn would help him land into the wind. Maybe he was just hot dogging. Regardless, if he was an up jumper and he did a hook turn, he should've known better and performed a different maneuver. Sad to loose him, but not feeling sorry about the accident itself. Stuff like this is what gives a bad reputation to skydiving in the eyes of people with little or no knowledge of the sport.

Cheers!

friends. (3, Funny)

capaslash (941889) | about 9 months ago | (#45451541)

"I wonder if it will be friends with me?" - Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.
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